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3536 Concours Street, Suite 100 | Ontario, CA 91764 Office: 909-974-4900 | Fax: 909-974-4004 August 14, 2018 JN 168168 Sri Jayaram Foundation Inc. Contact: Arunasri Reddy 3579 East Foothill Boulevard, #714 Pasadena, California 91107 SUBJECT: Biological Resources Memorandum for the Sri Sai Ram Mandir Project located in the City of Chino Sphere of Influence, San Bernardino County, California Dear Mrs. Reddy, Michael Baker International (Michael Baker) conducted a habitat assessment for the Sri Sai Ram Mandir Project (Project) located in the City of Chino Sphere of Influence, San Bernardino County, California. Michael Baker biologists Ashley Spencer and Frances Yau inventoried and evaluated the condition of the habitat within the project site on August 6, 2018 to characterize existing site conditions and assess the potential occurrence of special-status 1 plant and wildlife species that could pose a constraint to project implementation. This biological resources memorandum provides an in-depth assessment of the suitability of the on-site habitat to support burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia), as well as several other special-status plant and wildlife species identified by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) California Natural Diversity Data Base (CNDDB) and other electronic databases as potentially occurring in the vicinity of the project site. PROJECT LOCATION The project site is generally located north of State Route 91, east of State Route 71, south of State Route 60, and west of Interstate 15 in the City of Chino Sphere of Influence, San Bernardino County, California (refer to Exhibit 1, Regional Vicinity). The project site is depicted on the Ontario quadrangle of the United States Geological Survey’s (USGS) 7.5-minute topographic map series in an un-sectioned area of Township 2 south, Range 8 west (refer to Exhibit 2, Site Vicinity). Specifically, the project site is located north of Riverside Drive, east of East End Avenue, south of Walnut Avenue, and west of Roswell Avenue (refer to Exhibit 3, Project Site). 1 As used in this report, “special-status” refers to plant and wildlife species that are federally or State listed, proposed, or candidates; plant species that have been designated a California Native Plant Society (CNPS) Rare Plant Rank; and wildlife species that are designated by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) as fully protected, species of special concern, or watch list species.

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Transcript of Sri Sai Ram Mandir Project HA 8.13 › uploads › LUS › Environmental › SRI...Aug 14, 2018  ·...

  • 3536 Concours Street, Suite 100 | Ontario, CA 91764

    Office: 909-974-4900 | Fax: 909-974-4004

    August 14, 2018 JN 168168

    Sri Jayaram Foundation Inc.

    Contact: Arunasri Reddy

    3579 East Foothill Boulevard, #714

    Pasadena, California 91107

    SUBJECT: Biological Resources Memorandum for the Sri Sai Ram Mandir Project located in the City

    of Chino Sphere of Influence, San Bernardino County, California

    Dear Mrs. Reddy,

    Michael Baker International (Michael Baker) conducted a habitat assessment for the Sri Sai Ram Mandir Project

    (Project) located in the City of Chino Sphere of Influence, San Bernardino County, California. Michael Baker

    biologists Ashley Spencer and Frances Yau inventoried and evaluated the condition of the habitat within the

    project site on August 6, 2018 to characterize existing site conditions and assess the potential occurrence of

    special-status1 plant and wildlife species that could pose a constraint to project implementation. This biological

    resources memorandum provides an in-depth assessment of the suitability of the on-site habitat to support

    burrowing owl (Athene cunicularia), as well as several other special-status plant and wildlife species identified

    by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (CDFW) California Natural Diversity Data Base (CNDDB)

    and other electronic databases as potentially occurring in the vicinity of the project site.

    PROJECT LOCATION

    The project site is generally located north of State Route 91, east of State Route 71, south of State Route 60, and

    west of Interstate 15 in the City of Chino Sphere of Influence, San Bernardino County, California (refer to

    Exhibit 1, Regional Vicinity). The project site is depicted on the Ontario quadrangle of the United States

    Geological Survey’s (USGS) 7.5-minute topographic map series in an un-sectioned area of Township 2 south,

    Range 8 west (refer to Exhibit 2, Site Vicinity). Specifically, the project site is located north of Riverside Drive,

    east of East End Avenue, south of Walnut Avenue, and west of Roswell Avenue (refer to Exhibit 3, Project Site).

    1 As used in this report, “special-status” refers to plant and wildlife species that are federally or State listed, proposed, or candidates;

    plant species that have been designated a California Native Plant Society (CNPS) Rare Plant Rank; and wildlife species that are

    designated by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) as fully protected, species of special concern, or watch list

    species.

  • August 14, 2018

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    Sri Sai Ram Mandir Project

    Biological Resources Memorandum

    PROJECT DESCRIPTION

    The proposed project consists of the construction of a 10,000 square foot temple and associated infrastructure,

    including a parking lot with seventy-six (76) stalls. In addition, project activities will include landscaping and

    the installation of paved driveways (refer to Exhibit 4, Project Depiction).

    METHODOLOGY

    A literature review and records search was conducted to determine which special-status biological resources

    have the potential to occur on or within the general vicinity of the project site. In addition to the literature review,

    a general habitat assessment or field survey of the project site and surrounding area was conducted. The field

    survey was conducted to document existing conditions within the project site and assess the potential for special-

    status biological resources to occur.

    Literature Review

    Prior to conducting the field survey, a literature review and records search was conducted for special-status

    biological resources potentially occurring on or within the vicinity of the project site. Previously recorded

    occurrences of special-status plant and wildlife species and their proximity to the project site were determined

    through a query of the CDFW’s QuickView Tool in the Biogeographic Information and Observation System

    (BIOS), CDFW’s CNDDB Rarefind 5 database, the California Native Plant Society (CNPS) Electronic

    Inventory of Rare and Endangered Vascular Plants of California, Calflora Database, compendia of special-status

    species published by CDFW, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) species listings.

    All available reports, survey results, and literature detailing the biological resources previously observed on or

    within the vicinity of the project site were reviewed to understand existing site conditions and note the extent of

    any disturbances that have occurred on the project site and surrounding area that would otherwise limit the

    distribution of special-status biological resources. Standard field guides and texts were reviewed for specific

    habitat requirements of special-status and non-special-status biological resources, as well as the following

    resources:

    • Google Earth Pro historic aerial imagery (1994 – 2017);

    • San Bernardino County General Plan;

    • United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) Web Soil Survey; and

    • USFWS Critical Habitat designations for Threatened and Endangered Species.

