Wolfgang Bengel - Mastering Digital Dental Photography

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Why dental photography? Dentistry is one of the branches of medicine which has always used photography. There are many reasons for this.

Transcript of Wolfgang Bengel - Mastering Digital Dental Photography

  • MASTERING digital dental photography Wolfgang Bengel

    Quintessence Publishing Co, Ltd London, Berlin, Chicago, Tokyo, Barcelona, Beijing, Istanbul, Milan,

    Moscow, Mumbai, Paris, Prague, Sao Paulo, Seoul, Warsaw

  • British Library Cataloguing in Publication Data Bengel, Wolfgang Mastering digital dental photography 1. Dental photography - Technique 2. Photography - Digital techniques I. Title 617.6'0028 ISBN-10: 1850971528

    2006 Quintessence Publishing Co, Ltd Quintessence Publishing Co, Ltd Grafton Road, New Maiden, Surrey United Kingdom www.quintpub.co.uk

    All rights reserved. This book or any part thereof may not be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publisher.

    Editor: Kathleen Splieth, Wampen Layout and Production: Bernd Burkart, Berlin Printing and Binding: Bosch-Druck GmbH, Landshut

    Printed in Germany

    ISBN 1-85097-152-8

  • Dedication

    To Helmi, Christiane, and Renate

    who accompanied our way for many years with patience, commitment and unlimited loyalty.

    V

  • Foreword

    Photography can be found virtually everywhere in daily life, and it seems that im-ages are being produced everywhere in both personal and professional applications. Bioinformatics, a new field, is speeding ahead, and new applications are being ex-plored at exponential rates as computers and digital tools become mainstream. The actual photomechanical process has become so easy that it might actually be diffi-cult to achieve the quality results one might expect. Practitioners have become a bit spoiled and rarely think about the role and goal of the pictures and are more enam-ored with the technology and how cool it is.

    Photography has experienced an incredible transformation in the last 10 years as digital methods have taken over photographic applications. Originally invented in the late 1830's with silver halide materials, photography's evolution to the 1990's was a long steady continuum of improvements with few, if any, significant departures from methods and materials. Small improvements occurred frequently and were most ev-ident in color photography, but fundamentally used silver halide materials and most-ly film. These fundamental principles were grounded in physical and chemical processes.

    In specific applications, photography can remember what the mind struggles to and photography can more easily describe what words cannot. Photography, when practiced correctly, can make the invisible visible. Science, and in particular medicine, quickly adopted photography as a tool for the documentation of procedures, disease and treatments. With careful and precise approaches, photography could reproduce reality with a precision that drawing or other illustrative methods could not. It was a powerful way to share conditions and cases that otherwise words struggled to achieve.

    As the mid 1990's arrived, digital photography and more specifically digital cam-eras started to arrive in the marketplace. Although their resolution was low, they cre-ated a small buzz and purists argued about their poor picture quality, while innova-tors were delighted with what might be possible. In the 10 or so years since the Ap-ple Quicktake first appeared in photography stores, digital photography has com-

    vii

  • pletely displaced film photography in science and medicine. Digital has achieved in 10 years what took silver halide materials more than 150 years to achieve.

    The future is indeed exciting. With CCD and CMOS chips being able to resolve more things than ever using chips that are often 8+ million pixels, applications are being explored daily for imaging situations that otherwise were not possible with film. Display devices, printers, software and a slew of other inventions create a myriad of choices, provide methods, and provide new usages or others that have yet to be con-sidered. Often it is overwhelming and challenging at best to know where to go, how to purchase tools and what are the standards.

    The advantages of this new technology do however come with a cost. New tech-nology is very dynamic and standards are being proposed daily for approaches and practices, but are not widely accepted in all industries. It can be frustrating when con-sidering purchasing products for specific applications as the prices are constantly de-creasing and improvements are continually made. New software allows things to be measured, changed, shared, and integrated into new communication tools with the click of a mouse. Images now are being animated, used in reports and put onto web sites at exponential rates. These applications are unparalleled in film technologies.

