Young German Texans ((((YGT)) · Schloss Neuschwanstein in its wild setting is from the...

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1 Young German Texans (YGT) Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Texas, U.S.A Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Texas, U.S.A Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Texas, U.S.A Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Texas, U.S.A. Summer (Sommer) 2016 VOL. II NO.2 Pflugerville Katy Eddy Kerrville Seattle Floresville Nome Frelsburg Trent Houston New Ulm Kingsbury Cypress Fayetteville Nome Bellville Frisco Harper Spring Tomball The Woodlands Missouri City Huntington Texas German Society Organized September 6, 1983 Witte Schmid Haus 1860 Editor _ Marie Herridge, 5462 Hwy W. Bellville, Texas 77418

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    Young German Texans ((((YGT)))) Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Texas, U.S.AAustria, Germany, Switzerland, Texas, U.S.AAustria, Germany, Switzerland, Texas, U.S.AAustria, Germany, Switzerland, Texas, U.S.A....

    Summer (Sommer) 2016 VOL. II NO.2

    Pflugerville Katy Eddy

    Kerrville Seattle Floresville

    Nome Frelsburg

    Trent Houston New Ulm Kingsbury Cypress Fayetteville

    Nome Bellville

    Frisco Harper

    Spring Tomball The Woodlands

    Missouri City Huntington Texas German Society

    Organized September 6, 1983 Witte Schmid Haus 1860

    Editor _ Marie Herridge, 5462 Hwy W. Bellville, Texas 77418

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    Young German Texans (YGT) Austria, Germany, Switzerland, Texas, U.S.A....

    Das ist Gut!

    Young German Texan: ______________________________________ Age: __________

    Young German Texan: ______________________________________ Age: __________

    Young German Texan: ______________________________________ Age: __________

    Young German Texan: ______________________________________ Age: __________

    ○ 1 Year - $2.00 ○ 5 Years - $10.00 Today’s date: ________________

    Send form & money to: Robert Herridge, 5462 Hwy 159 W, Bellville, TX 77418

    Sponsor(s): ____________________________________ Phone:_____________________

    Sponsor(s) Address: _______________________________________________________

    Sponsor(s) Email: __________________________________________________________

    Sponsor(s)’ TGS Chapter:___________________________________________________

    YGT Parent(s): ________________________________ Phone:_____________________

    YGT Parent(s) Address: ____________________________________________________

    YGT Parent(s) Email: ______________________________________________________

    State Seal Das Haus Museum

    Schoenau Community 2650 Witte-Schmid Rd. New Ulm, TX 78950

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    Crosswords from previous issues:

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    Speaking some GermanSpeaking some GermanSpeaking some GermanSpeaking some German

    Singular Pronouns

    ich - I

    du - you (for people that know each other)

    Sie - you (for your elders or people you don’t know)

    Plural Pronouns

    wir - we

    ihr - you (for people that know each other)

    Sie - you (for your elders or people you don’t know)

    Examples of the word “man” in German

    Hier spricht man nur Deutsch. One only speaks German here.

    Man hat von dort eine gute Aussicht. You have a good view from here.

    Man fährt in Europa oft mit dem Fahrrad. People often use a bike in Europe.

    Hat man Ihnen das nicht mitgereilt? Didn’t they tell you about that?

    jemand (someone) and niemand (no one)

    Ich habe jemand an der Ecke gesehen. I saw someone on the corner.

    Niemand kann es verstehen. No one can understand it.

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    Neuschwanstein Castle (Sleeping Beauty’s Castle)Neuschwanstein Castle (Sleeping Beauty’s Castle)Neuschwanstein Castle (Sleeping Beauty’s Castle)Neuschwanstein Castle (Sleeping Beauty’s Castle)

    The fantastical castles and palaces built by King Ludwig II may have bankrupted his kingdom, but they proved to be a wise long-term investment, having become some of Germany’s most visited tourist attractions.

