Dessler HRM12e PPT 08 (1)

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Transcript of Dessler HRM12e PPT 08 (1)

Chapter 8

Training and Developing Employees

Part Three | Training and DevelopmentCopyright 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall PowerPoint Presentation by Charlie Cook The University of West Alabama

WHERE WE ARE NOW

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LEARNING OUTCOMES1. Summarize the purpose and process of employee orientation.

2. List and briefly explain each of the four steps in the training process.3. Discuss how you would motivate trainees. 4. Describe and illustrate how you would identify training requirements. 5. Explain how to distinguish between problems you can fix with training and those you cant. 6. Explain how to use five training techniques.Copyright 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 83

LEARNING OUTCOMES (contd)7. List and briefly discuss four management development programs.

8. List and briefly discuss the importance of the eight steps in leading organizational change.9. Answer the question, What is organizational development and how does it differ from traditional approaches to organizational change?

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Basic Definitions In the field of human resource management, training and development is the field concerned with organizational activity aimed at bettering the performance of individuals and groups in organizational settings It has been known by several names, including employee development, human resource development, and learning and development.

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Training: This activity is both focused upon, and evaluated against, the job that an individual currently holds. Education: This activity focuses upon the jobs that an individual may potentially hold in the future, and is evaluated against those jobs. Development: This activity focuses upon the activities that the organization employing the individual, or that the individual is part of, may partake in the future, and is almost impossible to evaluate. Learning: is acquiring new or modifying existing knowledge, behaviors, skills, values, or preferences and may involve synthesizing different types of information.Copyright 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 86

Purpose of OrientationOrientation Helps New Employees

Feel welcome and at ease

Understand the organization

Know what is expected in work and behavior

Begin the socialization process

Employee orientation (often called onboarding today) provides new employees with the information they need to function; ideally, though, it should also help new employees start getting emotionally attached to the firm.Copyright 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 87

The Orientation Process

Employee benefit information

Company organization and operations

Personnel policies

Employee Orientation

Safety measures and regulations

Daily routine

Facilities tour

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The Training Process Training Is the process of teaching new employees

the basic skills they need to perform their jobs Is a hallmark of good management Reduces an employers exposure to negligent

training liability

Trainings Strategic Context The aims of firms training programs must make

sense in terms of the companys strategic goals. Training fosters employee learning, which

results in enhanced organizational performance.

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Steps in the Training ProcessThe Four-Step Training Process1

Needs analysis or Training Need Analysis

23 4

Instructional design Program implementationEvaluation

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Training Programs Training programs consist of four steps. 1.In the training need analysis step, identify the specific knowledge and skills the job requires, and compare these with the prospective trainees knowledge and skills (TNA). 2.In the instructional design step, formulate specific, measurable knowledge and performance training objectives, review possible training program content (including workbooks, exercises, and activities), and estimate a budget for the training program. 3.Implement the program, by actually training the targeted employee group using methods such as on-the-job or online training. 4. In the evaluation step, assess the programs success (or failures).

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Training, Learning, and Motivation Make the Learning Meaningful1. At the start of training, provide a birds-eye view of the material to be presented to facilitate learning. 2. Use a variety of familiar examples. 3. Organize the information so you can present it logically, and in meaningful units. 4. Use terms and concepts that are already familiar to trainees. 5. Use as many visual aids as possible. 6. Create a perceived training need in trainees minds.Copyright 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 812

Training, Learning, and Motivation (contd) Make Skills Transfer Easy1. Maximize the similarity between the training situation and the work situation. 2. Provide adequate practice. 3. Label or identify each feature of the machine and/or step in the process. 4. Direct the trainees attention to important aspects of the job. 5. Provide heads-up, preparatory information that lets trainees know what might happen back on the job.Copyright 2011 Pearson Education, Inc. publishing as Prentice Hall 813

Training, Learning, and Motivation (contd) Reinforce the Learning1. Trainees learn best when the trainers immediately reinforce correct responses, perhaps with a quick well done. 2. The schedule is important. The learning curve goes down late in the day, so that full day training is not as effective as half the day or three-fourths of the day.

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Analyzing Training NeedsTraining Needs Analysis

Task Analysis:Assessing new employees training needs

Performance Analysis:Assessing current employees training needs

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FIGURE 82

Example of Competency Model for Human Resource Manager

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Performance Analysis: Assessing Current Employees Training NeedsSpecialized Software Assessment Center Results Individual Diaries Performance Appraisals

Methods for Identifying Training Needs

Job-Related Performance Data

Attitude Surveys

Observations

Tests

Interviews

Cant-do or Wont-do?

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Training Methods On-the-Job Training Apprenticeship Training Informal Learning Computer-Based Training (CBT) Simulated Learning

Job Instruction Training Lectures Programmed Learning

Internet-Based Training Learning Portals

Audiovisual-Based Training Vestibule Training Teletraining and Videoconferencing

Electronic Performance Support Systems (EPSS)

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The OJT Training Method On-the-Job Training (OJT) Having a person learn a job

by actually doing the job.

Types of On-the-Job Training Coaching or understudy Job rotation Special assignments

Advantages Inexpensive Learn by doing Immediate feedback

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On-the-Job TrainingSteps to Help Ensure OJT Success1

Prepare the learner Present the operation Do a tryout Follow up

2 3

4

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FIGURE 84

Job Instruction Training at UPS

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Delivering Effective Lectures Dont start out on the wrong foot. Give your listeners signals. Be alert to your audience. Maintain eye contact with audience. Make sure everyone in the room can hear.

Control your hands. Talk from notes rather than from a script. Break a long talk into a series of five-minute talks.

Practice and rehearse your presentation.

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Programmed LearningPresenting questions, facts, or problems to the learner Providing feedback on the accuracy of answers

Allowing the person to respond

Advantages Reduced training time Self-paced learning Immediate feedback Reduced risk of error for learner

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Intelligent Tutoring Systems Advantages Reduced learning time Cost effectiveness Instructional consistency

Types of Programmed Learning Interactive multimedia training

Virtual reality training Virtual classroom

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Internet-Based Training

Teletraining and Videoconferencing

Distance Learning Methods

Electronic Performance Support Systems (EPSS)

Computer-Based Training

E-learning and learning portals

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