Teaching Deaf Learners

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This presentation was delivered at the first international conference on teaching deaf learners, held in Amsterdam, 19-21 March 2014. The first part is by Caselli and Rinaldi and is concerned with language development of deaf children in the era of cochlear implants. The second part is by Gennari with contributions by Melonio and is concerned with technology enhanced learning for deaf learners.

Transcript of Teaching Deaf Learners

  • 1. INTERMEZZO Now, given what we know about the context deaf learners learn in, and deaf learners characteristics, can we improve how to teach deaf learners via technology? If yes, how? See the next part of the presentation.
  • 2. 1st International Conference onTeaching Deaf Learners Amsterdam, NL, 19-21 March 2014 OUTLINE 1. Technology enhanced learning: what 2. From requirements to design guidelines 3. Evaluation by examples 4. Conclusions
  • 3. TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED LEARNING: WHAT PART I
  • 4. 1st International Conference onTeaching Deaf Learners Amsterdam, NL, 19-21 March 2014 TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED LEARNING (TEL) Good TEL should support its learners learning styles
  • 5. 1st International Conference onTeaching Deaf Learners Amsterdam, NL, 19-21 March 2014 TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED LEARNING (TEL) Good TEL should support its learners learning styles
  • 6. 1st International Conference onTeaching Deaf Learners Amsterdam, NL, 19-21 March 2014 TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED LEARNING (TEL) Good TEL should support its learners learning styles
  • 7. 1st International Conference onTeaching Deaf Learners Amsterdam, NL, 19-21 March 2014 TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED LEARNING (TEL) Good TEL should support its learners learning styles
  • 8. 1st International Conference onTeaching Deaf Learners Amsterdam, NL, 19-21 March 2014 TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED LEARNING (TEL) Good TEL should support its learners learning styles
  • 9. 1st International Conference onTeaching Deaf Learners Amsterdam, NL, 19-21 March 2014 TEL FOR ITS LEARNERS This means that good TEL for its learners promotes its learners can use it ousability (learner experience)
  • 10. 1st International Conference onTeaching Deaf Learners Amsterdam, NL, 19-21 March 2014 TEL FOR ITS LEARNERS This means that good TEL for its learners promotes its learners can use it ousability (learner experience) to disclose the door of learning opedagogical effectiveness
  • 11. 1st International Conference onTeaching Deaf Learners Amsterdam, NL, 19-21 March 2014 HOW TO DESIGN USABLE AND PEDAGOGICALLY EFFECTIVETEL
  • 12. 1st International Conference onTeaching Deaf Learners Amsterdam, NL, 19-21 March 2014 HOW TO DESIGN USABLE AND PEDAGOGICALLY EFFECTIVETEL strive for evidence-based user requirements
  • 13. 1st International Conference onTeaching Deaf Learners Amsterdam, NL, 19-21 March 2014 HOW TO DESIGN USABLE AND PEDAGOGICALLY EFFECTIVETEL strive for evidence-based user requirements design with user requirements
  • 14. 1st International Conference onTeaching Deaf Learners Amsterdam, NL, 19-21 March 2014 HOW TO DESIGN USABLE AND PEDAGOGICALLY EFFECTIVETEL strive for evidence-based user requirements design with user requirements evaluate usability and pedagogical effectiveness
  • 15. 1st International Conference onTeaching Deaf Learners Amsterdam, NL, 19-21 March 2014 HOW TO DESIGN USABLE AND PEDAGOGICALLY EFFECTIVETEL strive for evidence-based user requirements design with user requirements evaluate usability and pedagogical effectiveness
  • 16. 1st International Conference onTeaching Deaf Learners Amsterdam, NL, 19-21 March 2014 HOW TO DESIGN USABLE AND PEDAGOGICALLY EFFECTIVETEL strive for evidence-based user requirements design with user requirements evaluate usability and pedagogical effectiveness
  • 17. 1st International Conference onTeaching Deaf Learners Amsterdam, NL, 19-21 March 2014 HOW TO DESIGN USABLE AND PEDAGOGICALLY EFFECTIVETEL strive for evidence-based user requirements design with user requirements evaluate usability and pedagogical effectiveness
  • 18. HOW TO DESIGN USABLE AND PEDAGOGICALLY EFFECTIVETEL strive for evidence-based deaf requirements design with deaf requirements evaluate deaflity and pedagogical effectiveness
  • 19. From requirements to design PART II
  • 20. READING (1/2) Requirements Deaf learners seem to have problems in connecting information in text and processing long complex sentences Luke had raced past him. Ben had never been beaten before, since he only ever raced with kids who were smaller and slower than him. He wanted a rematch. NO
  • 21. Design Explanatory text, e.g., instructions, should prefer simple sentences with close referential expressions READING (1/2) Requirements Deaf learners seem to have problems in connecting information in text and processing long complex sentences Luke had raced past him. Ben had never been beaten before, since he only ever raced with kids who were smaller and slower than him. He wanted a rematch. NO
  • 22. Design Explanatory text, e.g., instructions, should prefer simple sentences with close referential expressions READING (1/2) Requirements Deaf learners seem to have problems in connecting information in text and processing long complex sentences Luke had raced past him. Ben had never been beaten before, since he only ever raced with kids who were smaller and slower than him. He wanted a rematch. NO YES Luke had raced past him. Ben had never been beaten before, since he only ever raced with kids who were smaller and slower than him. Ben wanted a rematch.
