Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011

of 12 /12
After five months of campaigning and 11 debates, many USU students are still trying to make a decision of who to vote for among the Republicans vying for the opportunity to challenge Barack Obama for the presidency in the 2012 elections. At this point the race has been character- ized by a swiftly revolving list of front runners. There has been a consistent group of eight candidates, however, who have been featured most prominently by media and have been invited to participate in debates: Rep. Michele Bachmann, former Godfather’s Pizza CEO Herman Cain, former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich, former ambassador to China and Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, Rep. Ron Paul from Texas, Texas Gov. Rick Perry, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum from Pennsylvania. “The GOP seems to have so many candidates,” said Trent Hunsaker, a USU student working toward his master’s degree in technical writing. “I think it’s hard for anybody to truly care and sup- port just one at this point. No one’s really standing out.” Hunsaker’s views are shared by some USU stu- dents who still seem to be forming opinions about Republican candidates as the first set of primary elections get closer. “I’m all for a woman president, but I feel like she’s just not competent enough,” said Courtney Hahne, a junior majoring in communications. “Truth be told, the only exposure I’ve had to her is in the debates, but nothing she says seems new or original. I don’t think she’s very well rounded.” “She’s an intelligent woman with leadership potential, yet when she tries too hard to appeal to Tea Party voters, I think she comes off a little crazy,” said Issac Benion, a senior majoring in economics. “I think she’d have a problem appeal- ing to enough American voters to get into the White House.” Philadelphia as the director of business “I think he has a simple way to reform the tax code and raise revenue,” Benion said. “But personally I’m not interested in hearing about all the sexual harassment allegations that will come up next year instead of the issues, so I think that hurts him as a viable candidate.” “He’s got some interesting views,” said Adam Utah Wednesady, Nov. 30, 2011 ±'EQTYW :SMGI 7MRGI ² 9XEL 7XEXI 9RMZIVWMX] 0SKER 9XEL www.utahstatesman.com S tatesman The ASUSU discusses tuition plateau change BY CHRIS LEE news senior writer Avalanche experts advise caution BY STEVE KENT web editor Students chime in on GOP candidates BY TIM BARBER staff writer Students and community members who spend time in the mountains outside of ski resorts this winter should educate themselves about avalanches, according to local avalanche experts. There may not have been much snowfall so far this ski season, but avalanche expert Toby Weed said he expects to see an increase in avalanche danger later this year. Weed works as the Logan area fore- caster for the Utah Avalanche Center. “We’re getting set up for a possible Christmas tragedy this year,” Weed said. “Right now, we don’t have as much ava- lanche danger in the mountains, but it will pick up pretty drasti- cally when we get a snowstorm.” Weed said the high-pressure weather currently in the area is creating a layer of weak snow that, if covered by a stronger layer of snow from storms later in the year, could increase the risk of avalanches. According to the Utah Avalanche Center, four people were killed by avalanches in Utah in 2010. “The snow on the very bot- tom of the snowpack is weak and the other snow on top is stronger, so it may have the tendency to break and slide as a unit — as a great big slab down the hill,” Weed said. “Those are fairly deadly.” Before traveling in the back- country in the winter, outdoors enthusiasts should check the Avalanche Center’s forecast, available at utahavalanchecen- ter.org, Weed said. - mobilers were killed in an avalanche near Logan Peak, said Sgt. Jake Peterson of the Cache County Sheriff’s Office. Peterson is the commander of the local search and rescue team. Peterson said it’s difficult for search and rescue to save some- one trapped in an avalanche. The chances of a victim surviv- ing decrease drastically after Even in the unlikely event a victim’s partner is able to call search and rescue immediately after an avalanche occurs, he said, and even if weather condi- tions allow helicopter flight, responders would not be able minutes. Often, the best search and rescue can do is recover the bodies of avalanche victims, Peterson said. People traveling in the back- country need to have the proper education and equipment, said USU Outdoor Recreation Program Coordinator Brian Shirley. The ORP will hold a free snow safety clinic Dec 1. Shirley said clinic won’t go in depth about how to test snow for instability. Rather, the 7/-)67 )<4036) % 723;'3:)6)( ,-00 in Utah. Local avalanche experts say although Utah has not received much snow yet this year, skiers and hikers should still be careful of avalanches. USU’s Outdoor Recreation Program rents out tools students can use in the case of an avalanche. Photo courtesy of Steve Kent 6=%2 &%=0-7 %2( >%', 0%67)2 members of the ASUSU Executive Council, responded to a proposal that could alter the current tuition plateau policy. The change would expand the plateau for students and would increase tuition for part time students. Members of the council said the change could be costly. DELAYNE LOCKE photo increase could impact part- time students registered for fewer than 12 credits per semester as part of a possible change in the university’s tuition plateau policy. Erik Mikkelsen, ASUSU president, said tuition currently plateaus between students pay the same He presented the pos- sible changes to the ASUSU Executive Council Tuesday night. He said the council was asked to prepare its opinions on the changes for the Registrar’s Office. “When we merged with USU Eastern, we had to have a lot of policy shifts,” Mikkelsen said. “At USU Eastern, currently, their class tuition goes from 10 The change would raise USU Eastern’s plateau and would lower the Logan campus plateau, with the two meeting at 12 credits. Mikkelsen said the goal is to have both schools use the same plateau without changing either one too much. He said fees would be re-adjusted to balance out the money USU receives from tuition and fees. He said this will only bal- ance out the revenue gener- ated by tuition and fees, not increase it. Because of this, he said, fees would decrease See INCREASE, Page 3 See GEAR, Page 2 See TOP , Page 2 Campus News Features Many students raise pets to accompany them through their college years. Page 4 Sports Find out how students at USU’s sister school, USU Eastern, feel about the name and logo changes on their campus. Page 2 USU’s football team will play in the Famous Idaho Potato Bowl Dec. 17 in Boise. Page 7 Opinion “The die-hard fans are most likely your future donors. Yes, they’re also the ones who will toe the line and go too far, but in my opinion, that line still has never been fully crossed.” Page 10 Today’s Issue: Interact Now! Added Value! Online exlusives, blogs, a place to comment on stories, videos and more. Free Classfieds, too. www.utahstatesman.com ,EZI ]SY XVMIH SYV new cross [SVH TY^ ^PI# =SY can win VIWXEYVERX certificates NYWX F] JMPP MRK MX SYX 4EKI Today: As Spectrum behavior is debated, here’s a walk down memory lane: 1-',)0) &%',1%22 ,)61%2 '%-2

description

complete issue

Transcript of Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011

Page 1: Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011

After five months of campaigning and 11 debates, many USU students are still trying to make a decision of who to vote for among the Republicans vying for the opportunity to challenge Barack Obama for the presidency in the 2012 elections. At this point the race has been character-ized by a swiftly revolving list of front runners. There has been a consistent group of eight candidates, however, who have been featured most prominently by media and have been invited to participate in debates: Rep. Michele Bachmann, former Godfather’s Pizza CEO Herman Cain, former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich, former ambassador to China and Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman, Rep. Ron Paul from Texas, Texas Gov. Rick Perry, former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum from Pennsylvania. “The GOP seems to have so many candidates,” said Trent Hunsaker, a USU student working toward his master’s degree in technical writing. “I think it’s hard for anybody to truly care and sup-port just one at this point. No one’s really standing out.” Hunsaker’s views are shared by some USU stu-dents who still seem to be forming opinions about Republican candidates as the first set of primary elections get closer.

“I’m all for a woman president, but I feel like she’s just not competent enough,” said Courtney Hahne, a junior majoring in communications. “Truth be told, the only exposure I’ve had to her is in the debates, but nothing she says seems new or original. I don’t think she’s very well rounded.” “She’s an intelligent woman with leadership potential, yet when she tries too hard to appeal to Tea Party voters, I think she comes off a little crazy,” said Issac Benion, a senior majoring in economics. “I think she’d have a problem appeal-ing to enough American voters to get into the White House.”