    Foremost among them is the almost impossibly romantic Schloss Neuschwanstein (Neuschwanstein Castle), perched high up on a rugged hill above the village of Hohenschwangau near Füssen in southwest Bavaria, in southern Germany. Begun in 1869, it’s a vision of what the Middle Ages might have been, and was inspired by Ludwig’s musical mentor, Richard Wagner (its interiors are filled with references to Wagner’s operas). Some of the castle’s interiors, like the Minstrel’s Hall and the Throne Room, are decorated with the utmost extravagance, but the castle was never completed, and the unfortunate Ludwig spent little time here. The castle served as a model for the Sleeping Beauty Castle of Disneyland. The best view of Schloss Neuschwanstein in its wild setting is from the Marienbrücke, the little bridge high above the castle.

    While Neuschwanstein castle was being built, Ludwig kept an eye on its progress from the neighboring castle of Hohenschwangau, just 1km (0.5 miles) away. This neo-Gothic building had been constructed by his father, Maximilian II. In fact, Neuschwanstein and Hohenschwangau collectively are known as ‘die Königsschlösser’ (the royal castles).

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    The Greater Swiss Mountain DogGreater Swiss Mountain DogGreater Swiss Mountain DogGreater Swiss Mountain Dog (German: Grosser Schweizer Sennenhund or French: Grand Bouvier Suisse) is a dog breed which was

    developed in the Swiss Alps.

    The name Sennenhund refers to people called Senn or Senner, dairymen and

    herders in the Swiss Alps. Greater Swiss Mountain Dogs are almost certainly the

    result of indigenous dogs mating with large mastiff types brought

    to Switzerland by foreign settlers. At one time, the breed was believed to have

    been among the most popular in Switzerland.[1] It was assumed to have almost

    died out by the late 19th century, since its work was being done by other breeds

    or machines, but was rediscovered in the early 1900s.[2]

    The breed is large and heavy-boned with great physical strength, but is still agile

    enough to perform the all-purpose farm duties it was originally used

    for.[2] Its breed standard calls for a black, white, and rust colored coat.

    The Greater Swiss Mountain Dog is sociable, active, calm, and dignified, and

    loves being part of the family. It is relatively healthy for its size and tends to have

    far fewer problems than more popular breeds in its size range. Among the

    four Sennenhunde, or Swiss mountain dogs, this breed is considered the oldest,

    and is also the largest.

    Weight Male 132.3–154.3 lb (60.0–

    70.0 kg)

    Female 110.2–132.3 lb (50.0–

    60.0 kg)

    Height Male 25.5–28.5 in (65–72 cm)

    Female 23.5–27 in (60–69 cm)

    Coat short, double coat

    Color tricolor (black, rust or tan, and

    white)

    Litter size: up to 18

    Life span: approximately 11

    years

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    Wie heiß ist es in TWie heiß ist es in TWie heiß ist es in TWie heiß ist es in Texas? exas? exas? exas? (How hot is it in Texas?)

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    Es, es, es und es Volkslied (1800’s)

    Als Abschieds- und Wanderlied wurde Es, es, es und es, es ist ein harter Schluss im 19. Jahrhundert von Handwerksburschen und Studenten gern gesungen. Auch heute noch ist es als Wanderlied bekannt und vor allem in Folk- und Wanderkreisen beliebt gehört noch heute zum Standardrepertoire der noch existierenden

    Schächte.

    Volksweise (1826)

    Melodie zum Lied Es, es, es und es

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    History of the German Language German is one of the world's most-spoken languages, with roughly 118 million speakers,

    including native and second-language speakers. It's also one of the most commonly spoken

    languages in the European Union. This is due in large part to the fact that German is the

    official language in seven countries, among them Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and Belgium.

    In addition, it's a recognized secondary language in another ten countries. Approximately two

    million residents of the United States speak German, or a dialect of it, and these numbers

    continue to grow. With so many people speaking German, it makes sense to pursue it as an

    option when thinking of learning a second language. If you learn German, you stand a better

    chance of being able to communicate with a large and growing portion of the world's

    population. How did German grow to be so widely spoken? What are its origins, and where is it

    headed?

    German Language Origin The German language has a long and tumultuous history and is one of the oldest languages in

    Europe. Linguistic German history dates back to at least the 6th century AD. It wasn't always

    the German language we're familiar with today, though. German has its roots in Old Saxon, the

    language spoken by the Saxon people, a group of Germanic tribes. Sometime between the 3rd

    and 5th centuries AD, a phenomenon took place called the High German consonant shift. This

    was a change in sound (pronunciation) that took place in several phases, changing the

    language from the West Germanic dialect of Old Saxon to a new language–Old High German.

