Emotional Intelligence - East Tenth Group · Strengthen Emotional Intelligence Emotional...

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By Frank Faeth, Leadership Advisor and Execuve Coach, East Tenth Group, Inc. – Dan Pink Today’s leaders need to be globally savvy, culturally aware, flexible, and visionary. We tend to measure success in terms of intelligence – or IQ – which does help when fledgling leaders are trying to climb the corporate ladder, but emoonal intelligence – a high emoonal quoent (EQ) is even beer. In fact, highly emoonally intelligent leaders are more producve, movate their teams more effecvely, and make beer decisions. What is Emoonal Intelligence? In Daniel Goleman’s book, Working with Emoonal Intelli- gence, he defines EI as: “the capacity for recognizing our own feelings and those of others, for movang ourselves, and for managing emoons well in ourselves and in our relaonships.” Emoonal intelligence is that aspect of self-awareness that allows you to idenfy your emoons, and emoonal triggers and to understand their influence on your behavior and decision making. Leaders who do not have strong emoonal intelligence tend to be less empathec. They don’t pick up on the individual nuances of their team members, which results in a more stressful environment for everyone. The Benefits of Emoonal Intelligence Leaders with emoonal intelligence are more opmisc, visionary, self-aware, and disciplined. They are asserve and decisive without being overbearing. In fact, they are oſten more charismac and empathec, bringing out the best in those around them. Being in touch with – and in control of – your emoons and reacons helps you build stronger relaonships, make beer decisions, and movate others. Emoonally intelligent leaders can build stronger, higher-performing teams. Strongest Indicator of Success 90 percent of top performers are also high in emoonal intelligence. Emoonal intelligence accounted for 58 percent of success in jobs – the strongest predictor of success when tested alongside 33 other workplace skills. Emoonal Intelligence and Team Performance Team members are more movated, more willing to work hard, and more loyal to leaders that they feel connected to, inspired by, and appreciated by. To be that kind of leader requires you to be connected to your own emoons and to leverage your own self-awareness, thereby building stron- ger relaonships with others. Building stronger relaonships is the core of emoonal intelligence. A Differenator to Build Stronger Teams The US Department of Labor esmates that the average cost of a bad hiring decision can equal 30 percent of the individual’s first-year potenal earnings. Your team plays an integral role in defining your company’s culture. What can you do to make sure the people you bring in to your company contribute posively to your culture, your team, and your future? Emoonal intelligence is not a new concept, and it’s oſten discussed in terms of leadership development – creang beer and strong management teams. But emoonal intelligence should be a top priority with every new hire, too. There is a strong connecon between hiring people who already exhibit a high level of emoonal intelligence and overall success. “To be emoonally intelligent is in many ways a prelude to understanding deeper movaon.” Emoonal Intelligence Maers Greatly for Smart Leadership Hire for Emoonal Intelligence 90% of Top Performers Have High Emoonal Intelligence Emoonal Intelligence Accounts for 58% of Success Top Performers Success Factor 90 % 58 %
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Transcript of Emotional Intelligence - East Tenth Group · Strengthen Emotional Intelligence Emotional...

  • By Frank Faeth, Leadership Advisor and Executive Coach, East Tenth Group, Inc.

    – Dan Pink

    Today’s leaders need to be globally savvy, culturally aware, flexible, and visionary. We tend to measure success in terms of intelligence – or IQ – which does help when fledgling leaders are trying to climb the corporate ladder, but emotional intelligence – a high emotional quotient (EQ) is even better. In fact, highly emotionally intelligent leaders are more productive, motivate their teams more effectively, and make better decisions.

    What is Emotional Intelligence?In Daniel Goleman’s book, Working with Emotional Intelli-gence, he defines EI as:

    “the capacity for recognizing our own feelings and those of others, for motivating ourselves, and for managing emotions well in ourselves and in our relationships.”

    Emotional intelligence is that aspect of self-awareness that allows you to identify your emotions, and emotional triggers and to understand their influence on your behavior and decision making.

    Leaders who do not have strong emotional intelligence tend to be less empathetic. They don’t pick up on the individual nuances of their team members, which results in a more stressful environment for everyone.

    The Benefits of Emotional IntelligenceLeaders with emotional intelligence are more optimistic, visionary, self-aware, and disciplined. They are assertive and decisive without being overbearing. In fact, they are often more charismatic and empathetic, bringing out the best in those around them. Being in touch with – and in control of – your emotions and reactions helps you build stronger relationships, make better decisions, and motivate others. Emotionally intelligent leaders can build stronger, higher-performing teams.

    Strongest Indicator of Success90 percent of top performers are also high in emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence accounted for 58 percent of success in jobs – the strongest predictor of success when tested alongside 33 other workplace skills.