Philadelphia as the director of business

“I think he has a simple way to reform the tax code and raise revenue,” Benion said. “But personally I’m not interested in hearing about all the sexual harassment allegations that will come up next year instead of the issues, so I think that hurts him as a viable candidate.” “He’s got some interesting views,” said Adam

UtahWednesady, Nov. 30, 2011

www.utahstatesman.com

StatesmanThe

ASUSU discusses tuition plateau changeBY CHRIS LEE

news senior writer

Avalanche experts advise cautionBY STEVE KENT

web editor

Students chime in on GOP candidatesBY TIM BARBER

staff writer

Students and community members who spend time in the mountains outside of ski resorts this winter should educate themselves about avalanches, according to local avalanche experts. There may not have been much snowfall so far this ski season, but avalanche expert Toby Weed said he expects to see an increase in avalanche

danger later this year. Weed works as the Logan area fore-caster for the Utah Avalanche Center. “We’re getting set up for a possible Christmas tragedy this year,” Weed said. “Right now, we don’t have as much ava-lanche danger in the mountains, but it will pick up pretty drasti-cally when we get a snowstorm.” Weed said the high-pressure weather currently in the area is creating a layer of weak snow that, if covered by a stronger

layer of snow from storms later in the year, could increase the risk of avalanches. According to the Utah Avalanche Center, four people were killed by avalanches in Utah in 2010. “The snow on the very bot-tom of the snowpack is weak and the other snow on top is stronger, so it may have the tendency to break and slide as a unit — as a great big slab down the hill,” Weed said. “Those are fairly deadly.”

Before traveling in the back-country in the winter, outdoors enthusiasts should check the Avalanche Center’s forecast, available at utahavalanchecen-ter.org, Weed said.

-mobilers were killed in an avalanche near Logan Peak, said Sgt. Jake Peterson of the Cache County Sheriff ’s Office. Peterson is the commander of the local search and rescue team. Peterson said it’s difficult for search and rescue to save some-one trapped in an avalanche. The chances of a victim surviv-ing decrease drastically after

Even in the unlikely event a victim’s partner is able to call search and rescue immediately after an avalanche occurs, he said, and even if weather condi-tions allow helicopter f light, responders would not be able

minutes. Often, the best search and rescue can do is recover the bodies of avalanche victims, Peterson said. People traveling in the back-country need to have the proper education and equipment, said USU Outdoor Recreation Program Coordinator Brian Shirley. The ORP will hold a free snow safety clinic Dec 1. Shirley said clinic won’t go in depth about how to test snow for instability. Rather, the in Utah. Local avalanche experts say although Utah has not

received much snow yet this year, skiers and hikers should still be careful of avalanches. USU’s Outdoor Recreation

Program rents out tools students can use in the case of an avalanche. Photo courtesy of Steve Kent

members of the ASUSU Executive Council,

responded to a proposal that could alter the current tuition plateau policy. The change

would expand the plateau for students and would increase tuition for part time students.

Members of the council said the change could be costly. DELAYNE LOCKE photo

increase could impact part-time students registered for fewer than 12 credits per semester as part of a possible change in the university’s tuition plateau policy. Erik Mikkelsen, ASUSU president, said tuition currently plateaus between

students pay the same

He presented the pos-sible changes to the ASUSU Executive Council Tuesday night. He said the council was asked to prepare its opinions on the changes for the Registrar’s Office. “When we merged with USU Eastern, we had to

have a lot of policy shifts,” Mikkelsen said. “At USU Eastern, currently, their class tuition goes from 10

The change would raise USU Eastern’s plateau and would lower the Logan campus plateau, with the two meeting at 12 credits. Mikkelsen said the goal is to have both schools use the same plateau without changing either one too much. He said fees would be re-adjusted to balance out the money USU receives from tuition and fees. He said this will only bal-ance out the revenue gener-ated by tuition and fees, not increase it. Because of this, he said, fees would decrease

See INCREASE, Page 3

See GEAR, Page 2

See TOP, Page 2

Campus News

Features

Many students raise pets to

accompany them through their

college years.

Page 4

Sports

Find out how students at USU’s

sister school, USU Eastern, feel

about the name and logo changes

on their campus.

Page 2

USU’s football team will play in

the Famous Idaho Potato Bowl

Dec. 17 in Boise.

Page 7

Opinion

“The die-hard fans are most likely

your future donors. Yes, they’re

also the ones who will toe the line

and go too far, but in my opinion,

that line still has never been fully

crossed.”

Page 10

Today’s Issue:

Interact Now!

Added Value!

Online exlusives, blogs, a place

to comment on stories, videos

and more. Free Classfieds, too.

www.utahstatesman.com

new cross

can win

certificates

Today: As

Spectrum

behavior is

debated, here’s

a walk down

memory lane:

Page 2: Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011

Ceramics Guild holds annual holiday sale

BriefsCampus & Community

-Compiled from staff and media reports

The USU Ceramics Guild holds its annual holiday sale in the Ceramic Studio, located in room 123 of the Fine Arts Visual Building on USU’s campus, Dec. 8-10. “The holiday sale is an excellent opportunity to see the best work being produced by undergraduate, graduate and community educa-tion ceramics students,” said Scott McClellan, a USU ceramics student. “It is a wonderful chance to meet the artists in person and find out how they create their work.” Patrons will have the opportunity to browse a wide range of both func-tional and decorative pottery, meet the artists and purchase affordable art. Items at the sale will include everything from practical domestic wares such as mugs, plates, bowls and teapots, to sculptural vases, wall hangings and more. Proceeds raised from the holiday sale are used to promote educa-tion of the ceramic arts through the financial support of the USU Potter’s Guild. Money raised in previous USU guild initiatives has been used to purchase a clay mixer as well as help send students to the National Ceramics Conference.

Life after surviving Rwanda genocide A serious subject — the occur-‐rence of genocide-‐rape in Rwanda — is the foundation for the next presentation at USU’s Museum of Anthropology and its “Saturdays at the Museum” activity. The featured guest is USU fac-‐ulty member Maggie Zraly, who is featured Saturday, Dec. 3, in two presentations, the first at 12:30 p.m. and again at 2:30 p.m. While events in Rwanda had devastating effects, there were survi-‐vors, Zraly said. A faculty member in the anthro-‐pology program in the department of sociology, social work and anthro-‐pology at USU, Zraly has studied survivors and will share their sto-‐ries, documenting the emotions and trauma that occurred in Rwanda. In addition to Zraly’s presenta-‐tions, documentaries about Rwanda will be shown at the museum throughout the day.

USU’s bands present the sixth annual Tri-State Band Symposium featuring two public concerts in the Kent Concert Hall of the Chase Fine Arts Center on Dec. 2-3. “This annual event is a showcase of the Utah State University Bands and is lauded as a highly entertain-ing event for the whole family,” said Thomas Rohrer, director of bands at USU. The conductor for this year’s event is Randol Alan Bass, an internationally-recognized com-poser and conductor. As an included highlight, the USU wind and percussion students will present a sampler concert Friday, Dec. 2, at 8 p.m. This unique concert will include the wind and jazz orchestras along with selected chamber ensembles from the wind and percussion areas in USU’s Department of Music. “The sampler concert will be high-energy and fast-paced featur-ing music of lighter fare for Tri-State participants and the commu-nity at large,” said Rohrer. The honor band’s finale concert is Saturday, Dec. 3, at 3 p.m.

USU hosts tri-state band symposium

The policy of The Utah Statesman is to correct any error made as soon as possible. If you find something you would like clarified or find in error, please contact the editor at 797-‐1742, [email protected] or come in to TSC 105.

ClarifyCorrect

CampusNews Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011Page 2

Friday, Nov. 18

active military members about local crime trends, emergency management and self-defense.

Saturday, Nov. 19

N. 610 East in Logan. Police arrived and found smoke coming from the vehicle. As fire units arrived, f lames also ignited. The Logan Fire Department put the fire out. Logan City Police had the vehicle towed for further investigation.

intrusion alarm. USU plumbers working in the building set the alarm off, and the alarm was disabled for the day.

Sunday, Nov. 20

report by establishing a perimeter and stop-ping several individuals in the area of a pos-sible auto burglary. It was determined that no crimes occurred and no one was located near the scene.

incident on Old Main Hill. Police made contact with the suspects who were two juveniles and determined everything was OK.

Monday, Nov. 21

of two auto burglary suspects who later ran from police. USU Police assisted in pursuing one suspect, who was tracked through snow and later located and arrested by Logan Police. Both suspects were arrested.

looking for someone throwing snowballs at passing vehicles in the area of Darwin Avenue. Police searched the area and were unable to locate the culprits.

