MicroStation Training Guide

of 72 /72
MICROSTATION TRAINING GUIDE

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of MicroStation Training Guide

MICROSTATION TRAINING GUIDE

Training Material for MicroStation

Table of contents

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Introduction Fundamentals Design File Creation and setup Precision Input Manipulation and Viewing Tools Element Placement and Manipulation Levels Text Cells

2 3 9 11 15 21 29 31 33 39 42 56

10 Reference Files 11 Accudraw 12 Microstation 3D

1

Training Material for MicroStation Introduction MicroStation/J is a CAD Engine developed by Bentley designed to Edit and create Vector Drawings; it has features to Display Raster images too. Minimum System Requirement: 32 bit operating system 256Color monitor 32MB RAM 120MB Disk Space required Type of Drawing: Depending on the way in which the drawings are displayed and stored they are widely categorized as Vector Drawings and Raster Drawings Raster Drawing are drawings, which store pixel information of display hence a line would be formed by joining a series of adjacent color pixels. These are also known as Raster Images. Vector Drawings, In these types of drawings the lines end point would be stored and respectively be displayed in the space. The advantage of vector are that they are very precise, can be modified easily maintain thickness through out. Vector Drawings are suitable for engineering purposes.

2

Training Material for MicroStation FUNDAMENTAL MicroStation GUI Menu Bar Tool Bar Key In Design Window

Tool Frame

Tool Settings Child Palette

View Controls

Status Bar Mouse Operations: 1 Left Click Or Data Point Or Accept Button 2 Right Click Or Reset Point Or Reject Button

1+2 Tentative Operation / Snap

3

Training Material for MicroStation Quick Exercise: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Open Microstation/J. Open one of the supplied design file. Identify various GUI components shown on the previous page. Go to the window Open Close Open all the windows Again from the window menu use the various options e.g. tile, cascade, etc. View Controls: 1. 2. 3. 4. Below each window notice the view control palette. Use all the available view control tools. Try zooming in and zooming out, and panning. Use the fit View and window area tools. Elements: 1. Click on the draw line tool, and use the left mouse button, to place the start of the line, click again somewhere else to complete the line, use the right click to reset the operation. All MicroStation entities are known as elements, e.g. Circle, Line, Shape, etc. All Elements have some attributes. The element attributes related to display are Color this controls the color of the element Line Style this decides the pattern of line Line weight This controls the line thickness Levels It controls some important features like visibility of the elements Class Again categories elements into classes For Setting attributes Go to: Elements (Menu) -> Attributes (Also available in the Primary Tool Bar.) About MicroStation Design File A MicroStation document file is called a design file. MicroStation's File menu has items for creating, opening, and saving design files You cannot have more than one design file open or active in MicroStation at a time. If you open a design file when one is already active, MicroStation automatically closes the first file. However, you can view the contents of other design files by attaching them for reference to the active design. When you create a design file, MicroStation copies one of the provided templates or seed design files. The seed file is copied to a new file name that you specify in the Create Design File dialog box.

4

Training Material for MicroStation To create a design file and open it as the active design file 1. From the File menu, choose New. The Create Design File dialog box opens. The default filter is *.dgn. 2. The file specification for the default seed design file is displayed in the Seed File section. 3. (Optional) To change the filter, choose the corresponding item in the List Files of Type drop-down list. The file list is useful for avoiding assigning the new file an already existing filename. 4. (Optional) To select a different seed design file, click the Select button and use the Select Seed File dialog box. 5. (Optional) To select a different destination disk drive, choose the desired drive from the Drives option menu. 6. (Optional) To select a different destination directory, use the Directories list box. 7. In the Files field, key in a name for the new design file. Although the extension .dgn is often used to indicate a MicroStation design file, any or no extension is acceptable. 8. Click OK. Preparing to Draw: Except for user preferences, there are no default settings in MicroStation. The settings described in the following subsections can be saved in the design file on disk. To preserve changes to these design file settings between sessions, you must explicitly save the settings. Seed files When you create a design file, you identify a seed file as a template for the design file. The new design file is actually a copy of the seed file. Seed files do not (necessarily) contain elements, but, like other design files, they do contain settings and view configurations. Having a seed file with customized settings keeps you from having to adjust settings each time you create a design file. If you wish, you can have a different seed file for each type of drawing you do. To select a seed file 1. From the File menu, choose New. The Create Design File dialog box opens. 2. In the Seed File section, click the Select button. The Select Seed File dialog box opens. The default filter is *.dgn. 3. (Optional) To list all files in the Files list box, choose All Files from the List Files of Type option menu.

5

Training Material for MicroStation 4. (Optional) To select a different source disk drive, choose the desired drive from the Drives option menu. 5. (Optional) To select a different source directory, use the Directories list box. 6. In the Files list box, select the desired seed file. Or In the Files field, key in the name of the desired seed file. 7. Click OK. Design plane In 2D drafting, the MicroStation equivalent of a sheet of drafting paper is the design plane. The design plane is composed of points at which you enter data points when placing elements in a design. Each point in the design plane has associated x (horizontal) and y (vertical) positions or coordinates. The design plane, then, is simply a Cartesian coordinate system upon which your design lies.

Coordinates are expressed in the form (x,y). MicroStation's Default workspace, the point called the Global Origin (GO) is set to the design plane's exact center and assigned the coordinates 0,0.

Any point to the right of the Global Origin has a positive x-value; any point to the left has a negative x-value. Any point above the Global Origin has a positive y-value; any point below has a negative y-value.

For most purposes the Global Origin in the provided seed files is fine. You may wish to change the location or coordinates of the Global Origin, though. For example, an architect may want all coordinates to be positive values. A mapper or surveyor may need to use a grid system defined by a government agency to reference all locations to a specific point.

6

Training Material for MicroStation When you enter a data point, MicroStation saves its coordinates as 32-bit integers. Accordingly, the design plane has 232 (4,294,967,296) points in each dimension. The distance between two adjacent points is the smallest distance MicroStation can address. This distance is one positional unit or unit of resolution (UOR). The 3D Design Cube is analogous to the 2D design plane. Working units Although MicroStation thinks in positional units, it lets you draw in real world units like feet and inches, or meters and centimeters. These real world units are called working units.

Working units are expressed as master units (the largest units in a design) and fractional sub-units. The number of positional units per sub-unit is called the working resolution. How working units are expressed

Distances in design files are sometimes expressed in the form of three numbers separated by colons MU:SU:PU. For example, 3:4:100 means three master units (MU), four sub-units (SU), and 100 positional units (PU). The table has examples of distances expressed in this form. Working Units Miles / feet / inches Yards / feet / inches Yards / feet / inches MU:SU:PU 350::6 :12:8 ::11 Distance 350 miles, 6 inches One half millimeter 12 feet, 8 inches 11 inches Working resolution Determines the precision with which elements are drawn and the working area of the design plane. The working area is the size, in working units, of the design plane; the size of the design cannot exceed the working area. Because the design plane is square, there is an inverse relationship between precision and working area. Working units settings Consist of working units and working resolution and are specific to a design file. The working unit settings in the discipline-specific seed files provided with MicroStation are commonly used in the respective disciplines. Some of the provided seed files have English working unit settings and others have metric settings. To easily convert back and forth between metric and English units, use working unit settings groups.

