DPI Update Collaborative PST Conference Focus On Reading Results.

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Transcript of DPI Update Collaborative PST Conference Focus On Reading Results.

2010-11 MPS Corrective Action Requirements

DPI UpdateCollaborative PSTConference

Focus On Reading Results

1Special Education Team NewsMolly Bever Consultant for Intellectual DisabilitiesLauren Holapa Office Operations AssociateNico Mittnacht Consultant for ComplianceNancy Molfenter Consultant for TransitionHeike Saynisch Office Operations AssociateChristina Specter Consultant for ComplianceVaunce Ashby Consultant for DisproportionalityScott Brown Consultant for ImplementationAnita Castro Consultant for ComplianceJayne Bischoff, Universal Design for Learning ConsultantSherri Honaker Operations Program AssociatePatricia Williams Assistant Director

2Specific Learning DisabilitiesLiteracy Data and Specific Learning Disabilities Eligibility Webinar Series

Dyslexia and Specific Learning Disabilities

Progress Monitoring for Specific Learning Disabilities Eligibility DecisionsItem 3: New Supplemental Guidance on SLD pageUpdated guidance regarding dyslexia and new guidance regarding the use of computer adaptive tests (CATs) verses curriculum based measures (CBMs) for progress monitoring in a special education evaluation for specific learning disabilities (SLD) is available on the SLD webpage http://sped.dpi.wi.gov/sped_ld. Click on the Supplemental Guidance Resources category.DPIs latest webinar in the series Leading A Balanced Reading Assessment System has been published: Literacy Data and Specific Learning Disability Eligibility. In this webinar, DPI Literacy Consultants Laura Adams and Barb Novak are joined by DPI School Psychology Consultant Kathryn Bush and DPI SLD Consultant Debra Heiss to explore Wisconsins SLD eligibility criteria. Topics include an overview of the eligibility rule, literacy data needed to make an SLD eligibility decision, and the eligibility decision and report .This webinar is intended for reading specialists and literacy leaders, but would also be applicable to other educators and instructional leaders. We encourage viewers to watch the webinar with colleagues as part of their professional learning.Find this webinar athttps://sites.google.com/a/dpi.wi.gov/lit-live-assessment/home/literacy-data-and-sld-eligibility. Find the home page for the series athttp://bit.ly/LitAssessment.3EBD Update

EBD PST meeting that have been scheduled for spring are:CESA 10 Apr 11CESA 11March 9CESA 12March 10CESAs 9, 6 and 8 are pending datesThe focus of these meetings will be interventions for EBD students and the reduction of incidents of seclusion and restraint.

4Autism Updates

Autism PST meeting on topic of Supporting Mental Health and Anxiety for Students with Autism which Promotes Access to Instruction. May 4 in Superior and May 6 in Oshkosh PSTs on the Autism PST email list receive registration link. Contact Daniel Parker, [email protected] if you would like to be added to the PST update list and receive registration.Autism UpdatesAutism PST meeting May 4 in Superior and May 6 in Oshkosh on topic of Supporting Mental Health and Anxiety for Students with Autism which Promotes Access to Instruction. PSTs on the Autism PST email list receive registration link. Contact Daniel Parker, [email protected] if you would like to be added to the PST update list and receive registration.Autism DPI page has been updated with over 400 short videos on the topic of preparing students with autism for life in college as well as direct links to 16 recorded webinars on various topics such as FBA, self directed IEPs, visual schedules, effective use of paraprofessionals, and several webinars outlining NPDC-ASD evidence based practices for students with autism as well as WSPEI webinars on UDL, mental health, and many others.

5Autism Updates

Autism DPI page has been updated with over 400 short videos on the topic of preparing students with autism for life in collegeDirect links to 16 recorded webinars on various topics such as FBA, self directed IEPs, visual schedules, effective use of paraprofessionals, Several webinars outlining NPDC-ASD evidence based practices for students with autism as well as WSPEI webinars on UDL, mental health, and many others.