Tuesday, Nov. 22

ing “missiles” — snowballs — at Valley View Tower. Before police arrived, the suspects in the case f led the area in a silver sports car with a spoiler.

at Old Main Hill. Police made contact with the patient who was a juvenile with a bloody nose. The patient was released to his parents.

Compiled by Catherine Meidell

Contact USU Police at 797-1939 for non-emergencies.

Anonymous reporting line: 797-5000EMERGENCY NUMBER: 911PoliceBlotter

From Page 1

Avalanche gear available to rent at ORP facilityclinic is designed to teach outdoor enthusiasts what avalanche-prone terrain looks like and how to avoid the areas. More in-depth clinics and sem-inars will be host by the ORP later in the season in conjunction with Friends of the Utah Avalanche Center, Shirley said. Good equipment can increase the ability to find and rescue an avalanche victim in their party, Weed said. “Be prepared,” he said. “Everyone in your party needs to have a shovel, a probe and a beacon at the very least,” he said. Shovels, probes and beacons are available to rent from the ORP. Peterson said a probe is usually a segmented metal pole, like a tent pole, that can be stuck into the snow to locate buried victims.

“It’s kind of a needle in a haystack approach to avalanche search,” Peterson said. Peterson said a search is more effective when both the victim and the searchers are wearing avalanche beacons. A beacon, or avalanche transceiver, is a device that transmits an electronic signal. In the event of a burial, a victim’s partners can use their beacon to help locate the victim. Weed said another effective piece of avalanche safety equip-ment is an avalanche airbag — a def lated bag attached to a canister of compressed air. In an ava-lanche, a victim can pull a trigger or a lever to automatically inf late the airbag, creating a breath-able air pocket and increasing their buoyancy, along with their chances of being found near the

surface of the snow when the snow stops sliding. Since avalanche rescue equip-ment is worthless unless you know how to use it, Peterson said he encourages people to train with their equipment. People need to take precautions before they enter the backcountry, Peterson said. “Regardless of the season, you need to have a plan,” he said. “Don’t go alone, and tell someone what time to expect you back and what time to push the panic but-ton — so to speak — and call for help.”

[email protected]

how he seems more proactive and motivated than some of the other candidates. I don’t agree with everything he says, but I appreciate his business credentials.”

“I’d really have a hard time supporting someone for president who so openly cheated on their wife,” said Spencer Starley, a junior biology major. “I think he’s been in politics so long that I don’t think he’s dynamic,” Benion said. “His personal life is also minefield of scandals.”

“I don’t feel like he’d do the country a service if he was elected,” Johansen said. “I think his lousy debate performance shows a lack of confidence in what he’s saying. When you’re president, you have to be able to be decisive in your actions.” “He had good intentions and potential, but his inability to debate has really hurt his chances,” Tarbet said. “Not that it means he would be a bad president, but the voting public really expects a bet-ter public-speaking ability.”

“He has genuine credible ideas, ideas that could really change the direction the country would go in, but his appeal just doesn’t seem to be as fresh and probably won’t be attractive to a majority of people,” said Brooke Tarbet, a senior majoring in accounting. “I think he has the most conviction and is right about a lot of things, but in some ways that consis-tency is a weakness,” said Landon Pope, a senior majoring in history and economics. “He doesn’t really seem to have changed his opinions for the last 30 years, and I’m not so sure that’s a trait you want of someone in office. He’s almost marginalized himself with an inability to compromise.”

Executive for the Huntsman Corporation (1993-

“He’s got good experience overseas, and he was a good governor, but I feel like he doesn’t really have the business mindset right now that we need,” said Josh Johansen, a senior majoring in exercise science. “By far the most capable candidate in the field, he seems to be most willing to compromise — a middle-of-the-road candidate — he seems easy going,” Hunsaker said. “I like him because he’s the only candidate with any significant foreign policy experience.”

Olympics Salt Lake City Games Organizing

“He knows what he’s talking about and seems to

be really educated and focused on issues,” Hahne said. “I like his plans, and I like what he’s got to say. And I think he’s handled pressure from the other candidates well.” “In an economic downturn, I think he’s got the right policies and is the right president to help us get where the economy is healthy again,” Hess said. “His business experience with the Salt Lake Olympics shows that. I like how honest he is about his health care plan, saying that its something that worked in Massachusetts but not necessarily would work for the whole country.”

“I think he would have been a convincing can-

adapted at all to how the public really thinks, and that’s why you see his poll numbers so low.” “Rick who?” Hunsaker asked. Romney, who sought the nomination of the Republican Party in 2008, has consistently polled near the top of the pack, garnering at least 20 percent in most national and early primary state polls. However, challengers to Romney who have joined him at the top of the polls never seem to last. Bachmann, Perry, Cain and most recently Gingrich have had upswings in the polls matching or surpassing Romney’s support. “I’m skeptical of a lot of the new polls I’ve seen that declare a new front runner,” Benion said, “because their sources seem to be a little questionable. Whereas independent news source polls always seem to show Romney having the best chance.”

[email protected]

MITT ROMNEY

RICK SANTORUM

Some skeptical of polls indicating rotating frontrunners

NEWT GINGRICH

JON HUNTSMAN

RICK PERRY

“... I'm skeptical of a lot of the new polls I've seen that declare a new front runner.”

— Issac Benion,

USU student

RON PAUL

haystack approach to avalanche search,” Peterson said. Peterson said a search is more effective when both the victim and the searchers are wearing avalanche beacons. A beacon, or avalanche transceiver, is a device that transmits an electronic signal. In the event of a burial, a victim’s partners can use their beacon to help locate the victim. Weed said another effective piece of avalanche safety equip-ment is an avalanche airbag — a def lated bag attached to a canister of compressed air. In an ava-lanche, a victim can pull a trigger or a lever to automatically inf late the airbag, creating a breath-able air pocket and increasing their buoyancy, along with their chances of being found near the

“Regardless of the season, you need to have a plan.”

— Sgt. Jake

Peterson,

Cache County

Sheriff’s Office

From Page 1

Page 3: Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011

For many students at USU Eastern, having a new name doesn’t change attitudes about the school. However, the recent merger is bringing opportunities it never had before as a two-year community college in Price, Utah, said USU Eastern’s student body president Thomas Garvin. Garvin said the change has been hard for students and community members who attended the school before it merged with USU in 2010. The change added eight more syllables to the school’s name, but for the most part the transition has been smooth. “I’ve seen both sides of it,” Garvin said. “Some people are really excited about it, or they hate it. It’s not so much that they hate USU — it’s that the change is hard. For the last however many years since the school started, we’ve had that local community college feel and the com-munity has held on tight to that.” Certain community members are worried the school will lose its community college feel because of the affiliation with USU, Garvin said. Others are more optimistic and believe having the wider-known USU brand in its name enhances the college’s resources, he said. Stacey Sartori, a freshmen majoring in nurs-ing, said, “I thought it would be good because since the two schools are together, we’ll get more students from up north to come down here.” The merger and subsequent name change gave USU Eastern a chance to gain more recognition, said Brad King, vice chancellor for administration and advancement. He said visibility and lack of reputation is something the school has always struggled with. “You only get one chance to make a first impression,” King said. “So we don’t want to make any large mistakes as we’re feeling our way through this.” King is working with USU’s John DeVilbiss to create a marketing plan that will brand USU Eastern as a “comprehensive regional college.” It’s a package he said is still in the process of being defined as they try to sell it to prospective students. King said, “It really is — John DeVilbiss put it I think — ‘The heart of a community college and the soul of a research university.’ What could be better than that package?” Garvin said the college will continue to offer its traditional small class sizes and compete to have the lowest tuition in the state. The college now has the added access to resources like the Merrill-Cazier Library at USU’s Logan campus. “What I would like to see is 10 years from now all the other schools say, ‘That’s what we want to be,’” King said. “Because it really is a unique structure and a unique mission.” The change is in more than just resources, though. “It is a great difference,” cosmetology fresh-man Elise Debry said. “I think it’s a good thing. It’s just taking awhile for us to transform — get used to it — because everybody here still calls it