Feet / inches / thousandths 120:10: (or 120:10) 120 feet, 10 inches Millimeters / thousandths :500: (or :500)

7

Training Material for MicroStation 1. After you create a design file but before you begin to draw, you should confirm that the working unit settings provide adequate precision for your design task and a working area that exceeds the projected size of the design. Both requirements can usually be met with Saving design file settings once you have done the settings To preserve changes to design file settings such as working units and coordinate readout, between sessions, you must explicitly save the settings. To save the current settings to the active design file on disk 1. From the File menu, choose Save Settings (or press ).

8

Training Material for MicroStation Design File Creation and Setup

The purpose of this lab is to allow you to create a design file, accomplish design file setup in preparation for working in it, and practice with some of the basic element placement tools. Invoke MicroStation and create a new MicroStation Design File. 1. From the File pull-down menu on Menu Bar, select the New item. Create a new design file with lab1 as the file name (.dgn will be the default extension) Make sure that you select seed2d.dgn as your seed file (hint look for the Select Button). (Be sure you create the file in the training directory) 2. Select the OK button on the Create Design File dialog box. MicroStation will open the design file. 3. From the Settings pull-down menu on the menu bar select the Design File item, then choose Working Units. While the Working Units dialog box is displayed no other actions can be performed in MicroStation. Youll have to dismiss this dialog box to continue, but before that. Key in FT for Master Units. Key in IN for Sub Units. Key in 12 for IN Per FT. Key in 1000 for Pos Units Per IN.

4. Again from the Settings pull down menu on the Menu Bar, select Design File and then select Grid item. Set the Grid Reference to 12 so that it coincides with the new working units. Select the OK button (or press the Enter key). A dialog box will display informing you that the size of existing elements will change. Select the OK button. 5. IMPORTANT: From the File pull-down menu on the Menu Bar, select the Save Settings item to save your design session parameters. See the Message at Status bar settings saved. 6. Draw Illustration 1. Use any combination of the Place Block Tool, the Place Line Tool, and The Place Circle by Center Tool. (Look into the Main Palette).

9

Training Material for MicroStation Illustration 1

This completes the Design File Creation and Setup lab. You are now ready to continue with the next lesson: Precision Input.

10

Training Material for MicroStation Precision Input To enter a data point at specific coordinates in the design plane 1. In the Data Point Key-in dialog box, key in POINT ABSOLUTE x,y or XY=x,y x and y are the x- and y-coordinates, respectively.

Absolute. GO denotes the Global Origin; xd and yd denote the design file xand y-axes.

To enter a data point at a distance from the last tentative point or data point and angle relative to the view x-axis 1. In the Data Point Key-in dialog box, key in POINT DISTANCE d,q or DI=d,q d is the distance from the most recently entered tentative point or data point and q is the angle relative to the view x-axis.

Relative. P denotes the last data or tentative point, xv the view x-axis, and q the angle.

11

Training Material for MicroStation To enter a data point at distances along the design plane axes from the last tentative point or data point. 1. In the Data Point Key-in dialog box, key in POINT DELTA x,y or DL= x,y x and y are the distances along the design plane x- and y-axes, respectively.

Distance. P denotes the last data or tentative point; xd and yd the design file x- and y-axes. To enter a data point at distances along the view axes from the last tentative point or data point. 1. In the Data Point Key-in dialog box, key in POINT VDELTA x,y or DX=x,y x and y are the distances along the view x-axis and y-axis, respectively.

Distance. P denotes the last data or tentative point; xv and yv the view x- and y-axes. The purpose of this lab is to allow you to gain more practice using some of the basic element placement tools, and to introduce the use of precision input.

12

Training Material for MicroStation The dimensions are shown on the Illustrations only to aid in precision input. Do not replicate them in this exercise. 1. Create a new file named lab2 in the student directory. Set your working units: Key in FT for Master Units Key in IN for Sub Unites Key in 12 for IN Per FT Key in 1000 for Pos Units Per In Select the OK button (or press the Return Key). A dialog box will display informing you that the size of existing elements will change. Select OK button. 2. From the Settings pull-down menu on The Menu Bar, select Design file and then Grid item. Set the Grid Reference ton 12 so that it coincides with the new working units. 3. From the File pull-down menu select the Save Settings item to save your design session parameters. 4. Select The Place Line Tool and Keyin xy=0,0 in Keyin browser (Utilities ->Keyin). This will be the lower left corner of Illustration 1 (see next page). 5. Do not press the reset button until the last data point is accepted. Using Precision Input, key-in the following entries to place the rest of the data points: Illustration1 dx = 0,2 dx = 1.25,0 di = 1.75,315 di = 0.5, 60 di = 2,0 di = 1:2:347,-90 xy = 0,0

13

Training Material for MicroStation Next Draw the diagram in Illustration 2. Use the Place Shape, Place Line and Place Circle by Diameter tools. See the Polygons Sub-palette, The Lines Sub-palette, and The Circles and Ellipses Sub-palette for reference. Use precision input to assure accurate placement. Select the Fit View tool and identify view 1. This will cause all elements in view 1 to display. Arrange your views anyway, you like. Save your settings.

1.

2. 3. 4.

Illustration 2 Note: Dimensions are not to be placed during this exercise This completes the Precision Input lab. You are now ready to continue with the next lesson.

14

Training Material for MicroStation

Manipulation and Viewing Tools The purpose of this Lab is to give you practice working with the manipulation tools, views and multiple elements. You will work in the same file you created in Lab1. 1. Open the lab1 design file by using the Open File (See illustration 1) Illustration 1

Be sure to save the file as lab2.dgn (Select Save As from the File pull-down menu.) 2. Once the file is open, use the Fit Active Design tool to fit all the elements in view. See the View Control Palette.

15

Training Material for MicroStation

3. Use The Change Element Attributes Tool to change the boxes to the following: color 7 weight 4 linestyle 4 4. Use The Change Element Attributes Tool to change the circles to the following: color 7 weight 4 linestyle 5 5. Use The Change Element Attributes Tool to change the circles to the following: color 4 weight 4 linestyle 5 6. Use The Element Selection Tool to select the lines and blocks in the middle section of the chart. Use The Copy Element Tool to copy these elements to below the lower left circle of chart. (See Illustration 2). Illustration 2

7. Use the view Attributes dialog box to turn off the display of line weight in view 1. 8. Open views 3 and 4. By window Open/close tool. Arrange all the views.