Preparing Students with Autism and other Developmental Disabilities for Life in College Over 400 video clips of disability resource center staff in colleges across Wisconsin as well as students with autism, parents, and teachers discuss how to prepare students with autism for life in college.Clips available on youtube categorized topics such as why college, exploring colleges, accommodations, job preparation and careers, and understanding autism.The videos will be used to create an online module. Link to videos on DPI Autism Web Page: http://sped.dpi.wi.gov/sped_autism

Special Education PD CalendarThis calendar lists many of the professional development opportunities available across Wisconsin in relation to education and students with IEPs / students with disabilities. Users can sort and filter trainings, workshops, and conferences by disability area, organization, county/district, or topic. The calendar allows you to submit an event for consideration to be included in this calendar.IHE DatabaseTo assist students, families, and educators in finding information about services for students with disabilities in college, DPI created an online database of disability resource center contacts across Wisconsin.Disability resource center staff in Wisconsins technical colleges, independent colleges, and University of Wisconsin System campuses provided DPI with information on contact information for their disability resource center staff that can answer questions about services provided to students with disabilities as well as information students may need to know to be able to qualify for disability services in their institutions.Many of the disability resource staff also provided information on common programs, services, and accommodations they may be able to provide to students with disabilities in college. Visitors to this site can also find out about the types of supports various colleges provide to all students such as housing options, health services, transportation, and many others.Although this database was originally created with the unique needs of students with autism in mind, the authors feel the content and resources provided may assist students with any type of disability who is seeking a post-secondary education.This database was created through collaboration between DPI and the Wisconsin Community of Practice on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities and the site is maintained through theWisconsin Statewide Parent Educator Initiative.Click here to find out more about this databasePreparing Students with Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities for Life in CollegeAs a companion to theIHE Database, DPI collected 400 video clips of students who attend or graduated from college as well as families, educators, and disability resource center staff at colleges around Wisconsin who shared their ideas, knowledge, and advice on how to support students, families, and educators to assist all students to be college and career ready.Although this database was originally created with the unique needs of students with autism in mind, the authors feel the content and resources provided may assist students with any type of disability who is seeking a post-secondary education.These videos were separated into 17 playlists available on the WDPI Resources to the Field YouTube channel. Below are links to each playlist.Please share these videos and incorporate them in presentations, meetings, and discussions to help prepare students with disabilities for life in college. The videos can be accessed athttps://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLambIxavELhY_QEMejHaHBXL6SBOALcI9.2015-16 two day training schedule / registration available at DPI autism web page and includes trainings on autism essentials, teaching/supporting new behavior, early childhood, supporting visual thinkers, and social communication. http://sped.dpi.wi.gov/sped_autism

6Intellectual DisabilitiesChanging fromCD to Intellectual Disabilities and both definition and eligibility requirements revisionsEmergency rule in effect July 1, 2015 Please contact Molly Bever with any questions.

ID and SDD Criteria RevisionsPublic hearings held on April 3 and 6; period for public commentary closedFavorable commentaryNext steps forwarded for legislative reviewEmergency rule in effect from July 1-November 27, 2015Will share proposed language and its intent publicly prior to passageQuestions to Molly and JennyRevisions to worksheets; FAQs; webinar; regional trainings in fall; guidance

7Significant Developmental DelayPermits the identification of children with significant developmental delay (SDD) through the age of nine rather than six. Emergency rule in effect July 1, 2015 Please contact Jenny Giles with any questions.

ID and SDD Criteria RevisionsPublic hearings held on April 3 and 6; period for public commentary closedFavorable commentaryNext steps forwarded for legislative reviewEmergency rule in effect from July 1-November 27, 2015Will share proposed language and its intent publicly prior to passageQuestions to Molly and JennyRevisions to worksheets; FAQs; webinar; regional trainings in fall; guidance

8Early ChildhoodInclusion Policy Statementhighlighting the importance of making sure that all young children with disabilities have access to inclusive high-quality early childhood programs

You can read information on the policy statement here.

Item 6: Inclusion Policy StatementRecently, the U.S. Departments of Education and Health and Human Services released a policy statement highlighting the importance of making sure that all young children with disabilities have access to inclusive high-quality early childhood programs. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced the new policy statement in Kansas City, Missouri, during the first stop of his back-to-school bus tour.The policy statement sets a vision for States, local educational agencies, schools, and public and private early childhood programs to strengthen and increase the number of inclusive high-quality early childhood programs nationwide. As the country continues to move forward on the critical task of expanding access to high-quality early childhood programs for all young children, it is imperative that children with disabilities be included in these efforts.You can read information on the policy statement here.

