University of North Carolina Wilmington€¦  · Web viewUniversity of North Carolina Wilmington....

of 36/36
University of North Carolina Wilmington Educational Program Assessment Plan and Report Assessment Plan for 2011-2012 Cameron School of Business Primary Contact Name/Info: Becky Porterfield, AoL Director, Cameron School of Business Degree: Master of Science in Computer Science and Information Systems MSCSIS Program Outcomes Program Outcome UNCW Strategic Goal Tools Implementation Summary of Findings Actions Taken PO 1: Increase dialogue between industry and MS CSIS program. UNCW Goal 5 Wilmington IT Exchange and Conference Dr. Tom Janicki; number of industry people, faculty and students who attend events Spring 2012 event had approximately 300 attendees: students, industry professionals, faculty. Breakout sessions and panels also support PO2. Supports PO3 through broad awareness marketing. Panel topics are adjusted each year to maintain currency. Post- event meetings to adjust operational issues. New speakers and special guests each year. IT Career Day Dr. Tom Janicki Fall 2012 event had more than 20 employers Continue to promote the event, with the
  • date post

    20-Oct-2019
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    0
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of University of North Carolina Wilmington€¦  · Web viewUniversity of North Carolina Wilmington....

University of North Carolina Wilmington

Educational Program Assessment Plan and Report

Assessment Plan for 2011-2012

Cameron School of Business

Primary Contact Name/Info: Becky Porterfield, AoL Director, Cameron School of Business

Degree: Master of Science in Computer Science and Information Systems

MSCSIS Program Outcomes

Program Outcome

UNCW Strategic Goal

Tools

Implementation

Summary of Findings

Actions Taken

PO 1: Increase dialogue between industry and MS CSIS program.

UNCW Goal 5

Wilmington IT Exchange and Conference

Dr. Tom Janicki; number of industry people, faculty and students who attend events

Spring 2012 event had approximately 300 attendees: students, industry professionals, faculty. Breakout sessions and panels also support PO2. Supports PO3 through broad awareness marketing.

Panel topics are adjusted each year to maintain currency. Post-event meetings to adjust operational issues. New speakers and special guests each year.

IT Career Day

Dr. Tom Janicki

Fall 2012 event had more than 20 employers inverviewing. Approximately 30 graduate students attended. Approximately CSIS alumni attended.

Continue to promote the event, with the goal of increasing industry and student involvement.

Cyber Defense Competition

Dr. Ulku Yaylacicegi, Dr. Ron Vetter, faculty and IT Professionals

Spring 2012 group of graduate and undergraduate students attended their first event. New contacts made with DOD and FBI.

Continue involvement making operational changes. Offer independent study credit to students.

Cape Fear .Net Developer Group

Meeting space on campus through Dr. Janicki, IT professionals arrange meetings

This fills a professional organization gap in the Wilmington area. Venue for faculty and professionals to interact and share knowledge.

Continue supporting this professional group through meeting space and attendance of faculty and students.

PO2: Provide learning opportunities for faculty

UNCW Goal 2

IT Breakfast Series

Dr. Tom Janicki; number of breakfast meetings and attendance data

Approximately 2 breakfast meetings each semester. Faculty and professionals share knowledge and keep current with fast-changing technologies.

Continue to offer new topics each year.

Cyber Defense Competition

Dr. Ulku Yaylacicegi, Dr. Ron Vetter, faculty and IT Professionals

Bi-weekly meetings of students with industry professionals guest-speaking. Faculty learn real-world challenges.

Continue and increase involvement in this event.

Cape Fear .Net Developer Group

Meeting space on campus through Dr. Janicki, IT professionals arrange meetings

A valuable learning opportunity for faculty.

Continue supporting this professional group through meeting space and attendance of faculty and students.

Faculty training

Faculty arrange their own, funding support from ISOM and CSB

At least 4 IS faculty traveled for multi-day technical training. New knowledge integrates well into the classroom.

Continue to financially support technical training trips. Seek new sources of funds for training.

PO3: Improve student recruitment

UNCW Goal 1

New web site content; web site analytics

Dr. Douglas Kline, Dr. Tom Janicki, other faculty

Web site content does not address concerns of prospective students. Web traffic has been stable over 2 years.

Implement “landing pages” more focused towards specialized areas such as Security. Provide links from capstone documents to main site. Improve calls-to-action. More clearly explain application process.

Social media: LinkedIn, Facebook

Dr. Douglas Kline, Mrs. Karen Barnhill

Social media usage is increasing among potential applicants

Establish LinkedIn and Facebook presences. Adopt LinkedIn for internal processes such as event announcement. Use LinkedIn for public announcements: awards, publications, etc.

Google Adwords and reports

Dr. Douglas Kline, Mrs. Karen Barnhill

The current Adwords budget is too small to have a measurable effect, but shows anecdotal promise.

Increase adword budget, have focused landing pages, target major metro regions one direct flight from Wilmington.

Graduate School applications reports

Graduate School

Applicants hear about graduate programs from 1) the web; 2) word-of-mouth

Increased social media usage. Increase alumni word-of-mouth through social media.

MSCSIS Student Learning Outcomes

MSCSIS Program

SLO1: Graduates will be able to formulate and solve problems using advanced mathematics and numerical methods, and computer information systems-based techniques.

UNCW Goal 1

Method: Multiple choice questions were developed to assess content knowledge.

