Fish and food security: securing blue growth of aquaculture

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Presented by Michael Phillips and Malcolm Beveridge at the Asia Conference on Oceans, Food Security and Blue Growth, held in Bali, Indonesia, from the 18th to the 21st of June, 2013.

Transcript of Fish and food security: securing blue growth of aquaculture

  • Fish and food security: securing blue growth of aquaculture Asia Conference on Oceans, Food Security and Blue Growth (ACOFB 2013). 18-21 June 2013, Bali, Indonesia Michael Phillips and Malcolm Beveridge
  • Outline Fish and food security Blue growth in aquaculture Future actions
  • Wealth and population growth are major drivers for animal source food consumption, including fish
  • Fish demand is growing .. along with other animal sources foods source: Hall et al. (2011) Year Production(milliontonnes) 20 40 60 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 80 100 120 Pig Chicken Fish Production targets(national data) Production forecast (this study) Year Production(milliontonnes) 20 40 60 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 80 100 120 FAO (2004) IFPRI (2003) Ye (1999) Fish Baseline scenario Technologicaladvances in aquaculture Ecological collapse of fisheries Globalconsumption remains at 1996 levels (15.6 kg/y) Globalconsumption rises to 22.5 kg/y Growing fisheries (0.7% perannum) Stagnant fisheries Year Production(milliontonnes) 20 40 60 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 80 100 120 FAO (2004) Wijkstrom (2003) IFPRI (2003) Ye (1999) Fish Baseline scenario Technologicaladvances in aquaculture Ecological collapse of fisheries Globalconsumption remains at 1996 levels (15.6 kg/y) Globalconsumption rises to22.5 kg/y Growing fisheries (0.7% perannum) Stagnant fisheries
  • Aquaculture is growing to meet demand
  • Future fish demand (2007-2015) source: FAO - Cai (2011)
  • Future need
  • Small-scale, wild, fisheries will remain important for the poor, food and nutrition
  • Blue growth of aquaculture
  • The world according to aquaculture source: Hall et al. (2011)
  • Aquaculture major species groups, 2008 other aquatic animals freshwater fishes aquatic plants clams, mussels, oysters prawns, shrimps, etc. salmon, trout, etc. marine fishes 5 10 15 20 25 28.8 15.8 13.1 0 5.0 3.3 source: http://www.fao.org/sof/sofia/index_en.htm 1.8 0.6 million tonnes
  • Aquaculture growth impacts ecosystems Major impact categories Eutrophication Freshwater use Land use Ecotoxicity Biodiversity Climate change Energy use
  • Life cycle analysis approach
  • Environmental impacts - a summary source: Hall et al.
  • Farmed fish compares well with other animal source foods
  • But, business as usual doubles impacts of aquaculture by 2030 source: Rockstrm et al, 2009 Aquaculture impact categories Eutrophication Freshwater use Land use Ecotoxicity Biodiversity Climate change Energy use Biotic depletion source: Rockstrom et al. 2009 Our planetary boundaries
  • Putting blue growth of aquaculture into practice
  • Blue Frontiers interventions Innovation Regulations and policy Technologies and management Monitoring and compliance Supply, demand and markets source: Hall et al. 2011
  • (1) Innovations Feeds Genetics Systems Extension Markets Mobile tech
  • (2) Regulations and policy International standards New regulations and policy Implementation
  • (3) Lower impact technology
  • Significant scope for improvement in environmental performance .. within species groups and between species groups
  • (4) Monitoring and compliance
  • source: Cai (2011) (5) Better understand supply and demand scenarios
  • (6) Blue Investments US$50-70 billion in infrastructure Clear need for private partnerships
  • Messages Future food and nutrition security requires both aquaculture and fisheries Aquaculture can be an efficient animal source food producer Lower impact aquaculture pathways necessary Change is possible but the challenge is scale Inclusive partnerships
  • Thankyou Terima Kasih M.Phillips@cgiar.org WorldFish and CGIAR Research Program on Aquatic Agricultural Systems (AAS) Acknowledgements Resource Legacy Fund, GIZ and FAO/Allfish