October 2010 Interfaith Connection Newsletter, Interfaith Works

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 I I NTERFAITH NTERFAITH C C ONNECTION ONNECTION  Published Monthly by Interfaith Works, P.O. Box 1221, Olympia, WA 98507 [email protected]  (360) 357-7224  www.Interfaith-Works.org Interfaith Works is an association of congregations, affiliated  non-profit organizations and individuals. Our purpose is to  promote interfaith understanding, and serve the community through charitable, social and educational endeavors. OCTOBER 2010 9/1 1 INTERF AITH EVENT FILLS CONGREGA TION 3,019 Miles & a World A way… Scott Stevens Gainesville, Florida, is 3,019 miles away from where I sit as I write this. And it seems at least 3,000 miles away spiritually, at least in the kind of spirituality promoted by a certain "Christian" pastor there, who we'll leave unnamed. I was thinking earlier about what to post on this loaded date, nine years after the attacks by terrorists in Washing- ton DC, New York, and Pennsylvania. I could post music (Continued on page 2) Printed on 30% post-consumer recycled paper Olympia Responds Danny Kadden, Executive Director  On September 11, a day of solemn memories was clouded this year by threats from a Florida-based pastor to publicly burn copies of the Qur'an. In Olympia, Interfaith Works members and friends responded by coming to- gether to sit as friends and neighbors from across faith traditions, to hear readings and teachings from the Qur'an given by Imam Nabil, leaders and clergy from the local Buddhist, Christian, Jewish, and interfaith communities, and other leaders of the Islamic Center of Olympia (a member of Interfaith Works), and to express our shared commitment to religious freedom for all people. We were not alone. Similar inter- faith gatherings were held in t he Seattle area, Tacoma, and in a diverse set of cities from Beverly (continued on page 3) Imam Nabil addresses 9/11 gathering

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Transcript of October 2010 Interfaith Connection Newsletter, Interfaith Works

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    IINTERFAITHNTERFAITH CCONNECTIONONNECTION

    Published Monthly by Interfaith Works, P.O. Box 1221, Olympia, WA [email protected] (360) 357-7224 www.Interfaith-Works.org

    Interfaith Works is an association of congregations, affiliatednon-profit organizations and individuals. Our purpose is topromote interfaith understanding, and serve the community through

    charitable, social and educational endeavors.OCTOBER 2010

    9/11 INTERFAITH EVENT FILLS CONGREGATION

    3,019 Miles & a World Away

    Scott Stevens

    Gainesville, Florida, is 3,019 miles away from where I sitas I write this. And it seems at least 3,000 miles awayspiritually, at least in the kind of spirituality promoted by acertain "Christian" pastor there, who we'll leave unnamed.

    I was thinking earlier about what to post on this loadeddate, nine years after the attacks by terrorists in Washing-ton DC, New York, and Pennsylvania. I could post music

    (Continued on page 2)

    Printed on 30% post-consumer recycled paper

    Olympia Responds

    Danny Kadden, Executive DirectorOn September 11, a day of solemnmemories was clouded this year bythreats from a Florida-based pastor to

    publicly burn copies of the Qur'an. InOlympia, Interfaith Works membersand friends responded by coming to-gether to sit as friends and neighborsfrom across faith traditions, to hearreadings and teachings from theQur'an given by Imam Nabil,

    leaders and clergy from the localBuddhist, Christian, Jewish, andinterfaith communities, and otherleaders of the Islamic Center ofOlympia (a member of InterfaithWorks), and to express ourshared commitment to religious

    freedom for all people.

    We were not alone. Similar inter-faith gatherings were held in theSeattle area, Tacoma, and in adiverse set of cities from Beverly

    (continued on page 3) Imam Nabil addresses 9/11 gathering

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    October 2010, p. 2

    showing the peaceful side of Islam, or something

    about the folly of the misguided rush to war that fol-lowed 9/11.

    Instead I baked oatmeal cookies. Lots of oatmealcookies. And then I went to a local interfaith eventbilled as "An interfaith response to anti-Islamic hate."