Administration: Questions are administered to all students in CSC/MIS 532 Design and Analysis of Algorithms at the end of their program. The MSCSIS faculty committee reviews the data and initiates any changes.

No trends in scores were apparent over time. However, correct answers to the recurrence question of the assessment were very low.

Special attention will be given to writing and solving recurrences for running time in the Computer Algorithms course.

SLO2: Graduates will demonstrate knowledge of ethics and professionalism, and understand contemporary issues such as green computing, data security, privacy, and compliance with regulations.

UNCW Goal 3

Method: Multiple choice questions were developed to assess content knowledge.

Administration: Questions are administered to all students in CSC/MIS 534 Information Security Management at the end of their program. The MSCSIS faculty committee reviews the data and initiates any changes.

No trends were identified in assessment scores across time. However, questions regarding cryptoanalysis were low.

The textbook and instructor for MIS 534 will change in the Spring. Dr. Cummings will be teaching the course in Spring 2013, and will cover cryptoanalysis.

SLO3: Graduates will be able to complete analysis and design of business processes employing the latest information technology techniques, including the unified process model.

UNCW Goal 1

Method: Multiple-choice questions were developed to assess content knowledge.

Administration: Questions are administered in CSC/MIS 550 and 565, Software Engineering and Analysis, Modeling, and Design courses, respectively at the end of their program. The MSCSIS faculty committee reviews the data and initiates any changes.

Scores did not change in a patterned way over time. However, a particular question regarding project management’s role in system development scored very low.

Additional emphasis will be placed on the role of project management in the system development process, in the MIS550 course.

SLO4: Graduates will be able to apply science and business principles to analyze and interpret data, using analytic and computer-based techniques.

UNCW Goal 1

Method: Multiple-choice questions were developed to assess content knowledge.

Administration: Questions are administered in CSC 555 Data Management Systems at the end of their program. The MSCSIS faculty committee reviews the data and initiates any changes.

No obvious trends over time were apparent. However, correct responses to the question regarding Clustered indexes were very low.

Additional readings on clustered indexes will be assigned in the MIS555 class.

SLO5: Graduates will demonstrate effective communication through written and oral presentations.

UNCW Goal 1

A: Written Communication

Method: A capstone assessment survey was developed for all projects for evaluation, including thesis.

Administration: The faculty team evaluates the work using the assessment survey to determine if effective written communication was evident. This is conducted when the major culminating project for the degree is completed. The MSCSIS faculty committee reviews the data and initiates any changes

Question 7 of the overall capstone evaluation form is the only communication question on the rubric. No obvious trends appear in the data. However, anecdotal evidence suggests oral communication skills can be improved.

More granular assessment questions will be added to measure oral and written components. Extra-curricular communication skills sessions will be delivered prior to Career Night.

SLO6: Graduates will be exposed to a variety of advanced technology communications tools, such as Web conferencing, wikis, and social networking software.

UNCW Goal 1

Method: Multiple-choice questions were developed to assess content knowledge.

Administration: Assessment is administered by faculty member in the CSC 544 Network Programming course every fall semester to all students. The MSCSIS faculty committee reviews the data and initiates any changes

Rubric scores showed no clear trend over time. However, the scores are generally very high, with many questions scoring 100%.

A new set of questions should be developed that will more accurately assess this student learning outcome.

Appendix A: MSCSIS Program Goals

Information Systems / MS Computer Science Information Systems

Advisory Board Meeting

Tuesday, September 21, 2010

Madeline Suite

5:15 to 7:30 p.m.

Agenda (Key Items)

1. Update on success of WITX Conference

2. Introduction of Guests / Business and Student

3. Career Day (November 16, 2010) Update, seek speakers, interview tables

4. Breakouts to seek input from the advisory board as we start our 5 year review of the MS CSIS program. Information below is intended as background materials in advance of the meeting.

Review of MS CSIS Program

Overview of Program:

The Information Systems & Operations Management department from the Cameron School of Business and the Computer Science department from the College of Arts and Sciences began the Master of Science in Computer Science and Information Systems in Fall 2005. The MSCSIS is an intensive graduate program aimed at preparing the student to take on leadership roles in the development and implementation of computer and information systems. The curriculum requires 36 semester hours. There are six required core courses providing a mix of theoretical underpinning, technical skills and information technology perspectives. Students can choose elective courses to provide opportunity for additional study in a variety of areas. The program culminates with a capstone experience that can be an integrative project or a thesis.

Experienced professionals and undergraduates from both disciplines will enable significant classroom sharing of real world and theoretical knowledge.

Core Course Topics:

MIS 534. Information Security Management

· Security Architecture and Models

· Telecommunications and Network Security

· Business Continuity Planning and Disaster Recovery

· Physical Security, including securing network devices

· Authentication, authorization, and accounting

· Implementing firewall technologies, intrusion prevention and VPN

· Cryptographic systems

MIS 555. Database Management Systems

· Structured Query Language

· Data Modeling

· Indexing & Balanced Trees

· Transaction Management

· DB Management (Hardware, Backup, Recovery, Maintenance, etc.)

MIS 565. Analysis, Modeling and Design

· System development methodologies including the cycle and iterative design models: development phases including system selection and planning, analysis, logical design, physical design, implementation and maintenance

· Techniques for requirements, determination, collection and organization

· Team organization and communication; interviewing, presentation, design and delivery; group dynamics and leadership.

