Presentation - Addie Model

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Presented by: Donna O. O’Connor Carrietta Brown Pauletta Welsh McDonald The ADDIE Model
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Transcript of Presentation - Addie Model

The ADDIE Model

Presented by: Donna O. OConnor Carrietta Brown Pauletta Welsh McDonald

Outline

The Addie Model

Overview and Step 1: Analysis

Presented by Donna OConnor

Steps 2 & 3: Design & Development

Presented by Carrietta Brown

Steps 4 & 5: Implementation & Evaluation

Presented by Pauletta Welsh McDonald

Part 1: Overview & Analysis Training

What is training? Why use a systematic approach to training? Overview of the ADDIE Model Origin of the ADDIE Model Alternatives to the ADDIE Model The Kemp Model The Dick & Carey Model Knirk & Gustafson Model Training Needs Analysis: Uses and benefits of the TNA Persons who guide the TNA Levels of the TNA Factors Affecting the TNA

Why Training?

Training plays an important role in increasing productivity and competitiveness. Training therefore should be targeted, carefully planned and evaluated. One must take a systematic approach to designing effective training systems.September 6, 2011 4

Prepared by Donna O. O'Connor

Why a Systematic Approach to Training?

Support organizational mission and strategy

Increase productivityEnhance workforce and organization flexibility Lower or remove performance deficiencies Improve product quality Increase employee commitment Lower turnover and absenteeism rate Meet regulatory requirements Improve service to customersSeptember 6, 2011 5

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Origin of the Addie Model ADDIE (Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation, Evaluation) is a model of the Instructional System Design (ISD) family. ADDIE first appeared in 1975. It was created by the Center for Educational Technology at Florida State University for the U.S. Armed ForcesPrepared by Donna O. O'Connor September 6, 2011 6

The Original Addie Model

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The Revised Addie Model Dr. Russell Watson (1981), Chief, Staff and Faculty Training Division of the Fort Huachuca, Arizona, presented a paper to International Congress for Individualized Instruction. He discussed the ADDIE model as developed by Florida State University. His presentation contained a slightly revised model. The five basic phases are the same, but the steps within each phase have been slightly modified.

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The Revised Addie Model

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Alternatives to the Addie Model The Kemp Model Kemp Model The Jerold Kemp instructional design method and model defines nine different components of an instructional design while adopting a continuous implementation/evaluation model.Adopts a wide view. The oval shape of his model conveys that the design and development process is a continuous cycle that requires constant planning, design, development and assessment to insure effective instruction. It is systemic and non-linear and seems to encourage designers to work in all areas as appropriate .

It is particularly useful for developing instructional programmes that blend technology, pedagogy and content to deliver effective, inclusive (reliable) and efficient learning.

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Alternatives to the Addie Model The Kemp Model

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Alternatives to the Addie Model -The Dick & Carey Model Dick and Carey's model details a comprehensive and detailed process It has been criticized for being too rigid and cumbersome for the average design process. It describes all the phases of an iterative process that starts by identifying instructional goals and ends with summative evaluation.

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Alternatives to the Addie Model The Dick & Carey Model

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The Knirk and Gustafson design method and model is a prescriptive stage model for instructional designers. They designed a three stage process which includes problem determination, design and development. The problem determination stage includes identification of the problem, definition of the pedagogical goals and identification of what the learners can do (knowledge, skills, learning styles, affect, etc.)

Alternatives to the Addie Model The Knirk & Gustafson Model

The design stage includes developing objectives and specifying strategies.The development stage includes development of materials, testing and revision.September 6, 2011 14

Prepared by Donna O. O'Connor

Alternatives to the Addie Model The Knirk & Gustafson Model

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The ADDIE Model

What is ADDIE? A systematic approach (model) for developing effective instruction. One of the most popular models in instructional design. Outcome of each step feeds into the subsequent step. Evaluation is ongoing throughout each layer of design.

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The Addie Model The ADDIE design model revolves around the following five components: Analysis Design Development

ImplementationEvaluationPrepared by Donna O. O'Connor September 6, 2011 17

Step 1: Analyzing Training NeedsDesign

AnalysisEvaluate

Develop

Evaluate

Implement

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NEEDS ANALYSIS

What is a needs assessment? The process of collecting data to identify gaps between actual and desired performance If gaps point to a lack of KSAs, then specific training objectives are established.