9IEP Sample FormsAligned with the Reading Drives Achievement: Success through Literacy. Piloted by a number of volunteer districts throughout the state.Sample Forms finalized in the spring of 2016. Review the DRAFT Sample Forms. Questions or feedback about the DRAFT Sample Forms may be directed [email protected] 2: Sample FormsThrough a stakeholder process, the Special Education Team has revised several Sample Special Education Forms to align with the new accountability system, Reading Drives Achievement: Success through Literacy. New prompts on the Sample Forms encourage IEP teams to consider if a student has disability-related needs that affect reading and to develop goals, services and progress monitoring to address the needs and improve student outcomes. The revised Sample Forms are currently in DRAFT version while being piloted by a number of volunteer districts throughout the state. The department plans to finalize the Sample Forms in the spring of 2016. District staff, parents and students are encouraged to review the DRAFT Sample Forms. Questions or feedback about the DRAFT Sample Forms may be directed [email protected] forms are located at http://sped.dpi.wi.gov/sped_form_int.Pilot RDA PCSA during the 2015-2016 school yearFinalize revised forms in May 2016Provide training on the RDA PCSA during the 2016-2017 school yearBeginning monitoring with the RDA PCSA during the 2017-2018 school yearData for Indicators 8, 11, and 14 will be still be collected on a cyclical basis with no interruptions

10CCR IEP Updates

Introduction to College and Career Ready IEPs online guidance including PowerPoint Watch for several short video clips narrating the overview module as well. Specific modules going deeper into CCR IEP frameworks will be developed throughout the year.

IDEAChanges LivesStudents with disabilities are attending college in record numbersLearn what attending college means tothese studentsand watch a four minute trailer for the movieRethinking College.For more information about college and post-secondary opportunities for students with disabilities visitThe Association on Higher Education and DisabilityandThink College

IDEAChanges LivesStudents who receive special education services, including those with cognitive and intellectual disabilities, are attending college in record numbers, an achievement that few people would have thought possible before the passage of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in 1975. As we approach the 40th anniversary of IDEA, we can reflect not only on the impact that it has had on individual lives but the benefits to society that come from having a workforce of students who are college and career ready. IDEA provides supports to students who now attend elementary through high school with their siblings and same age peers with the expectation that they will continue to do so in post-secondary settings. Four-year colleges, community colleges, and career and technical education centers have risen to the challenge by providing supports and accommodations so that students can not only attend, but thrive in post-secondary settings. Learn what attending college means tothese studentsand watch a four minute trailer for the movieRethinking College.

For more information about college and post-secondary opportunities for students with disabilities visitThe Association on Higher Education and DisabilityandThink College

12Co-TeachingWhy a co-teaching workgroup at DPI?

Co-teaching is one of the strategies that can advance reading proficiency and overall academic outcomes for students with disabilities

Supporting co-teaching efforts goes hand-in-hand with DPI focus on Results Driven Accountability (RDA)Vision of Co-teaching FactorsCo-Teaching ModulesModules are under development to provide evidence-based practice information to the field. Modules will be based on the factors from the previous slide.IntroductionEffective PracticeTeacher-Teacher RelationshipsStudent-Teacher RelationshipsFamily and Community EngagementSchool and Instructional LeadershipDraft Introductory VideoTIG Updates The 3rd annual TIG Academy took place October 29-30 at the Wilderness Conference Center in the Wisconsin Dells and 550+ people attendedDPI and DVR collaborated to present on the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) at the Transition AcademyTIG continues to support PROMISE Grant enrollmentTIG hosted a Transition Collaboration meeting on December 2nd with presentations on both WIOA and PROMISE in conjunction with DWD/DVRAdditional avenues to support districts with practice shifts under WIOA will be developedTIG Statewide ActivitiesMore than 70 districts will be conducting their own Post-school Outcomes Survey (Indicator 14) again this yearThere are 6 districts plus one consortia of districts engaged in the best practices project to improve employment outcomes for students with the most significant disabilities (Community-based Integrated Employment (CBIE) Project)CBIE schools use the Transition Improvement Plan (TIP) and will also use individual student service level data to determine degree of increased use of evidence-based practices in transition375+ total Transition Improvement Plans (TIPs) have been createdby districts around the stateDPI/TIG will be working with TransCen this spring to conduct a formal external evaluation of our workThe TIG website: http://www.witig.org/ houses information and resources