16

Training Material for MicroStation 9. Use the Fit Active Design tool to fit all the elements in view 4. See The View Control Palette. Scale the drawings to be twice as large using scale tool as well as using fence. 10. Use the Window Area tool to zoom around the top box of the chart. See The View Control Palette. 11. Save the view as CEO using Saved Views. 12. Recall the saved view CEO and display it in view 3. 13. Save Setting of the file. This completes the manipulation and Viewing Tools lab. You now ready to continue with the next lesson: Element Placement and Manipulation Selecting an element When precision is not important, the easiest way to perform element manipulations and modifications is to use the Element Selection Tool in the Element Selection tool box (in the Main tool frame, Element Selection is the default representative of the Element Selection tool box). Most basic manipulations and modifications can be done with the Element Selection tool, including:

Moving and copying Scaling Moving vertices Modifying axes

When precision is important, the PowerSelector tool is useful for distinguishing the elements on which to perform manipulations and modifications. The PowerSelector tool is used to select and deselect multiple elements in a variety of ways. The Attribute List field in the PowerSelector settings window allows unique methods for selecting elements. The active set is denoted by a list of values that ends with a semicolon. You can edit these values before the semi-colon to build a subset. Only the elements that match the existing values are kept, the others are removed from the set. Pressing or applies the subset. Switching attributes allows you to continue the process of elimination. If values are entered after the semi-colon, PowerSelector performs a scan on the active file and all locatable reference files. A selection scan supports add, subtract and inverse selection modes. If a semi-colon is not used: PowerSelector assumes a subset if elements are selected, and a scan if nothing is selected. The attributes Level, Color, Style, Weight, and Class will locate simple elements within a complex element and act upon the entire complex element.

17

Training Material for MicroStation The Types attribute supports exact matches only. Tool Setting Sets the selection method:

Effect

Method

Individual selection is performed on a per element basis, as with the regular Element Selection tool. If you enter a data point but miss an element, the Block Method activates. Block Inside all elements inside the defined block are selected. Block Overlap all elements inside and overlapping the defined block are selected. Shape Inside all elements inside the defined shape are selected. Shape Overlap all elements inside and overlapping the defined shape are selected. Line elements are selected by drawing a line that intersects them.

Sets the objective of using the tool:

Mode

Add selects elements. Subtract deselects elements. Invert toggles the selection status of an element (selects deselected elements and deselects selected elements). Clear/Select All deselects all selected elements, or selects all elements if no elements are currently selected.

Clicking the Show More Information arrow expands the Tool Settings window to reveal the Attribute combo box and the Attribute List field.

Attribute

Level ranges between 1 and 63. Color ranges between 0 and 254. Style Standard line styles range between 0 and 7. Weight Line weight ranges between 0 and 31. Type Element type numbers as defined in the on-line Reference Guide. Class Element class values as defined in the on-line Reference Guide.

To select elements inside or overlapping a rectangular area 1. Select the PowerSelector tool. 2. In the Tool Settings window, select the following icons: Method - Block and Mode - Add (+)

18

Training Material for MicroStation If Block is set to Inside the block has a solid border and no dashed line running through it. If Block is set to Overlap the block has a dashed border and a dashed line running through it. (Optional) To change between Inside and Overlap, select the icon again using either the keyboard shortcut or the pointer. Enter a data point to define the first corner of the block. Move the pointer until the dynamically displayed block contains or overlaps the elements you want to select. Enter a second data point to close the block. To select elements contained in or overlapping a polygonal area 1. Select the PowerSelector tool. 2. In the Tool Settings window, select the following icons: Method - Shape and Mode - Add (+) 3. (Optional) To change between Inside and Overlap, select the icon again using either the keyboard shortcut or the pointer. 4. Enter a data point to define the first vertex of the polygonal shape. 5. Continue entering data points until the polygonal shape contains or overlaps the elements you want to select. 6. Enter a final data point to close the polygonal shape. To select elements that intersect a line 1. Select the PowerSelector tool. 2. In the Tool Settings window, select the following icons: Method - Line and Mode - Add (+) 3. Enter a data point to begin the line. 4. Enter a data point to end the line. All elements touched by the line are selected. To select elements based on their attributes 1. 2. 3. 4. Select the PowerSelector tool. In the Tool Settings window, select the following icon: Mode - Add (+) In the Tool Settings window, click the Show More Information icon. From the Attribute combo box, choose an element attribute or property as the selection criterion. 5. In the Attribute List field, key in the values applicable to elements you want to select. All of the selected elements with the specified values are selected. The Attributes List field updates to display all found values and ends with a semi-colon. To select additional elements or deselect some selected elements based on their attributes.

3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

19

Training Material for MicroStation 1. Select the PowerSelector tool. 2. In the Tool Settings window, select the following icons: Method - Block and Mode - Add (+) or Subtract (-) 3. (Optional) To change between Inside and Overlap, select the icon again using either the keyboard shortcut or the pointer. 4. Enter a data point to define the first corner of the block. 5. Move the pointer until the dynamically displayed block contains or overlaps the elements you want to select or deselect. 6. Enter a second data point to close the block. 7. In the Tool Settings window, click the Show More Information icon. 8. From the Attribute combo box, choose an element attribute or property as the selection criterion. The attribute or property values applicable to the selected elements display in the Attribute List field. 9. In the Attribute List field after the semi-colon, key in the values applicable to elements you want to select or deselect. All of the selected elements with the values specified after the semi-colon are selected or deselected. 10. Try using it on the circles and lines leaving out the boxes.

20

Training Material for MicroStation Element Placement and Manipulation Good now we go to our next exercise The purpose of this exercise is to familiarize you with more complex element and manipulation tools. You will gain additional experience using precision input and the fence operations. This lab will be the start of a project that you will work on for the remainder of this tutorial. 1. Create a new file named lab4. This file will be used for all the future labs. 2. Setup and save your working units, reference grid, etc., just like the initial steps performed in the earlier labs. 3. Save your design file settings. 4. Use the Place Line Tool to draw a 330 ft horizontal line beginning at the global origin. (Global origin is located at 0,0. Use xy=0,0 for a starting point). 5. Zoom Out or Fit your view until you see the entire line. 6. Use the Rotate Copy tool to rotate a copy of the horizontal line 90 degrees about its midpoint. (See Illustration 1) Look for the Rotate Tool. Select the tool, set The Active Angle, and select the Make Copy check button/box. Identify the horizontal line by snapping to its center. To do this, position the cursor near the center of the line and place a tentative point. Reset to complete the operation. Illustration 1

21

Training Material for MicroStation 7. Use the Copy Parallel by key-in tool to place one copy on each side of the original lines, to form the street curbs. See the Move Parallel Tool. To make width of the streets 22 feet, the distance should be 11 feet (See Illustration 2). Illustration 2

8. Use the Window Area tool to zoom in on the intersection of the streets. Use the Delete Part of Element Tool to clip a portion out of the curb lines as shown in Illustration 3.

Illustration 3 9. Also check out the IntelliTrim, the one with the bulb.