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A Needs Assessment can be Used to Identify: Organization goals and its effectiveness in reaching these Discrepancies between current and future performance Types of programmes needed Target audience for the programme

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Benefits of Analyzing Training Needs

Do it right the first time. "Analyze fully; design once."

The ADDIE analysis phase serves a major role in the quality assurance process.It defines the project's needs and ways to measure its success.

Increased relevance of content based on fact not intuition Provides base-line information for evaluation of training Increase the motivation of participants Increase the chances that the time and money spent would be wisely spent Wrong focus Too easy or too hard Incomplete, redundant, or inaccurate content If you rush to development, you may not catch those errors until you launch the course.September 6, 2011 21

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Reasons Organizations Do Not Conduct Needs Assessment

Lack of support for the needs assessment process Time consuming Difficult to summarize findings into objective data Managers may prefer action over research Training fads and demands from senior managers sometimes take precedence Dont know how to conduct an assessmentSeptember 6, 2011 22

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Who Guides the Needs Analysis

The training specialist may speak with many people to learn about the project and its overall goals. Here are just a few examples of individuals who can provide information:

Project sponsors (executives or senior leadership)Subject matter experts (SMEs) Representative members of the target audience Anyone who will be impacted by or have influence on the final training product.September 6, 2011 23

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Levels of Training Needs Analysis

Organizational Entire organization, single division or department At this level you prepare for future need

Job/Task Single job category Indicated by low productivity

Individual Individual employee Indicated by poor review or employee assistance requestSeptember 6, 2011 24

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Organizational Analysis

Identifies the KSAOs that employees will need in the future as the organization and their jobs change

An examination of how internal and external environmental factors affect overall organizational performanceIdentifies constraints on trainingSeptember 6, 2011 25

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Task Analysis

Starts with job requirements and compares employee KSAs to identify areas in need of improvement. Job descriptions and specifications provide information on expected performance and skills required. Gaps between job requirements and job performance indicate a need at the task level.September 6, 2011 26

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Individual Analysis

Focuses on individual employees and how they perform their jobs Performance review data is used to identify needs Self-assessment can also be used If these reveal performance gaps, a development plan is designed to help the employee improveSeptember 6, 2011 27

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Factors Affecting TNA Internal

Environment

Changes in equipment Changes in procedures Mergers & Acquisitions New technology Organizational growth Downsizing New product lineSeptember 6, 2011 28

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Factors Affecting TNAExternal

Environment

Changes in skills, guided by the strategic plan Changes in demographics ie. changes in the labour pool, literacy levels of workers Changes in laws and regulationsPrepared by Donna O. O'Connor September 6, 2011 29

Step 1. Analysis: Training Needs Assessment ModelIdentify Goal

Training Gather/Analyze Data Identify Performance Gap Identify GoalProblem?

If no

Refer Back to Manager

Identify Instructional Goals

Propose Solutions

Evaluate Options/Estimate Budget and Timing

Present ProposalPrepared by Donna O. O'Connor September 6, 2011 30

Analyzing Training Needs

During analysis, the following is identified: the learning problem, the goals and objectives, the audiences needs, existing knowledge, and any other relevant characteristics.

Analysis also considers the learning environment, any constraints, the delivery options, and the timeline for the project.September 6, 2011 31

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Questions that drives the Needs Analysis

Collect critical information about business needs, learners' capabilities, and course content. Here are some of the questions you may ask during the ADDIE analysis phase: What are the business needs driving this training project? What are the goals and objectives for this training project? How will you define success for both the learner and the project? How will you measure that success? Who is the intended training audience? What do the members of the learning audience already know? What do they need to learn? What resources are already available?

The training specialist uses the answers to these, and any possible combination of other questions, to write the course's performance objectives.September 6, 2011 32

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Think About it1.

Needs assessments may not be conducted in organizations because: a. Gaps between employees skills and knowledge are already known b. Managers may prefer action over research c. There is no existing job descriptions d. Knowledge of what other companies are doing precludes a costly study

2. Which level is a needs assessment targeting when measuring what skills are required to perform a job effectively? a. Individual b. Task c. Organizational d. StrategicSeptember 6, 2011 Prepared by Donna O. O'Connor 33

Bibliography

Learning-Theories.com: Knowledge base and webliography (n.d.). Retrieved September 5, 2011 from http://www.learningtheories.com/addie-model.html

September 6, 2011

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Stay tuned for Steps 2 to 5 Step

2: Step 3: Step 4: Step 5:

Design Development Implementation Evaluation

September 6, 2011

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