· Project feasibility assessment and risk analysis

· Design reviews and structured walkthroughs

· Human computer interaction (HCI)

· Software and system quality metrics

· Software package evaluation and acquisition, open source, managing, external relationships and procurement.

· Currency in the field of Information Technology

· Enhanced presentations/writing skills

CSC 532. Design and Analysis of Algorithms I

· Design of efficient computer algorithms.

· Algorithms for sorting, searching, pattern matching, and polynomial arithmetic, cryptography.

· The study of greedy algorithms, graph algorithms.

CSC 544. Network Programming

· TCP/IP Protocols: SMTP, HTTP, ARP, TCP, UDP, IP, DNS, ICMP, DHCP, SNMP

· Implementation of network and distributed programming concepts

· Client/server application programming

· Networking programming interfaces (specifically raw sockets and socket APIs)

· Hands on experience with network components (significant laboratory component)

CSC 550. Software Engineering

· Reading, critiquing and summarizing research literature (4-8 weeks)

· Software architecture and design

· UML modeling and the UML metamodel

· Aspect-oriented software engineering

· Model-driven software development

Elective Courses Offered:

MIS 513. (MBA 513) Information Analysis and Management

CSC 515. (415) Artificial Intelligence.

CSC 517. Symbolic Artificial Intelligence

CSC 520. Digital Image Processing

CSC 421/521. Computer Gaming

CSC 537. (437) Parallel Computing

CSC 546. (446) Grid Computing

MIS 560. Data Mining

MIS 567. Software Architecture and Development Practices

POM 572. Project Management

MIS 575. E-Strategies and Implementation

CSC 577. Pattern Recognition

MIS 587. (CSC 587) Systems Simulation

CSC 591. (MIS 591) Directed Independent Study

CSC 592. (MIS 592) Topics in Computing

CSC 594. (MIS 594) Research Project

CSC 595. (MIS 595) Research Seminar

CSC 598. (MIS 598) Internship

CSC 599. (MIS 599) Thesis

Capstone Experience:

Option 1 - Research Project

This option requires at least 36 semester hours of graduate credit, with three credit hours for the project (CSC 594 or MIS 594). Under this option, the student is required to complete a three hour research project under the direction of a graduate advisory committee. This project could involve the development of software, work on a project (potentially part of a team), independent research, or some other scholarly pursuit. The outcome includes a technical paper written by the student and an oral defense acceptable to the student's advisory committee. In the oral defense, the student is responsible for the domain of the research project as well as the program coursework.

Option 2 - Thesis

This option requires at least 36 semester hours of graduate credit, with six credit hours for the thesis (CSC 599 or MIS 599). Each student must present and defend a thesis, based on original research, acceptable to the student's advisory committee, prior to graduation. In the oral defense, the student is responsible for the domain of the research effort as well as the program coursework. The thesis defense is open to the public.

List of Capstone/Thesis Completed:

Seiken Higashionna, Constructing a 3D morphable face from a single picture by establishing a correspondence from 2D active appearance model parameters, July 16, 2010

Maz Boddoohi, An Evaluation of Software Architectures, May 3, 2010

Christopher Cotton, Rez-o-lution: Ticket Management System, April 30, 2010

Matthew Ratliff, Active Appearance Models for Affect Recognition using Facial Expressions, April 23, 2010

Parker Moran, Advancement of Academic Research Computing at UNCW, April 16, 2010

Jerry Martin, Suppressing Independent Loops in Packing/Unpacking Loop Nests to Reduce Message Size for Message-Passing Code, April 14, 2010

Maurice Benson,Using 3D Video Game Scenarios and Artificial Neural Networks to Classify Brain States for a Brain Computer Interface, March 30, 2010

Camilo Alvarez, iTour: A System for Self-Guided Virtual Campus Tours of UNCW, December 8, 2009

Matt Boykin, Utilization of Automation to Deliver Historical Economic Data to Customers through the Use of Web Technologies, December 3, 2009

Matt Hernandez, Determining Improvements to IT Systems through Business Service Management while Calculating, Through Time Savings (or Fractional Employee Reduction), the Business Value of IT Investments, December 1, 2009

Matt Mascherin, Venture Business Plan for E-Commerce Business, December 1, 2009

Robert Harrison, A Low-Cost Tele-Operated Robotic Platform, November 30, 2009

Casey Tucker, GNU Radio and the USRP as a Solution for Remote Emergency Monitoring, November 11, 2009

Royce Nobles, Evaluation of Spelling Correction and Concept-based Searching Models in a Data Entry Application, June 25, 2009

Sarah Peck, Analysis and Implementation of an Assurance of Learning System for the Cameron School of Business, May 13, 2009

Justin Denning, A Quantitative Analysis of SQL Server 2008 Constructs, May 1, 2009

Kevin Matthews, Development and Evaluation of an Adaptive Grading/Learning System (AGLS), December 11, 2008

Steve Sutton, Cipher-N -- a Secure, Web-based Document Exchange Service, December 8, 2008

William Shipman, CommunityTips.org: A system for Anonymous Tipping, October 30, 2008

Max Rupplin, DDAS: Distributed Data Analysis System, June 13, 2008

Josh Tobey, Utilizing Web Technologies to Provide Historical Data Relative to the Economic Health of Southeastern North Carolina, May 8, 2008

James G. Huff, An Applicable Approach to Signal Analysis and Peak Detection, May 7, 2008

Ryan Renninger, Analysis and Implementation of a Financial Budgeting System in a Corporate Environment, April 25, 2008