    The literature review and records search provided a baseline from which to inventory the biological resources

    potentially occurring within the project site. Additional recorded occurrences of those species found on or near

    the project site were derived from database queries. The CNDDB database was used, in conjunction with ArcGIS

    software, to review historical special-status species occurrence data within the vicinity of the project site.

  • August 14, 2018

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    Habitat Assessment and Field Survey

    Michael Baker biologists Ashley Spencer and Frances Yau inventoried and evaluated the condition of the habitat

    within the project site on August 6, 2018. Plant communities were preliminarily identified on aerial photographs

    and visually inspected during the field survey to document their extent within the project site. The plant

    communities occurring within the project site were further evaluated for their potential to provide suitable habitat

    for special-status plant and wildlife species as well as function as corridors and/or linkages that may support the

    movement of wildlife through the area. Special attention was given to any special-status habitats and/or

    undeveloped, natural areas, which have a higher potential to support special-status plant and wildlife species.

    All plant and wildlife species, including dominant plant species within each plant community, observed during

    the field survey were recorded. Plant species were identified by visual characteristics and morphology in the

    field. Unusual and less familiar plant species were photographed during the field survey and identified in the

    laboratory using taxonomical guides. Wildlife detections were made through observation of scat, trails, tracks,

    burrows, nests, and/or visual and aural observation. In addition, site characteristics including soil condition,

    topography, hydrology, anthropogenic disturbances, indicator species, condition of on-site plant communities,

    and presence of jurisdictional drainage and/or potential wetland features were noted.

    EXISTING SITE CONDITIONS

    The project site consists of a disturbed, unvegetated lot located southwest of the intersection of Roswell Avenue

    and Walnut Avenue. The project site contains evidence of a high level of human disturbance as a result of on-

    going weed abatement activities (i.e. disking) and illegal dumping. Areas surrounding the project site primarily

    consist of residential land uses. State Route 60 is located directly north of the project site and State Route 71 is

    located approximately 1.5 miles to the west. In addition, an active railway runs along the northern boundary of

    the project site in a northwest/southeast direction. On-site surface elevation ranges from approximately 751 to

    758 feet above mean sea level (msl) and gently slopes to the south. According to the USDA NRCS Custom Soil

    Resource Report for San Bernardino County, the project site is underlain by the following soil units: Grangeville

    fine sandy loam (Gr); and Hilmar loamy fine sand (Hr) (refer to Exhibit 5, Soils). Refer to Attachment B for

    representative photographs taken throughout the project site.

    VEGETATION

    The project site appeared to have been recently disked and as a result is primarily unvegetated with a few

    scattered ruderal/weedy, low-growing plant species (refer to Exhibit 6, Vegetation). Common plant species

    observed within and adjacent to the project site included tree of heaven (Ailanthus altissima), annual burrweed

    (Ambrosia acanthicarpa), wild oat (Avena fatua), lamb’s quarters (Chenopodium album), Jimsonweed (Datura

    wrightii), common sunflower (Helianthus annuus), prickly lettuce (Lactuca serriola), cheeseweed (Malva

    parviflora), tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca), Russian thistle (Salsola tragus), and puncture vine (Tribulus

    terrestris). Several ornamental tree species, including date palm (Phoenix sp.) and Mexican fan palm

    (Washingtonia robusta), associated with surrounding residential properties were also observed within and along

  • August 14, 2018

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    the western and southern boundaries of the project site. Refer to Attachment C for a complete list of plant species

    observed during the field survey.

    WILDLIFE

    Plant communities provide foraging habitat, nesting/denning sites, and shelter from adverse weather or

    predations. This section provides a general discussion of those wildlife species that were observed during the

    field survey or that are expected to occur within the project site based on existing site conditions. The discussion

    is to be used a general reference and is limited by the season, time of day, and weather conditions in which the

    field survey was conducted. Wildlife detections were based on calls, songs, scat, tracks, burrows, and direct

    observation. Refer to Attachment C for a complete list of wildlife species observed during the field survey.

    Fish

    No fish or hydrogeomorphic features (e.g., creeks, ponds, lakes, reservoirs) with frequent sources of water that

    would support populations of fish were observed on or within the vicinity of the project site. Therefore, no fish

    are expected to occur and are presumed absent from the project site.

    Amphibians

    No amphibians or hydrogeomorphic features (e.g., creeks, ponds, lakes, reservoirs) with frequent sources of

    water that would support amphibian species were observed on or within the vicinity of the project site. Therefore,

    no amphibians are expected to occur and are presumed absent from the project site.

    Reptiles

    No reptilian species were observed during the field survey. However, the project site and surrounding area have

    the potential to support reptilian species that are adapted to a high level of human disturbance. Common reptilian

    species expected to occur within the project site include western side-blotched lizard (Uta stansburiana elegans),

    San Diego alligator lizard (Elgaria multicarinata webbii), Great Basin fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis

    longipes), and Great Basin gopher snake (Pituophis catenifer deserticola).

    Birds

    Bird species detected during the field survey included Anna’s hummingbird (Calypte anna), American crow

    (Corvus brachyrhynchos), house finch (Haemorhous mexicanus), barn swallow (Hirundo rustica), California

    towhee (Melozone crissalis), northern mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos), house sparrow (Passer domesticus),

    American bushtit (Psaltriparus minimus), black phoebe (Sayornis nigricans), common starling (Sturnus

    vulgaris), Cassin’s kingbird (Tyrannus vociferans), and mourning dove (Zenaida macroura).

    Mammals

    The project site provides suitable habitat for a limited number of mammals that are adapted to a high level of

    human disturbance associated with on-going weed abatement activities and illegal dumping. However, most

  • August 14, 2018

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    mammalian species are nocturnal and are difficult to observe during a diurnal field survey. The only mammalian

    species observed during the field survey was California ground squirrel (Otospermophilus beecheyi). Other

    common mammalian species expected to occur on the project site include opossum (Didelphis virginiana),

    Audubon’s cottontail (Sylvilagus audubonii), and raccoon (Procyon lotor).

    NESTING BIRDS

    No active nests or birds displaying nesting behavior were observed during the field survey. Although heavily

    disturbed, the ornamental trees and vegetation associated with the project site and surrounding residential

    properties provide suitable foraging and limited amount of nesting opportunities for a variety of year-round and

    seasonal avian residents, as well as migrating songbirds that could occur in the area. Additionally, the project

    site provides limited ground nesting opportunities due to the high level of weed abatement activities which would

    likely deter birds from nesting on the open ground.