  • 23. READING (2/2) Requirements Deaf learners may miss key info if distributed or dense on the screen
  • 24. You can win 5 points if you can solve the game in 1 minute and a half. ! To solve the game, look at the episode in the centre of the screen, and move tiles into the central bucket. NO READING (2/2) Requirements Deaf learners may miss key info if distributed or dense on the screen
  • 25. You can win 5 points if you can solve the game in 1 minute and a half. ! To solve the game, look at the episode in the centre of the screen, and move tiles into the central bucket. NO Design Relevant text should be chunked by semantic proximity, and each chunk should be contiguous to its visual representation (if any) READING (2/2) Requirements Deaf learners may miss key info if distributed or dense on the screen
  • 26. You can win 5 points if you can solve the game in 1 minute and a half. ! To solve the game, look at the episode in the centre of the screen, and move tiles into the central bucket. NO Design Relevant text should be chunked by semantic proximity, and each chunk should be contiguous to its visual representation (if any) ! ! Move tiles into the central bucket ! ! ! ! YES READING (2/2) Requirements Deaf learners may miss key info if distributed or dense on the screen
  • 27. ATTENTION (1/2) Requirements Deaf individuals seem to be > better in allocating visual attention to the periphery of the visual field > more easily distracted by peripheral events NO
  • 28. ATTENTION (1/2) Requirements Deaf individuals seem to be > better in allocating visual attention to the periphery of the visual field > more easily distracted by peripheral events NO
  • 29. Design On the edge of the screen, an interface should have nothing that can distract deaf learners from their main task ATTENTION (1/2) Requirements Deaf individuals seem to be > better in allocating visual attention to the periphery of the visual field > more easily distracted by peripheral events NO
  • 30. Design On the edge of the screen, an interface should have nothing that can distract deaf learners from their main task ATTENTION (1/2) Requirements Deaf individuals seem to be > better in allocating visual attention to the periphery of the visual field > more easily distracted by peripheral events NO YES
  • 31. Requirements Wrt hearing children, deaf children show > orienting attention < selective attention = in divided attention ATTENTION (2/2)
  • 32. Requirements Wrt hearing children, deaf children show > orienting attention < selective attention = in divided attention ATTENTION (2/2)
  • 33. Requirements Wrt hearing children, deaf children show > orienting attention < selective attention = in divided attention ATTENTION (2/2) NO
  • 34. Requirements Wrt hearing children, deaf children show > orienting attention < selective attention = in divided attention ATTENTION (2/2)
  • 35. Design The tool should use: - visual clues for orienting attention - sequencing of tasks - animation for main tasks (and abstract concepts) Requirements Wrt hearing children, deaf children show > orienting attention < selective attention = in divided attention ATTENTION (2/2)
  • 36. Design The tool should use: - visual clues for orienting attention - sequencing of tasks - animation for main tasks (and abstract concepts) Requirements Wrt hearing children, deaf children show > orienting attention < selective attention = in divided attention ATTENTION (2/2)
  • 37. Design The tool should use: - visual clues for orienting attention - sequencing of tasks - animation for main tasks (and abstract concepts) Requirements Wrt hearing children, deaf children show > orienting attention < selective attention = in divided attention ATTENTION (2/2)
  • 38. Design The tool should use: - visual clues for orienting attention - sequencing of tasks - animation for main tasks (and abstract concepts) Requirements Wrt hearing children, deaf children show > orienting attention < selective attention = in divided attention ATTENTION (2/2) YES
  • 39. Requirements Young deaf children have more difficulties for serial recall and take more time for recovering attention MEMORY
  • 40. Requirements Young deaf children have more difficulties for serial recall and take more time for recovering attention Design Enforce recognition instead of recall, e.g., via coherent spatial positioning MEMORY
  • 41. Requirements Young deaf children have more difficulties for serial recall and take more time for recovering attention Design Enforce recognition instead of recall, e.g., via coherent spatial positioning MEMORY
  • 42. Evaluation ofTEL by examples Part III
  • 43. CORNERSTONE TERENCESMILE VISEL LEARNING DOMAIN
  • 44. SMILE CORNERSTONE TERENCEVISEL
  • 45. SMILE mathsandscience CORNERSTONE TERENCEVISEL
  • 46. VISEL CORNERSTONE TERENCESMILE LEARNING DOMAIN mathsandscience
  • 47. VISEL CORNERSTONE TERENCESMILE LEARNING DOMAIN mathsandscience storytelling
  • 48. CORNERSTONE mathsandscience SMILE VISEL LEARNING DOMAIN storytelling mathsandscience TERENCE
  • 49. CORNERSTONE mathsandscience SMILE VISEL LEARNING DOMAIN storytelling mathsandscience TERENCE storycomprehension
  • 50. TERENCE mathsandscience SMILE VISEL LEARNING DOMAIN storytelling mathsandscience CORNERSTONE storycomprehension
  • 51. TERENCE mathsandscience SMILE VISEL LEARNING DOMAIN storytelling mathsandscience CORNERSTONE storycomprehension storycomprehension
  • 52. SMILE VISEL CORNERSTONE TERENCE USABILITY PEDAGOGICAL EFFECTIVENESS ? ? ? ?