CEU.” Krista Gibbs, a sophomore majoring in nursing who works as a resident assistant on campus, said the hardest change was not calling it CEU anymore. Garvin said he tries to correct people when they call it CEU, even in the community. “We’re throwing the logo up on anything we can, just because if the community is involved, it will make that much of a difference,” Garvin said. “That’s why Logan does so well. It’s not because they’re doing anything special, it’s that the community supports the institution. And that’s how we stay alive as a college. We support the community, the community supports us.” People still hang on to the old logo, but at the same time they embrace the new one, said Jessica Prettyman, a sales associate at USU Eastern’s bookstore. Everything with the CEU logo is on the sale rack, replaced by sweatpants, water bottles, T-shirts, key chains, blankets, backpacks and mugs sporting the new USU Eastern logo. “Most of it’s been really positive,” Prettyman said. “Most of it’s been ‘I can’t believe we’re getting rid of CEU stuff, I’ve got to get it before it’s out.’ People who have been here forever are trying to get all they can.” At the same time, new gear is flying off the shelves, Prettyman said, adding that the new sweatpants are especially popular. “People have been crazy about the new stuff,” she said. Neveij Walters, a power forward on USU Eastern’s men’s basketball team, said the name change does not matter to him. “I don’t mind. It’s just a name, you know? The fact that I’m here playing basketball is a privilege every day,” he said. “As long as I play basket-ball I do not mind. They can change it to whatever they want to.” King said, “We are what we are,

we are what we have been, but we’re more than that now.” The merger with USU is now more visible around campus, but is a slow process, he said. USU Eastern is financing the brand change on its own, which is an expensive process. USU is helping with personnel and production to design brochures and billboards. At the start of the year King said banners were put up all over campus that have the college’s new name and say “Experience the Difference” on them. Those who have visited USU’s other campus-es should recognize the dark blue metal signs outside of the campus buildings in Price. They look exactly the same except they state “Utah State University – College of Eastern Utah” in the corner, King said. Visible changes will continue around cam-pus, he said. “Chancellor Peterson always likes to say, ‘It’s like building the jet while you’re in the air,’” King said. “Things are solidi-fying even as we’re doing some things. We hope that we have the landing gear finished when it’s time to land. It’s the only caution there.” Of course, this isn’t the first time

the college has changed its name, King said. “There are some alumni that are still lamenting the fact that we have a name change and all of that good stuff, but we’ve done this before,” King said. “We went from Carbon College to College of Eastern Utah, and there are still some alumni that are mad at us for making that change 50 years ago.”

[email protected]

AggieLife

Aggie

Life

880 South

Main Street

Logan

435.787.4222Buy an

ord

er of F

occaci

a Bre

ad and

a dri

nk get a

n 8 o

ne toppin

g piz

za

STUDEN

T APPRECIA

TION

SPECIA

L...

FREE! exp

ires

12/31/1

1

Page 3Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011

Bring this Ad With You for the Special!

CampusNewsFrom Page 1

Tuition for part-time students may increase

A hub for hungry artists

THE RECENTLY-OPENED ARTIST BLOCK CAFE AND BAKERY in the Fine Arts Building will hold open house activities the rest of the week. Every day the cafe has prize giveaways, chalk art contests at 1p.m. and live music from 6-8 p.m. Lindsey Wiltshire, the cafe’s customer service manager, said, some students enjoy having a cafe closer to their classes. DELAYNE LOCKE photo

by $75 for students taking 12-18 credits and increase for students taking fewer credits. “The people that it would affect the most are the people that are not full-time students,” Mikkelsen said. “Their tuitions get a rise and everyone else’s tuitions get dropped.” Ryan Baylis, ASUSU Athletics vice president, said most of the students affected are residents who pay in-state tuition. He said many of them are people taking just a few classes. “Number-wise we’re talk-ing small amounts, if you’re a resident,” Baylis said. “I don’t think we’re talking about thousands of dollars — some-thing like $75 if you’re taking 10 credits.” According to Justin Watkins, ASUSU regional campus and distance educa-tion vice president, tuition would increase 4 percent for part-time students. He said he thinks about half of the regional campus students attend part time. “We just did this petition where we were worried about this last 15-percent increase over the last how many years, and right here we’ve got 4-percent increase for part-time students,” Watkins said. “It seems pretty steep.” According to Cami Jones, ASUSU Graduate Studies vice president, graduate students would also be impacted by the tuition increase. “For the graduate students, it’s completely different,”

Jones said. “Full time is six credits.” Jones said nine credits is a greater amount of credits for graduate students. She said most graduate students would never reach the plateau. The Executive Council also received the schedule for next semester’s ASUSU elections, during the meeting. Hannah Blackburn, ASUSU Public Relations director, presented the new dates and said elections will be Feb. 27 to March 1. Applications for elected officers are due Feb. 1 at 4:30 p.m., she said, and a manda-tory meeting for the candi-dates will be held at 5 p.m. in the TSC Auditorium. Applications for appointed officer positions will be released Feb. 21. She said the applications used to come out the week after elections but will now take place the week before elections. The appointed officer applications will be due March 5. In the past, the newly elected officers would make the applications for the appointed positions, but this year the outgoing officers will make the applications, Blackburn said. The new schedule will not conflict with Engineering Week, a possibility ASUSU officers were formerly con-cerned about, she added.

[email protected]

USU EASTERN underwent a redesign featuring decor that resembles Logan’s campus. Some students at USU Eastern say the name change has not had a significant impact on the school, but other changes related to the merger do. EVAN MILLSAP photo

USU Eastern students reflect on changes since mergerBY LIS STEWARTstaff writer

Page 4: Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011

Megan Paxton is the proud fourth owner of a blue beta fish named Jaslene. “We inherited her from a friend who was getting married and didn’t want her anymore,” she said. Paxton and her roommate Lauren Page, both juniors majoring in biology, take time out of their schedule to care for their fish. “We feed her twice a day — once in the morning and once at night,” Paxton said. “She eats a lot for a fish. Her bowl needs to be cleaned about once a week.” But Paxton maintains that Jaslene is well worth the time commitment. “She’s the best little desk companion anyone could ask for,” she said. “Every time she sees us, she swims up to the side of her tank. She probably thinks we’re there to feed her, but we like to pretend she’s just excited to see us.” For many students, one of the hardest parts of tran-sitioning to a new life away from home is leaving behind family pets. Students who have grown up their whole lives with animals may miss their pets as much as they miss family members. Many, like Paxton, fill this hole by purchasing fish — a small, easy-to-care-for animal with minimal costs and responsibilities — while they are away at school. But for other students, a fish is not enough. On top of a full course load, some stu-dents adopt animals ranging from small rodents to large dogs. “We got our dog Thor because my wife and I were hardly at home at the same time,” said Lance Rasmussen, a junior majoring in theatre arts. “My wife felt like she wanted some company while there by herself.” However, Rasmussen

quickly came to realize there were many things about a pet to consider. Like many student pet owners, he said, he began to question whether the companionship and love given by his dog was worth all the stress associated with taking care of it. “Having a pet to take care of can definitely be stressful when added to the rest of student life,” said Joanna Noll, a junior majoring in theatre education who owns two rats and four fish. Many students who adopt larger animals such as cats and dogs often have to deal with restrictions placed upon them by building manage-ment and landlords. No pets — aside from fish — are allowed in campus housing, so students who own pets must live off campus. Pet-friendly housing can be hard to find in Logan, and often comes with a deposit or extra fee. Landlords also often have strict rules regarding pet ownership. There are also financial considerations for students who own pets. Noll said expenses associated with her pets include food, ter-rariums, bedding, aquarium rocks for her fish and toys, as well as veterinary care in case a pet falls ill. Pets also require a sub-stantial time commitment by the owners. Not only does it take time to clean up after and provide for pets, it is also important to give them daily attention and love. “You have to be respon-sible for someone besides yourself,” Noll said, “and who will be directly affected by your actions.” If a student has a pet and then finds themselves too busy to care for it properly, the pet’s health could suffer and even lead to death. “You have to think of it as being in charge of keeping a sentient creature alive and happy,” Rasmussen said. “It’s tough.”