    MIGRATORY CORRIDORS AND LINKAGES

    Habitat linkages provide links between larger undeveloped habitat areas that are separated by development.

    Wildlife corridors are similar to linkages but provide specific opportunities for animals to disperse or migrate

    between areas. A corridor can be defined as a linear landscape feature of sufficient width to allow animal

    movement between two comparatively undisturbed habitat fragments. Adequate cover is essential for a corridor

    to function as a wildlife movement area. It is possible for a habitat corridor to be adequate for one species, but

    inadequate for others. Wildlife corridors are significant features for dispersal, seasonal migration, breeding, and

    foraging. Additionally, open space can provide a buffer against both human disturbance and natural fluctuations

    in resources.

    The project site is located in a heavily developed area within Unincorporated San Bernardino County and is

    exposed to on-going weed abatement activities (i.e., disking) which limits wildlife movement opportunities

    throughout the area. Further, the project site is surrounded by development and light and noise associated with

    State Route 60 to the north, the active railway to the east, and the surrounding residential properties to the south,

    east, and west would likely deter wildlife from utilizing the project site as a movement corridor. As such,

    development of the project site is not expected to disrupt wildlife movement opportunities within or adjacent to

    the project site.

    JURISDICTIONAL AREAS

    There are three key agencies that regulate activities within inland streams, wetlands, and riparian areas in

    California. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) Regulatory Branch regulates the discharge of dredge or

    fill materials into “waters of the United States” pursuant to Section 404 of the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA),

    Section 10 of the Rivers and Harbors Act, and Section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries

    Act. Of the State agencies, the Regional Water Quality Control Board (Regional Board) regulates discharges to

    surface waters pursuant to Section 401 of the CWA and the California Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control

  • August 14, 2018

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    Act, and the CDFW regulates alterations to streambed and associated plant communities under California Fish

    and Game Code Sections 1600 et seq. of the California Fish and Game Code.

    No jurisdictional drainage and/or wetland features occur within the boundaries of the project site. Therefore,

    development of the project site will not result in impacts to Corps, Regional Board, or CDFW jurisdictional areas

    and regulatory approvals will not be required.

    SPECIAL-STATUS BIOLOGICAL RESOURCES

    The CNDDB was queried for reported locations of special-status plant and wildlife species as well as special-

    status natural plant communities in the Ontario USGS 7.5-minute quadrangle. A search of published records of

    these species was conducted within these quadrangles using the CDFW’s CNDDB Rarefind 5 database and

    CNDDB Quickview Tool in BIOS. The habitat assessment evaluated the conditions of the habitat(s) within the

    boundaries of the project site to determine if the existing plant communities, at the time of the survey, have the

    potential to provide suitable habitat(s) for special-status plant and wildlife species.

    The literature search identified seventeen (17) special-status plant species, thirty-four (34) special-status wildlife

    species, and one (1) special-status plant community as having the potential to occur within the Ontario USGS

    7.5-minute quadrangle. Special-status plant and wildlife species were evaluated for their potential to occur within

    the project site based on habitat requirements, availability and quality of suitable habitat, and known

    distributions. Special-status plant and wildlife species determined to have the potential to occur within the

    vicinity of the project site are presented in Attachment D, Potentially Occurring Special-Status Biological

    Resources. Attachment D provides a detailed analysis regarding the potential occurrence of special-status plant

    and wildlife species within the project site.

    Special-Status Plants

    Seventeen (17) special-status plant species have been recorded in the CNDDB and CNPS within the Ontario

    USGS 7.5-minute quadrangle (refer to Attachment D). No special-status plant species were observed on-site

    during the field survey. The project site is routinely exposed to on-going weed abatement activities (i.e., disking)

    and illegal dumping resulting in heavily disturbed soils and an absence of natural plant communities. Therefore,

    no special-status plant species are expected to occur and are presumed to be absent from the project site. Focused

    surveys for special-status plant species are not recommended.

    Special-Status Wildlife

    Thirty-four (34) special-status wildlife species have been recorded by the CNDDB within the Ontario USGS

    7.5-minute quadrangle (refer to Attachment D). No special-status wildlife species observed during the field

    survey. Based on habitat requirements for specific special-status wildlife species and the availability and quality

    of habitats needed by each species, it was determined that the project site has a low potential to support Cooper’s

    hawk (Accipiter cooperii). All remaining special-status wildlife species are presumed to be absent from the

    project site based on habitat requirements, availability and quality of habitat needed by each species, and known

    distributions. The potential occurrence of burrowing owl is described in further detail below.

  • August 14, 2018

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    Biological Resources Memorandum

    Burrowing Owl

    The burrowing owl is currently listed as a California Species of Special Concern. It is a grassland specialist

    distributed throughout western North America where it occupies open areas with short vegetation and bare

    ground within shrub, desert, and grassland environments. Burrowing owls use a wide variety of arid and semi-

    arid environments with well-drained, level to gently-sloping areas characterized by sparse vegetation and bare

    ground (Haug and Didiuk 1993; Dechant et al. 1999). Burrowing owls are dependent upon the presence of

    burrowing mammals (such as ground squirrels) whose burrows are used for roosting and nesting (Haug and

    Didiuk 1993). The presence or absence of colonial mammal burrows is often a major factor that limits the

    presence or absence of burrowing owls. Where mammal burrows are scarce, burrowing owls have been found

    occupying man-made cavities, such as buried and non-functioning drain pipes, stand-pipes, and dry culverts.

    Burrowing mammals may burrow beneath rocks and debris or large, heavy objects such as abandoned cars,

    concrete blocks, or concrete pads. They also require open vegetation allowing line-of-sight observation of the

    surrounding habitat to forage as well as watch for predators.

    Despite a systematic search of the project site, no burrowing owls or sign of burrowing owl activity (i.e., pellets,

    feathers, castings, or white wash) were observed during the field survey. The project site is primarily unvegetated

    and/or vegetated with a variety of low-growing plant species that allow for line-of-sight observation favored by

    burrowing owls. However, the project site is located within a heavily developed area within Unincorporated San

    Bernardino County and is exposed to a high level of disturbance associated with the active railway to the north

    and on-going weed abatement activities which would likely deter burrowing owls from occupying the project

    site. In addition, several power poles and ornamental trees surround the project site which further decreases the

    likelihood that burrowing owls would occur as these features provide perching opportunities for larger raptor

    species (i.e., red-tailed hawk [Buteo jamaicensis]) that prey on burrowing owls. Therefore, burrowing owl is

    presumed absent from the project site and focused surveys are not recommended.