    My community has some strong interfaith credentials,with the roots of the most prominent interfaith organi-zation dating back to 1969. So I wasn't surprised tohear about this event, a response to the Florida flare-up and a positive, neighborly way to observe the an-niversary of a dark day. Though I was a little sur-prised to arrive near the Unitarian Universalist con-

    gregation where the event was being held -- in aquiet residential neighborhood -- and find so manycars there I had to park two blocks away.

    The place was packed. I recognized some faces, and

    learned who others were as they spoke. The mainportion of the program was in the hands of local Mus-lims, who talked about the Quran, aspects of faith,

    and how some Arabs were essentially going back topre-Islamic traditions of vengeful violence, which findno support in Islam. The new Imam of the local

    mosque, a Moroccan, was charming and self-effacing, and recited beautifully a passage from theQuran, with others translating.

    Equally moving were the comments by other localfaith community leaders. One after another, Chris-tians, Jews, Bahais, Buddhists, and others stood to

    support local Muslims and denounce intolerance,violence, and "them vs. us"-ness.

    And it wasn't just the rabbis and ministers andmonks. As I mentioned, the place was packed. Whichmeant that here, more than three thousand milesaway from this week's center of controversy, we had

    a gathering of two or three times more people thanare members in that tiny Gainsville church.

    I can only imagine what kind of gatherings happenedin larger cities around the USA. And I hope Muslimsabroad will see some images of these kind of gather-ings, and realize that most Americans do not hate

    them, and do not wish to desecrate their scriptures.Instead we want to live in a world where people offaith (and even of no particular faith) can share thequalities of respect, tolerance, gratitude, and com-passion. We want to live in a world where a tiny mes-sage of hate cannot be louder than the voices of themany seeking peace.

    Every religion, every nation has its crazies. It's up tothe rest of us to not allow them to set the agenda foreveryone.

    I suppose that's my 9/11 message. Goes well withoatmeal cookies.

    Scott Stevens is a delegate for Interfaith Works, and Direc-tor of the World Sacred Music Festival. He blogs atSoundRoots World Music & Global Culture,www.soundroots.org. Reprinted by permission.

    3,019 Miles Away (Continued from page 1)

    Abubaker Rony from the Islamic Center of Olympia,

    Interfaith Works Executive Director Danny Kadden, and

    Mustafa Mohamedali, member of the Islamic Center of Olym-

    pia and Interfaith Works Board Member prepare for the

    Quran reading at the 9/11 interfaith event.

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    October 2010, p. 3

    One of the most significant insights coming to usfrom our spiritual traditions, from indigenous peo-ples and from science, is the notion that there isonly one Earth community, there is only one sacredcommunity and that is "The Community of Life".Virtually everything that exists is part of this interconnected, interdependent, and living system.

    We see this web of interconnectedness every-where when we look at the natural world, and if wewant to unlock the meaning of life, we must try tounderstand this way in which all of reality is inter-linked. As one living and closed system, the wholeearth community is organized and structured insuch a way that all members of this sacred commu-nity of life depend on, and feed off of, each other

    for their existence. Thus, eating and being eaten is...at its basic and literal reality, a deeply mysticalmatter. When we eat, we not only take into our-selves another being, but that being becomespart of us, those molecules become part of ourhuman tissue. The metaphor for food here isless that of fuel than that of communion. Eating

    and being eaten incarnates one of the centralmysteries of life: each life at some point becom-ing food for other life, in an on-going chain oflife, death, and mutual sustenance.(Carla Berkedal, Earth Letter, Nov. 1996, p. 10).

    It is for this reason that Wendell Berry says, Howwe eat will determine to a considerable extent how

    the world is used.Eating then, is a profoundly spiritual, religious andethical act, for what we eat, where our food comesfrom, and how we eat are all expressions of ourhow we are embedded in this sacred Community ofLife and as such, can be seen as a sacrament.

    I do not mean to suggest we can live harmlesslyor strictly at our own expense; we depend uponother creatures and survive by their deaths. Tolive, we must daily break the body and shed theblood of creation. The point is, when we do thisknowingly, lovingly, skillfully, reverently, it is asacrament. When we do it ignorantly, greedily,clumsily, destructively, it is a desecrationin

    such desecration we condemn ourselves tospiritual and moral loneliness, and others towant. (Wendell Berry, The Gift of Good Land,1983, p. 272)

    In our series, Ethical Eating: Healthy Planet,Healthy Food, Healthy People, we will exploreways to eat well in the community of life. Please

    join us for the whole series or for any part of this

    series.

