Wt4603 unit7 week8

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Unit 7 Week 8 Lecture Notes

Transcript of Wt4603 unit7 week8

  • 1. WT4603 Wood Processing Safety & Practice Lecture Unit 7 (Week 8) BANDSAW & ROUTERS Lecturer: Mr. Joseph Lyster joseph.lyster@ul.ie Notes prepared by: Mr. Donal Canty, Mr. Des Kelly and Mr. Joseph Lyster Notes available on www.slideshare.net/WT4603

2. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 3. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 4. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 5. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 6. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 7. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 8. WT4603 Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering 9. WT4603 Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering 10. WT4603 Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering 11. WT4603 Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering 12. WT4603 Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering 13. WT4603 Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering 14. WT4603 Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering 15. WT4603 Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering 16. WT4603 Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering 17. 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Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 Hand Router Consists of cutter rotating at between 800 to 30,000 RPM being driven by a vertically mounted motor set on a flat based framework 32. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 Hand Router 33. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 Cutting grooves Cutting rebates Cutting slots and recesses Cutting beads or mouldings Cutting dovetails Cutting dovetailed slots and grooves Edge trimming Profiling (jigs/formers) Hand Router 34. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 Large powerful routers are heavy and can be difficult to handle for light work. Generally in schools the type of work that the router will have to perform will be light to medium work. As a rough guide to classifying routers: 400 W to 600W are for light duty 750 W to 1200W are for medium duty 1250 W upwards are for heavy duty Hand Router: Power 35. Speed Machine speed can range from about 800 to 30000 rpm. Nearly all modern routers have variable speed motors, the setting is by a simple numbered knob showing up to 5 or 6 positions. The required speed will depend upon the size of cutter being used and the material being cut. The appropriate speed setting for any combination will need to be determined by trial and error/experience. The variable speed control should not be in a position where it could inadvertently be changed while routing. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 36. Hand Router Router cutter (bit) is fitted to a collet on the lower end of the motor It is a direct drive system Motor sizes can vary from horse power to 3 horse power The bigger the motor the heavier the router Cutter profile will often determine the size of the motor required for the job Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 37. Hand Router Collet Simple but accurate chuck Attached directly to the bottom of the motor armature Collet holds the bit so that the motor can make it spin Two most common size collet are 6mm and 12mm 12mm collet will hold a bit with a 12mm shank which is stronger than the 6mm Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 38. Hand Router The base of the router is what holds the motor in position in relation to the work It usually incorporates two operating handles Handles used to control the machine Can be used to lock/release depth plunge Can contain on off switch Base plate of the router is a plastic sole on the bottom of the base Reduces frictional contact with material Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 39. Hand Router Motors rated on their horse power Will also have an amperage rating Determines the maximum amount of current the motor can draw in continuous use without overheating and burning out Routers may have the same horsepower rating and different amperage rating e.g. 1 hp drawing 8 amps 1 hp drawing 10 amps Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 40. Hand Router Router motor is of the universal brush type which is primarily used for intermittent, variable speed operations Induction motors (brushless) are primarily used for long term fixed speed operations such as the circular saw etc. This is the reason why a 1 hp router motor is much smaller than a 1 hp circular saw motor Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 41. Cutter Speed The router is a high speed cutting machine Generally it is taken that the higher the speed the smoother the cut However if the cutter diameter is increased the peripheral cutter speed increases which can make the machine hard to control and prone to damaging the material Can also lead to burning of the wood and blunting of the cutting edge Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 42. Collet Like a drill chuck it is designed to hold a round shank bit The collet makes almost full contact with the cutter shank unlike the three fingered shank of the drill chuck Router bit shanks must be sized to match the inside diameter of the collet Collet must hold cutter while revolving at high speed Must also be able to resist side loading Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 43. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 Collet 44. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 Collet A tapered sleeve that is made in a number of segments that is used to hold the shaft of a cutter or bit. 45. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 Collet needs to be cleaned regularly Must prevent rust Must prevent wear Can clean with solvents but must spray with WD40 afterwards 46. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 Cutters (Router bits) Two types of cutter High Speed Steel (HSS) Tungsten Carbide Tipped (TCT) HSS work well on softwood because of their keen edge but will blunt quickly TCT cutters perform much better than HSS on hardwoods and MDF Cutters should be cleaned regularly with white spirit and fine scraper to remove dirt, resin and debris. Cutters should also be inspected for damage prior to operating. 47. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 A router bit is a tool for woodworking giving a quality finish to the material. It cuts wood providing a way to give a clean and even a decorative edge to woodwork. The following is some basic information about router bits to get you started in your woodworking efforts. Here are the there main parts of a router bit: 1. The shank- the part of the router bit that is inserted into the collet (the sleeve of the router). 2. The cutting edge- this part cuts and removes the wood. They are available in several sizes and shapes. 3. The pilot- the guide for the router in order to make a correct cut. It can be an extension of the shank or a ball bearing attachment. Cutters (Router bits) 48. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 Cutters (Router bits) Cutters can have disposable or interchangeable profiles. 49. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 Cutters (Router bits) Cutter diameter will have a direct effect on the power required form the router motor. 50. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 Cutter selection & feed direction 51. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 Feed direction If you feed a router into a piece of material without using a guide fence or bearing guide you will find that the router will pull to one side. If you push the router into the material from position (A), the router will pull to your left. If you pull the router into the material toward you from position (B), the router will pull to your right. This occurs as the cutter will climb on the material in front of the cutting edge. This motion must be utilised when using guide fences. 52. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 Feed direction & the fence To process a straight housing or trench you can use a straight edge guide (A) or the guide fence that is supplied with the router(B). 53. Department of Manufacturing & Operations Engineering WT4603 Feed direction & the fence In the photo the fence is securely clamped in position. The router is being fed in the direction (F). The router will try to pull to the operators left hand side. With the fence clamped on the