    Special-Status Plant Communities

    According to the CNDDB, one (1) special-status plant community has been reported in the Ontario USGS 7.5-

    minute quadrangle: Riversidian Alluvial Fan Sage Scrub. Based on the results of the field survey, this special-

    status plant community does not occur within the project site.

    CRITICAL HABITAT

    Critical Habitat refers to specific areas within the geographical range of a species at the time it is listed that

    include the physical or biological features that are essential to the survival and eventual recovery of that species.

    Maintenance of these physical and biological features requires special management considerations or protection,

    regardless of whether individuals or the species are present or not. In the event that a project may result in take

    or adverse modification to a species’ designated Critical Habitat, a project proponent may be required to engage

    in suitable mitigation. However, consultation for impacts to Critical Habitat is only required when a project has

    a federal nexus. This may include projects that occur on federal lands, require federal permits (e.g., CWA Section

  • August 14, 2018

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    Biological Resources Memorandum

    404 permit), or receive any federal oversight or funding. If there is a federal nexus, then the federal agency that

    is responsible for providing funds or permits would be consult with the USFWS.

    The project site is not located within federally designated Critical Habitat. Therefore, impacts to Critical Habitat

    will not occur and consultation with the USFWS will not be required for the loss or adverse modification to

    Critical Habitat.

    CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    The project site primarily consists of a disturbed, unvegetated lot with a few scattered, low-growing plant species

    located southwest of the intersection of Roswell Avenue and Walnut Avenue. The project site is routinely

    exposed to on-going weed abatement activities (i.e., disking) and illegal dumping resulting in heavily disturbed

    soils and an absence of natural plant communities. Therefore, no special-status plant species are expected to

    occur within the project site and no additional surveys are recommended.

    No special-status wildlife species were observed during the field survey. Based on habitat requirements for

    specific special-status wildlife species and the availability and quality of habitats needed by each species, it was

    determined that the project site has a low potential to support Cooper’s hawk. All remaining special-status

    wildlife species are presumed to be absent from the project site based on habitat requirements, availability and

    quality of habitat needed by each species, and known distributions.

    Nesting birds are protected pursuant to the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA) and Sections 3503, 3503.3, 3511,

    and 3513 of the California Fish and Game Code. If project activities are to be initiated during the nesting season

    (February 1 to August 31), a pre-construction nesting bird clearance survey shall be conducted by a qualified

    biologist no more than three (3) days prior to the start of any vegetation removal or ground disturbing activities

    to ensure that birds protected under the MBTA and California Fish and Game Code are not impacted. A qualified

    biologist shall survey all suitable nesting habitat within the project site, and within a biologically defensible

    buffer distance surrounding the project site, for nesting birds prior to commencing project activities.

    Documentation of surveys and findings shall be submitted to Sri Jayaram Foundation Inc. for review and file. If

    no active nests are detected, construction may begin. If an active nest is found, the bird shall be identified to

    species and the approximate distance from the closest work site to the nest shall be estimated and the qualified

    biologist shall establish a “no-disturbance” buffer around the active nest. The distance of the “no-disturbance”

    buffer may be increased or decreased according to the judgement of the qualified biologist depending on the

    level of activity and species (i.e., listed, sensitive). The qualified biologist shall periodically monitor any active

    nests to determine if project-related activities occurring outside the ‘no disturbance” buffer disturb the birds and

    if the buffer should be increased. Once the young have fledged and left the nest, or the nest otherwise becomes

    inactive under natural conditions, construction activities within the buffer area can occur.

    Although burrowing owl focused surveys are not recommended, a pre-construction burrowing owl clearance

    survey shall be conducted to ensure that burrowing owls remain absent from the project site and impacts to any

    occupied burrows do not occur. In accordance with the Staff Report on Burrowing Owl Mitigation (CDFW 2012),

  • August 14, 2018

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    Biological Resources Memorandum

    two pre-construction clearance surveys shall be conducted 14-30 days and 24 hours prior to any vegetation

    removal or ground disturbing activities. Documentation of surveys and findings shall be submitted to Sri Jayaram

    Foundation Inc. for review and file. If no burrowing owls or occupied burrows are detected, construction may

    begin. If an occupied burrow is found within the development footprint during pre-construction clearance

    surveys, a burrowing owl exclusion plan will need to be prepared and submitted to CDFW for approval prior to

    initiating project activities.

    No jurisdictional drainage and/or wetland features were observed within or adjacent to the project site. Therefore,

    development of the project site will not result in impacts to Corps, Regional Board, or CDFW jurisdictional areas

    and regulatory approvals will not be required.

    The project site is not located within federally designated Critical Habitat. Therefore, impacts to Critical Habitat

    will not occur and consultation with the USFWS will not be required for the loss or adverse modification to

    Critical Habitat.

    Please do not hesitate to contact me at (909) 974-4961 or [email protected] or Ashley Spencer at

    (909) 974-4962 or [email protected] should you have any questions or require further

    information.

    Sincerely,

    Thomas Millington Ashley Spencer

    Biologist Biologist

    Natural Resources Natural Resources

    Attachments:

    A. Project Exhibits

    B. Site Photographs

    C. Flora and Fauna Compendium

    D. Potentially Occurring Special-Status Biological Resources

  • Attachment A

    Project Exhibits

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    SRI SAI RAM MANDIR PROJECTBIOLOGICAL RESOURCES MEMORANDUM

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    SRI SAI RAM MANDIR PROJECTBIOLOGICAL RESOURCES MEMORANDUM

  • SRI SAI RAM MANDIR PROJECTBIOLOGICAL RESOURCES MEMORANDUM

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  • SRI SAI RAM MANDIR PROJECTBIOLOGICAL RESOURCES MEMORANDUM

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    ° 0 200100 Feet

    LegendProject Site

    Exhibit 4

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    Harvest Ct

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  • SRI SAI RAM MANDIR PROJECTBIOLOGICAL RESOURCES MEMORANDUM

    Soils

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    Source: Google, Esri SSRGO Soils Database

