WHAT INSPIRES AND MOTIVATES US TO WHAT INSPIRES AND MOTIVATES US TO CREATE BONNIE CRAMOND, PH.D. THE

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Transcript of WHAT INSPIRES AND MOTIVATES US TO WHAT INSPIRES AND MOTIVATES US TO CREATE BONNIE CRAMOND, PH.D. THE

  • WHAT INSPIRES AND MOTIVATES US TO CREATE BONNIE CRAMOND, PH.D.

    THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA

  • INSPIRATION COMES FROMCOMES FROM THE LATIN WORDWORD INSPIRARE--

    G OMEANING TO BREATHE INTO

  • CREATIVE INSPIRATION AS A SPIRITUAL GIFT

    The Ancients believed that the muses gave humans gifts of creative inspiration to g g p allow them to be more god‐like, at least temporarily.

  • PEOPLE OF MANY CULTURES BELIEVE THAT CREATIVE INSPIRATION IS SPIRITUAL AND HUMANS ARE MEREINSPIRATION IS SPIRITUAL AND HUMANS ARE MERE CONDUITS

    ▪ Black Elk 1863 ‐ 1950 Oglala LakotaOglala Lakota

    ▪ “I cured with the power that came through me. Of  course, it was not I who cured, it was the power from 

    the Outer World; the visions and ceremonies only 

    made me like a hole through which the power could 

    come to the two‐leggeds. If I thought that I was doing 

    it myself, the hole would close up and no power could 

    come through.”

  • LIONEL RICHIE ▪ Believes his success as a songwriter comes from God, his "co‐ composer." p

    ▪ "I give credit to my co‐writer because all I did was write down  h t H t ld t it d "what He told me to write down." 

    ▪ Richie also revealed that he prefers to collaborate during the  night. "In other words," he said, "from about eleven to about 

    seven in the morning is a very wonderful time because ... God  American singer, songwriter, ain't worried with too many other folks ... I know He is very busy 

    during the day, so I wait for late night, and it works for me.”

    g , g , actor and record producer; Winner of 5 Grammys,  13 American Music Awards,  a Golden Globe and an Oscara Golden Globe, and an Oscar

  • SOMETIMES OTHERS’ WORK, AND COMPETITION INSPIRES USCOMPETITION, INSPIRES US

  • ’ “ f Titian’s “Venus of Urbino”

    Circa 1532

    Gaugin’s “Spirit of  The Dead Walking”

    1892Circa 1532 1892

    Manet’s “Olympia” 18651865

    OR EXTENDING THE WORK OF OTHERSOR, EXTENDING THE WORK OF OTHERS

  • SOMETIMES INSPIRATION COMES FROM DESIRE TO EXPRESS EMOTION ABOUT ANDESIRE TO EXPRESS EMOTION ABOUT AN EVENT

  • OR TO CONNECT WITH OTHERS

    To share emotions such as anguish, longing, and loneliness, as in  these sculptures by Camille Claudel

    B.Cramond, University of Georgia

    these sculptures by Camille Claudel

  • American writer, Kurt Vonnegut, g

  • INSPIRATION AND MOTIVATION MAY DIFFER ACCORDING TO  THE TYPE OF CREATIVITY

    INVENTIVE OR INNOVATIVE: EXPRESSIVE:INVENTIVE OR INNOVATIVE: addresses a worthwhile problem  novel and appropriate solution

    Illustrates the creator’s emotions & aesthetics original and valuableoriginal and valuable

  • INNOVATIVE OR INVENTIVE CREATIVITYINNOVATIVE OR INVENTIVE CREATIVITY IS INSPIRED MORE BY OBSERVATION OF A PROBLEM

    Ocean Clean Up Array  Designed by 19 Year Old

    Plastic in the Ocean Designed by 19 Year Old  Boyan Slat

  • AND CURIOSITY

  • NOT REAL DICHOTOMY   INVENTIVE                                             EXPRESSIVE ▪ Aesthetic experience in the p realization of an elegant solution  to a problem

    ▪ There are many problems to be  solved in the completion any  artistic expressionartistic expression  

    “When I am working on a problem, I  thi k b t b t b t h Inever think about beauty, but when I 

    have finished, if the solution is not  beautiful, it know it is wrong."  American architect, systems theorist,

    author,

    B.Cramond, University of Georgia

    , designer, and inventor.

  • AESTHETICS AND SCIENCE?AESTHETICS AND SCIENCE? “Aesthetic considerations can be  d i i Th h h f ldecisive. Though they often attract only  a few scientists to a new theory, it is  upon those few that its ultimate triumph  may depend” (p. 155). 