Allen Rawls, A Systematic Approach for Improving Predicted Arrival Time Using Historical Data in Absence of Schedule Reliability, April 16, 2008

Daniel Rayburn-Reeves, Disambiguating Human Spoken Diary Entries Using Context Information, April 4, 2008

Shaun Border, Communication Between Outlook Mobile Services and Mobile Devices, November 19, 2007

Alisha Oliver, Exploring Methods to Justify Projects with Intangible Benefits, November 14, 2007

Eric Harris, Extending GridNexus and JXPL to Support the Visual Assembly of Web Services, July 12, 2007

Ryan Wilkins, Neurocognitive Inspired Hierachical Face Recognition System, May 10, 2007

Chris Holtsford, A Solution for Community Development, May 2, 2007

Employers of Graduates:

American Eagle Chicago IL

Deloitte Touche Atlanta GA

GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Wilmington NC

New Hanover Regional Medical Wilmington NC

Corning Wilmington NC

ATMC Shalotte NC

PPD Wilmington NC

Safe Data Inc Wallace NC

VisionAir Wilmington NC

United Advisors Wilmington NC

The Coastal Companies Holden Beach NC

Health Care Software Farmingdale NJ

Triumph Interactive Wilmington NC

W. T. Cox Subscriptions Wilmington NC

Grant Thornton Raleigh NC

TranS1 Wilmington NC

AT&T Charlotte NC

UNCW Wilmington NC

Pricewaterhouse Coopers Washington DC

Specialty Soft Wilmington NC

Cape Fear Community College Wilmington NC

94% of graduates have positions within their field or are attending graduate school (1 graduate in PhD program) within 2 months of graduation. Average Starting Salary: $54,545

Review of MS CSIS Program

BREAKOUTS

Breakout sessions organized into the following groups:

Core Curriculum:

1. Review the core course topic lists.

2. Is there anything missing?

3. Are the topics relevant today?

Selection of Electives:

1. Review the electives offered.

2. Are there any elective courses that are missing?

3. Are the courses relevant today?

4. How should we assess the value of our programs?

Service Learning / Community Involvement / Project Theses

1. Internships are strongly encouraged in the program.

2. What can we do to get more students placed?

3. How should internships be assessed?

4. Review the projects/theses completed.

5. Are the projects relevant today?

6. How do we involve the community / mentor relationship

Appendix B: MSCSIS SLO1 Findings

Content Knowledge Assessment Results, Spring 2011

CSC 532

Questions and Answers

Spring 2009 Percentage Correct (N=1)

Spring 2011 Percentage Correct (N=8)

1)

Is the following true or false?

0.0%

50.0%

f(n) = O(g(n)) Implies g(n) = O(f(n))

a)

True

b)

False

2)

Is the following true or false?

100.0%

25.0%

f(n) = O(g(n)) implies g(n) = Ω(f(n))

a)

True

b)

False

3)

What is the O() complexity for the following function. Give your answer as a function of n.

100.0%

62.0%

float PiPower(n)

{

int I = 1;

float prod = 3.14;

while (I < n)

{

prod = prod * prod;

I = 2 * I;

}

return (prod);

}

a)

O(n)

b)

O(n^2)

c)

O(n^3)

d)

O(log n)

4)

What is the O() complexity for the followng segment of program which multiplies two matrices a and b (resident in 2-d arrays) to find the result matric in c.

100.0%

75.0%

int i=0, j=0, k=0;

float a[n][n], b[n][n], c[n][n];

for (i=0; i

for (j=0; j

for (k=0;k

c[I, j ]=c[I,j] +a{I,k}*b[k,j];

a)

O(n)

b)

O(n^2)

c)

O(n^3)

d)

O(log n)

5)

The two most common algorithms (Prim and Kruskal Algorithms) to solve Minimum Spanning Tree problem belong to which of the following class of techniques.

100.0%

100.0%

a)

Dynamic Programming

b)

Divide and Conquer

c)

Greedy

6)

Which of the following characterizes the applicability of Dynamic Programming Techniques to solve problems?

100.0%

75.0%

a)

Solution of the problem is always composed of the solutions of two almost equal sized sub problems

b)

Solution of the problem uses solution of sub-problems which have been solved earlier.

c)

Problem can be formulated by a set of linear inequality constraints and the objective is to optimize a linear function.

7)

Write a recurrence for the running time T(n) of f(n), and solve that recurrence. Assume that addition can be done in constant time.

0.0%

50.0%

def f(n):

if n ==1:

return 1

else:

return f(n-1)+f(n-1)

a)

T(n)=T(n-1)+T(n-1) +Ѳ(1)

b)

T(n)=T(n-1)+Ѳ(1)

c)

T(n)=T(n-1)

d)

T(n)=Ѳ(1)

8)

Decide whether you think the following statement is true or false.

0.0%

50.0%

In a flow network which has maximum flow from node s to node t the flow across any s-t cut (no matter which cut is considered) is the same.

a)

True

b)

False

9)

Which of the following characterizes the applicability of Linear Programming Technique to solve problems?

100.0%

88.0%

a)

Solution of the problem is always composed of the solution of two almost equal sized sub problems

b)

Solution of the problem uses solution of sub-problems which have been solved earlier.

c)

Problem can be formulated by a set of linear inequality constraints and the objective is to optimize a linear function.

10)

Decide whether you think the following statement is true or false.