22

Training Material for MicroStation

10. Place arcs at each corner of the streets by using The Construct Circular Fillet Tool. Use a 30ft radius. (See Illustration 4). Illustration 4

11. Change the element attribute of the centerlines. Set Color to yellow Set Linestyle to 4 Set Weight to 0 Use the Change Element Attributes Tool to change the display of the lines. Make sure that you change only the above attributes. 12. Reset the elements attributes (Color, Linestyle, Weight) back to 0. 13. Use The Extend line Tool to shorten the vertical lines at each end of the North/south streets by exactly 30 feet (See Illustration 5) Illustration 5

23

Training Material for MicroStation

14. Create the adjacent streets as shown in Illustration 6: Place a fence around the intersection you have drawn. Select the Mirror Fence Copy Horizontal tool. See The Mirror Tool Select these options: Mirror About Horizontal Make Copy Use fence You will see a dynamic copy of the fence. Identify the end of one of the vertical lines. Reset to end the copy operation. Place a new fence to include the newly mirrored elements. Use the Mirror Fence Copy Vertical tool to mirror these streets. Identify one of the horizontal streets. Illustration 6

15. Place fence around the streets in the upper right corner of the street grid. Use the Rotate Copy tool to copy the streets at 150 degrees. See the Rotate Tool. The centerlines of the streets should be connected. (See Illustration 7) 24

Training Material for MicroStation

Illustration 7

16. Use the Extend Two Element to Intersection Tool to finish the street lines as shown in Illustration 8. Illustration 8

17. Use the Construct Circular Fillet Tool to fillet the connections of the streets. Use 75 feet as your fillet radius. Remember to match the element attributes of the lines being modified.

25

Training Material for MicroStation

18. Draw a pond in the middle block of the streets using The Place Point or Stream Curve Tool. (See Illustration 9) Change the element attributes of the pond. Illustration 9

19. Use the Copy Parallel tool to copy the outside street lines back to make the rear properly lines. See The Move Parallel Tool. Use a distance of 124 ft. (See Illustration 10) Illustration 10

20. Use the different types of Extend tools to extend property lines to meet each other and the street edges. Use the Copy Parallel Tool to make lots 50 feet wide. They will not all fit evenly.

26

Training Material for MicroStation

21. Use the Extend Tools to make your lots look similar to Illustration 11. See The Modify Element Sub-palette. Illustration 11

22. Change the element attributes of the lot lines. Linestyle 6 Color green Weight 1 23. Draw a golf course at the end of subdivision using The Place Point or Stream Curve Tool. Place two lakes on the course as shown in Illustration 12. Use the following attributes for the golf course: Linestyle 0 Weight 2 Color 6 Level 60 When drawing the lakes use color blue, linestyle 0 and weight 1. Illustration 12

27

Training Material for MicroStation

This completes the Element Placement and Manipulation lab. You are now ready to continue with next lesson: Levels

28

Training Material for MicroStation

Levels The purpose of this lab is to give you more practice with element placement and manipulation. Level manipulation will also be covered. 1. Open the design file you created in Lab 4 (lab4.dgn). Or you can open the file lab4s.dgn and save it as lab.dgn. 2. Set the highlight color to some color other than red. See Setting Element Highlight Color. 3. Zoom into an unused portion of the file. Using the Place Shape Tool draw the following house roof outlines. See the Polygon Subpalette. Use weight of 2, linestyle of 0 and color red. Draw the roof on level 5. ( see illustration 1 ) Illustration 1

4.

Move the centerlines of the subdivision to level 3. Select the Change Element Attributes Tool. Change your active level to 3. This is the destination for the move. Make sure that you change only the level attribute. Identify only the yellow dashed centerlines; once accepted they are moved to the active level. Hint: This operation is easier if you open an additional view, make 3 the active level in that view and turn the display of all other levels off. See the View Levels Settings Box. 5. Change your level to 1. 6. Turn off level 3 so that you are no longer looking at the centerlines.

29

Training Material for MicroStation

7. Use the Place Point or Stream Curves Tool to draw a stream as shown in Illustration 2. Draw the stream in blue on level 19. Illustration 2

8. Draw a green curve in the center of the subdivision on level 57 (See Illustration2). 9. Draw a line string at the right of your drawing that will be used as a True North Indicator. Draw it on level 1 and use color 0. (See Illustration) This completes the Levels lab. You are now ready to continue with the next lesson: Text

30

Training Material for MicroStation

Text The purpose of this lab is to give you practice placing text. This exercise uses many of the text placement tools discussed earlier. 1. Open your subdivision drawing or open the file lab5s.dgn and use the Save As item to save the file with a new name. Set your active level to 12, color to 0 and weight to 0. 2. Use the Place above element tool to place names on the streets as shown in Illustration 1. See the Place Text Tool. Use a text size of 12, font 3, and set line spacing to 5 feet. 3. Use the Place Text Along Element Tool to place text along the curve representing the creek. See the Place Text tool. Use a text size of 15 feet, line spacing of 5 feet and inter character spacing of 5 feet. (See Illustration 1) 4. Set inter-character spacing to 0. 5. Use the Place Text tool to label the park, the pond, and the curve string (this will be a wooded area) as shown in Illustration 1. See the Place Text Tool. Use font 23, and a text size of 15 feet. 6. Label the North-Arrow using font 0 with a text size of 12 feet. (See justification) 7. Label the subdivision as shown in Illustration 1, using font 42 and a size of 30 feet. 8. Use the Change Text to Active Attributes Tool to change the North Arrow text font to 7, and size 20 feet. 9. Use the Edit Text Tool to change the name assigned to the pond.

31

Training Material for MicroStation

Illustration 1

This completes the Text lab. You are ready to continue with the next lesson: Cells

32

Training Material for MicroStation

Cells The purpose of this lab is to give you practice working with cells and cell libraries. In this lab, you will create a cell library, and several cells. The dimensions shown in the Illustrations are for aiding you with your cell creations. Do not replicate them in this lab. 1. Open your subdivision design file (or open lab6s.dgn and Save As with a new name). 2. Create a new cell library with the name xx.cel (where xx represents your initials) in the student directory. See Cell Library Creation. 3. Create three cells from the three roof outlines you drew in the Levels lab. Define each cell origin by snapping to the lower left corner of the roof. Name the cells house1, house2, house3. See Cell Creation. 4. Set your active level to5, weight to1, and color to anything you like. 5. Create a cell representing a tree using The Place Point or Stream Curve Tool. Use the dimensions shown in Illustration 1 as a guide. Illustration 1 + Defines origin point for each of the cells in this lab.

6. Create an arrowhead point cell. This will be used as a line terminator for the True North Indicator. Select the Place Line Tool. Each section of the X is 5 feet. Use the dimension shown in Illustration 3 as a guide. DI=24.5,30 DI=24.5,150 DI=14,300 Snap back to the starting point, accept it, and then reset.

Illustration 2

33

Training Material for MicroStation

7. Create a cell representing a chain link fence using The Place Line Tool. Each section of the X is 5 feet. Use the dimension shown in Illustration 3 as a guide. Illustration 3

8. Create the following two cells. The first one will represent a manhole and the second a telephone pole. Use the Place Circle by Center Tool to create these cells, use 6 feet as the diameter. For the manhole place lines at each of the circle as it is shown in Illustration 4. Define the cell origin point to be the center of the manhole and telephone. Illustration 4

Manhole

Telephone Pole

9. Place cells of the roof outlines on some lots. Use all three buildings. Utilize your Active Angle when placing buildings on angled lots. (Note: Illustration 5 shows houses placed on some of the lot, You are not required to duplicate this. You only have to place houses on some of the lots).

