Property-Based Monitoring for Dragonflies and Damselflies (Odonata)

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Property-Based Monitoring for Dragonflies and Damselflies (Odonata) Bob DuBois Ecological Inventory & Monitoring Bureau of Endangered Resources Dept. of Natural Resources Superior, WI
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    10-Jan-2016
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Property-Based Monitoring for Dragonflies and Damselflies (Odonata). Bob DuBois Ecological Inventory & Monitoring Bureau of Endangered Resources Dept. of Natural Resources Superior, WI. Why Bother With Odonates? Because people care about them!. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Transcript of Property-Based Monitoring for Dragonflies and Damselflies (Odonata)

  • Property-Based Monitoring for Dragonflies and Damselflies (Odonata)Bob DuBoisEcological Inventory & MonitoringBureau of Endangered ResourcesDept. of Natural ResourcesSuperior, WI

  • Why Bother With Odonates? Because people care about them!

    First, a group of animals captures peoples attention.Next, field guides and books become available.Then over time, the pool of people grows who are competent in identification of and knowledge about the groupOdonates are starting to enter this more mature phase of public awareness

  • Besides, theyre fun to have around!

  • Decide on what the objectives will be, what life stages to sample, and who will do the collecting and make the identifications

  • But you need to know just a little about Odonata life historyAn aquatic larva transforms to a terrestrial adult

  • New adult Dragonhunter emerging from its exuviaShed larval exoskeleton iscalled an exuvia

  • Same individual 20 minutes laterNow called a teneral

  • Mature adult Dragonhunter

  • Considerations for Sampling AdultsAre present for several weeks to several months depending on speciesWarning they could have flown from elsewhere!Should be seen mating or ovipositingSome species are rarely seen as adultsEasiest life stage to identifyMay be challenging to sample

  • Got him!

  • Lyre-tipped spreadwings layingeggs into a plant stem

  • Considerations for Sampling LarvaeAre present for the longest time frameIndicate a breeding site with certaintyMay be very time-consuming to collectAre the most difficult life stage to identifyNeed special equipment and knowledge to identifyMay be part-grown and unidentifiableCurrent keys to larvae stink

  • Empire BogDouglas Co., WI

  • Ebony boghaunterWilliamsonia fletcherilarva

  • Empire BogDouglas Co., WI

  • Considerations for Sampling ExuviaeAre present for the shortest time frameIndicate a breeding site with certaintyAre often easy (time efficient) to collectAre difficult to identify as are larvae, except that they are full grownLeast collecting impact ecologically

  • Searching for exuviae in a sheltered areawhere they will often persist for a longer time

  • Ophiogomphus exuviae found at least a month post-emergence

  • Monitoring recommendations if the goal is a comprehensive species list for a propertyVisit a site at least 4 times during flight season (mid-May through September)Sample adults and exuviae each visitLarval sampling may help (esp. rivers)Look for evidence of adult breedingChoose nice weather days to sampleSample all habitat types on the propertyBring along a competent odonatist

  • Identification HelpsField guides (user-friendly; minimal equipment needed)Keys (harder to learn to use; more equipment needed)Internet discussion groups and websites (show your photos; ask questions)Regional experts (show photos; ask questions; send specimens)

  • Add the data to the Wisconsin Odonata Survey (WOS) Websitehttp://WIatri.net/inventory/odonata

    Or Google Wisconsin Odonata Survey

  • http://WIatri.net/inventory/odonata

  • Questions?