0.0%

62.0%

Let G be a flow market, with a source s and a sink t, and a positive integer capacity c(e) on every edge e. If it is a maximum flow in G, then f saturates every edge out of s with flow (I.e. for all edges e out of s, we have f(e)=c(e) ).

a)

True

b)

False

Total

60.0%

63.8%

Appendix C: MSCSIS SLO2 Findings

Ethics Assessment Results, Spring 2011

Questions and Answers

Spring 09 Percentage Correct (N=9)

Spring 10 Percentage Correct (N=5)

Spring 11 Percentage Correct (N=24)

1

Identifying, assessing, and reducing risk to an acceptable level and maintaining the achieved level is referred to as _________.

88.89%

100.00%

91.7%

a.

Risk planning

b.

Risk management

c.

Security management

d.

Operations management

2

What are the three fundamental principles (AIC triad) that serve as a security program’s objectives?

66.67%

100.00%

95.8%

a.

Confidentiality, ignorance and Authenticity

b.

Collision, Integrity and Availability

c.

Confidentiality, Integrity and Availability

d.

Consistency, Integrity and Authorization

3

The steps of an access control model should follow which logical flow?

66.67%

60.00%

70.8%

a.

Identification, authorization, authentication, accountability

b.

Authorization, authentication, accountability, identification

c.

Identification, authentication, authorization, accountability

d.

Identification, accountability, authentication, authorization

4

What is the new program/standard that evaluates the computer security in the United States?

33.33%

60.00%

33.3%

a.

TCSEC

b.

Common criteria

c.

National security standards

d.

ITSEC

5

Which of the following items is Not considered a preventive physical control?

100.00%

80.00%

91.7%

a.

Fencing

b.

Access logs

c.

Security guards

d.

Security dogs

6

A function that takes a variable-length string and creates a fixed-length value is called ______.

100.00%

80.00%

58.3%

a.

One-way hash

b.

Digital signature

c.

PKI

d.

Encryption

7

When considering an IT system Development life-cycle, security should be:

100.00%

80.00%

87.5%

a.

Mostly considered during the initiation phase

b.

Mostly considered during the development phase

c.

Treated as an integral part of the overall system design

d.

Add once the design is completed

8

Preparing for a damaging event before it takes place in order to minimize loss and ensure that the business continues to operate is the definition of _______?

100.00%

100.00%

95.8%

a.

Business impact analysis

b.

Business continuity planning

c.

Recovery planning

d.

Emergency response

9

A hospital is trying to select a facility backup option. They want to ensure no downtime and extremely focused on contingency planning and testing capability through the year. Which of the following alternatives would serve the hospital best?

44.44%

60.00%

20.8%

a.

Warm site

b.

Hot site

c.

Reciprocal agreement

d.

Redundant site

10

Which of the following is the science of studying and breaking encryption algorithms and cryptosystem?

100.00%

80.00%

50.0%

a.

Cryptography

b.

Encryption

c.

Monoalphabetic substitution

d.

Cryptoanalysis

Total

80.00%

80.00%

69.6%

Appendix D: MSCSIS SLO3 Findings

Content Knowledge Assessment Results, Spring 2011

Questions and Answers

Fall 09 Percentage Correct (N=13)

Spring 10 Percentage Correct (N=6)

Spring 11 Percentage Correct (N=5)

1)

In general, academics and professionals read research literature for all but one of the following reasons.

69.23%

66.67%

80.00%

a)

Gain breadth of understanding across many areas.

b)

Gain depth of understanding in specific areas.

c)

Gain understanding of what has been done.

d)

Gain understanding of what cannot be done.

2)

Which of these questions is least important in assessing research articles?

38.46%

16.67%

60.00%

a)

What is the contribution or significance of the paper?

b)

What problem is being investigated?

c)

What is the primary research area of the author(s)?

d)

What kind of paper is it?

3)

To which scientist is the origin of separation of concerns principle normally attributed?

100.00%

83.33%

60.00%

a)

Barry Boehm

b)

Fred Brooks

c)

E. W. Dijkstra

d)

D. L. Parnas

4)

Which of the following is not a fundamental AOSD concept

92.31%

83.33%

100.00%

a)

Advice

b)

Component

c)

Join point

d)

Weaving

5)

A meta-model is:

100.00%

100.00%

80.00%

a)

A model that describes other models.

b)

A description of the four levels of the UML.

c)

An instance of a correct model.

d)

Any analysis of a model from a specific perspective.

6)

Software testing shows all of the following, except:

46.15%

100.00%

40.00%

a)

The presence of faults.

b)

The absence of faults.

c)

Test effectiveness.

d)

Test efficiency.

7)

It is difficult to find all the bugs in large complex software because:

92.31%

100.00%

60.00%

a)

The software testers may not know what to do.

b)

The tools may be inappropriate for the testing tasks.

c)

Exhaustive testing is not possible.

d)

Testing is expensive.

8)

Validation is:

38.46%

50.00%

20.00%

a)

Determining if developers are building a software artefact according to user requirements.

b)

Determining if developers are building a software artefact according to industry standards.

c)

Determining if developers are building a software artefact according to its specification.

d)

Making sure users know what they want.

9)

A test oracle is:

53.85%

83.33%

60.00%

a)

A list of expected and actual results.

b)

A list of prefix values, input, postfix values and expected output.

c)

The description of the purpose of a set of tests.

d)

The set of predicted results for a set of tests.

10)

Identify the concept that is not fundamental to model-driven software development.