    Emotional Intelligence and Team PerformanceTeam members are more motivated, more willing to work hard, and more loyal to leaders that they feel connected to, inspired by, and appreciated by. To be that kind of leader requires you to be connected to your own emotions and to leverage your own self-awareness, thereby building stron-ger relationships with others.

    Building stronger relationships is the core of emotional intelligence.

    A Differentiator to Build Stronger TeamsThe US Department of Labor estimates that the average cost of a bad hiring decision can equal 30 percent of the individual’s first-year potential earnings. Your team plays an integral role in defining your company’s culture. What can you do to make sure the people you bring in to your company contribute positively to your culture, your team, and your future?

    Hire for Emotional Intelligence.

    Emotional intelligence is not a new concept, and it’s often discussed in terms of leadership development – creating better and strong management teams. But emotional intelligence should be a top priority with every new hire, too. There is a strong connection between hiring people who already exhibit a high level of emotional intelligence and overall success.

    To hire with emotional intelligence in mind, ask pointed interview questions designed to determine emotional intelligence as well as skill sets. Obtain referrals from existing team members who exhibit the emotional intelligence characteristics you want to foster in others. Utilize behavior assessments and employ people analytics to leverage data in your hiring decisions. And always request and talk to references.

    Strengthen Emotional IntelligenceEmotional intelligence alone is not enough. Developing and strengthening emotional intelligence requires mindfulness. Leaders can strengthen their emotional intelligence by employing mindfulness. Mindfulness is a state of active, conscious focus on the moment; it improves our ability to have big ideas.

    Strengthen your emotional intelligence by using mindfulness to practice these four steps:

    Develop awareness.People with high EI are acutely aware of their own emotions and how they are being impacted by their emotions. Start by being more mindful of your emotions and work to more specifically identify what you’re feeling instead of generalizing in broad emotional terms.

    Pause.When your emotions are getting the best of you, pause. Take a breath. Walk away. Do anything but react or decide when you’re not clearheaded enough to do it.

    Develop soft skills.Listen more carefully. Speak with kindness. Use empathy. Communicate with others more effectively.

    Walk the talk.Be a better leader by setting the right example. Instead of seeking glory, seek to help others. Inspire, manage conflict, and motivate through enthusiasm and positivity.

    When you employ and practice mindfulness, you are immediately more capable of recognizing emotions, emotional triggers, and emotional responses, so that you can improve your emotional intelligence. The competencies go hand in hand. Through mindfulness, you can:

    Reduce negative emotional responsesDo certain behaviors, personalities, or actions cause you to react unprofessionally? Build awareness by recognizing when negative emotions are impacting you, and learn to pause before responding. A pause will give you time to breathe, think through your response, and provide a measured, professional response rather than lashing out.

    Reduce stressHow we manage stress and behave in stressful situations will impact how we are perceived as leaders. Mindfulness helps you learn to identify when you are feeling stress, helping you to better manage your behavior and your interactions with others. And once you identify your stress, you can use techniques such as breathing exercises, meditative practices, or simply sitting still to bring down your stress level.

    Improve interpersonal skillsInstead of becoming irritated or choosing to avoid people who are more difficult for you to engage with, practice interacting with them. Be completely present, listen more carefully, and pause to formulate responses. The more effort you put into working on interpersonal skills, the stronger they will become.

    Emotional Intelligence is a critical factor in becoming a strong, innovative, and bold leader. Emotional intelligence can be strengthened, but at the end of the day, it requires a deep commitment and willingness to be genuine about your emotional connection to your people. Care about them, understand their needs, and recognize what they need to thrive.

    “To be emotionally intelligent is in many ways a prelude to understanding deeper motivation.”

    Emotional IntelligenceMatters Greatly for Smart Leadership

    Hire for Emotional Intelligence

    90% of Top Performers Have High Emotional

    Intelligence

    Emotional Intelligence Accounts for

    58% of Success

    Top Performers Success Factor

    90% 58%

  • – Dan Pink

    Today’s leaders need to be globally savvy, culturally aware, flexible, and visionary. We tend to measure success in terms of intelligence – or IQ – which does help when fledgling leaders are trying to climb the corporate ladder, but emotional intelligence – a high emotional quotient (EQ) is even better. In fact, highly emotionally intelligent leaders are more productive, motivate their teams more effectively, and make better decisions.

    What is Emotional Intelligence?In Daniel Goleman’s book, Working with Emotional Intelli-gence, he defines EI as:

    “the capacity for recognizing our own feelings and those of others, for motivating ourselves, and for managing emotions well in ourselves and in our relationships.”

    Emotional intelligence is that aspect of self-awareness that allows you to identify your emotions, and emotional triggers and to understand their influence on your behavior and decision making.

    Leaders who do not have strong emotional intelligence tend to be less empathetic. They don’t pick up on the individual nuances of their team members, which results in a more stressful environment for everyone.