However, for some, the benefits outweigh the disad-vantages. Pet ownership has been accredited with giving pet owners longer, healthier lives. According to a study done by the University of Buffalo, pets can reduce stress, enhance mood and even lower blood pressure. Larger animals such as dogs give students reason to get out and exercise more often. Students who suffer from loneliness can find

companionship and uncondi-tional love in a pet, and it is that love that most pet own-ers say makes it all worth it. “It’s frustrating at times,” Rasmussen said. “But every time we think of getting rid of him and moving some-where, he looks at us and we can’t say no. And it is pretty nice knowing that there’s someone at the house who will always be happy to see you.” Noll said she could not imagine getting through her

daily life without a pet waiting for her at home. “It’s definitely not very smart or practical,” Noll said. “But for me, it’s 100 percent worth it. Nothing cheers you up and helps you cope like a small, warm ball of fur with a little pink, wet nose.”

[email protected]

daily life without a pet waiting for

“It’s definitely not very smart or practical,” Noll said. “But for me, it’s 100 percent worth it. Nothing cheers you up and helps you cope like a small, warm ball of fur with

www.utahstatesman.com

AggieLife Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011Page 4

A student’s best friend

Tricking the eyemajoring in exercise science, studies while he pets his dog Nala. Some students believe the companionship

and love from pets outweigh the time and expense needed to take care of them. AMANDA DUNN photo

BY MACKENZI VAN ENGELENHOVENstaff writer

Magic is in the air — but not because of the holiday season. Logan is home to many magicians like Steven Viator and Richard Cannon, who recently placed in the Cache Valley Magic Competition, drawing contestants from as far away as Salt Lake City and Preston, Idaho. Competing was a first for Viator, a junior at USU majoring in finance and economics who placed third, and Cannon, the 80-year-old, first-place winner who said he didn’t even plan on participating before he arrived. “The club decided they were going to run this contest down at Legend’s, and you could come and watch the show for 10 bucks a per-son,” Cannon said. “I had a few tricks in my pocket, but I went there and fully intended to watch the show. I’m not very competitive.” Richard Hatch, an organizer of the event, told Cannon he could receive the $10 back by competing in the event and Cannon agreed. When he was announced the winner, Cannon said he was stunned. “I found the other competitors’ other acts to be better than mine,” Cannon said. “I was pleased with my performance, but I didn’t

think I was in the running for prize money.” Cannon said he began when he was about 10 years old, but for some in the competition, 70 years of practice is a far-off destination. “I’ve been doing (magic) unofficially for about three years, but I started doing shows and performing about a year ago,” Viator said. “It all started way back when my son actually got a magic kit for his birthday. He was too young to read the instructions, so I learned the tricks and taught him, and we put on a little magic show for the family. And then I just got hooked.” He said for the first two years he mostly looked up new tricks in books or on the Internet. Viator said he’d like to start a club at USU for other students interested in magic. “I need to find people who are interested in learning magic,” Viator said. “There’s not a large population that I know of (here at USU), but if we reach out to people, I think it could grow pretty significantly.” Hatch lived elsewhere for awhile, and when he moved back to Logan he became Viator’s mentor. Hatch, who was raised in the valley,

in finance and economics, placed third in this year’s Cache Valley Magic Competition. Viator has been practicing magic for three years. KATRINA ANNE PERKINS photo

USU student places in Cache Valley Magic CompetitionBY MARIAH NOBLEfeatures senior writer

See WINS, Page 6

Page 5: Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011

Because sometimes it’s nice to have a little remind-er.

1. Stop eating when you’re full: Avoid taking second helpings just because the food tastes good. Dish up your plate knowing that’s all you’re going to eat and then just enjoy it. Usually eating one helping of a tasty meal is enough to fill you up. And remember that it can take up to 20 minutes after eat-ing to realize how full you actually are.

2. Educate yourself: You might be surprised by what you find out regarding what is and what isn’t healthy. Do a little research on the foods you eat, more than just looking at the sugar or carbohydrate content.

3. Plan social activities that don’t revolve around food: It’s almost automatic to think of going the gas sta-tion for hot chocolate, hav-ing friends over for brown-ies or going out to dinner when you’re planning social outings. Instead, try plan-ning something that will get you moving, like a sledding trip, an indoor game of ulti-mate Frisbee or ice skating at Merlin Olsen Park.

4. Eat healthy meals: This time of year it’s hard enough to resist plates of cookies lying around the kitchen and delicious home cooked meals at your mom’s. In the

meantime, do yourself a favor by sticking to healthy choices for your basic meals, such as a bowl of oatmeal in the morning or a sandwich on wheat bread for lunch. Having a healthy foundation can help you maintain some stability even if you are eat-ing more sweets than usual.

5. Beware of drinks: Holiday drinking can be a big source of extra (and empty) calorie intake. Alcoholic drinks are extremely high in calories, but so are sodas, punches and any other sugary drinks. It’s a good idea to limit your-self to one glass of punch and then drink water after that.

6. Don’t eat something just because it’s in front of you: I know this seems a little obvious, but it’s actually really hard to do. Don’t eat that stale cookie left over from last week just because it’s on the counter. Don’t eat candy you don’t even like that much just because it was free in the Taggart Student Center. Don’t eat those boring store-bought donuts at your club meeting just because someone offers you one. Save up and indulge on something really delicious that you love to eat instead of eating sweets because they are laying around.

7. Lighten up: Sometimes you can really cut a reci-pe’s fat and calories down by switching to light cream cheese, low-fat butter sub-stitutes, one percent milk, etc. It may take a trial run to see what you can cut out before losing flavor. I think light eggnog is just as good as the real thing, and no one will notice if you cut the butter in the stuffing

down a little bit. Also, if you replace half of the oil or but-ter in goodies recipes with applesauce they will usually taste just as great.

8. Avoid store-bought snacks and going out: Even at this time of year when we love baking more than we should and just all-out feasting, it’s still healthier to eat at home. Lots of store-baked goodies have extra oil to keep them fresh lon-ger, along with other pre-servatives and unhealthy

ingredients. Also, at home you have more control of your por-tion size than you do when you go out to eat. If you do go out, eat half of your meal there and take the other half home for lunch the next day.

9. Be careful of oblivious grazing: When food is out, people munch. But remem-ber, just because you’re only taking a pinch/bite/dip, it’s still adding up. The best thing to do is be aware of how much you are eat-

ing without knowing you’re doing it.

10. Use seasonal produce whenever you can: Just because it’s cold outside doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be eating lots of fresh fruit and veggies. Pears, pome-granates, spinach, butternut squash, sweet potatoes, Brussels sprouts, cranber-ries, acorn squash, broccoli, oranges and carrots are all in season right now. A fresh relish tray is a great way to get some

healthy snacking in, espe-cially if you use light sour cream in the dip. Almost any vegetable can be made into a delicious side dish by tossing it with a little olive oil and some spices and roast-ing it in the oven.

– Jennelle Clark is a senior majoring in psycholoy who

runs the online food blog foodislikeart.blogspot.com.

She loves making, eating and sharing her food. Send comments to jenn.wilson@

aggiemail.usu.edu.

Perfect Partner

630 West 200 North753-8875

Let us help plan

your big day

You Best Choice for Wedding Invitations & paper goods

Perfect Partner

630 West 200 North753-8875

Let us help plan your big day

You Best Choice for Wedding Invitations & paper goods

Perfect Partner

630 West 200 North753-8875

Let us help plan your big day

You Best Choice for Wedding Invitations & paper goods

Your Best Choice forWedding Invitations & paper goods

Today’s Puzzle Answers

AggieLifeWednesday, Nov. 30, 2011 Page 5

Ten tips for eating healthy this holiday season

Breaking up is hard to do, but necessaryTHE HOLIDAY SEASON brings scrumptious desserts and a multitude of appetizers, but it is important to stick to healthy habits.