    The shift from Germanic dialect to the Old High German language lasted until approximately

    the mid-9th century AD. It wasn't until the early 1500s that another German history change

    came about, when Martin Luther translated the Bible. For his translation, he used another form

    of German, called Middle High German, which was based on different dialects than Old High

    German.

    The Catholic Church rejected this translation of the Bible, and created their own standard

    version based on yet other dialects from other regions of Germany. At the time, the country

    was divided into several independent states, each with its own German culture and its own

    dialects. There was no standard language accepted throughout the nation. Many German

    writers tried to bring about a standardization of the German language in order for more people

    to understand their work, but this would not occur for nearly 300 years.

    German History It wasn't until about 1800 that standard German became an accepted written form of the

    language for government communications. Over the next 100 years, the standard German

    language spread throughout the country. More and more townspeople began to speak it, and it

    became the language of choice for the written word. From 1852 to 1860, the Brothers Grimm

    wrote and released a 16-part German dictionary. To this day, it remains the most

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    comprehensive dictionary of the German language. Also in 1860, grammatical and

    orthographic (spelling and writing) rules were published in the Duden Handbook, and in 1901,

    this was declared the definitive guide to the standard German language.

    German Language Today The standards set out in the Duden Handbook

    remained in place for nearly 100 years when German

    history changed again under the German

    orthography reform of 1996 (Rechtschreibreform in

    German). In July of that year, the governments of

    several German-speaking countries such as

    Germany, Switzerland, and Liechtenstein, signed an

    agreement in Vienna, Rechtschreibreform.

    The agreement laid out a plan to change German

    spelling rules to simplify the language and make it

    easier to learn. At the same time, the agreement

    recognized that the language rules could not change

    substantially, so that the German people using the language at that time would not be required

    to relearn it.

    The reform plan met with a great deal of controversy and resistance by many German people,

    with some states seeing it as a threat to German culture and refusing to adopt it, resulting in

    court intervention. The Federal Constitutional Court of Germany stated in 1998 that general

    orthography could not be governed; citizens could continue to write and spell German the way

    they always had. However, the court also ruled that the government was able to enforce the

    reform in schools and public administration.

    After the reform was put in place, Germany went through an eight-year transition for

    implementation in schools. During that period, many media outlets also underwent the

    transition. However, some major newspapers and magazines and some well-known writers

    continued to refuse to adopt the new rules.

    At the end of this transition period, the Council for German Orthography voted unanimously in

    2006 to remove the reform changes that had caused the most controversy, which appeased

    many of the media organizations that had opposed the reform in its former iteration. This major

    change to the reform was put in place just before the new school year began. The following

    year, some traditional German spellings were finally phased out of the language.

    One notable difference to come from this reform was the abandonment of the ligature ß, which

    had previously taken the place of ss in some words. The ligature can still be seen in use from

    time to time, but not nearly as frequently as it was prior to 1996.

    While things seem to have calmed down for the time being, few languages have undergone so

    many changes in such a relatively short period of time as the German language. It is truly a

    living and vibrant language, mirroring the hardy German people who have lived through strife,

    preserved their German culture, and emerged as a country that is an important member of the

    global community. Being able to more thoroughly understand these people, their history, and

    their culture, are but a few of the many benefits of learning German.

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    Zillertal

    The Zillertal ("Ziller valley") is a valley in Tyrol, Austria that is drained by the Ziller River. It is the widest valley south of the Inntal ("Inn valley") and lends its name to the Zillertal Alps, the strongly glaciated section of the Alps in which it lies. The Tux Alps lie to its west, while the lower grass peaks of the Kitzbühel Alps are found to the east.

    The Zillertal is one of the valley areas in Tyrol most visited by tourists. Its largest settlement is Mayrhofen.

    Geography

    Zillertal Alps

    The Zillertal branches from the Inn trench near Jenbach, about 40 km northeast of Innsbruck, running mostly in a north-south direction. The Zillertal proper stretches from the village of Strass to Mayrhofen, where it separates into four smaller valleys, the Tux Valley and the sparsely settled, so-called Gründe – Zamsergrund, Zillergrund and Stilluppgrund. Along the way, two more Gründe and the Gerlos valley, which leads to the Gerlos Pass and into Salzburg, branch off.