    Event flyer on next page.

    Olympia Responds(continued from page 1)

    Hills to Hoboken, from Atlanta to Cheyenne.

    Our 9/11 program provided a powerful public fo-rum to discuss our reactions to what has beengoing on, and what steps we might take to keepour community a safe and welcoming place for allfaiths.

    This has been one of Interfaith Works core mis-

    sions through the years, one that now takes onnew urgency and meaning, and one that we willcontinue to support.

    Thank you to Rev. Art Vaeni and theOlympia Unitarian Univer-

    salist Congregation for hosting Interfaith Works

    9/11 Response to Anti-Muslim Bigotry.

    EATING ETHICALLY IN THE COMMUNITY OF LIFE

    Sr. Mimi Maloney, SNJM, Interfaith Works Earth Stewards Committee

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    EARTHCARE Series: Videos, Presentations, Conversations 2010-2011

    Oct.

    13

    Hands-on Earth Care with Children Whats happening in localschools that could serve as models for gardening and waste reduction

    (recycling, composting) in other local schools?

    A panel discussion with Karen Ray (Thurston Co. Food Bank School

    Gardens Coordinator), Rob Cahill (Lakes Elementary Teacher), and PeterGuttchen (Thurston Co. Solid Waste Food to Flowers Coordinator).

    Nov.

    10

    Earth Care Goes Poetic: Poetry and Sustainability Workshop forYouth and the Young at Heart Dr. Don Foran will help fledgling and futurepoets of all ages focus on images from our bruised but brilliant world and show how

    poetry truly can save our world.

    Jan.

    12

    Food, Inc. (DVD) lifts the veil on our nation's food industry, exposingthe highly mechanized underbelly that has been largely hidden from the

    American consumer. We are a nation riddled with widespread obesity,

    particularly among children, and an epidemic level of diabetes.

    Feb.

    9

    Hidden Dangers in Kids Meals: Genetically Engineered

    Foods (DVD). In this video, shocking research results, inadequateregulations, and warnings from eminent scientists explain why

    Genetically Modified Foods are dangerous and should be removed from

    kids' meals, and why GMOs (Genetically Modified Organisms) threatenyour health, the environment and future generations.

    Mar.

    9

    Good Food (DVD) offers an intimate look at the farmers, ranchers,and businesses that are creating a more sustainable food system in the Pacific

    Northwest.

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    PPPeeeooopppllleee Sat.Apr.

    9

    Discover the Wonders of Nature at the Nisqually National

    Wildlife Refuge* Aimed especially at families and educators, thisprogram includes a tour of the Education Center, Nature Explore Area, and

    information about the Refuges environmental education programs.*Note: Nisqually Wildlife Refuge, 10 am to noon, Saturday, April 9

    Where: TraditionsCaf 3005th

    AveSW,Olympia Time:79pm

    EventsareonWednesdays(exceptApr.9),followedbydiscussion.Forinformationcall4595825.

    AllEventsareFree.DonationsAccepted.

    Weve got the

    wholeworld

    in our hands. Now what?

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    COMMUNITY CALENDARA listing of some of the activities and events of Interfaith Works members, affiliated organizations, and of general interest.

    IW does not necessarily endorse these events. More details and events at www.Interfaith-Works.org.

    October 2010, p. 5

    October 7

    Thursday78:45 pm

    The Union of Two Paths: Wisdom & Its Methods Determining the effectiveness and

    achievements of one's practice on these paths in the journey of personal and social trans-formation. 1211 Wilson Street NE, Olympia, WA. Nalanda Institute, www.nalandaolywa.org

    October 9Saturday9:30-3:30

    Moving with Jesus We will adapt and modify yoga and tai chi movements to depict Jesuslife story. Cost: $50. Facilitated by Roy DeLeon. Register by 10/5. Priory Spirituality Center,500 College St. NE, Lacey, 98516. www.stplacid.org; 438-2595

    October 10

    Sunday8,10:30 am

    Liturgical Dance in Memory of John Twelves In a dance tribute to Johns long, active,

    and god-centered, Mary Alice Olson and Meri Russell will perform at both services. St.Johns Episcopal Church, 114 20th Ave SE, (at Capitol Way). All are Welcome!