30.77%

33.33%

20.00%

a)

Metamodeling

b)

UML

c)

Diagrams

d)

Model transformations

Total

66.15%

71.67%

58.00%

Appendix E: MSCSIS SLO4 Findings

Content Knowledge Assessment Results, MIS 555, Fall 2010

Question & Answers

Fall 2008 (N=7)

Fall 2010 (N=13)

1. The main purpose of referential integrity constraints in a relational database is to:

Maintain data quality

57%

54%

2. Structured Query Language is a(n):

All of the above

57%

77%

3. A foreign key must:

Refer to a valid value in the referenced table

43%

54%

4. As compared to other data structures, Balanced Trees are used in relational databases because they:

Reduce physical data access

86%

100%

5. Data fragmentation is helpful in what type of system?

Online transaction processing (OLTP)

100%

69%

6. The "I" in the ACID transaction requirements stands for:

Independent

100%

100%

7. One purpose of an SQL view is to:

Control user access to data

100%

85%

8. Transaction collisions without loss of data integrity are accomplished with:

Locks

100%

100%

9. Relational databases were created to:

Reduce program-data dependence

57%

38%

10. Clustered indexes perform especially well on:

Range conditions in the where clause

71%

62%

Appendix F: MSCSIS SLO5 Findings

1. Written Communication Assessment Results, Spring 2011

Category

Spring 2007 (N=6)

Summer 2007 (N=3)

Fall 2007 (N=6)

Spring 2008 (N=14)

Summer 2008 (N=3)

Fall 2008 (N=11)

Spring 2009 (N=10)

Fall 2009 (N=18)

Spring 2010 (N=16)

Summer 2010 (N=3)

Fall 2010 (N=6)

Spring 2011 (N=8)

Summer 2011 (N=9)

Fall 2011 (N=15)

Spring 2012 (N=39)

Summer 2012 (N=7)

Select and Narrow Topic for Research or Projects

3.83

5.00

4.33

4.14

4.00

4.36

4.40

4.26

4.00

3.67

4.17

3.63

4.33

4.07

4.74

4.71

Use Computer Lit Skills/Info Databases for Research

4.00

4.67

4.17

3.71

2.33

4.18

4.30

4.11

4.00

4.00

4.00

3.13

4.33

3.93

3.74

4.71

Independently Read CS and IS Papers

3.83

4.67

4.17

3.64

2.50

3.55

4.20

4.11

3.88

3.33

4.17

3.25

4.33

3.79

3.44

4.71

Apply Concepts, Principles, and Theories

4.50

4.67

4.17

4.43

4.33

4.45

4.70

4.11

4.31

4.00

4.33

3.88

4.89

4.13

3.82

4.57

Critically Analyze, Evaluate Project or Thesis Results

4.33

4.33

3.83

4.21

3.67

4.09

4.60

4.16

4.06

3.33

4.00

3.00

4.78

3.93

3.56

4.57

Assess Conclusions and Implications of Research or Project

4.50

4.67

4.20

4.14

4.00

4.36

4.40

4.37

4.13

3.33

4.00

3.25

4.44

4.07

3.49

4.57

Present Research/Proj. Findings (Clear, Coherent, Succinct)

4.33

4.33

4.17

4.14

3.33

4.09

4.30

4.00

4.06

3.33

4.17

3.63

4.78

3.87

3.72

4.43

Evaluate Work of Others Objectively and Fairly

3.60

4.00

3.80

3.93

2.50

4.00

4.22

3.89

3.88

3.33

3.83

3.38

4.33

3.79

3.49

4.43

Analyze Bus. User's Needs/Develop Solution

4.17

4.33

4.33

4.31

3.00

4.36

4.30

4.26

3.69

3.00

2.60

3.38

4.33

3.86

3.62

4.14

Combine CS/IS Learning for Research or Bus. Opportunities

4.33

4.00

4.20

4.23

3.33

4.36

4.70

4.32

3.73

3.67

2.83

3.13

4.56

3.67

3.54

4.29

2. Oral Communication Assessment Results

Fall 2010

Spring 2009

Appendix G: MSCSIS Goal 6 Findings

Content Knowledge Assessment Results, Fall 2010

Question & Answers

Fall 2008 % Correct (N=13)

Fall 2009 % Correct (N=2)

Fall 2010 % Correct (N=15)