    This richly illustrated book by Dr Wolfgang Bengel builds on his initial book in-vestigating Dental Photography published in 1984. Excellent practical solutions are shared in very logical manner. Attention to detail is evident upon a quick review of the table of contents. As a practicing dentist and having a long history of using pho-tography, he has produced an excellent book that should serve as a cornerstone of any practitioner of digital photography in a clinical setting.

    Professor Michael Peres Rochester Institute of Technology

    viii Foreword

  • pletely displaced film photography in science and medicine. Digital has achieved in 10 years what took silver halide materials more than 150 years to achieve.

    The future is indeed exciting. With CCD and CMOS chips being able to resolve more things than ever using chips that are often 8+ million pixels, applications are being explored daily for imaging situations that otherwise were not possible with film. Display devices, printers, software and a slew of other inventions create a myriad of choices, provide methods, and provide new usages or others that have yet to be con-sidered. Often it is overwhelming and challenging at best to know where to go, how to purchase tools and what are the standards.

    The advantages of this new technology do however come with a cost. New tech-nology is very dynamic and standards are being proposed daily for approaches and practices, but are not widely accepted in all industries. It can be frustrating when con-sidering purchasing products for specific applications as the prices are constantly de-creasing and improvements are continually made. New software allows things to be measured, changed, shared, and integrated into new communication tools with the click of a mouse. Images now are being animated, used in reports and put onto web sites at exponential rates. These applications are unparalleled in film technologies.

    This richly illustrated book by Dr Wolfgang Bengel builds on his initial book in-vestigating Dental Photography published in 1984. Excellent practical solutions are shared in very logical manner. Attention to detail is evident upon a quick review of the table of contents. As a practicing dentist and having a long history of using pho-tography, he has produced an excellent book that should serve as a cornerstone of any practitioner of digital photography in a clinical setting.

    Professor Michael Peres Rochester Institute of Technology

    viii Foreword

  • Preface and acknowledgements

    My last book on dental photography was published in 2002. It dealt with conven-tional and digital techniques.

    When I was asked by the publisher to prepare a 2nd edition, I realized that pho-tography had changed completely.

    In the professional world, the transition from conventional silver-halide photog-raphy to digital photography was not only underway but nearly completed. I thus decided to write a completely new book concentrating only on digital photography. Of course, the principles of photography have not changed. But in many cases, dig-ital photography has changed the approach to photography.

    In my hands-on photography courses, I learned a great deal about problems col-leagues have when starting with digital photography and stumbling into the pitfalls of soft- and hardware. Therefore, I have tried to compile a book which is practically oriented. Although the user has to deal with things like image editing programs, archiving programs, and some software problems, digital photography is much eas-ier than the old silver-halide technique. The learning curve in the digital world is much steeper, as there is the great opportunity of immediate image checking. After users have overcome their initial inhibitions about the new technique, they have the chance to explore new worlds of creativity and fascinating possibilities.

    I have never yet met a user who returned to conventional photography after he or she had stepped into the digital world.

    Writing such a book relies on the help of others. I would like to thank Mrs. Bahr of Olympus, Mr. Scheffer of Nikon, Mr. Hermanns of Canon, and Mr. Bauer of Sigma, as well as Mr. Dieter Baumann and other people not mentioned here. Mr. Hubschen of Kaiser and Mr. Hiesinger of Novoflex supported me with advice on many occa-sions.

    My appreciation goes to my practice staff for their help and patience over many years.

    I thank my friend Dr. Steve Chu, New York, for our discussions.

    ix

  • x Preface and Acknowledgements

    Again, I would like to extend my gratitude to Mr. Haase of Quintessence Publishing for the opportunity of publishing another book. Mr. Burkart was responsible for the production of this work. I would like to thank him especially for his attention to de-tail and his patience.

    At last I have to thank my wife and the whole family for their patience.

    Wolfgang Bengel Bensheim

  • Contents

    Man - Image - Medicine 1