Report on Enhancing Security and Stability in Afghanistan · PDF file Report on Enhancing...

Click here to load reader

  • date post

    22-May-2020
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    6
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of Report on Enhancing Security and Stability in Afghanistan · PDF file Report on Enhancing...

  • Report on Enhancing Security and Stability

    in Afghanistan

    June 2015

    Report to Congress In accordance with sections 1224 and 1225 of the

    Carl Levin and Howard P. “Buck” McKeon National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 (P.L. 113-

    291); page 257 of House Report 113-102 accompanying H.R. 1960, the NDAA for FY 2014; and section 1531(e) of the NDAA for FY 2013 (P.L. 112-239), as amended by section 1531(b) of the NDAA

    for FY 2014 (P.L.113-66).

    Preparation of this report cost the Department of Defense a total of

    approximately $207,000 in Fiscal Year 2015.

    Generated on June 3, 2015, Ref ID: 5-7B5DCF1

  • This report is submitted consistent with section 1225 of the Carl Levin and Howard P. “Buck” McKeon National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 (P.L. 113-291), which replaces the previous reporting requirement for reports on “Progress toward Security and Stability in Afghanistan.” It includes a description of the strategy of the United States for security and stability in Afghanistan, a current and anticipated threat assessment, as well as a description and assessment of the size, structure, strategy, budget, and financing of the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces. This inaugural report is the first in a series of reports required every 180 days through fiscal year 2017 and was prepared in coordination with the Secretary of State. The content of this report also responds to the report requested on page 257 of House Report 113-102 accompanying H.R. 1960, the NDAA for FY 2014, Report on U.S. Strategy in Afghanistan Post-2014; and required by section 1531(e) of the NDAA for FY 2013 (P.L, 112-239), as amended by section 1531(b) of the NDAA for FY 2014 (P.L.113-66), Plan for the Use of the Afghanistan Security Forces Fund Through September 2017; and section 1224 of the NDAA for FY 2015, Plan for Sustaining the Afghan National Security Forces Through September 2017. This report covers efforts to enhance security and stability in Afghanistan from December 1, 2014, through May 31, 2015. This assessment complements other reports and information about Afghanistan provided to Congress; it is not intended to be the single source of all information about the combined efforts or the future strategy of the United States, its coalition partners, or Afghanistan. A classified annex accompanies this report. The next report will include an analysis of efforts to enhance security and stability in Afghanistan from June 1, 2015, through November 30, 2015.

  • I

    TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary ......................................................................................................................1

    Section 1 – Strategy and Objectives ..............................................................................................10

    1.1 U.S. Strategy in Afghanistan .............................................................................................. 10

    1.2 U.S. Objectives in Afghanistan ........................................................................................... 11

    1.3 U.S. Counterterrorism Mission ........................................................................................... 12

    1.4 NATO-led Resolute Support Mission ................................................................................. 13

    1.5 Indicators of Effectiveness .................................................................................................. 19

    Section 2 – Threat Assessment ......................................................................................................23

    2.1 Importance of Afghanistan-Pakistan Relations .................................................................. 23

    2.2 Current Security Conditions ............................................................................................... 25

    2.3 Anticipated Security Conditions ......................................................................................... 31

    Section 3 – Overview of the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces ................................33

    3.1 Strategy ............................................................................................................................... 33

    3.2 Force Structure and Size ..................................................................................................... 34

    3.3 Budget ................................................................................................................................. 34

    3.4 Long-Term Plan for Sustaining ANDSF Equipment and Infrastructure ............................ 35

    3.5 Capabilities ......................................................................................................................... 37

    3.6 Role of the Train, Advise, and Assist Commands .............................................................. 40

    Section 4 – Ministry of Defense and the Afghan National Army..................................................44

    4.1 Ministry of Defense ............................................................................................................ 44

    4.2 Afghan National Army ....................................................................................................... 57

    Section 5 – Ministry of Interior and Afghan National Police ........................................................76

    5.1 Ministry of Interior ............................................................................................................. 76

    5.2 Afghan National Police ....................................................................................................... 85

  • II

    Section 6 – Financing the ANDSF.................................................................................................92

    6.1 Holding the Afghan Ministries Accountable ...................................................................... 92

    6.2 U.S. Contributions .............................................................................................................. 92

    6.3 International Contributions ................................................................................................. 93

    6.4 Afghan Government Contributions .................................................................................... 94

    Annex A – Resolute Support Indicators of Effectiveness for the Ministry of Defense and the Ministry of Interior .................................................................................98

    Annex B – Acronyms ..................................................................................................................102

  • 1

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY On January 1, 2015, U.S. and coalition forces began a new phase of their involvement in Afghanistan with the start of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)-led train, advise, and assist (TAA) mission called Resolute Support (RS). After 13 years of combat operations, the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) mission formally ended on December 31, 2014. Simultaneously, U.S. Forces-Afghanistan (USFOR-A) transitioned from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) to Operation Freedom’s Sentinel (OFS), contributing to both the NATO RS mission and continuing U.S. counterterrorism efforts against the remnants of al Qaeda. In line with agreements at the NATO Summits in Lisbon in 2010 and Chicago in 2012, Afghan National Defense and Security Forces (ANDSF)1 assumed full security responsibility for the country, supported by the Afghan people. This transition was the natural progression of the U.S. strategy over the last several years that directly supported efforts to improve Afghanistan’s security, stability, and prosperity. Although the combat mission has ended, the ongoing TAA mission with the ANDSF demonstrates the international community’s enduring commitment to Afghanistan. Since 2001, U.S. and coalition forces have had a positive effect on progress in Afghanistan while protecting U.S. vital national interests. U.S. forces have supported the development of democratic governance, trained and equipped the ANDSF, and helped prevent the country from being used to launch terrorist attacks against the U.S. homeland. Afghanistan has experienced economic growth over the last 13 years and notable improvements in other socio-economic and social indicators. Today, more children are in school, including more than three million girls. In addition, women are participating in the electoral process and are active in the workforce, including serving their country in the ANDSF. The United States remains committed to preserving the gains made over the last decade. U.S. forces remain in Afghanistan at the invitation of the Afghan government, and their presence is governed by both the U.S.-Afghanistan Bilateral Security Agreement (BSA)2 and the NATO- Afghanistan Status of Forces Agreement (SOFA), which were both signed on September 30, 2014, and ratified by the Afghan Parliament3 on November 27, 2014. With support from the Afghan government and the Afghan people, U.S. forces are now conducting two well-defined and complementary missions to advance U.S. objectives to disrupt threats posed by al Qaeda, and to support the ANDSF in providing the Afghan people the opportunity to succeed as they stand on their own. First, U.S. forces are continuing a counterterrorism missio