PTP OutcomesTIG Coordinators continue to support directors and teachers to understand transition planning best practice and compliance requirements59 LEAs with errors, down from about 110 last year, and 98 records with errors, also down from last yearWisconsin continues to have over 98% compliance with Indicator 13 and recently published research shows that practice development and better outcomes follow higher levels of compliance with this indicator

Wisconsin Statewide Parent-Educator Initiative

WSPEI is piloting family engagement and literacy presentations for schools, districts, CESAs how to engage families of students with IEPs in literacy activities

WSPEI and WSEMS has a webinar available on how to Conduct Friendly and Productive College and Career Ready IEPs. This module provides ideas on how to welcome, honor, and connect with families in IEP meetings. Available on the WSEMS web site.

WSPEI updated Request a Training button to the WSPEI web site. Trainings for families and educators on a variety of topics including IEP Process, Confidentiality, Transition, Culturally Responsive Family Engagement, and Many Others.

WSPEI UpdatesThis spring WSPEI will be piloting family engagement and literacy presentations for schools, districts, CESAs interested in learning how to engage families of students with IEPs in literacy activities. If interested, contact your WSPEI coordinator.WSPEI and WSEMS has a webinar available on how to Conduct Friendly and Productive College and Career Ready IEPs. This module provides ideas on how to welcome, honor, and connect with families in IEP meetings. Available on the WSEMS web site.WSPEI updated Request a Training button to the WSPEI web site. Trainings for families and educators on a variety of topics including IEP Process, Confidentiality, Transition, Culturally Responsive Family Engagement, and Many Others.

19ACP and PTPsAll students beginning in Grade 6based on the STUDENTS interests, abilities, values, and goals. INFORMED CHOICES for education, training and careers. ACP is a CULTURE SHIFT

Students turning 14ACP WILL NOT REPLACE THE IEP/PTP. The IEP/PTP does not take the place of the ACPACP will inform, enhance and improve the IEP/PTP process prior to age 14 through 18-21.

Beginning at grade 6, the ACP will inform, enhance and improve the IEP/PTP process prior to age 14 through 18-21.ACP is based on the STUDENTS interests, abilities, values, and goals. ACP provides students and parents with the information needed to make INFORMED CHOICES for education, training and careers. ACP is a CULTURE SHIFT; the purpose of education is not just to get everyone into college; but, to allow students and their families to choose the best opportunities available to achieve personal education and career goals. Schools districts are ALREADY DOING SOME OF THE ACTIVITIES RELATED TO ACP such as conferencing, career exploration, career interest inventories, intentional course sequencing, etc. ACP requires EVERYONE TO SUPPORT STUDENTS in the process, including academic teachers, administrators, community members and parents. ACP WILL NOT REPLACE THE IEP/PTP. Districts should focus on how ACP services will be delivered in their district and how the ACP content will inform, enhance and improve the IEP/PTP process and services. Will the ACP software merge with the IEP/PTP software? While the ACP and IEP/PTP are closely related and complimentary to each other, the ACP software is procured and vendor selected, and at this time it remains unclear what the potential for interoperability could be between the ACP and IEP/PTP software systems.

Academic and Career Planning Updates: Earlier this fall DOA announced its intent to award the ACP Software procurement to Career Cruising. Stay tuned for details! This past summer The Academic and Career Planning pilot districts were selected. The districts are currently implementing the ACP process at very stages. If your district a pilot, check out the ACP website located the main DPI webpage. Lots of information and resources on the ACP website including an email alert. Contact Nancy Molfenter or Suzan Van Beaver. First annual statewide ACP conference in Stevens Point was on November 16-17. A great success, watch the ACP website for other trainings.

