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Transcript of Wheatbelt Aikido Student .2009-2011 Wheatbelt Aikido, LLC Page 1 of 27 Training for Life Student

  • 2009-2011 Wheatbelt Aikido, LLC Page 1 of 27

    Training for Life

    Student Handbook

    www.WheatbeltAikido.com

    208 North Main Street Kingfisher, OK 73750

    Aikido

    Wheatbelt

  • Wheatbelt Aikido: Student Handbook

    2009-2011 Wheatbelt Aikido, LLC Page 2 of 27

    Letter to Dojo Members ............................................................................................... 3 Training Principles from the Founder ........................................................................... 4 Conduct Outside of Class ............................................................................................ 6 Preparations Prior to Coming to the Dojo ..................................................................... 7 At the Dojo, Before Class............................................................................................. 8 At the Dojo, During Class ............................................................................................. 9 After Class ................................................................................................................. 11 Teaching and Learning .............................................................................................. 12 Cooperation and Consideration ................................................................................. 14 Ranks and Testing ..................................................................................................... 16

    Kyu Ranks.............................................................................................................. 16 Dan Ranks ............................................................................................................. 17 Teaching Ranks ..................................................................................................... 17 Styles of Aikido....................................................................................................... 18

    Birankai North America Mission & Vision ................................................................... 20 This is who we are: ................................................................................................ 20 This is where we are going: .................................................................................... 20

    Birankai North America Teachers Statement of Professional Ethics .......................... 21 Aikido Vocabulary / Japanese Terminology ............................................................... 22

  • Wheatbelt Aikido: Student Handbook

    2009-2011 Wheatbelt Aikido, LLC Page 3 of 27

    Letter to Dojo Members Dear Wheatbelt Aikido Member, Welcome to Wheatbelt Aikido. I hope that this handbook will help you better understand the training process as we help each other to deepen our mastery of Aikido. Membership in an Aikido dojo is not like membership in a health club or a gymnasium. Your Wheatbelt Aikido membership here makes you part of both a global community and a local family of people training together to improve themselves. The process of Aikido training is a journey that fundamentally and profoundly changes us. In our training sessions, our partners threaten us by attacking and we learn to respond by:

    Relaxing our bodies

    Focusing our minds

    Calming our spirits

    Making martially appropriate responses To do this we must face up to our own fears, ignorance, and physical limitations. Through sincere training, we learn to control our attacker by controlling ourselves. What we practice during our formal classes caries over into our daily lives. We can observe our progress during our everyday activities in the form of more relaxed and spontaneous actions and a heightened sense of awareness. By practicing Aikido diligently over a period of time, we enjoy the benefits of:

    True self-defense

    Improved general health

    Renewed intensity in our own personal search for truth

    Greater sensitivity in our dealings with others Certainly, such results do not come easy. However, they do proceed naturally from sincere and dedicated training. By learning to accomplish things that are difficult in class, you will also acquire more confidence when trying to accomplish difficult things in other areas of your life. We hope your training is enjoyable and productive. This handbook will help you become acquainted with some of the basic expectations that are common to Aikidoka (i.e. Aikido students) around the world. Sincerely, Neal Dunnigan, Chief Instructor Wheatbelt Aikido

  • Wheatbelt Aikido: Student Handbook

    2009-2011 Wheatbelt Aikido, LLC Page 4 of 27

    Training Principles from the Founder

    Reminders in Aikido Practice

    by

    Morihei Ueshiba (1883-1969), Founder of Aikido

    A.K.A O-Sensei (i.e. Great Teacher)

    1. Aikido decides life and death in a single strike, so students must carefully follow the instructor's teaching and not compete to see who is the strongest.

    2. Aikido is the way that teaches how one can deal with several enemies. Students must train themselves to be alert not just to the front but to all sides and the back.

    3. Training should always be conducted in a pleasant and joyful atmosphere.

    4. The instructor teaches only one small aspect of the art. Its versatile applications must be discovered by each student through incessant practice and training.

    5. In daily practice first begin by moving your body and then progress to more intensive practice. Never force anything unnaturally or unreasonably. If this rule is followed, then even elderly people will not hurt themselves and they can train in a pleasant and joyful atmosphere.

    6. The purpose of Aikido is to train mind and body and to produce sincere, earnest human beings. Since all the techniques are to be transmitted person-to-person, do not randomly reveal them to others, for this might lead to their being used by hoodlums.

  • Wheatbelt Aikido: Student Handbook

    2009-2011 Wheatbelt Aikido, LLC Page 5 of 27

    These six rules that O-Sensei defined are just as appropriate today as they were when in his lifetime. However, there are some important differences between todays Aikido students vs. the Aikido students of O-Senseis time. When O-Sensei was teaching, a new student would have:

    Already had the equivalent of a black belt in at lease one other martial art. Prior knowledge of martial arts basics was automatically assumed.

    Previously obtained five letters of recommendation from distinguished guarantors who would personally vouch for the student. Any failure of the student would be a major disgrace to those sponsors.

    The students would all be from the same cultural background and share a common understanding of what was considered appropriate conduct while training.

    Today Aikido training is much more easily accessible to students all over the world and available to all with a desire to learn. However, matters of etiquette and tradition, which were assumed to be implicitly understood by Aikidoka in O-Senseis day, now need to be spelled out in detail in the dojo (i.e. training hall, in Japanese way place as in way-of-life or life journey) rules. While some of these dojo rules may individually appear superficial. However, when taken together they help us to create a harmonious atmosphere for safe and productive training. Specifically the purpose of these dojo rules is to:

    Teach attention to detail and build awareness Make training safer Set a proper mood and help focus the students concentration Be a visible sign of respect to the founder, the teacher, and the other students Provide Aikidoka from all over the world a common vocabulary of behavior that

    allows them to practice together Aikido was developed in Japan. Much of the terminology, methodology, and etiquette that are used by Aikidoka today are derived from this Japanese origin. This should not surprise us. For example, classical musicians around the world all use Italian terminology for musical notation. Another example is European fencing which universally uses French terminology. While the need to develop a small Japanese vocabulary may initially present a learning challenge to some new Aikidoka, it will later facilitate more advanced practice. As a side benefit, the new Aikidoka will gain some insights into a different culture. Aikido has no religious affiliation and students of all beliefs practice Aikido. One of the purposes of Aikido practice is to bring Aikidoka into a higher state of personal insight. This will manifest itself differently in each Aikidoka according to his or her own belief system. Irrespective of any religious beliefs, all students are expected to maintain a respectful attitude while at practice or in the dojo. By keeping this proper attitude, your Aikido practice can be serious, yet fun, and intense, yet relaxed; all at the same time!

  • Wheatbelt Aikido: Student Handbook

    2009-2011 Wheatbelt Aikido, LLC Page 6 of 27

    Conduct Outside of Class

    By virtue of their training, Aikido students have responsibilities to themselves, their community, and other Aikidoka (past and present). Remember that the do in Aikido indicates a way of life and is not restrictive to your time spent in class.

    1. Beginning students are not to engage in unsupervised practice outside of class. 2. No student may engage in brawls, contests, or challenges. 3. Students must have the instructors permission before participating in any public

    or private Aikido demonstrations 4. Avoid discussions about the pros and cons of various martial arts styles. 5. Visiting other Aikido dojos is encouraged. Keep your sensei informed of your