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Transcript of Teachers returning to the profession - gov.uk · PDF file produced 8 other responses; of these...

  • Teachers returning to the profession Research brief

    December 2014

  • 2

    Contents List of tables 3

    Background and aim 5

    Approach 5

    Limitations 5

    Sample characteristics 7

    Findings 9

    Recruiting teachers 9

    Recruiting returning teachers 10

    Support for returning teachers 12

    Unsuccessful applications 16

    Benefits and barriers 17

    Marketing to returners 20

    Conclusions 22

    Appendix 1 – full questionnaire 23

  • 3

    List of tables Table 1: Location of school 7

    Table 2: Phase of school 7

    Table 3: Type of school 8

    Table 4: Is your school involved in initial teacher training (ITT)? 8

    Table 5: Average number of full and part time posts recruited to each year? 9

    Table 6: Do you fill all your vacant teaching posts? 9

    Table 7: Which subjects/key stages do you find are the most difficult to recruit to? 10

    Table 8: Which subjects were the returners recruited to teach? 11

    Table 9: Please indicate the number of full time and part time vacancies that you have filled by recruiting returners. 12

    Table 10: How long had the returning teacher(s) been out of teaching for? 12

    Table 11: What (if any) additional support have you put in place for the returner over and above what is offered to existing teachers coming to the school? 13

    Table 12: Which subjects were the returners interested in teaching? 13

    Table 13: What advice or support were you able to provide? 14

    Table 14: Do you provide support to any staff previously employed by your school who are now on career breaks? 15

    Table 15: Have you been contacted by a returner asking for support or advice on how to get back into teaching? 15

    Table 16: In the last 3 years, have you received an application from a returner (a qualified teacher who was not at the time employed as a teacher in the state sector) who was not recruited to post? 16

    Table 17: Which subjects were the applications for? 16

    Table 18: Were the applications for full or part time positions? 17

    Table 19: How long had the applicants been out of teaching for? 17

    Table 20: What (if any) barriers do you think there are to recruiting a returner? 18

  • 4

    Table 21: What (if any) are the potential benefits to employing a returner? 19

  • 5

    Background and aim This exploratory research aimed to gather intelligence on whether schools are using teachers returning to the profession to address issues in recruiting teachers, what issues have been experienced and what support was needed.

    The survey asked questions about:

    • How schools make use of the returner market to address workforce issues

    • Perceptions of returning teachers

    • How schools have supported returning teachers

    • Any issues experienced by schools looking to attract returning teachers.

    For the purposes of this research, a returning teacher was defined as a qualified teacher not currently employed as a teacher in the state sector but who was looking to return to teaching after a period away from the profession or in the independent sector.

    Approach An online survey was developed collaboratively between the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL) research and returners teams. The Association for School and College Leaders (ASCL) also commented on the survey. The survey was circulated via an entry in ASCL newsletters disseminated to 11,500 ASCL members. The survey was hosted on the education pages of gov.uk (https://www.education.gov.uk/schoolportal/feedback/returning_teachers.htm1) and was opened on 14 October 2014 and closed on 6 November 2014. A total of 107 responses were received which is a 1% response rate.

    Limitations The results presented here reflect the views of the 107 individuals who responded to the survey. It is not possible to judge if these responses are representative of the wider population of schools recruiting teachers.

    1 As the survey has closed, clicking this hyperlink will now produce an error message.

    https://www.education.gov.uk/schoolportal/feedback/returning_teachers.htm

  • 6

    The results commented on in this report are based on small base sizes which may not be representative of the wider population and the base size is too small to detect differences which may exist. This report therefore provides descriptive results only.

    Due to the majority of the responses coming from the secondary phase (104 responses) and only 3 responses from all-through schools, the findings are not split by phase. Where routing was applied in the questionnaire, the base size is given under the relevant table; for all other questions are reported for all respondents.

  • 7

    Sample characteristics The first part of the survey was a series of questions aimed at providing some data on the characteristics of the respondents.

    The first characteristic asked for was the location of the school and although there were responses from all the areas, only 2 responses were received from the North East and 7 each in Yorkshire and London (see table 1). Most responses were from the South East (24 responses) followed by the East of England (14 responses). It is therefore not possible to analyse the data by location.

    Table 1: Location of school

    Responses North West 13 North East 2 Yorkshire 7 East Midlands 11 West Midlands 14 East of England 15 London 7 South East 24 South West 14 Total 107

    Q1, base: all respondents, single response

    Next respondents were asked about the phase of the school (see table 2). No responses were received from the primary phase and only 3 from all-through schools. This means that it is not possible to analyse differences between phases.

    Table 2: Phase of school

    Responses Primary 0 Secondary 104 All-through 3 Total 107

    Q2, base: all respondents, single response

    The majority of the respondents (47 responses) were from convertor academies with 36 responses from local authority (LA) maintained schools and 13 responses from sponsored academies (see table 3). The remainder of the responses were spread across school types with no other group being large enough to comment on.

  • 8

    Table 3: Type of school

    Responses LA maintained 36 Sponsored academy 13 Convertor academy 47 Free school 0 Pupil Referral Unit 0 Special school 1 University technical college 0 Studio school 0 Community school 2 Foundation school 5 Independent 1 Voluntary-aided Church of England (VA C of E)

    1

    Voluntary-aided Catholic 1 Total 107

    Q3, base: all respondents, multiple response

    The final characteristic question related to involvement in initial teacher training (ITT). This question was open to multiple responses so a total of 201 selections were made as schools can have more than one ITT role (see table 4). The survey produced 8 other responses; of these 1 was re-classified as a school-centred initial teacher training (SCITT), 4 as Teach First and 1 as Troops to Teachers. The remaining other responses included a member of a teaching school alliance and one that works with overseas placements.

    Table 4: Is your school involved in initial teacher training (ITT)?

    Responses ITT provider 34 Teaching school 9 Teaching school alliance 32 School Direct school 41 SCITT 22 Provides placements for trainees for HEIs 56 Teach First 4 Troops to teachers 1 Other 2 Total 201

    Q4, base: all respondents, multiple response

  • 9

    Findings

    Recruiting teachers The next section of the survey looked at how responding schools find recruiting in general. The survey found that just under half (51 responses) of respondents recruited an average of 5 – 10 full-time posts and the same number of respondents (51 responses) recruited an average of 0 – 1 part-time posts (table 5).

    Table 5: Average number of full and part time posts recruited to each year?

    Full-time

    Part-time Responses Responses

    0-1 1 51 2-4 34 49 5-10 51 6 More than 10 21 1 Total 107 107

    Q5 & Q6, base: all respondents, multiple response

    Only 10 respondents stated that they were always able to fill vacant teaching posts. The majority of respondents (78) indicated that some subjects are more difficult to fill and 10 said that they do not fill all their vacant teaching posts (table 6).

    Table 6: Do you fill all your vacant teaching posts?

    Responses Always 10 Some subjects pose challenges 78 No 18 Total 106

    Q7, base: all respondents, single response

    A follow-up multiple response question about which subjects are the most difficult to recruit to indicates that respondents found sciences (176 responses, including physics (82 responses), chemistry (65 responses) and biology (29 responses)), maths (87 responses), and English (69 responses) are the most difficult to recruit to (table 7).

  • 10

    Table 7: Which subjects/key stages do you find are the most difficult to recruit to?

    Responses

    Art 2 Biology 29 Business Studies 11 Chemistry 65 Computer Science 51 Design and realisation 26 English 69 Food 21 Geography 14 History 13 Languages2 40 Maths 87 Music 13 P.E. 1 Physics 82 Religious education (R.E.) 18 Soci