    The Benefits of Emotional IntelligenceLeaders with emotional intelligence are more optimistic, visionary, self-aware, and disciplined. They are assertive and decisive without being overbearing. In fact, they are often more charismatic and empathetic, bringing out the best in those around them. Being in touch with – and in control of – your emotions and reactions helps you build stronger relationships, make better decisions, and motivate others. Emotionally intelligent leaders can build stronger, higher-performing teams.

    Strongest Indicator of Success90 percent of top performers are also high in emotional intelligence. Emotional intelligence accounted for 58 percent of success in jobs – the strongest predictor of success when tested alongside 33 other workplace skills.

    Emotional Intelligence and Team PerformanceTeam members are more motivated, more willing to work hard, and more loyal to leaders that they feel connected to, inspired by, and appreciated by. To be that kind of leader requires you to be connected to your own emotions and to leverage your own self-awareness, thereby building stron-ger relationships with others.

    Building stronger relationships is the core of emotional intelligence.

    A Differentiator to Build Stronger TeamsThe US Department of Labor estimates that the average cost of a bad hiring decision can equal 30 percent of the individual’s first-year potential earnings. Your team plays an integral role in defining your company’s culture. What can you do to make sure the people you bring in to your company contribute positively to your culture, your team, and your future?

    Hire for Emotional Intelligence.

    Emotional intelligence is not a new concept, and it’s often discussed in terms of leadership development – creating better and strong management teams. But emotional intelligence should be a top priority with every new hire, too. There is a strong connection between hiring people who already exhibit a high level of emotional intelligence and overall success.

    To hire with emotional intelligence in mind, ask pointed interview questions designed to determine emotional intelligence as well as skill sets. Obtain referrals from existing team members who exhibit the emotional intelligence characteristics you want to foster in others. Utilize behavior assessments and employ people analytics to leverage data in your hiring decisions. And always request and talk to references.

    Strengthen Emotional IntelligenceEmotional intelligence alone is not enough. Developing and strengthening emotional intelligence requires mindfulness. Leaders can strengthen their emotional intelligence by employing mindfulness. Mindfulness is a state of active, conscious focus on the moment; it improves our ability to have big ideas.

    Strengthen your emotional intelligence by using mindfulness to practice these four steps:

    Develop awareness.People with high EI are acutely aware of their own emotions and how they are being impacted by their emotions. Start by being more mindful of your emotions and work to more specifically identify what you’re feeling instead of generalizing in broad emotional terms.

    Pause.When your emotions are getting the best of you, pause. Take a breath. Walk away. Do anything but react or decide when you’re not clearheaded enough to do it.

    Develop soft skills.Listen more carefully. Speak with kindness. Use empathy. Communicate with others more effectively.

    Walk the talk.Be a better leader by setting the right example. Instead of seeking glory, seek to help others. Inspire, manage conflict, and motivate through enthusiasm and positivity.

    When you employ and practice mindfulness, you are immediately more capable of recognizing emotions, emotional triggers, and emotional responses, so that you can improve your emotional intelligence. The competencies go hand in hand. Through mindfulness, you can:

    Reduce negative emotional responsesDo certain behaviors, personalities, or actions cause you to react unprofessionally? Build awareness by recognizing when negative emotions are impacting you, and learn to pause before responding. A pause will give you time to breathe, think through your response, and provide a measured, professional response rather than lashing out.

    Reduce stressHow we manage stress and behave in stressful situations will impact how we are perceived as leaders. Mindfulness helps you learn to identify when you are feeling stress, helping you to better manage your behavior and your interactions with others. And once you identify your stress, you can use techniques such as breathing exercises, meditative practices, or simply sitting still to bring down your stress level.

    Improve interpersonal skillsInstead of becoming irritated or choosing to avoid people who are more difficult for you to engage with, practice interacting with them. Be completely present, listen more carefully, and pause to formulate responses. The more effort you put into working on interpersonal skills, the stronger they will become.

    Emotional Intelligence is a critical factor in becoming a strong, innovative, and bold leader. Emotional intelligence can be strengthened, but at the end of the day, it requires a deep commitment and willingness to be genuine about your emotional connection to your people. Care about them, understand their needs, and recognize what they need to thrive.

    Using Mindfulness

    [email protected] | www.easttenthgroup.com | 646. 809. 0112

    Procedures can be taught. Skills can be gained. But hiring for emotional intelligence will ultimately make the difference in the long-term success of your new hire and the overall success of your entire team.

    Using Mindfulness

    Emotional Intelligence is critical to the long-term success of everyemployee, team, and culture.

    To get immediately actionable leadership insight fromEast Tenth Group every month, visithttps://easttenthgroup.com/newsletter/and sign up for our Take.Action.Now. leadership tips.