34

Training Material for MicroStation 10. Make the tree your active cell and place trees randomly on the drawing. Do not place any trees near the curve string in the park.(See Illustration 5) 11. Turn of level 12. 12. Use The Place Active Cell Matrix Tool to place the first 10 manholes as shown in Illustration 6. There will be 2 rows, 5 columns, 270 feet between the rows, and 165 feet between the columns. Set the active Scale to 1. To define the matrix origin, snap on the end of the street marked with an X in Illustration 6. Do not enter a data point here; instead key in DI=11,90 and press . Place additional manholes randomly along the streets. Illustration 5

This completes the Cells lab. You are now ready to continue with the next lesson: Patterning

35

Training Material for MicroStation Patterning The purpose of this lab is to give you practice using the patterning tools in Microstation. You will also create a new cell that will be placed in the cell library you created in the Cells lab. 1. Open the subdivision file. 2. Ensure that the cell library you created in the lab Cells is attached. Or attach the cell library class.cel in the student directory. 3. Extend the center line of one of the vertical streets 20 feet (turn on level 3 if it is not visible). 4. Select the Place Arc by center tool and key-in radius of 23 feet. Place the first and the third data points at the ends of the street curbs. Place the second data point at the end of the extended center line. Remember to use tentative points for accuracy. The arc draws counterclockwise from data point 1 to 3. 5. Shorten the line you extended by 20 feet. 6. Make a cell out of the Cul-de sac. Put the origin at the center line you just shortened. 7. Place this cell at the ends of the other vertical streets. 8. Use the Drop Complex Status tool to drop the complex status on the Cap cells, before using the Construct Fillet tool to place arcs that merge them into curbs (30 feet radius). You will also need to fillet the original arc from which the cap was created (it can not be dropped since it was never a cell, only a template used to create the cell). 9. Use the Trim Element tool to trim the back property lines so that they do not overlap the Caps.

36

Training Material for MicroStation

Illustration 1

10. Draw a yellow linestring on level 16 above the stream. This will represent a fence line. 11. Use the Construct Active Points Between Data Points tool to place 3 telephone poles at a time along the streets. See choosing the Active Cell for information on making a cell the active point. 12. Place 10 trees along the green curve string in the park using the Construct Points Along Element tool. 13. Delete the line string behind the trees.

37

Training Material for MicroStation 14. Place an arrow at the end of the true north indicator using the Place active Line Terminator tool. Scale the arrow 1.5 times larger. 15. Use the Linear Pattern tool to pattern the linestring representing the fence line with the fence cell. 16. Use the Hatch Area Tool to pattern the houses along one street. Set your spacing to 10 feet and the angle to 45degrees. Do the hatching on level 16.Remember to use The Drop Complex Status Tool on each house before hatching. (See illustration 2) Illustration 2

This completes the Pattering Lab. You are now ready to continue with the next lesson: Reference Files

38

Training Material for MicroStation Reference Files This lab is designed to give you practice working with reference files. You will attach and manipulate reference files. 1. Create a new 2-D design file. From the File pull-down on The Command Window select the New item (or use the shortcut Ctrl-N). To name the file, use xxbor.dgn inserting your initials in the position of the Xs. 2. Once in the design file, select the Settings pull-down. Select the Working Units item. Key in FT for Master Units Key in IN for Sub Units Key-in 12 for SU per FT Key-in 1000 for Pos Units per IN Click OK. A dialog box will display informing you that the size of existing elements will change. Click OK. 3. Save your settings. (From File menu click on to save settings.) 4. Draw a border. Select the PLACE LINE TOOL. Place a data point at the global origin, to locate the lower left corner of the border. Use dimensions as shown in Illustration 1

Illustration 1

5. Exit the design file containing the border and open your subdivision design file. 6. Attach the second file containing the border as reference file to your subdivision drawing. From Tools pull down menu, click on to Reference file tools and from this toolbox select ATTACH REFERENCE FILE TOOL.

39

Training Material for MicroStation 7. Select your border.dgn file as the file to be attached. (You may have to change directories.) Click OK. Another dialog box will appear. This dialog box asks you to specify a logical name and description if desired. Click OK upon completion. 8. The border may not line up around your drawing. If it is not visible, use FIT ALL TOOL. 9. If the needs to be moved use the MOVE REFERENCE FILE TOOL. It will take at least two data points to move the reference file in response to the prompts. Refer to the Illustration 2 for the suggested position of the border. 10. Complete the title block for your drawing. Place your name, date and your company title as shown in the Illustration 2. Use your choice of font, text size, and line spacing. Place your text on level 12. 11. Zoom in around one of the roof s that was patterned and make a saved view out of it. (From UTILITY pull down menu, select SAVED VIEWS.) 12. Turn on level 12 13. Attach your design file containing the house saved view as a reference file (i.e. attach the file that you are currently in to itself). Select the saved view name you created in step 11, and scale it up to 8 times. Place it to the right of your screen as an enlarged detail as shown in Illustration 3. Illustration3

40

Training Material for MicroStation

14. The attached reference files are not displayed, execute the Attachment settings box and display your reference files. 15. If you are satisfied with the appearance of your design up to this point, do the following: Compress the design Save your settings Make a backup copy

41

Training Material for MicroStation AccuDraw Working with a mechanical engineering design, you will use MicroStations most powerful drafting aid, AccuDraw, in conjunction with its most flexible drawing tool, Place SmartLine. You will draw a simple wrench for use on a bicycle. The wrench will have an open and a closed end, each designed for 1inch nuts or bolts. Here is what the final drawing will look like:

The tutorial is structured as a series of exercises that are meant to be performed consecutively. You will learn about: Drawing the profile Completing the wrench Modifying the wrench In each exercise, it is assumed that you have just completed the preceding exercise.

If you have trouble If you have trouble when going through the lesson, doing one of the following usually helps: Reset, by pressing the Reset button. This is most useful when you have trouble using a tool. Undo, by choosing Undo from the Edit menu, or by clicking the Undo icon in the Standard tool bar below the main menu bar. This is most helpful after you finish using a tool and realize that you have made a mistake. Remember, MicroStation lets you undo more than just the last operation. Undo a change made with a view control by choosing the View Previous view control, located on the view control bar in the bottom border of each view window. This is helpful if you use a view control to zoom out or window an area and lose your bearings.

42

Training Material for MicroStation Remember DO NOT RESET OR ENTER A DATA POINT UNTIL TOLD TO DO SO.

43

Training Material for MicroStation

Exercise: Drawing the profileYou will employ a construction element as a reference center line. This construction line will be used as a drawing aid only it will not be plotted. Open the design file, wrench.dgn: 1. From the File menu, choose Open. The Open Design File dialog box opens. 2. In MicroStations dgn/learning directory, select wrench.dgn. 3. Click the OK button. Following are a few notes about wrench.dgn: The grid is displayed. Master units are inches. The distance between each grid reference cross is 1 inch. The grid points are 1/10th of an inch apart. The coordinate readout is set to Master units and uses 4 decimal places. A distance of one and one-half inches is displayed in the status bar as 1.5000. Snap Lock is turned on and Snap Divisor is set to 2. Line segments have three snap points one at either end and one at the midpoint. To enable snapping: From the Settings menus Locks sub-menu, choose Dialog. In the Locks settings box, turn on Snap Lock. Place a line as a construction element: 1. From the Element menu, choose Attributes. The Element Attributes settings box opens. 2. Set the Active Color to Red (3) by pressing on the small square to the right of the Color field, and dragging the pointer to the red tile in the first row of the drop-down color palette, and then releasing the Data button. 3. Set the Active Line Style to Dashed (2) by pressing on the option menu to the right of the Style field, dragging the pointer to the menus dashed entry, and then releasing the Data button. 4. Confirm that the Active Line Weight is set to zero (0) by checking the value in the Weight field. If the Active Line Weight is not set to zero, choose 0 from the Weight option menu.