202011 Wisconsin Act 125 - Seclusion and Physical Restraint2nd Largest # of IDEA Complaints

Training Requirement

Reporting Requirement

More informationSchool staff who may use physical restraint must receive appropriate training. At least one staff member in each school where restraint might be used must be trained. The school is responsible for maintaining records on the training received by staff, including how long the training is considered valid and when refresher courses are necessary.

Schools should carefully consider which staff members should receive training. Administrators, security/safety personnel, regular education staff, student services and special education staff should be considered. The district may wish to consider training several people within a school. In the rare event physical restraint is needed in a situation, it is may be helpful to have more than one trained person available to ensure safety for students and staff alike.

There are several different providers of training on preventing the need for physical restraint and how to use it safely. The department does not approve, recommend, or endorse any particular program.

Act 125 requires schools to abide by new notification requirements. Any time seclusion or physical restraint is used, the principal or his or her designee must notify the parent of the incident as soon as possible and no later than one business day after the incident. Business day is defined as Monday through Friday, except for federal and state holidays. Schools should be aware a day may be a business day even if students are not in attendance. For example, a snow day would be considered a business day as well as days during winter or spring breaks that are not state or federal holidays. The principal or designee must also alert the parent to the availability of the required written report, which we will describe shortly.

21Using Data to Decrease Physical Restraint and SeclusionWith Act 125, schools are asked to report and maintain data on seclusion and physical restraint. Through an analysis of the data collected, educators can identify patterns of using seclusion and restraint, review practices used in seclusion and restraint and evaluated the impact of interventions in preventing seclusions or restraints. Using the data collected will provide a framework to reduce the use of physical restraint and seclusion.Item 7: DPI Articulate Module: Using Data to Decrease Physical Restraint and SeclusionThe Special Education Team has put together the resource module on seclusion and restraint. We hope the resource will help school districts and their schools to use data in reducing all incidents involving seclusion and restraint. Wisconsin Act 125 went into effect on September 2012. The legislation intended to protect students from harmful and life-threatening seclusion and restraint practices. Educators can now find this valuable resource which would help school teams use data in decreasing the incidents of seclusion and restraint.In the school setting more and more decisions are made based on data. With Act 125, schools are asked to report and maintain data on seclusion and physical restraint. Through an analysis of the data collected, educators can identify patterns of using seclusion and restraint, review practices used in seclusion and restraint and evaluated the impact of interventions in preventing seclusions or restraints. Using the data collected will provide a framework to reduce the use of physical restraint and seclusion.

22Twice Exceptional StudentsOSEP Memo 15-08 Children with disabilities with high cognition.Obligation to evaluate all children, regardless of cognitive skills, suspected of having on of 13 disabilitiesWisconsinsToolkit for Gifted Educationincludes examples of service plans for twice exceptional students

In spite of the guidance provided in Letter to Delisle, we continue to receive letters from those who work with children with disabilities with high cognition, particularly those with emotional disturbance or mental illness, expressing concern that some local educational agencies (LEA) are hesitant to conduct initial evaluations to determine eligibility for special education and related services for children with high cognition. Contact Person Name: Rebecca Walawender Telephone: 202-245-7399 400 MARYLAND AVE. SW, WASHINGTON, DC 20202 www.ed.gov The Department of Educations mission is to promote student achievement and preparation for global competitiveness by fostering educational excellence and ensuring equal access. Page 2 OSEP Memo 15-08 In transmitting OSEP Memo 15-08, I am requesting that you widely distribute Letter to Delisle to the LEAs in your State, and remind each LEA of its obligation to evaluate all children, regardless of cognitive skills, suspected of having one of the 13 disabilities 23Interpreter TrainingWSPEI, WI FACETS, ALSA, DTAN, and Green Bay Public Schools have collaborated to develop a training for interpreters at IEP meetings. This training will be made available in CESA 7 on 01/13, CESA 6 on 02/01, CESA 2 on 02/25. Contact each CESA for registration information.