    Unlike other side valleys of the Inntal, the Zillertal rises constantly, but only marginally, from one end to the other – only about 100 m over 30 km. Permanent settlements cover about 9% of the entire area of the Zillertal municipalities.

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    History

    Near the Tuxer Joch, a pass between the Wipptal and the Tux Valley, there have been archeological finds from middle Stone Age. The oldest remains of settlements in the Zillertal date back to the Illyrians during the late Bronze and early Iron Ages – a tribe from the Balkan Peninsula who were absorbed by the Bavarians (Baiuvarii).

    The earliest written record of the Zillertal dates from 889, when Arnulf of Carinthia granted land to the Archbishop of Salzburg in the "Cilarestal". Ownership of the valley was divided along the river Ziller. Even today this division is visible, as churches on the right bank of the river generally have green towers and belong to Salzburg Diocese, while churches on the left bank have red towers and belong to Innsbruck Diocese.

    In 1248, the land west of the Ziller was acquired by the Counts of Tyrol, while the lands east of the Ziller pledged as security to the Counts of Tyrol by the Lords of Rattenberg from 1290 to 1380. In 1504, with both the County of Tyrol and the Archbishopric of Salzburg dominated by the Habsburgs, the Zillertal valley was united under Emperor Maximilian and put under joint Tyrolean/Salzburgian rule.

    In 1805, the Treaty of Pressburg ended the War of the Third Coalition and forced Austria to cede Tyrol to Bavaria. For the purposes of this treaty, the Zillertal was considered part of Salzburg and thus remained with Austria. The people of the Zillertal nevertheless joined Andreas Hofer's Tyrolean Insurrection of 1809 in the Battle of the Ziller Bridge (14 May). Later that year, the insurrection was defeated and the Zillertal briefly became Bavarian until the Congress of Vienna in 1814/1815.

    The Zillertal c. 1898

    While the relatively lenient stance of the archbishops of Salzburg had allowed the creation of small pockets of Protestantism in their lands since the Protestant Reformation, the remaining Protestants were oppressed more harshly during the Habsburg rule of the 19th century. In 1837, 437 Protestant inhabitants of the Zillertal left the valley after they were given the choice of renouncing the Augsburg Confession or emigrating to Silesia, where Frederick William III of Prussia offered them lands and housing near Erdmannsdorf (now Mysłakowice in western Poland).

    In 1902, the Zillertal Railway was constructed, which still runs between Jenbach and Mayrhofen to this day, opening up the valley, the economy of which had previously relied mostly on agriculture and mining, to commerce and tourism. From 1921 to 1976, magnesium carbonate (and later tungsten) were mined around the Alpine pastures of the Schrofen and Wangl Almen above the Tuxertal A ropeway conveyor of more than 9 km length was used to transport the ore to the Zillertal Railway goods station in the valley below.

    The Zillertal was known for its itinerant tradesmen, "farm doctors" and singing families. In the second half of the 19th century refuge huts were erected and trails established as climbing became a mass sport. The development of the area for tourism began in 1953/1954 with the construction of the Gerlosstein ski region, today the Zillertal Arena, which was soon followed by other lifts and the opening of the Mayrhofner Penkenbahn in 1954. The use of water power took off in the 1970s.

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    Economy

    Sawmill at Fügen and goods train on the Zillertalbahn

    In the second half of the 20th century, after the end of mining in the valley, tourism became the area's dominant economic activity. In 2003, tourists stayed a total of 6 million nights in the valley, mostly during winter sports holidays. Following a phase of mergers by building connecting lifts during the 1990s and early 2000s, there are now four big ski areas and three smaller satellite areas in the valley, with a combined total of more than 170 lifts and more than 630 km of downhill slopes.

    Traditional agriculture – mostly cattle, dairy and some sheep farming on the Alm pastures – is still widespread and the large sawmill outside the village of Fügen is a sign of the lumber industry that also plays a significant role. The periphery of the area is home to a number of factories. Four large reservoirs in the Gründe supply water to a total of eight hydroelectric power stations, generating slightly more than 1,200 GWh per year.