44

Training Material for MicroStation 5. Set the Active Class to Construction by choosing Construction from the Class option menu. The Element Attributes settings box now displays the settings used for the reference centerline.

45

Training Material for MicroStation

6. In the Primary tool bar, select the Start AccuDraw tool. The AccuDraw window opens. If the windows fields are labeled Distance and Angle, press to change them to x and y. 7. From the Settings menus Locks sub-menu, choose Grid. A checkmark to the left of the Grid menu item indicates that Grid Lock is turned on. Grid Lock works in combination with the grid. Data points placed between grid points are moved and locked to the nearest grid point. 8. In the Linear Elements tool box, select the Place Line tool. 9. On a large grid reference point, on the far left side of view window, enter a data point. AccuDraws compass appears as a dashed square at the location where you placed the data point. As you move the pointer to the right, both fields in the AccuDraw window update to show the distance in the X and Y planes from the compass to the current pointer location. 10. Move the pointer horizontally to the right of the first data point until the line highlights. This indicates the line currently under construction is now indexed to the X axis from the current compass location. AccuDraws Y field will display a 0 value and AccuDraws input focus (the place where any keyboard entry will be directed) will be on the X field. 11. Key-in 5. Because the input focus was on the X field you do not have to choose the field to enter a value. AccuDraw anticipates your next input by placing the input focus in the appropriate place. The line is tentatively constrained at a length of 5 inches.

46

Training Material for MicroStation

12. With X showing 5, and Y showing 0, enter a data point (i.e., click the mouse) to accept AccuDraws values. 13. Reset. Start drawing the profile of the wrench: The wrenchs profile includes the open end and the shank. When the profile is drawn, it looks like this:

1. In the Element Attributes settings box, set the Active Color to Blue (1). 2. Set the Active Line Style to Solid (0).

3. Set the Active Line Weight to 1. 4. Set the Active Class option to Primary. 5. In the Linear Elements tool box, select the Place SmartLine tool. 6. Snap a tentative point to the left end of the reference centerline, and enter a data point to begin the Profile. If the current tentative point snap mode is not set to endpoint (icon on status bar should be the one with the dot on the end of the line) then set it by clicking on the snap mode icon and choosing the correct snap mode. 7. Move the pointer up vertically from the AccuDraws compass. The line should index to the vertical axis. If the dynamic line does not appear indexed (i.e., a fat, highlighted appearance) move the pointer until it is indexed. Constrained line of 5 inches. The input focus will automatically be on the Y data field of the AccuDraw window. 8. Key-in 0.5.The dynamic vertical line segment will lock to half an inch.

47

Training Material for MicroStation

9. Enter a data point to place the segment. Continue drawing the wrenchs jaw: 1. With the dynamic smartline still preset go to the Tool Settings window and set the Vertex Type to Rounded. 2. In the Rounding Radius field, key-in 0.1 and hit a return. 3. Click on the AccuDraw window to return input focus to AccuDraw. 4. Returning to the view window, move the pointer to the left of the AccuDraw compass. Keep the line indexed to the compass X axis. 5. Key-in 1.0 Note how AccuDraw locks the horizontal element to 1 unit of length. The rounded arc vertex automatically displays.

6. Enter a data point to place the line segment.

48

Training Material for MicroStation

Constructing the wrenchs head: 1. Returning to the Tool Settings window, set Segment Type to Arcs and Vertex Type to Sharp. The AccuDraw drawing plane automatically switches to Polar coordinates. 2. Move the pointer to the right of the compass keeping the arcs radius line indexed to the horizontal axis. AccuDraw displays both the indexed radius indicator line and a dynamic arc. 3. Key-in 0.9 which will appear in the Distance field of the AccuDraw window. 4. Enter a data point to define the center point of the arc. As you move the pointer to the right a semi-circular arc is dynamically displayed.

5. Key-in a Tab to switch input focus to the Angle field. Key-in 180. If a circle appears instead of the expected arc, move the pointer to the right of the AccuDraw compass. This will result in the correct element display. 6. Enter a data point to place the arc segment. Drawing the shank: 1. Switch the drawing plane coordinate system back to Rectangular (press ). 2. In the Tool Settings window, set Segment Type to Lines. 3. Move the pointer to the right of the compass until the dynamic line is indexed to the horizontal access.

49

Training Material for MicroStation

4. Key-in 3.3.

5. Enter a final data point to place the line segment. 6. Reset to complete the construction of the profile. Modify the open-end arc radius: The arc used to describe the outside edge of the wrench was drawn larger than necessary. The Modify Element tool is used to reduce the radius of the arc. 1. In the Modify tool box, select the Modify Element tool. 2. Enter a data point on the wrenchs outside arc profile. 3. From the Modify Element Tool Settings window, change Method to Radius, preserve ends. 4. With AccuDraws input focus on the distance field (the default) enter 0.7000.

5. Enter a data point to make the change. 6. Reset.

50

Training Material for MicroStation

Exercise: Completing the wrenchThe first portion of the wrench is now complete. To create the other half of the wrench, a mirrored copy is made from the first half of the wrench. Mirror the wrench profile about the reference centerline: 1. In the Manipulate tool box, select the Mirror tool. 2. In the Tool Settings window, set (or confirm) Mirror About: Horizontal. 3. Set Make Copy option to on (has an X in its check box).Modifying the wrenchs arc. 4. Enter a data point on the wrench profile ( the blue element created in previous exercise).

As you move the pointer, the mirror image of the wrench profile is dynamically displayed. The location of the pointer defines the axis that the image is mirrored around. 5. Snap a tentative point to the reference centerline (the red dashed line). 6. Enter a data point to accept the mirrored copy of the wrench profile.

51

Training Material for MicroStation

7.

Reset.

52

Training Material for MicroStation

Draw the closed end of the wrench: To complete the profile of the wrench, an arc is added at the closed end. 1. In the Linear Elements tool bar, select the Place SmartLine tool. 2. In the Tool Settings window set Segment Type to Arcs and Vertex Type to Sharp. 3. Snap a tentative point to the right end of the upper wrench profile (the horizontal line segment). 4. Accept the tentative point to begin the arc placement.

5. To establish the center point of the arc, snap a tentative point to the right end of the reference centerline (the red dashed line). 6. Accept the center location.

If the arc does not appear as shown in the illustration just move the pointer in a clockwise rotation about the arcs centerpoint. This will unwind the arc in the right direction. 7. Snap a tentative point to the right end of the lower wrench profile. 8. Accept the arc endpoint. Note how the AccuDraw compass appears as the endpoint of the new arc. This indicates the readiness to continue the smartline construction. However, we are done with this portion of the design so the next step is to complete the construction. 9. Reset to complete the arc.

