New Jersey Jewish Standard, February 8, 2013

download New Jersey Jewish Standard, February 8, 2013

If you can't read please download the document

  • date post

    08-Aug-2015
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    168
  • download

    8

Embed Size (px)

description

Matisyahu and more in this issue of the North Jersey's weekly Jewish newspaper

Transcript of New Jersey Jewish Standard, February 8, 2013

JS-1* JS-1*JSTANDARD.COM2012 81N E W J E R S E Y JewishStandardMatisyahus post-Chabad spirituality to shine at BergenPAC concertNo more black and whiteCOMMUNITYLocal groups take action on gun violenece 16REMINISCENCE Ed Koch, 1924-2013 18, 26February 8, 2013 Vol. LXXXII No. 20 $1.00 JS-22Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 PUBLISHERS STATEMENTJewish Standard (USPS 275-700 ISN 0021-6747) is published weeklyonFridayswithanadditionaleditioneveryOctober,bytheNewJerseyJewishMediaGroup,1086TeaneckRoad,Teaneck,NJ07666.PeriodicalspostagepaidatHackensack,NJandadditional offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to New Jersey Jewish Media Group, 1086 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, NJ07666. Subscription price is $30.00 per year. Out-of-state subscriptions are $45.00, Foreign countries subscriptions are $75.00.The appearance of an advertisement in The Jewish Standard does not constitute a kashrut endorsement. The publishing of a paidpolitical advertisement does not constitute an endorsement of any candidate political party or political position by the newspaper,the Federation or any employees.The Jewish Standard assumes no responsibility to return unsolicited editorial or graphic materials. All rights in letters and unso-licitededitorial,andgraphicmaterialwillbetreatedasunconditionallyassignedforpublicationandcopyrightpurposesandsubjecttoJEWISH STANDARDsunrestrictedrighttoeditandtocommenteditorially.Nothingmaybereprintedinwholeorinpart without written permission from the publisher. 2013FYIA puzzle for our readers what do you think?We are pleased to be able to offer you the Jerusalem Post crossword puzzle.This puzzle was created by David Benkof, who has been making themsince1999.HecreatesthemregularlyfortheJerusalemPost andotherJewishnewspapers;sofar,twiceheshadapuzzlepub-lished in the New York Times as well.Benkofs puzzles draw on every aspect of Jewish life, from Israeli cities to Jewish holidays to Hollywood luminaries to famous rabbis to Yiddish expressions. He delights in occasional use of Jewish word-play, misleading and trickery. Examples:A reader seeing a 4-letter entry for Conservative Cantor? might thinkaboutawomanchazzan,buttheanswerisERICCantor,the House Republican Majority leader.Areaderseeinga7-letterentryforWheretofindanunin DecembermightthinkaboutchurchesandChristmas,butthe answer is DREIDEL, because the Hebrew letter nun is found there.BenkofisfromSt.Louis.Hemadealiyahin2010andlivesin Jerusalem.You can find our first puzzle on page 38 of this issue.Then we want to hear from you.Please let us know if you are interested in our continuing to pub-lish crossword puzzles. Drop us an email at editor@jewishstandard.com. If enough readers want the puzzle, we will continue to run it. We look forward to hearing your verdict.Joanne PalmerLETTERS TO THE EDITORPAGE 20If synagogues wish to prosper in the 21st century, the emphasis need to be creating core members.Alan Mark Levin, Fair LawnCANDLELIGHTING TIME: FRIDAY, FEB. 8, 5:03 P.M.SHABBAT ENDS: SATURDAY, FEB. 9, 6:05 P.M.NOSHES .................................................................................................. 4BRIEFLY LOCAL .................................................................17OPINION .............................................................................................. 18COVER STORY.................................................................... 24TORAH COMMENTARY .................................. 37CROSSWORD PUZZLE ....................................38ARTS & CULTURE ........................................................39GALLERY ......................................................................................... 43LIFECYCLE ...................................................................................44CLASSIFIED ..............................................................................46HOME DESIGN .................................................................... 48REAL ESTATE ...................................................................... 