1. The main difference between TCP and UDP is:

TCP is connection-oriented and UDP is connectionless

69%

100%

87%

2. World Wide Web technologies include:

All of the above

92%

50%

100%

3. When developing a network application, the primary programming interface is:

Sockets

92%

100%

87%

4. Examples of distributed computing/programming paradigms include:

All of the above

62%

100%

47%

5. Which of the following are social networking sites:

All of the above

92%

100%

93%

6. Wireshark is an example of:

Network Sniffer

100%

100%

100%

7. ARP refers to:

Address Resolution Protocol

100%

100%

93%

8. DNS refers to:

Domain Name System

92%

100%

87%

9. Network security technologies include:

All of the above

92%

50%

73%

10. Database management systems used for web programming include:

All of the above

92%

100%

93%

CSC/MIS 594 & 599 Capstone Assessment Results

Spring 2007 (N=6)Select and Narrow Topic for Research or ProjectsUse Computer Lit Skills/Info Databases for Research Independently Read CS and IS PapersApply Concepts, Principles, and Theories Critically Analyze, Evaluate Project or Thesis ResultsAssess Conclusions and Implications of Research or Project Present Research/Proj. Findings (Clear, Coherent, Succinct) Evaluate Work of Others Objectively and Fairly Analyze Bus. User's Needs/Develop SolutionCombine CS/IS Learning for Research or Bus. Opportunities3.833333333333333543.83333333333333354.54.3333333333333334.54.3333333333333333.64.1666666666666674.333333333333333Summer 2007 (N=3)Select and Narrow Topic for Research or ProjectsUse Computer Lit Skills/Info Databases for Research Independently Read CS and IS PapersApply Concepts, Principles, and Theories Critically Analyze, Evaluate Project or Thesis ResultsAssess Conclusions and Implications of Research or Project Present Research/Proj. Findings (Clear, Coherent, Succinct) Evaluate Work of Others Objectively and Fairly Analyze Bus. User's Needs/Develop SolutionCombine CS/IS Learning for Research or Bus. Opportunities54.6666666666666674.6666666666666674.6666666666666674.3333333333333334.6666666666666674.33333333333333344.3333333333333334Fall 2007 (N=6)Select and Narrow Topic for Research or ProjectsUse Computer Lit Skills/Info Databases for Research Independently Read CS and IS PapersApply Concepts, Principles, and Theories Critically Analyze, Evaluate Project or Thesis ResultsAssess Conclusions and Implications of Research or Project Present Research/Proj. Findings (Clear, Coherent, Succinct) Evaluate Work of Others Objectively and Fairly Analyze Bus. User's Needs/Develop SolutionCombine CS/IS Learning for Research or Bus. Opportunities4.3333333333333334.1666666666666674.1666666666666674.1666666666666673.83333333333333354.24.1666666666666673.84.3333333333333334.2Spring 2008 (N=14)Select and Narrow Topic for Research or ProjectsUse Computer Lit Skills/Info Databases for Research Independently Read CS and IS PapersApply Concepts, Principles, and Theories Critically Analyze, Evaluate Project or Thesis ResultsAssess Conclusions and Implications of Research or Project Present Research/Proj. Findings (Clear, Coherent, Succinct) Evaluate Work of Others Objectively and Fairly Analyze Bus. User's Needs/Develop SolutionCombine CS/IS Learning for Research or Bus. Opportunities4.14285714285714323.71428571428571443.64285714285714284.42857142857142884.21428571428571444.14285714285714324.14285714285714323.92857142857142844.30769230769230754.2307692307692308Summer 2008 (N=3)Select and Narrow Topic for Research or ProjectsUse Computer Lit Skills/Info Databases for Research Independently Read CS and IS PapersApply Concepts, Principles, and Theories Critically Analyze, Evaluate Project or Thesis ResultsAssess Conclusions and Implications of Research or Project Present Research/Proj. Findings (Clear, Coherent, Succinct) Evaluate Work of Others Objectively and Fairly Analyze Bus. User's Needs/Develop SolutionCombine CS/IS Learning for Research or Bus. Opportunities42.33333333333333352.54.3333333333333333.666666666666666543.33333333333333352.533.3333333333333335Fall 2008 (N=11)Select and Narrow Topic for Research or ProjectsUse Computer Lit Skills/Info Databases for Research Independently Read CS and IS PapersApply Concepts, Principles, and Theories Critically Analyze, Evaluate Project or Thesis ResultsAssess Conclusions and Implications of Research or Project Present Research/Proj. Findings (Clear, Coherent, Succinct) Evaluate Work of Others Objectively and Fairly Analyze Bus. User's Needs/Develop SolutionCombine CS/IS Learning for Research or Bus. Opportunities4.36363636363636334.18181818181818173.54545454545454544.45454545454545414.09090909090909084.36363636363636334.090909090909090844.36363636363636334.3636363636363633Spring 2009 (N=10)Select and Narrow Topic for Research or ProjectsUse Computer Lit Skills/Info Databases for Research Independently Read CS and IS PapersApply Concepts, Principles, and Theories Critically Analyze, Evaluate Project or Thesis ResultsAssess Conclusions and Implications of Research or Project Present Research/Proj. Findings (Clear, Coherent, Succinct) Evaluate Work of Others Objectively and Fairly Analyze Bus. User's Needs/Develop SolutionCombine CS/IS Learning for Research or Bus. Opportunities4.40000000000000044.34.24.74.59999999999999964.40000000000000044.34.22222222222222234.34.7Fall 2009 (N=18)Select and Narrow Topic for Research or ProjectsUse Computer Lit Skills/Info Databases for Research Independently Read CS and IS PapersApply Concepts, Principles, and Theories Critically Analyze, Evaluate Project or Thesis ResultsAssess Conclusions and Implications of Research or Project Present Research/Proj. Findings (Clear, Coherent, Succinct) Evaluate Work of Others Objectively and Fairly Analyze Bus. User's Needs/Develop SolutionCombine