Overeating and eating out are two ways to add on weight but are easily prevented. JENNELLE CLARK photo

I changed my major this past month. Yes, I know it’s cliche, but like anyone featured on the “Real World/Road Rules Challenge,” I must face reality. There are innumerable reasons why someone would alter their course of study. Some feel a change will enhance chances of a successful career. Others believe they will be happier or experience more fulfill-ment in a new major. All the others just know, through vast support and wisdom from the depths of the universe, that they are destined to be a secret shopper. My reason for switching, other than free Reptar Bars, was because I simply fell out of love with my current major. Sure it seemed uplifting and pleasing from the start, what with the warm welcome from advisers handing out four-year curriculum papers and all. The first year or so of educational

c o u r t s h i p was rather blissful, if not simply a s t o u n d -ing. I was l e a r n i n g new things, o p e n i n g myself to new envi-r o n m e n t s and seeing things from a new perspec-tive. I had an outlook on life that told me my new major was leading me to places I never knew I could go. Day after day I wanted to keep explor-ing my major. I just wanted to be with my major. I couldn’t have been happier, because I found the one. I just knew it. I’d take my major home to the parents and

they were so pleased I chose a field I could settle down with. Everyone was coming up with diploma-shaped roses. Then year two came around and, much to my adjunct-motivated chagrin, things just weren’t the same. Suddenly this major wasn’t as mysterious or alluring. I wasn’t as excited to share my relationship with oth-ers. We weren’t as carefree as we were in the entry-level courses, when we could run free and just be happy together. I’d come home from my 4000-level class frustrated and angry, and my major didn’t know what to do to console me. I’d see her out having fun with other new majors and get jealous. It was a whirling dervish of confusion — one that couldn’t even save Cory and Topanga. Finally, contemplating life one day in a recitation, I knew our time together must come to an end.

I sat my major down in my apartment bedroom. She seemed upbeat and happy, always moving forward, but it wasn’t hard to see she knew what was coming. I told her I was grateful for the time we had together — for the textbooks collected, conversations with passersby about the Gross Domestic Product, relating anything and everything to episodes of “Beavis and Butthead,” including a comparison of brand equity to Daria Morgandorffer that had us laughing to tears — and how all these memories will never go away. I then took a breath and told her it was time for me to move on, that it wasn’t her, it was me... and, okay, a little bit of her as well. She was angry, she was hurt and she was confused. She said she wanted to

Steve Schwartzman

Just a few laughs

Just a few

See RELATIONSHIP, Page 6

Jennelle Clark

EatThat!

Page 6: Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011

When it comes to service, members of the Society of Aviation Maintenance Professionals (SAMP) decided to think outside the aviation box. Teaming up with the Happy Factory on Oct. 28, the USU club donated toys to young children. “Our club wanted to do something outside of just aviation maintenance,” said Cade Cross, a senior majoring in aviation technology main-tenance management and this year’s SAMP president. “We came across this great service opportunity donating wooden cars and toys to elementary kids.” Eugene Fletcher, a junior minoring in aviation main-tenance, said the club split into two groups, and each group visited three different elementary schools. “I used to work at the Aviation Training Center in the Coast Guard for three years and learned to love aviation,” Fletcher said. “I was able to help when SAMP delivered toys to kids in the Logan Area.” The Happy Factory is a non-profit organization based in Cedar City. Charles Cooley, founder of The Happy Factory, said it produces simple wooden toys for kids all over the globe. FedEx then ships toys for free, anywhere from Iraq to Africa to Logan, Utah. “We take some wood that would be wasted, mix it with some time that would be wasted and make a toy to stimulate a mind so that it won’t be wasted,” Cooley said.

About 15 years ago, Cooley said, he and his wife Donna started asking for help from friends and volunteers in the community, and the organization began to grow progressively. Cross said he found out about The Happy Factory from his grandfather, a volun-teer for the organization. He said the toys are also used to help kids with disabilities. “The steam shovels are used to teach kids with dis-abilities hand-eye coordina-tion,” he said. Cross said the playground-style steam shovels include a seat for kids to sit on, and they come with a tub and plastic balls so the kids can practice scooping them up. He said Walmart donates the tubs and balls for each steam shovel.

“It was great giving them to the kids and being able to show them how to use their new toys,” he said. Fletcher agreed and said the service felt good. “Man, wow, to see their faces was so nice,” Fletcher said. “I used to be a substitute teacher and love being around kids. The steam shovels were the best to watch the kids use. They were so thrilled to play with their new toys. My favorite was to see them smile and thank us for everything we did.” Cooley said the “steam shovel therapy” is now being incorporated into the special needs programs around the Logan area. “These wooden toys are not as simple as they might seem,” he said. “In many cases they are a gift that helps unlock a child’s ability to

think and to cope with the world around them. They are therapeutic tools for children suffering from physical and emotional problems. Or if nothing else, they prove a smile or a laugh.” Donna Cooley, co-founder of The Happy Factory, said its motto is: “We may not be able to make a toy for every child in the world that needs one, but we’re going to try.” Donna said every $4 donated produces 10 cars for 10 happy children. Quoting Winston Churchill, Charles said, “This isn’t the end. This isn’t even the beginning of the end. This is only the end of the beginning.”

[email protected]

S.E. Needhamwww.seneedham.com

Where Utah Gets Engaged!

Surprise her with a solitaire…let her choose the ring.

Getting Engaged?

S.E. Needham Quality at Internet Pricing.

Design a unique, one-of-a-kind ring with precision at Utah’s oldest jewelry store with today’s newest technology in custom jewelry. S.E Needham Jewelers has a state-of-the-art jewelry

milling machine which takes commands from computer generated modeling. We provide 3-dimensional design

review with guaranteed satisfaction.

AggieLife Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011Page 6

Aviation club makes children’s spirits soar

NowPlayingWhat’s on your

playlist?Lindsay Berntson,

freshman,exercise science,Smithfield, Utah

1. Be Calm - Fun2. You and I - Ingrid Michaelson3. Mouthwash - Katy Nash4. Last Friday Night - Katy Perry5. White Sky - Vampire Weekend6. All The Pretty Girls - Fun7. Wild Child - Enya8. Kids - MGMT9. Hello, Goodbye - The Beatles10. You Belong With Me - Taylor Swift

Information compiled by Jimena Herrero

Each week The Statesman finds one student with an iPod to see what is playing on his or her playlist.

From Page 5

A relationship with a major requires commitment

From Page 4

Practicing magic for 70 years

THE SOCIETY OF AVIATION MAINTENANCE PROFESSIONALS performed a service outside of its area of expertise. Teaming up with The Happy Factory, a

charity toy company, it donated toys to young children. CAITLYN LEWIS photo

explain all these emotions vividly but could only ask “Why?” This was when I said what had to be said — which was the hardest thing to say — “There’s someone else.” She looked at me with crushed, tear-ridden eyes and asked, “Who?” I swallowed hard, “Speech Communications.”She was flabbergasted. She said she thought we had plans. We were going to get an MBA, move somewhere nice and give birth to a healthy, vibrant, beautiful career. “Sure we had difficult times,”

murmured the rather downtrodden major, “but we could work through it. We could change professors, take fewer credits, anything.” She truly believed it could work even if I would have none of it. I told her I was sorry. I told her I hope this didn’t put anything between us, and I hope she could still be my minor; but I’m a different man now and it was time we moved forward. She didn’t say anything after that. She just stood up and left, and I’ve been with my new major ever since. Sure it’s a new pathway, and who

knows what will happen? But I’m happy for the time being, even if I’ll forever look back and wonder, “What if?” After all, breaking up is hard to do.

– Steve Schwartzman was a junior

majoring in marketing and minoring in

speech communication. His column

runs every Wednesday. He loves sports,

comedy and creative writing. He

encourages any comments at his email

[email protected],

or find him on Facebook.