    Roswel

    l Ave

    ?z

    ° 0 200100 Feet

    LegendProject Site

    Grangeville Fine Sandy Loam

    Hilmar Loamy Fine Sand

    Exhibit 5

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    Gr

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  • SRI SAI RAM MANDIR PROJECTBIOLOGICAL RESOURCES MEMORANDUM

    Vegetation

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    Roswel

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    Disturbed (4.83 Acres)

    Exhibit 6

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  • Critical Habitat

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    Source: Esri Imagery, US Fish and Wildlife Service

    ?z

    !"̀$

    ° 0 21 Miles

    LegendProject Site

    Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii extimus)Yellow-Billed Cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus)Least Bell's Vireo (Vireo bellii pusillus)Coastal California Gnatcatcher (Polioptila californica californica)

    Exhibit 7

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    SRI SAI RAM MANDIR PROJECTBIOLOGICAL RESOURCES MEMORANDUM

  • Attachment B

    Site Photographs

  • Attachment B – Site Photographs

    Sri Sai Ram Mandir Project

    Biological Resources Memorandum

    Photograph 1: Standing within the southeastern portion of the project site looking west. Evidence of

    recent weed abatement activities (i.e., disking) can be seen in the foreground.

    Photograph 2: Looking northwest across the western portion of the project site. Evidence of illegal

    dumping can be seen in the distance.

  • Attachment B – Site Photographs

    Sri Sai Ram Mandir Project

    Biological Resources Memorandum

    Photograph 3: Looking southwest across the central portion of the project site.

    Photograph 4: Standing within the northern portion of the project site looking southeast across the

    project site.

  • Attachment B – Site Photographs

    Sri Sai Ram Mandir Project

    Biological Resources Memorandum

    Photograph 5: Standing within the southeastern portion of the project site looking south across the

    project site.

    Photograph 6: Standing within the southeastern portion of the project site looking northwest.

  • Attachment C

    Flora and Fauna Compendium

  • Attachment C – Flora and Fauna Compendium

    Sri Sai Ram Mandir Project

    Biological Resources Memorandum

    Table C – 1: Plant Species

    Scientific Name Common Name

    Ailanthus altissima*

    Ambrosia acanthicarpa

    Avena fatua*

    Baccharis salicifolia

    Bromus diandrus*

    Bromus madritensis ssp. rubens*

    Chenopodium album*

    Convolvulus arvensis*

    Datura wrightii

    Digitaria sanguinalis*

    Erigeron bonariensis*

    Erodium cicutarium*

    Euphorbia maculata *

    Helianthus annuus

    Lactuca serriola*

    Malva parviflora*

    Nicotiana glauca *

    Phoenix sp.*

    Pseudognaphalium luteoalbum*

    Salix lasiolepis

    Salsola tragus*

    Schismus barbatus*

    Solanum elaeagnifolium*

    Tribulus terrestris*

    Washingtonia robusta*

    tree of heaven

    annual burrweed

    wild oat

    mulefat

    ripgut brome

    foxtail brome

    lamb’s quaters

    field bindweed

    Jimsonweed

    hairy crabgrass

    flax-leaved horseweed

    coastal heron’s bill

    spotted spurge

    common sunflower

    prickly lettuce

    cheeseweed

    tree tobacco

    date palm

    Jersey cudweed

    arroyo willow

    Russian thistle

    common Mediterranean grass

    horse nettle

    puncture vine

    Mexican fan palm

    Table C – 2: Wildlife Species

    Scientific Name Common Name

    Aves Birds

    Calypte anna Anna’s hummingbird

    Corvus brachyrhynchos

    Haemorhous mexicanus

    Hirundo rustica

    Melozone crissalis

    Mimus polyglottos

    Passer domesticus

    Psaltriparus minimus

    Sayornis nigricans

    Sturnus vulgaris

    Tyrannus vociferans

    American crow

    house finch

    barn swallow

    California towhee

    northern mockingbird

    house sparrow

    American bushtit

    black phoebe

    common starling

    Cassin’s kingbird

    Zenaida macroura mourning dove

    Mammalia Mammals

    Otospermophilus beecheyi California ground squirrel

    *Non-native/invasive

  • Attachment D

    Potentially Occurring Special-Status Biological Resources

  • Attachment D – Potentially Occurring Special-Status Biological Resources

    Sri Sai Ram Mandir Project

    Biological Resources Memorandum

    Table D-1: Potentially Occurring Special-Status Biological Resources

    Scientific Name

    Common Name Status Habitat

    Observed

    Onsite Potential to Occur

    SPECIAL-STATUS WILDLIFE SPECIES

    Accipiter cooperii

    Cooper’s hawk

    Fed:

    CA:

    None

    WL

    Generally, found in forested areas up to 3,000 feet in elevation,

    especially near edges and rivers. Prefers hardwood stands and mature

    forests, but can be found in urban and suburban areas where there are tall trees for nesting. Common in open areas during nesting season.

    No

    Low:

    Some suitable foraging habitat is present within the project site.

    Additionally, this species is

    known to occur within urban areas.

    Anniella stebbinsi

    southern California legless lizard

    Fed:

    CA:

    None

    SSC

    Locally abundant specimens are found in coastal sand dunes and a

    variety of interior habitats, including sandy washes and alluvial fans.

    A large protected population persists in the remnant of the once

    extensive El Segundo Dunes at Los Angeles International Airport.

    No Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present within the project site.

    Antrozous pallidus

    pallid bat Fed: CA:

    None SSC

    Common of low elevations in California. Occupies a variety of

    habitats including grasslands, shrublands, woodlands, and forests from sea level up through mixed conifer forests. Most common in open, dry

    habitats with rocky areas for roosting.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Arizona elegans occidentalis

    California glossy snake

    Fed:

    CA:

    None

    SSC Inhabits arid scrub, rocky washes, grasslands, and chaparral habitats. No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Artemisiospiza belli belli

    Bell's sage sparrow Fed: CA:

    None WL

    Occurs in chaparral dominated by fairly dense stands of chamise. Also found in coastal sage scrub in south of range.

    No Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present within the project site.