Universal Design for LearningUDL Startup Grants are underway. These grants are expected to go through the end of the 2016-17 school year and focus on two main areas:Building UDL Capacity Trainers available in every CESA and Large LEA. UDL Implementation 22 school teams and demonstration sites throughout WisconsinFor more information: Contact Jayne Bischoffhttp://dpi.wi.gov/universal-design-learningUDL Startup Grants are underway. These grants are expected to go through the end of the 2016-17 school year and focus on two main areas:Building UDL Capacity A UDL Presenters Academy was held on March 12-13. Over forty five educator leaders were provided training and resources from CAST to be able to provide professional development around UDL. Follow up sessions with CAST are being planned for those who participated.UDL Implementation On April 30, CAST again was here in Wisconsin to meet with the 22 school teams receiving UDL Startup Grant funds to work on UDL implementation. Over 110 educators attended this event and received training and access to CASTs UDL Implementation & Strategy Guide. Ongoing support from CAST will be provided to these school teams over the course of the next two school years.

25Racial Disproportionality in Special Education38 LEAs; those LEAs serve 42% of SWDs in Wisconsin. Wisconsin over-identifies Black and Native students in special education. Disproportionality Technical Assistance Network (the Network) - provides free/low-cost training, support, and technical assistance Onalaska School District. https://youtu.be/GYDsn609WRM

Every year, DPI analyzes district-submitted data and identifies districts with racial disproportionality in some part of their special education programming. This year, we notified 38 LEAs; those LEAs serve 42% of the students with disabilities in Wisconsin. As a state, we over-identify Black and Native students in special education. Black students are more than twice as likely, and Native students just less than twice as likely, than their White peers to be identified with a disability and needing special education.To meet the needs of LEAs with racial disproportionality in special education, the department has chosen to invest a portion of its discretionary grant funds awarded under IDEA to support the Disproportionality Technical Assistance Network (the Network). The Network provides free/low-cost training, support, and technical assistance to the identified LEAs and invited LEAs based on racial disproportionality in special education programming but with small cell sizes. For more information on the Network, please see thenetworkwi.com. The Network collaborates with other systems-change initiatives to address racial equity in education. The RtI Center and Promoting Excellence for All are scaling up supports to close race-based gaps in general education, which contribute to racial disproportionality in special education. As an example of the Networks partnership with the RtI Center, Id like to share with you a jointly-produced video on work in the Onalaska School District. https://youtu.be/GYDsn609WRM

26Wisconsin Student Assessment System (WSAS)StateSummative Assessment at grades 3-8 in English Language Arts and MathematicsState Summative Assessment at grades 4, 8 and 10 in Science and Social StudiesGrades 9 and 10ACT Aspire Early High SchoolGrades 11ACT Plus Writing and ACT WorkKeysGrades 3 -11Dynamic Learning Maps(alternate) Assessment in English Language Arts and MathematicsWisconsin Alternate Assessment for Students with Disabilities (WAA-SwD)Social StudiesatGrades 4, 8, and 10

StateSummative Assessment (To be determined) at grades 3-8 in English Language Arts and MathematicsState Summative Assessment (To be determined) at grades 4, 8 and 10 in Science and Social StudiesGrades 9 and 10ACT Aspire Early High SchoolGrades 11ACT Plus Writing and ACT WorkKeysGrades 3 -11Dynamic Learning Maps(alternate) Assessment in English Language Arts and MathematicsWisconsin Alternate Assessment for Students with Disabilities (WAA-SwD)Social StudiesatGrades 4, 8, and 1027Alternate Academic Achievement Standards/Assessment for Science

Wisconsin will be adopting theDynamic Learning Maps-Essential Elements in science. The DLM-EEs in science explore a deeper understanding of the WMAS.Beginning in the Spring of 2016, Wisconsin will use the DLM system for science as well as in the areas of ELA and math. In 2010, we increased the rigor and expectation for students with significant cognitive disabilities (SCD) in ELA and math. Since the creation of the Extended Grade Band Standards in science in 2007, we have continually seen students with SCD to make gains in this area. To provide increased expectations, Wisconsin will be adopting theDynamic Learning Maps-Essential Elements in science. This will provide a cohesive system for instruction and assessment in all content areas. The DLM-EEs in science explore a deeper understanding of the WMAS.As you may have heard, Wisconsin will no longer be administering the WKCE/WAA-SwD in the fall. Beginning in the Spring of 2016, Wisconsin will use the DLM system for science as well as in the areas of ELA and math. More detailed information, including training, will be shared with districts in the near future.