49ContentsNATIONALObama to visit Israel29ARTS & CULTURELore of the German losers 39LOCALAfter Sandy, recovering memories 15LOCALReuniting survivors6LOCALIt actually tastes good!14JS-3*JEWISH STANDARD FEBRUARY 8, 20133JS-5 NYBOARDOFRABBISPRESENTSDavid Broza LIVE AT TEMPLE EMANU-EL OF CLOSTERConcert to Benefit New Jersey Hurricane Sandy Victims Sunday, Feb. 10th / 1 Adar6:00pm ConcertVIP Reception after the Concert Tickets$50 eachVIP Ticket Packages$360: 2 Tickets + Signed CD$500: 2 Tickets + Signed CD + VIP Reception with Artist$ 1,000: 2 Premiere Tickets (first 3 rows) + Signed CD + VIP Reception with ArtistInvited Guests Governor Christie Senators Lautenberg & Menendez Congressmen Garrett, King & Pascrell To purchase tickets please contact Jessica Di Paolo at 212.983.3521 or jdipaolo@nybr.org Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 20135 Survivors reunited through local programMarla CohenOlga Jaeger and Marta Felberbaum both grew up under Nazi occupation, in the same region, now partofwesternUkraine,anareathatfrequent-lychangedhandsbetweenUkraine,Czechoslovakia, andHungary.BothwomenweresenttoAuschwitzas teenagers.ButitwasntuntiltheyendedupinaDisplaced PersonsCampinBamberg,Germany,eachtryingto make her way to the United States, that they met.SeparatedbyanoceanwhenFelberbaumleftfor America,theykeptintouchthroughletters.Theylater workedinthesamefactoryinNew York,butovertime they lost touch with one another.That is, until Caf Europa, a program of Jewish Family ServiceofNorthJersey,broughtthembacktogether about eight years ago.Its an opportunity to get together, Felberbaum said of the program. We used to go to Teaneck at a restaurant withtwoothergirls.Butitsgettingharderandwere getting older. So at least we get a ride. Its simpler.ThemonthlyprogramofJewishFamilyServiceof NorthernNewJerseyoffersagingHolocaustsurvivors achancetogettogether.Theprogram,heldattheFair Lawn Jewish Center on the first Tuesday of each month, varies,withlunch,aride,andarotatingprogramof lectures, musical performances, and films.But it is a long way from Uzhorod, where Felberbaum was born, to Fair Lawn, where she now lives. Her father wasawholesalerofwineandwhiskey,buyingdirectly from vineyards and producing his own kosher wine.We were religious people, she said.She,hermother,andthreesistersweredeportedto the Uzhorod ghetto, and later, when she was 16, all were sent to Auschwitz. When they arrived, and the cattle car door opened after a grueling trip, her father disappeared right away.I was scared I would lose my mother right away, too.Shedid.AstheypassedthroughJosefMengeles infamousselection,sheandhersisterswereselected tolive.Buthermotherwastoldtogototheright,and Felberbaumstillruesthemomentshelefthermothers side.Althoughnoonewascertainwhatfatelayinstore for them, Felberbaum had an inkling when a Jewish capo pointed ominously to a chimney. See that, Felberbaum recountedhimsaying.Youcameinthroughthedoor and youll go out through the chimney.Inthewaningdaysofthewar,Felberbaumwas liberated while on a train en route to another work camp. Ittookherthreemonthstomakeherwayhome,which wasunderthecontroloftheSovietUnion.Eventually, she was reunited with her sisters. They survived by selling cigarettes,loosetobacco,andwhiteflourgoodsthat theycouldsalvagefromastoretheirfatherhadowned befor the war to the Red Army soldiers who occupied the town.Felberbaum left home, realizing there was little future forherthere.ShefoundherwaytotheDPcamp,and there,housedinalongbuildingwheretheGerman cavalryhadoncekeptitshorses,shefoundotherslike her, hoping for a future, looking to leave Europe behind.IalwayssaytoOlgaIhadthenicesttimeinmylife in the DP camp, Felberbaum said. I was young. I didnt have to worry about food. I was working.Iwouldntcallitagoodtime,Jaegersaiddryly. Wheneachholidaytimecame,Icried.Ineededmy parents. I had to fend for myself.Despite their different take on that time, Felberbaum and Jaeger have an easy camaraderie, born from shared languageandsimilarhistory.Theyconsulteachother fortherightEnglishwordwhentheycannotfindthe rightYiddish,German,orHungarianone.Theyfinish sentencesforoneanotherabouttheirtimetogetherin the camps, and really, their views about that time are not so disparate.ThereisaSlovakexpression,Idonthavenothing anddontcareaboutanything,Jaegersaid.Itwasan easy life.Jaegertraveledapathsimilartoherfriends.Bornin Bilke a small town now part of Ukraine, about an hour and a half from where Felberbaum lived she and her family got through the war in relative quiet until Nazi ally HungaryinvadedinApril1944.Astheywerefinishing the Passover seder, there came a knock at the door. The Hungarianpoliceorderedthemtopackasuitcaseand headtothetownsynagogue.Fromthere,theywere senttotheghettoinBeregszasz,Hungary,thentoa brickfactory,andeventuallytoAuschwitz,wherethey separatedJaeger,hermother,andhersisterfromher father and two brothers.One morning, the guards took her mother and some childrenaway,tellingJaegerthathermotherwouldbe CommunityJS-6*6Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 Marta Felberbaum, left, and Olga Jaeger at a recent meeting of Cafe Europa at the Fair Lawn Jewish Center.Olga Jaeger is at the brides left, and Marta Felderbaum is at her right, in a wedding held in the Bamberg DP camp.A common area at the Bamberg DP camp when the two women lived there.see SurvivOrS page 3636Jewish standard FeBrUarY 8, 2013 JS-36watchingthem.Itwasahoax,Jaegersaid.Theywere notcaringforchildren.Ashermotherleft,shetoldher elder daughter, Take care of Olga, shes still a kid.I was crying, Jaeger said. I miss my mother.Another selection process came, and this time, Jaeger, then 15, was pulled out with the children. She wanted to gowithhersister,whopulledherinfrontofabarracks and yanked open the door. They both hid there.This is how I survived, said Jaeger. My sister saved my life.After that she worked in a munitions factory from July 1944 through the following April. The end of the war was approaching,althoughtheinmate