    Culture

    The Zillertal is particularly renowned for its musical tradition. For instance, several families of travelling singers and organ builders from the valley have been credited with spreading the Christmas carol Silent Night across the world during the 19th and early 20th centuries. More recently, the Schürzenjäger band have had tremendous success in German-speaking countries with their crossover mix of Volksmusik and pop.

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    Young German Texans (YGT) Austria, Germany, Switzer1and, Texas, USA

    Hoffnung haben Sie einen wunderbaren Sommer hatte! Hope you’ve had a wonderful Summer! Young German Texan: Jaclyn D. Herridge Sponsors: Robert & Marie Herridge Young German Texan: Hayden Kistler Sponsors: Robert & Marie Herridge Young German Texan: Payton Lindsay Sponsors: Robert & Marie Herridge Young German Texan: Jillian Herridge Sponsors: Robert & Marie Herridge Young German Texan: Torrie Drapela Sponsors: Russel & Lisa Drapela Young German Texan: Reed Drapela Sponsors: Russel & Lisa Drapela Young German Texan: Hunter Schumann Sponsors: Herbert & Laura Schumann Young German Texan: Katie Schumann Sponsors: Herbert & Laura Schumann Young German Texan: Dylan Porter Sponsors: Herbert & Laura Schumann Young German Texan: Laura Porter Sponsors: Herbert & Laura Schumann Young German Texan: James Schumann Sponsors: Herbert & Laura Schumann Young German Texan: Joshua W Whitney Sponsor: Roy W. Whitney Young German Texan: Anita Whitney Sponsor: Roy W. Whitney Young German Texan: Kenneth V. Adams Sponsor: Kevin L. Adams Young German Texan: Courtney E. Adams Sponsor: Kevin L. Adams Young German Texan: Aubrie Anna Reigle Sponsor: Anna R. Wilson Young German Texan: Flora Molloy Sponsor: Karl Micklitz Young German Texan: Andreas Mattern Sponsors: Mike & Angie Mattern Young German Texan: Braxton Barker Sponsor: Carolyn Daniels Young German Texan: Brock Barker Sponsor: Carolyn Daniels Young German Texan: Kyler Oldham Sponsor: Carolyn Daniels Young German Texan: Elena Mikes Sponsors: Gary & Linda Knesek Young German Texan: Elyse Mikes Sponsors: Gary & Linda Knesek Young German Texan: Claire Cagle Sponsors: Louis & Karen Palermo Young German Texan: Daisy Konecny Sponsors: Herb & Maryl Gerken Young German Texan: Julia Pestana Sponsors: Herb & Maryl Gerken Young German Texan: Joanna Gerken Sponsors: Herb & Maryl Gerken Young German Texan: Ronson Muegge Sponsors: Robert & Marie Herridge Young German Texan: Grace Muegge Sponsors: Robert & Marie Herridge Young German Texan: Ashley Froebel Sponsor: Ruth Froebel Young German Texan: Austin Froebel Sponsor: Ruth Froebel Young German Texan: Baylor Duarte Sponsor: Dottie Jordan Young German Texan: Paxton Duarte Sponsor: Dottie Jordan Young German Texan: Madeline Hays Sponsor: Dottie Jordan Young German Texan: Cory Dworaczy Sponsors: Victor and Irene Hosek Young German Texan: Brandon Dworaczy Sponsors: Victor and Irene Hosek Young German Texan: Phillip Hahn Sponsors: Clifford & Valeria Hahn Young German Texan: Matthew Hahn Sponsors: Clifford & Valeria Hahn Young German Texan: Erik Hahn Sponsors: Clifford & Valeria Hahn Young German Texan: Logan Krueger Sponsor: Peggy Schulin Young German Texan: Zoe Lynn Krueger Sponsor: Peggy Schulin Young German Texan: Lillian Cocek Sponsors: Susan & Anthony Stott Young German Texan: Hannah Kirby Sponsor: Heidi Kirby Young German Texan: Noah Keepers Sponsors: Jason & Sandra Keepers Young German Texan: Cameron Lee Schmelter Sponsors: Pat Schmelter Young German Texan: Carter Holtkamp Sponsors: Grace Holtkamp