53

Training Material for MicroStation 10. Close the AccuDraw Window. The wrench profile is complete.

54

Training Material for MicroStation

Create a hexagonal closed-end for the wrench: 1. In the Polygons tool box, select the Place Regular Polygon tool. The Place Regular Polygon Tool Settings window opens. 2. In the Tool Settings window, set Method to Circumscribed; Edges to 6; Radius to 0.5; Area to Solid; and Fill Type to None. 3. Snap a tentative point to the right end of the reference centerline. Wrench arc points and finished arc. A hexagon is dynamically displayed at the location of the pointer. 4. Accept the tentative point to place the hexagon.

5. Reset. The closed end of the wrench is complete. The wrench profile is complete and the reference centerline is no longer needed. Turn off the display of the construction element: 1. From the Settings menu, choose View Attributes. The View Attributes settings box opens. 2. Turn off Constructions. 3. Click the All button. The reference centerline is no longer visible. 4. Close the View Attributes window. Finished arc.

55

Training Material for MicroStation

Exercise: Modifying the wrenchLink the elements into a single complex shape: Next you will convert the two mirrored wrench halves into a single closed shape. Link the elements into a single complex element: 1. In the Groups tool box, select the Create Complex Shape tool. 2. In the Tool Settings window set Method to Automatic; Max Gap to 0.0004; Area to Solid; and Fill Type to None. 3. Identify the wrenchs upper shank. Enter subsequent data points to accept each new link in the chain in order to makes up the entire wrench chain. 4. When the last data point has been entered, the entire outline of the wrench is highlighted. 5. Accept.

Place hatching into the wrench: Next you will place hatching into the wrench using the Association option. Any modifications made to the shape will automatically cause the hatching to be regenerated. 56

Training Material for MicroStation

The outside profile of the wrench is a single complex shape created in previous exercise.

57

Training Material for MicroStation

1. In the Patterns tool bar, select the Hatch Area tool. (At start-up, Hatch Area is in the Main tool box.) 2. In the Tool Settings window, set hatching options to: Spacing to 0.125; Angle to 45; Tolerance to 0.0; Associative Pattern to On; and Method to Difference. Difference mode hatching patterns the area between two or more closed shapes, each identified by data points. Creating a single complex element from a chain. 3. To set the hatch pattern symbology, In the Primary tool bar, set Active Color to Red (2); Active Line Style to Solid (0); and Active Line Weight to 0. 4. Identify the wrench profile. 5. Identify the hexagon at the wrenchs closed end. This data point also accepts the profile.

6. Accept the hexagon. Both the profile and the hexagon are highlighted. 7. Reset. The solid part of the wrench is hatched.

The line on which one of the hatch lines is placed passes through the data point you entered to accept the profile. Next you will lengthen the span between the two ends is lengthened using the Manipulate Fence Contents tool.

58

Training Material for MicroStation

Use a fence to stretch the wrench: 1. In the element Selection tool box, select the Place Fence tool. 2. In the Tool Settings window, set Fence Mode to Inside. 3. Enter a data point slightly beneath the right end of the wrench.

As you move the pointer, the fence is dynamically displayed. 4. Drag the fence block up and to the left to confine the closed end of the wrench. 5. In the Primary tool bar, select the Start AccuDraw tool. The AccuDraw window opens. 6. In the Fence tool box, select the Manipulate Fence Contents tool. 7. In the Tool Settings window, set Operation to Stretch. 8. Enter a data point to be used as the starting location. The AccuDraw compass appears at the data point location. 9. Move the pointer to the right of the compass indexed to the X axis. 10. Key-in 2.0.AccuDraws input focus will take care of putting it in the correct field. 11. Enter another data point to initiate the stretching operation. The wrench is stretched 2 inches to the right. The hatching is automatically regenerated. 12. Select the Place Fence tool to remove the fence. Removing the fence when you have finished prevents accidental fence operations.

59

Training Material for MicroStation

Working with AccuDrawAccuDraw is controlled from a variety of sources. You can influence it through the use of one- and two-key sequences called keyboard shortcuts. Drawing tools, themselves, can influence AccuDraw's operation. Finally, AccuDraw itself maintains a number of user selectable options via the AccuDraw Settings dialog box. AccuDraw supports a large number of options. However, all of these options can be placed into one of three major AccuDraw functions:

Previewing and constraining data points Locating the AccuDraw compass Orienting AccuDraw's drawing plane

AccuDraw and the Popup CalculatorWith the popup calculator, you can perform mathematical operations on the values displayed in some MicroStation text fields, and the values adjust accordingly. This feature is documented here as it works with AccuDraw, its use is extendable to other controls. Active Scale and Active Angle fields currently support it. The popup calculator is supported as follows: Dialog Box (various) (various) Fields Active Angle Active Scale

AccuDraw window X / Y / Z

To use the popup calculator

1. With the input focus in a field that supports popup calculation, type any of the following: +, -, *, /, = Type a value or expression to complete the calculation. Press , enter a data point, or click outside the popup calculator to

60

Training Material for MicroStation accept the calculated value. Press if you want to reject the value.

MicroStation 3D 61

Training Material for MicroStation

Basic 3D ConceptsThis section introduces the basic concepts related to working with 3D designs.

Design cubeThe design cube represents a 3D design file's total volume. Points in 3D design files are defined with x-, y-, and z-values, or coordinates. 3D design files consist of a design cube in which you work. Points can be placed anywhere within the design cube, and are not restricted to a single plane.

The design cube and 2D design plane Design cube coordinates are expressed in the form (x,y,z). A 3D design file contains 4,294,967,296 positional units (UORs) in the x, y, and zdirections, analogous to the 2D Design Plane.

62

Training Material for MicroStation The global origin in the 3D seed files provided with MicroStation is located at the exact center of the design cube and assigned the coordinates (0,0,0). Any point in front of the global origin has a positive z-value and any point behind it has a negative z-value.

View volumeThe view volume (sometimes called the display volume) is the volume displayed in a 3D view. In most cases, only a part of the design cube is displayed in a view. Any elements, or parts of elements, not contained in the view volume are not displayed in the view. The window area, and its Display Depth bound the view volume.

Display DepthThe distance from the front to the back of a 3D view is its Display Depth, which is bounded by clipping planes.

The front clipping plane is the one nearest the viewer. The back clipping plane is farthest from the viewer.

Elements in front of the front clipping plane or behind the back clipping plane are not displayed in the view, even if they are within its viewing area, regardless of how far the view is zoomed out.

Active DepthThe Active Depth is the plane, parallel to the screen in a view, on which data points are entered by default. The Active Depth is perpendicular to, and is measured along, the view's z-axis. This is why it is sometimes referred to as the active z-depth. The grid lies on this plane as well.

63

Training Material for MicroStation

B-Back Clipping Plane, AZ-Active Depth, F-Front Clipping Plane

The AccuDraw window in 3D

In 3D, when using Rectangular coordinates, the AccuDraw window has an additional field for the z-axis. For Polar coordinates in 3D, the AccuDraw window has the same two fields as in 2D.