CS/IS Learning for Research or Bus. Opportunities4.26315789473684254.10526315789473724.11111111111111074.11111111111111074.15789473684210534.368421052631578843.89473684210526334.26315789473684254.3157894736842106Spring 2010 (N=16)Select and Narrow Topic for Research or ProjectsUse Computer Lit Skills/Info Databases for Research Independently Read CS and IS PapersApply Concepts, Principles, and Theories Critically Analyze, Evaluate Project or Thesis ResultsAssess Conclusions and Implications of Research or Project Present Research/Proj. Findings (Clear, Coherent, Succinct) Evaluate Work of Others Objectively and Fairly Analyze Bus. User's Needs/Develop SolutionCombine CS/IS Learning for Research or Bus. Opportunities443.8754.31254.06254.1254.06253.8753.68753.7333333333333334Summer 2010 (N=3)Select and Narrow Topic for Research or ProjectsUse Computer Lit Skills/Info Databases for Research Independently Read CS and IS PapersApply Concepts, Principles, and Theories Critically Analyze, Evaluate Project or Thesis ResultsAssess Conclusions and Implications of Research or Project Present Research/Proj. Findings (Clear, Coherent, Succinct) Evaluate Work of Others Objectively and Fairly Analyze Bus. User's Needs/Develop SolutionCombine CS/IS Learning for Research or Bus. Opportunities3.666666666666666543.333333333333333543.33333333333333353.33333333333333353.33333333333333353.333333333333333533.6666666666666665Fall 2010 (N=6)Select and Narrow Topic for Research or ProjectsUse Computer Lit Skills/Info Databases for Research Independently Read CS and IS PapersApply Concepts, Principles, and Theories Critically Analyze, Evaluate Project or Thesis ResultsAssess Conclusions and Implications of Research or Project Present Research/Proj. Findings (Clear, Coherent, Succinct) Evaluate Work of Others Objectively and Fairly Analyze Bus. User's Needs/Develop SolutionCombine CS/IS Learning for Research or Bus. Opportunities4.16666666666666744.1666666666666674.333333333333333444.1666666666666673.83333333333333352.62.8333333333333335Spring 2011 (N=8)Select and Narrow Topic for Research or ProjectsUse Computer Lit Skills/Info Databases for Research Independently Read CS and IS PapersApply Concepts, Principles, and Theories Critically Analyze, Evaluate Project or Thesis ResultsAssess Conclusions and Implications of Research or Project Present Research/Proj. Findings (Clear, Coherent, Succinct) Evaluate Work of Others Objectively and Fairly Analyze Bus. User's Needs/Develop SolutionCombine CS/IS Learning for Research or Bus. Opportunities3.6253.1253.253.87533.253.6253.3753.3753.125Summer 2011 (N=9)Select and Narrow Topic for Research or ProjectsUse Computer Lit Skills/Info Databases for Research Independently Read CS and IS PapersApply Concepts, Principles, and Theories Critically Analyze, Evaluate Project or Thesis ResultsAssess Conclusions and Implications of Research or Project Present Research/Proj. Findings (Clear, Coherent, Succinct) Evaluate Work of Others Objectively and Fairly Analyze Bus. User's Needs/Develop SolutionCombine CS/IS Learning for Research or Bus. Opportunities4.3333333333333334.3333333333333334.3333333333333334.88888888888888934.77777777777777774.44444444444444464.77777777777777774.3333333333333334.3333333333333334.5555555555555554Fall 2011 (N=15)Select and Narrow Topic for Research or ProjectsUse Computer Lit Skills/Info Databases for Research Independently Read CS and IS PapersApply Concepts, Principles, and Theories Critically Analyze, Evaluate Project or Thesis ResultsAssess Conclusions and Implications of Research or Project Present Research/Proj. Findings (Clear, Coherent, Succinct) Evaluate Work of Others Objectively and Fairly Analyze Bus. User's Needs/Develop SolutionCombine CS/IS Learning for Research or Bus. Opportunities4.06666666666666643.93333333333333313.78571428571428564.13333333333333373.93333333333333314.06666666666666643.86666666666666673.78571428571428563.85714285714285723.6666666666666665Spring 2012 (N=39)Select and Narrow Topic for Research or ProjectsUse Computer Lit Skills/Info Databases for Research Independently Read CS and IS PapersApply Concepts, Principles, and Theories Critically Analyze, Evaluate Project or Thesis ResultsAssess Conclusions and Implications of Research or Project Present Research/Proj. Findings (Clear, Coherent, Succinct) Evaluate Work of Others Objectively and Fairly Analyze Bus. User's Needs/Develop SolutionCombine CS/IS Learning for Research or Bus. Opportunities4.74358974358974363.74358974358974363.43589743589743573.82051282051282073.56410256410256433.48717948717948723.71794871794871813.48717948717948723.61538461538461543.5384615384615383Summer 2012 (N=7)Select and Narrow Topic for Research or ProjectsUse Computer Lit Skills/Info Databases for Research Independently Read CS and IS PapersApply Concepts, Principles, and Theories Critically Analyze, Evaluate Project or Thesis ResultsAssess Conclusions and Implications of Research or Project Present Research/Proj. Findings (Clear, Coherent, Succinct) Evaluate Work of Others Objectively and Fairly Analyze Bus. User's Needs/Develop SolutionCombine CS/IS Learning for Research or Bus. Opportunities4.71428571428571444.71428571428571444.71428571428571444.57142857142857124.57142857142857124.57142857142857124.42857142857142884.42857142857142884.14285714285714324.2857142857142856

MIS 565 Oral Communication Assessment

Fall 2008Technical KnowledgePresentation MaterialsPresentation StylePresenter Presence4.57142857142857123.85714285714285723.42857142857143422.7142857142857144Fall 2009Technical KnowledgePresentation MaterialsPresentation StylePresenter Presence4.41666666666667143.41666666666666072.41666666666666072.1666666666666665Fall 2010Technical KnowledgePresentation MaterialsPresentation StylePresenter Presence4.53.93.242.7600000000000002