28Promoting Excellence for AllThe Promoting Excellence for All eCourse is a resource added to the Promoting Excellence for All Website to be used by Wisconsin practitioners working to close achievement gaps in their schools and districts.eCourse

29Based on the work of Promoting Excellence for AllSchool improvement areas that can close gaps:effective instruction, studentteacher relationships, family and community engagement, and school and instructional leadership

within a belief framework that pays attention to race and values culturally responsive practices

Family and Community Engagement

Time: 1 min. The Promoting Excellence for All Task Force included 18 educators from schools across Wisconsin that had succeeded in closing race-based achievement gaps. Again, here are the four areas of school improvement that they focused on. Family engagement has long been recognized as an important factor in improving student achievement, attendance, and graduation. In addition, efforts to engage all families in childrens education promote equity.

30ESEA Reauthorization: The Every Student Succeeds ActIt's time to replace the nation's most important education law with one that ensures opportunity for every child, expands support for schools, teachers, and principals, and preserves accountability for the progress of all students.40 Years of IDEA

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) was signed into law 40 years ago to assure that youth with disabilities receive a free and appropriate public education that provides educational opportunities and services.

40 Years of IDEAThe Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) was signed into law 40 years ago to assure that youth with disabilities receive a free and appropriate public education that provides educational opportunities and services. Amendments to the law have emphasized transition planning that is focused on improving the academic and functional achievement of youth with disabilities to facilitate movement from school to post-school activities, including postsecondary education, career and technical education,integrated employment, continuing and adult education, adult services, independent living, or community participation.For the latest OSERS blog andalso toview other resources, click http://www.ed.gov/edblogs/osers/2015/09/idea-changes-lives-preparing-for-the-transition-to-college-careers/.

32IDEA 40th Anniversary Dear Colleague Letter: Clarification of FAPE and Alignment with State Academic StandardsIDEAs That Work: Preparing Children and Youth with Disabilities for Success Supporting and Responding to Behavior: Evidence-Based Classroom Strategies for Teachers

IDEA 40th Anniversary CelebrationAs we celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). IDEA is a civil rights law, guaranteeing a free appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment to millions of children, many of whom were excluded 40 years ago from the American education system. As educators, advocates, parents, and policymakers, we need to work toward creating a culture of high expectations; ensuring students with disabilities have full access to college- and career-ready learning opportunities and assessments; and supporting students with disabilities so that they may excel in the general curriculum for college and career success. To do so, the U.S. Departments of Education and Justice have released several resources including the:Dear Colleague Letter: Clarification of FAPE and Alignment with State Academic Standards, which clarifies that individualized education programs for children with disabilities must be aligned with state academic content standards for the grade in which a child is enrolled. Dear Colleague Letter: Clarification of FAPE and Alignment with StateAcademic StandardsThe cornerstone of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) is the entitlement of each eligible child with a disability to a free appropriate public education (FAPE) that emphasizes special education and related services designed to meet the childs unique needs and that prepare the child for further education, employment, and independent living. The primary vehicle for providing FAPE is through an appropriately developed individualized education program (IEP) that is based on the individual needs of the child.This policy letter clarifies that IEPs for children with disabilities must be aligned with state academic content standards for the grade in which a child is enrolled.

IDEAs That Work: Preparing Children and Youth with Disabilities for Success website will connect teachers and families with resources to assist them in improving instruction and supporting academic, social, emotional, and behavioral needs of students with disabilities as they become college and career ready.Supporting and Responding to Behavior: Evidence-Based Classroom Strategies for Teachers toolkit, which summarizes evidence-based, positive, proactive, and responsive classroom behavior intervention and support strategies for teachers.

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IDEA requires that OSEP monitors how states are implementing special education.Previously, OSEP only considered compliance in making State determinations.Beginning with its 2014 determinations, OSEP considered results and compliance as factors in making State DeterminationsLow performing States will get more intensive support

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