BY CAITLYN LEWISstaff writer

said his discovery of magic has roots in his childhood when his mother got him a book of magic. He put together a show and friends and family encouraged him to continue doing it. When he was a teenager, his family lived in Germany, where Hatch said he met a men-tor who encouraged him to pursue the art by practicing. When he came back to the U.S., he put his magic aside for a bit, but he picked it up again while he was in graduate school

at Yale, studying physics. “I learned it’s a per-forming art,” Hatch said. “It’s not enough to do it for yourself in front of a mirror. I learned more in that first perfor-mance than in many

years of practicing. I learned timing is critical.” Soon, Hatch said, he began to consider the possibility of making it his career and decided to give it a try. “My interest in magic overwhelmed my interest in physics,” Hatch said. “I decided I’d rather appear to violate the laws of nature than discover them.” He said although he’s a magician, he refers to himself as a “deceptionist,” because

that is a better description of what he does. “Often ‘magician’ has a dark overtone,” Hatch said. This stigma, he said, causes some to avoid magic religiously and others to take him less seriously. Since his decision to make magic his occupation, he said he has contributed to the world of magic by performing and helping to create magicbookshop.com, a site Hatch said is “the biggest distributor of magic books in the world.” Upon returning to Logan, he and his wife began the Hatch Academy of Magic and Music, where they both are able to share their passions with students. “I really like having people experience that cognitive dissonance of seeing some-thing and having no idea how it happened,” Hatch said. Viator takes private lessons from Hatch. He said the lessons have given him more confidence while performing. “You’re always going to get on stage and worry that people are going to catch you and figure out the trick,” Viator said. “But he helps me build confidence, and after a show we go over what I need to improve.” Hatch also began the Cache Valley Conjurers club, with which magicians in the area meet to learn from and help one another. Both Cannon and Viator said this group helps their performances. “You get to see different points of view on your approach to different tricks,” Viator said of the meetings. “They teach you their tricks, and I’ll teach them mine. It’s also really nice to have a group of friends that you can just hang out with to get your mind off school, homework and whatever else.”

[email protected]

“I decided I'd rather appear to violate the laws of nature than discover them.”

— Richard Hatch,

magician

Page 7: Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011

BY TAVIN STUCKIsports editor

For the first time since 1997, Utah State is going bowling. This year, representatives from the Famous Idaho Potato Bowl have invited USU to play in the game Dec. 17. USU head coach Gary Andersen said the bowl is a tremendous opportunity. “It is a fantastic reward for all of the hard work and dedi-cation that these kids have put in,” the third-year head coach said. “I am so happy for them. Building a football program is a community event.” While it has not yet been decided which, Utah State will face a top finisher in the Mid-American Conference. Ohio or Toledo are likely opponents. The Aggies are 7-1 all-time against teams from the MAC and last beat Northern Illinois 42-7 at home in 1995. Kickoff is set for Saturday, Dec. 17 at 3:30 p.m. “Bronco Stadium will be decked with Aggie blue,” Andersen said.

[email protected]

www.utahstatesman.com

WednesdaySportsWednesday, Nov. 30, 2011Page 7

Bowling in BoiseFootball team accepts invitation for Idaho Famous Potato Bowl

celebrates with sophomore lineman Jamie Markosian after the 21-17 win over Nevada, Nov. 26, which led to an invitation for USU to play in the Famous Idaho Potato Bowl in Boise, Idaho. TODD JONES photo

TouchBase

Football

WACStandings

BY TYLER HUSKINSONassistant sports editor

Barring any conference changes, the USU men’s basket-ball team will be facing what will become a very familiar opponent tonight at the Dee Glen Smith Spectrum. The Denver Pioneers (4-1), from the Sun Belt Conference, return four starters and eight letterwinners from last year’s team and have picked up wins against Southern Mississippi, St. Mary’s and Texas A&M, Corpus Christi. “It’s a challenging game, good thing we are at home,” USU head coach Stew Morrill said. “We are coming off of a road win. That is certainly a positive, but this is a big chal-lenge for us.” Denver, which finished with a 9-7 record last season, is much improved compared to the last time USU faced the Pioneers. Senior Brian Stafford and sophomore Chris Udofia lead the Pioneers with 14 points per game. Udofia scored 10 points against the Aggies last year in Denver. “Last year we had no idea that he could shoot,” Morrill said of Udofia. “He had not shot it well in the game leading up to our game, but he is a really ath-letic guy that can drive by you as a five. He is just an impres-sive guy. He is certainly one of their best players right now. He does a really good job.” The defense has been stifling as well, only allowing about 58 points a game. “I am concerned whether we can score against that defense,” Morrill said. “You have got to do some different things and you only have a couple of days to work on it. It takes you out of what you practice and do every-day and into trying to make plays against that defense. “Instead of coming off screens and getting a shot sometimes, you have to make plays, drive it, kick it and play basketball. It takes you out of your system a little bit with the defense they play.” Senior guard Brockeith Pane, who didn’t start the first half but started the second half against Idaho State, nearly notched a double-double, scor-ing 13 points and pulling down nine rebounds. Brady Jardine, who is still nursing a torn ligament and will be out for the next 2-3 weeks, also scored 13 points against the Pioneers, hitting 5 of 5 shots from the field, and pulled down five rebounds. The Aggies will face the tough challenge of playing against a Princeton offense. “Denver is a real challenge for us, they have built their team up to where they have a lot of veterans and to where they think they can contend for a championship,” Morrill said. “Just the whole Princeton sys-tem — it is just really difficult to guard and to try and simu-late in practice.”

[email protected]

Basketball faces future WAC foe

The NBA is back — finally. For the first time in what seems like forever, good news came out of the NBA camp. After weeks and months of negotiating, it seemed that the players and owners were never going to reach an agreement on a new collective bargaining agreement. Then, to the surprise of all, it was announced Saturday, Nov. 26, that the play-ers and owners had reached a tentative deal for a shortened season beginning on Christmas. Training camp will start Dec. 9 in preparation for the season opener, which will occur on Christmas. Teams will play 66 games as opposed to the regular 82. For those involved with the NBA it’s finally a breath of fresh air. Only a week ago it seemed as if the prospect of both sides reaching an agree-ment was impossible. Antitrust lawsuits against the lockout had been filed by the NBA players, while the NBA owners had filed their own lawsuit claim-ing that the lockout was legal. Players had started playing overseas and things looked to keep going downhill. Now those lawsuits are a thing of the not-so-distant past and the players and owners are ready to play some ball. Fortunately, in the end, common sense prevailed from both sides of the table. Both the owners and players realized that the way they were headed was not going to get them where they ultimately wanted to be. It was a never-ending stalemate that was proving detrimental to both sides. Now, the NBA and its players have taken the

appropriate steps to get things back to where they were at the end of last sea-son and keep the NBA on the rise. While they may have lost a few of the bandwagon fans, the majority are going to forgive and forget, and in the long run the NBA will pick up more fans than it lost. Not only is the CBA more balanced for the play-ers and owners but it also has taken into account the importance of parity, and especially the impor-tance of competitive small-market teams. For fans here in Utah that’s a very good sign. Salt Lake is one of the smallest markets in the NBA and will greatly benefit from the new changes. Other small-market teams will see the same positive results. If teams are competitive, then the fans will show up, usually — for exceptions see Tampa Bay Rays. The new CBA is going to allow for a more balanced league and more competitive teams. It’s going to attract more fans. The layoff also has most certainly helped the veterans and is going to allow them to come back more rested and more likely to make it through all 66 games. For players like Tim Duncan, Kobe Bryant, Kevin Garnett, Ray Allen, Jason Kidd, Steve Nash, Dirk Nowitzki and others, this is defi-nitely going to allow them to play at a higher level throughout the season.

Stars playing at their highest level attract fans. The NBA is definitely going to benefit from the increased output of its aging stars. Also starting the season on Christmas Day is going to give the NBA a grand opening of sorts. Instead of the usual start of the season that’s mired between the NFL and college football, they’ll now be starting at the tailend of the NFL and right as college football is finishing up. It’s going to allow them to take center stage and showcase themselves on opening day, which they’re not able to do in a typical NBA season. The fans are going to come and see it. In the end it’s all going to be all right for the NBA. This lockout is not going to be as detrimen-tal as 1998-99. The NBA isn’t going to wait until February to start. It’s not going to have to get a new identity and find a new face as it did when Michael Jordan retired. The NBA has a plethora of stars that are in the prime of their careers and are going to bring in more fans than ever before. Thanks to the players and owners for proving us doubters wrong. It’s time for the NBA and amazing to happen once again.

– Spencer is a sophomore majoring in broadcast

journalism. He supports Manchester United and

hopes to live long enough to watch the Cubs win

a World Series. Send any comments to eliason.

[email protected].