    October 13Wednesday7:00 pm

    Hands-On Earth Care with Children - Earth Care Series on Ethical Eating, #1.Whats happening in local schools that could serve as models for gardening and waste

    reduction? A panel discussion at Traditions Caf, 300 5th Ave SW, Olympia. Free.

    October 14

    Thursday6:30 pm

    Conversation with Muslim Americans: How does it feel to be Muslim in America today?

    with members of the Lacey Islamic Center. Potluck desserts and tea. Sponsored by Com-mon Bread (TESC Interfaith Student Group) The Longhouse. http://Cbread.blogspot.com

    Oct.14-23Thur-Satvarious

    40-hour Professional Mediation Training. Learn powerful skills for helping people tosolve conflict with the Dispute Resolution Center. 2 consecutive weekends. Fee: $625. Pre-registration required. www.mediatethurston.com; 956-1155

    Nov. 10

    Wednesday7:00 pm

    Earth Care Goes Poetic - Earth Care Series on Ethical Eating, #2.

    Dr. Don Foran will help fledgling and future poets of all ages, and show how poetrytruly can save our world. Traditions Caf, 300 5th Ave SW, Olympia. Free.

    Nov. 13Saturday93 pm

    Winter Wonderland Bazaar - Bakery and Candy, Silent Auction, Nuts, Cookie Walk, Quilt-ing & Gift, Childrens & Household, Outdoor & Go-Green. Spaghetti luncheon 11:30-1. FirstUnited Methodist Church, 1224 Legion Way SE, Olympia, 98501; 943-2661

    November 21

    Sunday2:30 pm

    27th Annual Interfaith Thanksgiving: A Celebration of the Whole Human Family.

    Join us for music, words and songs of many faiths. Reception following.Tumwater United Methodist Church, 1401 Lake Park Dr. SW, Tumwater 98512.

    Oct. 28-Nov. 12varies

    Hospice Training. Volunteers provide support to families/caregivers and those who aredying by offering respite for a caregiver, running errands, being a loving presence. 30-hourtraining. Call Debe Edden, SoundHome & Hospice Volunteer Coordinator, 493-4689.

    October 16

    Saturday6:308:30 pm

    Introduct ion to the Enneagram. Learn nine distinct worldviews that make up Enneagram,

    gain tools for recognizing habits of thinking, feeling, acting. Cost: $60. Register by 10/8.Priory Spirituality Center, 500 College St. NE, Lacey, 98516. www.stplacid.org; 438-2595

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    Interfaith WorksPO Box 1221Olympia WA 98507

    Non-Profit Org.

    U.S. PostagePAID

    Permit No. 325Olympia, WA 98501

    ADDRESSSERVICEREQUESTED

    Support

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    www.interfaith-works.org

    A Wintery Wonderland Bazaar

    Saturday, November 13, 9 - 3 p.m.First United Methodist Church1224 Legion Way SE, Olympia; 943-2661

    Spaghetti Luncheon, 11:30 am1:00 pm

    OneOneOne---ofofof---aaa---Kind Silent AuctionKind Silent AuctionKind Silent Auction Varieties of Nuts Cookie Walk Bakery and Candy boothsBakery and Candy boothsBakery and Candy booths Christmas items

    Quilting and Gift items Childrens & Household itemsChildrens & Household itemsChildrens & Household items Outdoor boothOutdoor boothOutdoor booth Go Green booth

    27TH ANNUALIIINTERFAITHNTERFAITHNTERFAITH

    TTTHANKSGIVINHANKSGIVINHANKSGIVINGGG

    Sunday,

    November 21, 2:30 pm

    Tumwater United Methodist Church

    1401 Lake Park Dr. SW,

    Tumwater, 98512

    Music,words&songsofmanyfaiths

    Childrenwelcome

    Receptionwithlightrefreshmentsfollowing

    Allarewelcome

    Thank you for supporting Interfaith Worksthrough the Combined Fund Drive (CFD)the Wash-

    ington State public employee giving program. We were gladto meet some of you at the recent Charity Fairs.

    OUR CFD CHARITY CODE IS: 316251