    Aspidoscelis tigris stejnegeri

    coastal whiptail Fed: CA:

    None SSC

    Found in a variety of ecosystems, primarily hot and dry open areas with sparse foliage - chaparral, woodland, and riparian areas.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Athene cunicularia

    burrowing owl

    Fed:

    CA:

    None

    SSC

    Primarily a grassland species, but it persists and even thrives in some landscapes highly altered by human activity. Occurs in open, annual

    or perennial grasslands, deserts, and scrublands characterized by low-

    growing vegetation. The overriding characteristics of suitable habitat appear to be burrows for roosting and nesting and relatively short

    vegetation with only sparse shrubs and taller vegetation.

    No Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present within the project site.

    Buteo swainsoni

    Swainson's hawk

    Fed:

    CA:

    None

    THR

    Typical habitat is open desert, grassland, or cropland containing

    scattered, large trees or small groves. Breeds in stands with few trees in juniper-sage flats, riparian areas, and in oak savannah in the Central

    Valley. Forages in adjacent grassland or suitable grain or alfalfa fields

    or livestock pastures.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus sandiegensis

    coastal cactus wren

    Fed:

    CA:

    None

    SSC

    The coastal population inhabits cactus scrub from southern Ventura

    County and southwestern San Bernardino County to northwestern

    Baja California. Key habitat element is thickets of chollas or prickly-pear cacti tall enough to support and protect the birds’ nests.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

  • Attachment D – Potentially Occurring Special-Status Biological Resources

    Sri Sai Ram Mandir Project

    Biological Resources Memorandum

    Scientific Name

    Common Name Status Habitat

    Observed

    Onsite Potential to Occur

    Chaetodipus fallax fallax

    northwestern San Diego pocket mouse Fed: CA:

    None SSC

    Occurs in desert and coastal habitats in southern California, Mexico, and northern Baja California, from sea level to at least 4,596 feet above

    msl. Found in a variety of temperate habitats ranging from chaparral

    and grasslands to scrub forests and deserts. Requires low growing vegetation or rocky outcroppings, as well as sandy soils for burrowing.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Circus cyaneus

    northern harrier

    Fed:

    CA:

    None

    SSC

    Frequents meadows, grasslands, open rangelands, desert sinks, fresh

    and saltwater emergent wetlands; seldom found in wooded areas.

    Mostly found in flat, or hummocky, open areas of tall, dense grasses moist or dry shrubs, and edges for nesting, cover, and feeding.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Dipodomys merriami parvus

    San Bernardino kangaroo rat Fed: CA:

    END SSC

    Primarily found in Riversidian alluvial fan sage scrub and sandy loam

    soils, alluvial fans and flood plains, and along washes with nearby sage scrub. May occur at lower densities in Riversidian upland sage scrub,

    chaparral and grassland in uplands and tributaries in proximity to

    Riversidian alluvial fan sage scrub habitats. Tend to avoid rocky substrates and prefer sandy loam substrates for digging of shallow

    burrows.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Emys marmorata

    western pond turtle

    Fed:

    CA:

    None

    SSC

    Found in ponds, lakes, rivers, streams, creeks, marshes, and irrigation

    ditches, with abundant vegetation, either rocky or muddy bottoms, in woodland, forest, and grassland. In streams, prefers pools to shallower

    areas. Logs, rocks, cattail mats, and exposed banks are required for

    basking. May enter brackish water and even seawater. Found at elevations from sea level to over 5,900 feet in elevation.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Eumops perotis californicus

    western mastiff bat Fed: CA:

    None SSC

    Primarily a cliff-dwelling species, roost generally under exfoliating

    rock slabs. Roosts are generally high above the ground, usually allowing a clear vertical drop of at least three meters below the

    entrance for flight. In California, it is most frequently encountered in

    broad open areas. Its foraging habitat includes dry desert washes, flood plains, chaparral, oak woodland, open ponderosa pine forest,

    grassland, and agricultural areas.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Falco columbarius

    merlin

    Fed:

    CA:

    None

    WL

    Nest in forested openings, edges, and along rivers across northern North America. Found in open forests, grasslands, and especially

    coastal areas with flocks of small songbirds or shorebirds. Occurs at

    elevations below 3,900 feet above msl.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Falco mexicanus

    prairie falcon

    Fed:

    CA:

    None

    WL

    Ranges from southeastern deserts northwest throughout the Central Valley and along the inner Coast Ranges and Sierra Nevada.

    Distributed from annual grasslands to alpine meadows, but associated

    primarily with perennial grasslands, savannahs, rangeland, some agricultural fields, and desert scrub. Within the Sierra Nevada, this

    species range above the timberline in late summer, but winter at lower

    elevations. During the breeding season, this species is commonly found in foothills and mountains which provide cliffs and escarpments

    for nesting.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

  • Attachment D – Potentially Occurring Special-Status Biological Resources

    Sri Sai Ram Mandir Project

    Biological Resources Memorandum

    Scientific Name

    Common Name Status Habitat

    Observed

    Onsite Potential to Occur

    Icteria virens

    yellow-breasted chat

    Fed:

    CA:

    None

    SSC

    Primarily found in tall, dense, relatively wide riparian woodlands and thickets of willows, vine tangles, and dense brush with well-developed

    understories. Nesting areas are associated with streams, swampy

    ground, and the borders of small ponds. Breeding habitat must be dense to provide shade and concealment. It winters south the Central

    America. Found at elevations ranging from 820 to 2,625 feet above

    msl.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Lanius ludovicianus

    loggerhead shrike

    Fed:

    CA:

    None

    SSC

    Often found in broken woodlands, shrublands, and other habitats.

    Prefers open country with scattered perches for hunting and fairly dense brush for nesting.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Lasiurus xanthinus

    western yellow bat

    Fed:

    CA:

    None

    SSC

    Roosts in palm trees in foothill riparian, desert wash, and palm oasis

    habitats with access to water for foraging. No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present within the project site.