Orienting the drawing plane in 3DLearning to orient AccuDraw's drawing plane is essential to mastering 3D drawing. For example, it is easy with AccuDraw to place a non-planar complex chain or complex shape in an isometric view in any direction without reverting once to an orthogonal view. By simply rotating the drawing plane axes, you can strike off at a right angle to the current segment. This is most apparent during the creation of a true 3D drawing normally portrayed as an isometric drawing for example, a plumbing riser diagram. By starting a pipe run along one view axis and shifting it using the , , and keyboard shortcuts, you can twist and turn the pipe through 3D space.

64

Training Material for MicroStation

A simple plumbing riser diagram under construction showing the compass at each corner and annotation pointing out the drawing plane orientation at each vertex This ability to adhere to the standard view axes while manipulating your drawing in a pictorial view is so important that AccuDraw maintains the current orientation from tool to tool. You can still return to the view orientation by using the keyboard shortcut. The following table summarizes the AccuDraw keyboard shortcuts available for fine tuning the drawing plane orientation so the axes point where you want them to go:

Key

Effect Rotates the drawing plane to align with the view axes. Pressing this key a second time restores context-sensitive rotation. Rotates the drawing plane to align with the axes in a standard Front view. Pressing this key a second time restores context-sensitive rotation. Rotates the drawing plane to align with the axes in a standard Right view. Pressing this key a second time restores context-sensitive rotation. Rotates the drawing plane to align with the axes in a standard Top view. Pressing this key a second time restores context-sensitive rotation.

, Used to quickly and temporarily rotate the drawing plane by a single point. Used to permanently rotate the drawing plane by three points. Because it rotates the active ACS, this rotation will still be active after the tool in use is exited. If on, the tool setting Use Current Origin causes the drawing plane , origin to be used as the x-axis origin, thereby eliminating the need to enter an extra data point. Of course, in many cases it is desirable to be able to define the x-axis origin at a different location than the drawing plane origin.

65

Training Material for MicroStation , Rotates the drawing plane 90 about its x-axis. , Rotates the drawing plane 90 about its y-axis. , Rotates the drawing plane 90 about its z-axis.

Arbitrary rotationsBy default, AccuDraw orients the drawing plane to the view axes. This is in keeping with the way it works in 2D. You can return AccuDraw to this orientation at any time using the keyboard shortcut.

EXERCISE 11. 2. Select the place line tool to draw the line AB = 27 MU. Choose the PLACE ARC (CENTRE) tool and key-in radius = 19MU

3. Give tentative to point B and key-in dx =38. This will give us point D. Key-in dx= 19 to get point C, the center of the arc. Finally tentative point B and accept it to draw the arc. 4. Draw dx = 31 MU 5. Now choose the COPY PARALLEL TOOL and key-in 11MU for the distance. Select the three elements. 6. Edit the drawing using the EXTEND TWO ELEMENTS TO INTERSECTION and place two vertical lines at the either ends. 7. Using the CREATE COMPLEX SHAPE TOOL close the above elements. 8. Project the above shape into a solid using CREATE SURFACE / SOLID OF PROJECTION TOOL to a distance of 48 MU. 9. Now in the left view select point A as the reference point and draw the shape as you see in the LEFT VIEW of the drawing. For corner F, draw two straight lines FA and FG. Then fillet them with radius = 10 MU using the CIRCULAR FILLET TOOL. 10. Use the CREATE COMPLEX SHAPE to close it.

66

Training Material for MicroStation 11. Project the shape by using CONSTRUCT SOLID / SURFACE BY PROJECTION TOOL with the distance of 11MU.

67

Training Material for MicroStation

EXERCISE 2NOTE: Please check your WORKING UNITS otherwise make them as you wish. 1. Select the PLACE SMART LINE TOOL and in the left view draw a horizontal line AB = 203.0 MU. 2. Next draw a vertical line BC = 24 MU and a horizontal line CD = 175 MU. And a vertical line DE = 26 MU and EF = 13 MU. Reset. 3. Draw AG = 23 MU and join points GF using tentative. Fillet corner C using CONSTRUCT CIRCULAR FILLET command with a radius of 5MU. Make sure the TRUNCATE option is set to BOTH. To fillet select EF and FD. 4. Using CREATE COMPLEX SHAPE CREATE SHAPE ABCDEFG. 5. You are now ready to create a solid of this shape. Select the CONSTRUCT SURFACE /SOLID OF PROJECTION tool and key-in the distance of projection as 70MU and identify the shape you have created in the left view. Click in the TOP VIEW. 6. We will now create two holes in horizontal block using BOOLEAN OPERATIONS. But first set your active depth in the TOP VIEW to the upper surface of the horizontal block. 7. Choose the PLCE BLOCK TOOL and tentative to D in the TOP VIEW. Make sure that you do not select any point other than D. key-in dx = 10,-10. For the opposite corner key-in dx = 50,-75. 8. To fillet the block use the CONSTRUCT CIRCULAR FILET (with truncate BOTH) tool and key-in radius = 15 MU. To fillet a corner of the block, select the appropriate segments of the block. Fillet all Four Corners. 9. Repeat step 7 and 8 to create the second block with appropriate dimensions and offsets using point C as your reference point. You will also need to change the fillet radius when filleting the second block. 10. Use the CREATE COMPLEX SHAPE tool on the filleted blocks to make them each into single entity. 11. Move these shapes vertically above the surface use the MOVE ELEMENT tool with the axis lock on.

68

Training Material for MicroStation 12. Now create solid of the two shapes using the CONSTRUCT SOLID / SURFACE BY PROJECTION tool making sure that the two solids intersects the horizontal block through and through. 13. We are now ready to use 3D Modify. Select the Cut Solid tool from the 3D palette and select the horizontal block first and then one of the two blocks. Click the data button to start operation and another click if the result is acceptable. 14. Repeat above step for other block.

69

Training Material for MicroStation

EXERCISE 31. Use the PLACE SLAB command and place a slab of following dimensions Length = 10; Width = 5; Height =5; 2. You can indicate the length and width in the TOP VIEW and length in the FRONT VIEW. 3. Set the active depth in TOP VIEW to upper surface of the slab. 4. Place the following profile ABCDEFGH on the surface. Draw line CD by keying in the angle = -45 with a length of 2 MU. Similarly create EF with length = 2MU and angle=45 5. Make the above profile into a single entity using CREATE COMPLEX CHAIN TOOL. 6. Rotate the above profile about the axis AH. For this select the CREATE SOLID/SURFACE OF REVOLUTION with an angle of 360. Select the profile and select the points A and H in the TOP VIEW as axis of rotation. Make sure that the mode of axis selection has been set to points. 7. Accept the solid of rotation 8. Now for the 3D Modify select the Cut Solid tool. Select the solid slab first and then the solid of revolution. Accept the result.

70

Training Material for MicroStation

Spell Checker Tool

MicroStation now provides assistance for cleaning up those pesky spelling errors in design files. Using the Spell Checker tool, located in the Text toolbox, you can check the spelling of individual or multiple text elements. The Spelling button on the Text Editor window also provides access to Spell Checker, enabling you to review text before placing it in the design.

71