Yearbook Photography & Their stories

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    08-Jan-2018
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What types of photos should we be using in our yearbook? Yearbooks depend on photojournalism, which is the art of telling stories using photos. There are three types of photos in a yearbook: Action, or candid photos, document an event or story. Reference photos include portraits, group shots and team photos. Scrapbook poses are used for story-telling purpose.

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Yearbook Photography & Their stories What types of photos should we be using in our yearbook?
Yearbooks depend on photojournalism, which is the art of telling stories using photos. There are three types of photos in a yearbook: Action, or candid photos, document an event or story. Reference photos include portraits, group shots and team photos. Scrapbook poses are used for story-telling purpose. Examples of the three types of photos in our yearbook.
Action Reference Scrapbook Examples of the three types of photos in our yearbook. How can we shoot action photos that our readers will notice?
The story of the year comes alive in action photos. These photojournalistic images tell the story in many ways: Showing conflict or challenge Showing action and reaction Showing more than you could tell Showing relationships Capturing emotion Taking the reader there Conflict Reaction Relationship Emotion Action Photos 101 What should I know besides point and shoot?
While shooting photos, keep these suggestions in mind: Hold the camera steady Get as close as possible. Be patient. Wait for a moment. Shoot verticals and horizontals. Consider unusual angles. Consider the Rule of Thirds. What is the Rule of Thirds?
Good Use of Rule of Thirds No Use of Rule of Thirds What makes these photos good or bad for the yearbook?
Lets Discuss! What makes these photos good or bad for the yearbook? Answer the questions that arise from photos.
Story Time! What is an easy way to tell stories in the yearbook?
A caption is a mini-story that answers the five Ws and H: who, what, when, where, why and how. Captions require research and interviewing just like a story. What should we include in our captions to make them meaningful?
Most journalistic captions contain these components: The lead-in is a mini-headline for the caption. It should be catchy verbally and dynamic visually. The summary sentence is written in present tense and answers the five Ws and H about what is going on in the photo. The descriptive sentence, if used, provides background information the reader might not know and is best written in past tense. Quotes from individuals in the photo can also add a human touch to the story. Bad Example of a Caption
Boring! Good, not Great Example Good Lead-in! Great Example of a Caption
Summary Sentence Descriptive Sentence Quote