  • 53. SMILE VISEL CORNERSTONE TERENCE USABILITY PEDAGOGICAL EFFECTIVENESS
  • 54. CONCLUSIONS Part IV
  • 55. Requirements Deaf learners tend to like games with movement, and social tools such as social networks (2010) PREFERENCES
  • 56. Guideline TEL for learners could use captivating gestures and connect to social networks Requirements Deaf learners tend to like games with movement, and social tools such as social networks (2010) PREFERENCES
  • 57. Guideline TEL for learners could use captivating gestures and connect to social networks Requirements Deaf learners tend to like games with movement, and social tools such as social networks (2010) PREFERENCES This is consistent with the 2013 PEW findings
  • 58. 16/03/14 21:5Device Ownership Over Time | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project CLICK AND DRAG IN THE PLOT AREA TO ZOOM IN Cellphone Smartphone eBook Reader Tablet Computer Desktop or laptop computer mp3 player Game console 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 0 100 25 50 75 PEW RESEARCH CENTER People spent more time online, performed more activities, watched more video, and themselves become content creators social network usage for millenia
  • 59. 16/03/14 21:5Device Ownership Over Time | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project CLICK AND DRAG IN THE PLOT AREA TO ZOOM IN Cellphone Smartphone eBook Reader Tablet Computer Desktop or laptop computer mp3 player Game console 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 0 100 25 50 75 PEW RESEARCH CENTER People spent more time online, performed more activities, watched more video, and themselves become content creators In brief new TEL should (also) promote quality social experience for deaf learners, for creating, sharing and analysing learning contents... social network usage for millenia
  • 60. 16/03/14 21:5Device Ownership Over Time | Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Project CLICK AND DRAG IN THE PLOT AREA TO ZOOM IN Cellphone Smartphone eBook Reader Tablet Computer Desktop or laptop computer mp3 player Game console 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 0 100 25 50 75 PEW RESEARCH CENTER People spent more time online, performed more activities, watched more video, and themselves become content creators In brief new TEL should (also) promote quality social experience for deaf learners, for creating, sharing and analysing learning contents... ... so that the "future for deaf learners stays open" via TEL as welland teachers' active involvement at school social network usage for millenia
  • 61. 1st International Conference onTeaching Deaf Learners Amsterdam, NL, 19-21 March 2014 H. Knoors and M. Marschark (2014). Multimedia-Enhanced, Computer-Assisted Learning for Deaf Students. Ch. 10 of Teaching Deaf Learners. Oxford Press. ! TERENCE (http://www.terenceproject.eu): D1.2 for preferences in 2011, D7.4 for large-scale evaluation in 2013; articles in Proc. of ICALT 2012, IEEE, ebTEL 2013 and MIS4TEL 2014, Springer; article in IJTEL journal for TERENCE game design methodology, forthcoming in 2014. T. Di Mascio, R. Gennari,A. Melonio, P. Vittorini (2014). Designing Games for Deaf Children: First Guidelines. Accepted in Journal of Technology Enhanced Learning (IJTEL). ! T. di Mascio and R. Gennari (2009). A Usability Guide to IntelligentWebTools for the Literacy of Deaf People. In Book Integrating Usability Engineering for Designing the Web Experience: Methodologies and Principles, ICI Global. MAIN REFERENCES FORTHE 2nd PART