    Laterallus jamaicensis coturniculus

    California black rail

    Fed:

    CA:

    None

    THR ; FP

    Suitable habitat generally includes salt marches, freshwater marshes,

    and wet meadows. Typical associated vegetation includes pickle weed

    (Salicornia virginica), in salt marshes and bulrush (Scirpus spp.) in less saline habitats.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Neotoma lepida intermedia

    San Diego desert woodrat Fed: CA:

    None SSC

    Occurs in coastal scrub communities between San Luis Obispo and

    San Diego Counties. Prefers moderate to dense canopies, and

    especially rocky outcrops.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Nyctinomops macrotis

    big free-tailed bat Fed: CA:

    None SSC

    Maternity roosts have been documented in rock crevices, with

    evidence of long term use. Mainly roost in crevices and rocks in cliff situations. Some have been documented roosting in buildings, caves,

    and tree cavities.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Perognathus longimembris brevinasus

    Los Angeles pocket mouse

    Fed:

    CA:

    None

    SSC

    Occurs in lower elevation grasslands and coastal sage scrub communities in and around the Los Angeles Basin. Prefers open

    ground with fine sandy soils. May not dig extensive burrows, but

    instead will seek refuge under weeds and dead leaves instead.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Phrynosoma blainvillii

    coast horned lizard

    Fed:

    CA:

    None

    SSC

    Occurs in a wide variety of vegetation types including coastal sage

    scrub, annual grassland, chaparral, oak woodland, riparian woodland

    and coniferous forest. In inland areas, this species is restricted to areas with pockets of open microhabitat, created by disturbance (i.e. fire,

    floods, roads, grazing, fire breaks). The key elements of such habitats

    are loose, fine soils with a high sand fraction; an abundance of native ants or other insects; and open areas with limited overstory for basking

    and low, but relatively dense shrubs for refuge.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Polioptila californica californica

    coastal California gnatcatcher Fed: CA:

    THR SSC

    Obligate resident of sage scrub habitats that are dominated by

    California sagebrush. This species generally occurs below 750 feet elevation in coastal regions and below 1,500 feet inland. It prefers

    habitat with more low-growing vegetation.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Rana boylii

    foothill yellow-legged frog

    Fed:

    CA:

    None

    CTHR ; SSC

    Frequents rocky streams and rivers with rocky substrate and open, sunny banks, in forests, chaparral, and woodlands. Sometimes found

    in isolated pools, vegetated backwaters, and deep, shaded, spring-fed

    pools.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

  • Attachment D – Potentially Occurring Special-Status Biological Resources

    Sri Sai Ram Mandir Project

    Biological Resources Memorandum

    Scientific Name

    Common Name Status Habitat

    Observed

    Onsite Potential to Occur

    Rana draytonii

    California red-legged frog Fed: CA:

    THR SSC

    Found mainly near ponds in humid forests, woodlands, grasslands, coastal scrub, and stream sides with plant cover. Most common in

    lowlands or foothills. Frequently found in woods adjacent to streams.

    Occurs along the coast ranges from Mendocino County south and in portions of the Sierra Nevada and Cascades ranges.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Salvadora hexalepis virgultea

    coast patch-nosed snake

    Fed:

    CA:

    None

    SSC

    Inhabits semi-arid brushy areas and chaparral in canyons, rocky

    hillsides, and plains. Requires friable soils for burrowing. No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Setophaga petechia

    yellow warbler Fed: CA:

    None SSC

    Nests over all of California except the Central Valley, the Mojave

    Desert region, and high altitudes and the eastern side of the Sierra

    Nevada. Winters along the Colorado River and in parts of Imperial and Riverside Counties. Nests in riparian areas dominated by willows,

    cottonwoods, sycamores, or alders or in mature chaparral. May also

    use oaks, conifers, and urban areas near stream courses.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Spea hammondii

    western spadefoot Fed: CA:

    None SSC

    Prefers open areas with sandy or gravelly soils, in a variety of habitats including mixed woodlands, grasslands, coastal sage scrub, chaparral,

    sandy washed, lowlands, river floodplains, alluvial fans, playas, alkali

    flats, foothills, and mountains. Rainpools which do not contain bullfrogs, fish, or crayfish are necessary for breeding.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Taricha torosa

    Coast Range newt

    Fed:

    CA:

    None

    SSC

    Found in wet forests, oak forests, chaparral, and rolling grasslands. In southern California, drier chaparral, oak woodland, and grasslands are

    used.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Thamnophis hammondii

    two-striped gartersnake Fed: CA:

    None SSC

    Utilizes a variety of habitats including forests, mixed woodlands, grassland, chaparral, and farmlands. Often found near ponds, marshes,

    or streams. No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Thamnophis sirtalis infernalis

    south coast gartersnake Fed: CA:

    None SSC

    Utilizes a variety of habitats including forests, mixed woodlands,

    grassland, chaparral, and farmlands. Often found near ponds, marshes,

    or streams.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Xanthocephalus xanthocephalus

    yellow-headed blackbird Fed: CA:

    None SSC

    Occurs in freshwater emergent wetlands, and moist, open areas along

    croplands and mud flats of lacustrine habitats. Prefers to nest in dense wetland vegetation characterized by tules, cattails, or other similar

    plant species along the border of lakes and ponds.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    SPECIAL-STATUS PLANT SPECIES

    Calochortus catalinae

    Catalina mariposa-lily

    Fed:

    CA:

    CNPS:

    None

    None

    4.2

    Habitats include chaparral, cismontane woodland, coastal scrub,

    valley and foothill grassland. Found at elevations ranging from 49 to 2,297 feet above mean sea level (msl). Blooming period is from

    February to June.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Calochortus plummerae

    Plummer's mariposa-lily

    Fed: CA:

    CNPS:

    None None

    4.2

    Prefers openings in chaparral, foothill woodland, coastal sage scrub, valley foothill grasslands, cismontane woodland, lower montane

    coniferous forest and yellow pine forest. Often found on dry, rocky

    slopes and soils and brushy areas. Can be very common after a fire. Found at elevations ranging from 459 to 6,299 feet above msl.

    Blooming period is from May to July.

    No Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present within the project site.

  • Attachment D – Potentially Occurring Special-Status Biological Resources

    Sri Sai Ram Mandir Project

    Biological Resources Memorandum

    Scientific Name

    Common Name Status Habitat

    Observed

    Onsite Potential to Occur

    Calystegia felix

    lucky morning-glory

    Fed:

    CA: CNPS:

    None

    None 1B.1

    Historically associated with wetland and marshy places, but possibly in drier situations as well. Found in riparian scrub, meadows and seeps.

    Found at elevations ranging from 98 to 705 feet above msl. Blooming

    period is from March to September.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Centromadia pungens ssp. laevis

    smooth tarplant

    Fed:

    CA: CNPS:

    None

    None 1B.1

    Occurs in alkaline soils within chenopod scrub, meadows and seeps, playas, riparian woodland, valley and foothill grassland habitats.