    Examples: Copernicus’ astronomical  theory DeBroglie’s theory of matter andtheory, DeBroglie s theory of matter, and  Einstein’s general theory 

  • Monteleone’s Plastic Ocean  Art Exhibit

    Hokusai’s The Great Wave Corona Beer’s Ad Campaign

    INSPIRATION IS MULTI-DIMENSIONAL ANDINSPIRATION IS MULTI DIMENSIONAL AND DIRECTIONAL

  • INSPIRATION IS NOT ENOUGH; MOTIVATION MUST DRIVE ONE TOMOTIVATION MUST DRIVE ONE TO REALIZATION

    INSPIRATION = SPARK MOTIVATION = DRIVE

  • "GENIUS IS 1% INSPIRATION AND 99% PERSPIRATION"

    THOMAS EDISON

  • AMABILE’S COMPONENTIAL MODEL OFAMABILE S COMPONENTIAL MODEL OF CREATIVITY

  • PSYCHOLOGISTS ONCE BELIEVED THAT EXTRINSIC MOTIVATION LOWERED

    CREATIVITYCREATIVITY HOWEVER, THAT VIEW HAS BEEN SHOWN TO BE TOO SIMPLISTIC.

  • WHAT MOTIVATES US?WHAT MOTIVATES US?

    Motivation is complex— • Usually more than one  • May change in type or 

    i itpriority • May not be apparent to us • May differ in intensitiesMay differ in intensities • Must persist for  completionp

    https://www.primermagazine.com/2012/live/what‐is‐hard‐work/2

  • SOME EXAMPLESSOME EXAMPLES AND WHAT EDUCATORS CAN DO TO HELP STUDENTS

  • INTEREST ▪ Sometimes the problem is toSometimes the problem is to  generate interest; sometimes it is to  maintain it.

    ▪ Why are there so few of his paintings  remaining, other works unfinished? ▪ Some lost ▪ Events intervened ▪ Polymath too busy ▪ Procrastinator ▪ Slow worker ▪ Took on complex tasks ▪ Lost interest after the problem was  solved

    DaVinci’s study for the bronze equestrian  statue of Francesco Sforza, Duke of Milan— S l t d i l b t t i bsolved Sculpted in clay, but never cast in bronze

  • EDUCATORS CAN HELP STUDENTS ▪ Find interests and talents▪ Find interests and talents

    ▪ Learn to set reasonable  goals and standardsgoals and standards

    ▪ Use milestones and  timelinestimelines

    ▪ Use interests to maintain  work during more routinework during more routine  tasks

  • CHALLENGECHALLENGE

    Sony co founder Akio MoritaSony co‐founder Akio Morita 

  • EDUCATORS CAN HELP STUDENTS ▪ By posing appropriate▪ By posing appropriate  challenges to them

    ▪ To find appropriate▪ To find appropriate  challenges for themselves

    ▪ Systematically meet▪ Systematically meet  challenges

    ▪ Learn to succeed and fail▪ Learn to succeed and fail

  • AUTONOMY MASTERY & PURPOSEAUTONOMY, MASTERY, & PURPOSE People are more  motivated ifmotivated if 

    ▪ they feel they have some  choice and controlchoice and control, 

    ▪ they are learning, and 

    ▪ there is a real reason  and important outcome  from their workfrom their work.

    Pink, D. (2011). Drive: The surprising truth about what motivates us. New York, NY: Riverhead Books.Pink, D. (2011). Drive: The surprising truth about what motivates us. New York, NY: Riverhead Books. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6XAPnuFjJc&feature=youtu.be

  • EDUCATORS CAN HELP STUDENTS ▪ Giving some choices in▪ Giving some choices in  content and form

    ▪ Using problem based▪ Using problem‐based  curricula to solve real  problems (e.g. Future  Problem Solving)

    http://www fpspi org/http://www.fpspi.org/

  • GLIMPSES OF “SONGS” AND “COMPOSITIONS”GLIMPSES OF SONGS AND COMPOSITIONS WHILE STILL “LEARNING THE SCALES”

    ▪ Jason Cantarella, University of Georgia mathematics professor,  analogized, “In art there is a tension between technique and  inspiration It’s important to have both K 12 math appears to be allinspiration. It s important to have both. K‐12 math appears to be all  technique and no inspiration.”

    “ ’ lik if h i b h i [ d ] l l f l▪ “It’s like if we taught music by having [students] play scales for twelve  years without ever giving them the opportunity to play songs…”

  • THE HIGH OF CREATION ▪ Maslow called it B‐Cognition; Peak▪ Maslow called it B‐Cognition; Peak  experiences

    Csikszentmihalyi called it Flow▪ Csikszentmihalyi called it Flow

    ▪ Altered state of consciousness Th ti t it lf i th ti t

    ▪ There is evidence that creative  people experience a different level 

    The creative act itself is the motivator  because of the altered state of being it  produces; the product is less 

    of cortical arousal during a creative  process than do less creative people  (e g Martindale 1999)

    important

    (e.g., Martindale, 1999).

  • EDUCATORS CAN HELP STUDENTS ▪ Pacing lessons so that