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  • Bike/Ped Safety in Context of Sustainability

    APA Florida - Annual Conference

    Presented by

    Margaret Kubilins, PE ENV SP

    September 7, 2017

  • Bike/Ped Safety

    ▪ APA Sustainability Principles

    ▪ Simple Safety Design Principles

    ▪Details Matter

  • What are the E’s?

    Safe Routes to School

  • What are the E’s?

    Safe Routes to School

  • APA Sustainability Policy Framework

    - Six Principles

    1. Livable Built Environment

    2. Harmony with Nature

    3. Resilient Economy

    4. Interwoven Equity

    5. Healthy Community

    6. Responsible Regionalism

  • Bike/Ped Safety & Sustainability

    ✓ Built Environment

    • Less Impervious Area

    • Lighting

    ✓ Economy

    • Bicycle Friendly Communities

    • Attractive Places to Live and Work

    ✓ Equity

    • Access to Employment

    • Access to Health Care

    ✓ Health

    • Physical Activity – Mental, Emotional, Physical Health

    • Air Quality

  • Multimodal Access

    ▪ Perfect distance for daily

    physical activity

  • Designing for Pedestrians and Cyclists

    ✓ Safe

    ✓ Convenient

    ✓ Comfortable

    Photo Credit: Margaret Kubilins

  • Designing for Pedestrians and Cyclists

    1st. . . Along the Road

    Characteristics of Traffic

    • SPEED

    • Volume

    =

    Level of Traffic Stress

  • Designing for Pedestrians and Cyclists

  • Designing for Pedestrians and Cyclists

    • High Stress – It is estimated that 1% of the

    population will ride in high stress traffic. This level

    of stress includes using the full lane with high-

    volume traffic and cycling in >40 mph roads.

    • Moderate Stress – Significantly fewer cyclists

    will use these facilities. It is estimated that 10% of

    cyclists are anticipated to use roadways with

    sharrows or bike lanes. This is the reason the

    buffered bike lane became the standard for many

    jurisdictions.

    • Low Stress – These facilities accommodate

    most of the riding population through a network of

    low-volume low-speed streets and buffered bike

    lanes.

    • Very Low Stress – The cyclist only occasionally

    must be concerned about motorized traffic since

    these facilities have infrequent crossings and

    include low-volume, low-speed streets. These are

    neighborhood roads, cycle tracks/separated bike

    lanes, shared use paths, and trails.

    Level of Traffic Stress

  • Designing for Pedestrians and Cyclists

    1st . . . Along the Road

    Level of Traffic Stress

    Volume Speed

    low

    high

    Separation or Shared Space

    Auto Bike Ped

    Auto Bike Ped

    Auto Bike Ped

    Auto Bike Ped

  • Designing for Pedestrians and Cyclists

    1st . . . Along the Road – Comfort

    • Smooth

    • Shaded

  • Designing for Pedestrians and Cyclists

    2nd . . . Crossing the Road – Convenience

    •Direct

    •Delay

    =

    Safer Behavior

  • Designing for Pedestrians and Cyclists

    2nd . . . Crossing the Road – Convenience

    What are you asking the pedestrian and

    cyclist to do to cross the street?

    Safer Behavior

    • How frequent are the crossings?

    • How long is the signal timing?

    • Are crosswalks on all legs of the intersection?

    • Are there too many lanes to cross for the cyclist to make a left turn?

    • Are right turn vehicles in a separate lane so the conflict zone happens before the intersection?

  • Details

    Matter

    Sidewalk embellishments . . . Bumpy

    Crosswalk texture . . . Maintenance

    Cycle Length . . . Long Wait Times

    Drainage . . . . .

    . . . . . Puddles

    Street Tree Requirements . . . Toe Trip

  • Details

    MatterLarge Curb Radii . . . Crossing distance

    Leading Ped Interval (LPI) . . .

    Pedestrian always goes first

    On-street Parking . . . Door swing

    Bikes Lanes . . .

    Buffers from speed

    Lighting . . . Lower Fixture Height

  • Margaret Kubilins, PE ENV SP mkubilins@vhb.com

    813.327.5423

    Designing for Pedestrians and Cyclists

    ▪ Safe

    – Speed

    – Separation

    ▪ Convenient

    – Direct

    – Delay

    ▪ Comfortable

    – Smooth Surface

    – Shade