    Found at elevations ranging from 0 to 2,100 feet above msl. Blooming

    period is from April to September.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Chorizanthe parryi var. parryi

    Parry's spineflower

    Fed: CA:

    CNPS:

    None None

    1B.1

    Grows in sandy or rocky openings within chaparral, cismontane

    woodland, coastal scrub, and valley and foothill grassland habitats.

    Found at elevations ranging from 902 to 4,003 feet above msl. Blooming period is from April to June.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Cladium californicum

    California saw-grass

    Fed: CA:

    CNPS:

    None None

    2B.2

    Grows in alkaline or freshwater marshes and swamps. Additionally found in meadows and seeps. Found at elevations ranging from 197 to

    2,838 feet above msl. Blooming period is from June to September.

    No Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present within the project site.

    Dodecahema leptoceras

    slender-horned spineflower

    Fed: CA:

    CNPS:

    END END

    1B.1

    Chaparral, coastal scrub (alluvial fan sage scrub). Flood deposited terraces and washes. Found at elevations ranging from 1,181 to 2,690

    feet above msl. Blooming period is from April to June.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Horkelia cuneata var. puberula

    mesa horkelia

    Fed: CA:

    CNPS:

    None None

    1B.1

    Open sandy fields and chaparral, mostly away from the coast, old

    dunes, foothill edge of LA Basin, south Coast, Peninsular range.

    Found at elevations ranging from 230 to 2,657 feet above msl. Blooming period is from February to September.

    No Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present within the project site.

    Juglans californica

    southern California black walnut

    Fed:

    CA:

    CNPS:

    None

    None

    4.2

    Found in chaparral, cismontane woodland, coastal scrub, and riparian

    woodland habitats. Found at elevations ranging from 164 to 2,953 feet

    above msl. Blooming period is from March to August.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Juncus acutus ssp. leopoldii

    southwestern spiny rush

    Fed:

    CA: CNPS:

    None

    None 4.2

    Occurs in coastal dunes (mesic), meadows and seeps (alkaline seeps), and marshes and swamps (coastal salt) habitats. Found at elevations

    ranging from 9 to 2,953 feet above msl. Blooming period is (March)

    May to June.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Lepidium virginicum var. robinsonii

    Robinson's pepper-grass

    Fed:

    CA: CNPS:

    None

    None 4.3

    Dry soils on chaparral and coastal sage scrub. Found at elevations

    ranging from 3 to 2,904 feet above msl. Blooming period is from January to July.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Muhlenbergia californica

    California muhly

    Fed:

    CA: CNPS:

    None

    None 4.3

    Found in chaparral, coastal scrub, lower montane coniferous forest,

    meadows and seeps. Found at elevations ranging from 328 to 6,562 feet above msl. Blooming period is from June to September.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Navarretia prostrata

    prostrate vernal pool navarretia

    Fed:

    CA: CNPS:

    None

    None 1B.1

    Grows in coastal scrub, vernal pools, meadows and seeps, valley and

    foothill grassland habitats. Found at elevations ranging from 10 to 3,970 feet above msl. Blooming period is from April to July.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Pseudognaphalium leucocephalum

    white rabbit-tobacco

    Fed:

    CA:

    CNPS:

    None

    None

    2B.2

    Found in sandy and gravelly soils within chaparral, cismontane woodland, coastal scrub, and riparian woodland habitats. Occurs at

    elevations ranging from 0 to 6,890 feet above msl. Blooming period is

    from August to November.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

  • Attachment D – Potentially Occurring Special-Status Biological Resources

    Sri Sai Ram Mandir Project

    Biological Resources Memorandum

    Scientific Name

    Common Name Status Habitat

    Observed

    Onsite Potential to Occur

    Sidalcea neomexicana

    salt spring checkerbloom

    Fed:

    CA: CNPS:

    None

    None 2B.2

    Habitat includes chaparral, coastal scrub, lower montane coniferous forest, plays, and mojavean desert scrub. Found at elevations ranging

    from 49 to 5,020 feet above msl. Blooming period is from March to

    June.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Symphyotrichum defoliatum

    San Bernardino aster

    Fed: CA:

    CNPS:

    None None

    1B.2

    Grows in cismontane woodland, coastal scrub, lower montane coniferous forest, meadows and seeps, marshes and swamps, valley

    and foothill grassland (vernally mesic). Can be found growing near

    ditches, streams, and springs within these habitats. Found at elevations ranging from 7 to 6,693 feet above msl. Blooming period is from July

    to November.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    Thysanocarpus rigidus

    rigid fringepod

    Fed:

    CA:

    CNPS:

    None

    None

    1B.2

    Found in dry, rocky slopes within pinyon and juniper woodland

    habitat. Found at elevations ranging from 1,969 to 7,218 feet above

    msl. Blooming period is from February to May.

    No

    Presumed Absent:

    No suitable habitat is present

    within the project site.

    SPECIAL-STATUS PLANT COMMUNITIES

    Riversidian Alluvial Fan Sage Scrub CDFW Sensitive

    Habitat

    Occur within broad washes of sandy alluvial drainages that carry rainfall runoff sporadically in winter and spring but remain relatively

    dry through the remainder of the year. Is restricted to drainages and

    floodplains with very sandy substrates that have a dearth of decomposed plant material. These areas do not develop into riparian

    woodland or scrub due to the limited water resources and scouring by

    occasional floods.

    No

    Absent

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) -

    Federal

    END - Federal Endangered THR - Federal Threatened

    California Department of Fish and Wildlife

    (CDFW) - California

    END- California Endangered THR - California Threatened

    CTHR - The classification provided to a native

    species or subspecies of a bird, mammal, fish, amphibian, reptile, or plant that the Fish and

    Game Commission has formally noticed as

    being under review by the Department of Fish and Wildlife for addition to the list of

    threatened species, or a species for which the

    commission has published a notice of proposed regulation to add the species to the

    list of threatened species.

    SSC - California Species of Concern WL - Watch List

    FP - California Fully Protected

    California Native Plant Society (CNPS)

    California Rare Plant Rank

    1B Plants Rare, Threatened, or Endangered in California and Elsewhere

    2B Plants Rare, Threatened, or Endangered in

    California, but More Common Elsewhere 4 Plants of Limited Distribution – A Watch List

    Threat Ranks

    0.1 - Seriously threatened in California

    0.2 - Moderately threatened in California 0.3 - Not very threatened in California