NBA season is the best Christmas present

Spencer Wright

The Wright

Idea

NBA season is the best Christmas presentWright

Hockey heads out on weekend road tripBY MEREDITH KINNEYsports senior writer

The Utah State hockey team won the Beehive Classic and beat three ranked opponents last weekend. Now after a week off for Thanksgiving, the Aggies are headed to Colorado for a four-game road trip. Utah State will face off against No. 2 Arizona State University, No. 3 Colorado State University, No. 7 Northern Arizona University and unranked Northern Colorado University. The Aggies are currently No. 1 in the West and Utah State head coach Jon Eccles said this weekend could

have big implications for a national title bid. “It would be a huge jumpstart for our season,” Eccles said. “The rest of our season isn’t as difficult and if we can hold on to our number one spot, then we have an auto-bid for nationals.” This weekend’s matchups are important to win for the Aggies to prove themselves. Utah State will play most of its games from here on out against in-state teams. Aggie captain Brendan MacDonald agreed the sec-ond half of the season isn’t as strong. “We don’t play the thickest second schedule,” MacDonald said. “If we win out this weekend, we have a

good chance of solidifying first if we can keep playing like we are.” The Arizona State game pits the first and second place teams in the West against each other. “You’re always worried about that first game,” Eccles said. “We’re coming off a long bus ride and not sleeping in our own beds. But that first game can always set the tone for the rest of the tournament.” Since the Aggies haven’t seen the Sun Devils yet this season, it’s hard to prepare for the game. The competition is something MacDonald is excited about. “That benefits us because we’re used to playing teams like BYU and Weber,”

MacDonald said. “But we always try to play up to par with what we can do.” Colorado State is the only team the Aggies have seen before. USU narrowly beat the Rams 3-2 on a late goal from Joel Basson last week-end. Now the Rams have a home-ice advantage, but Aggie forward Jeff Sanders said the Aggies are ready. “They going to come out hard because we have a bounty on our heads,” Sanders said. “We are the number one team and we have to go into every game focused and prepared. Colorado State’s going to want to beat us — especially in their home rink.” The Aggies face Northern Arizona on Saturday night.

While the Lumberjacks have some offensive threats, USU’s top line will be a key to a Utah State victory. “They’re going to show why they are our number one line,” Sanders said. “They are going to be well prepared.” Sunday, the Aggies will go up against the University of Northern Colorado and while the Bears are unranked, Eccles expects his team to come out hard. “On any given day, a team can lose,” Eccles said. “But we’ve got a lot of talented players who are playing strong.”

[email protected]

Page 8: Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011

said. “The social worker comes over to the front desk and immediately directs us into a private room. I know it’s bad. We’re in the room where they take people they expect to break down — where they give people bad news.”

Life Flight

“We were just there for a couple of minutes when the doctor comes in,” Sheree Allen continued. “He started the conversation off with ‘We are going to Life Flight him.’” A doctor told the Allen family of Max Allen’s prognosis. He suffered a broken pelvis, a punctured lung and a broken occipital condyle — the bone located where the head connects to the neck. Along with that, the doctor said he had a traumatic brain injury. Life Flight took Max Allen to McKay-Dee Hospital in Ogden, where doctors kept him in a medically induced coma for 17 days. There were no guarantees he would wake up when doctors took him off the drugs to release him from his coma. He was unconscious at the scene of the accident and never regained consciousness during those first three weeks. Max Allen’s lacrosse coach Jon Atwood drove to Ogden soon after hearing the news. After talking with the family, Atwood said, it became clear what a long haul they were in for. “When I went down there and his parents explained what had happened,” Atwood said, “they were definitely prepared for the worst possible outcome.” Atwood had known the Allen family for over a decade. He coached at Sky View High School, where Max Allen’s older brother Mitchell played lacrosse for him. Atwood said his concern for Max Allen was for more than just fearing the loss of a good player. “I was pretty devastated,” Atwood said.

Waking up

After Max Allen woke up with almost three weeks miss-ing from his life, he said, he was unsure if he could live a normal life again. Whether or not he could return to the lacrosse field was the furthest idea from his mind. “When I first got there a lot of doctors didn’t think I would

live,” Max Allen said. “As the days went by they were like ‘Oh, he’ll live, he’ll be fine.’ But then they thought I would be severely handicapped.” Sheree Allen was eager for her son to come out of the coma, yet anxious that he might not. “When he was in the coma I wanted to see his eyes so bad,” Sheree Allen said. “We communicate so much with our eyes, and he’s laying there with his eyes closed.” When her son finally woke up just before Christmas, Sheree said it was a miracle. The family spent Dec. 25 gathered together around the hospital bed, open-ing presents and singing carols. Then Max Allen started to speak. His words were muffled at first, but eventually they became clearer. “His sense of humor started to come back,” Sheree Allen said. “He joked with us.” Sheree Allen said she was almost afraid to blink because it was hard to keep up with the

rapid improvements. “One minute he couldn’t sit up and the next he’s in his wheelchair, pushing down the hall,” Sheree Allen said. “Then a minute after that he’s standing, and the very next day he walks 120 feet down the hall.” When the man who wasn’t expected to survive walked out of the hospital just 32 days after being admitted, he still had a ways to go in the recovery process. He was still uneasy on his feet and his mind was still processing what had happened to him. “He had a lot of fears,” Sheree Allen said. “He was afraid that someone would bump into him and he would fall and get hurt.”

[email protected]

See the second half of Max Allen’s road to recovery in the next issue of The Utah Statesman Friday, Dec. 2.

BY MEREDITH KINNEYsports senior writer

Editor’s note: This is the first of a two-part series detailing the recovery story of Aggie lacrosse player Max Allen.

Lying in a hospital bed last December, Max Allen was unsure of where he was and what had happened to him. The Utah State lacrosse player didn’t

know the extent of his injuries or even what caused them, all he remembers is the confusion. “My mom tells me that I would look at her every day like ‘Why am I here? Where am I?’” Allen said. “She would ask if I knew where I was, and I would shake my head because I couldn’t talk. The day that I answered ‘yes’ was the day she stopped asking me.” What the Cache Valley

native didn’t know at the time was that he took the full force of a car crash on his way to work one Friday afternoon. Coming up to the one-year anniversary of the accident this Dec. 3, Allen still doesn’t remember much about the crash that changed his life. He said his understanding of the accident is through the eyes of others who were there. “I’ve been told that I was going to work,” Allen said. “We were turning left on 14th North and Second East. The light went yellow, we turned and a truck hit us.” Allen never made it to work at University 6 movie theater. The truck connected with the front passenger side of the silver Ford Escort he was riding in — exactly where he was sitting — giving him the full impact of the crash.

It’s serious

At home in Cove, Utah, Sheree Allen was settling in for the night. It had been a busy week and the mother of six was looking forward to a relaxing evening at home. When the phone call came, the voice of a Logan

Regional Hospital social worker explained what had happened. Sheree Allen’s 21-year-old son had been in a car accident and from what the social worker was informed, it sounded serious. At the time of the call, the social worker hadn’t been able to see Max Allen, yet, or speak with his doctor. “I said ‘How is he?’ I figured he broke his arm or something,” Sheree Allen said. “She said ‘I don’t know, yet. The doctors are (still) working on him. I haven’t been able to get into the room, yet, but from what I understand, it’s serious.’” Not knowing what she would find when she arrived at the emergency room, Sheree Allen grabbed her coat and made the 30-minute drive south. As Sheree Allen drove, doctors continued to work on her son. He hadn’t been able to call her himself; he had been too debilitated by the accident to use a phone. Sheree’s only knowledge of her son’s condition came from the social worker, who hadn’t seen her son either. “By the time I get to the hospital, I’ve decided this is going to be bad,” Sheree Allen

Athlete of the WeekNamed as the WAC defensive player of the week; recovered critical fumble to assist USU win vs. Nevada.

Bobby Wagnerlinebacker, football

Offi cial Medical Provider

of USU Athletics

Sponsored by:

Who should be the Athlete of the Month? VOTE TODAY THROUGH DECEMBER 4 at Facebook.com/loganregional. Everyone who votes will be entered to win a free lunch at Wingers!

Brian McKennaCross-Country

Vote for the Athlete of the Month (November)

Jade Tarver Soccer

Brockeith PaneMen’s Basketball

Robert TurbinFootball

AggiesAggiesAAggiesAthlete of the WeekAggiesthlete of the WeekAthlete of the WeekAAggiesAthlete of the WeekAAggiesAggiesAggiesSponsored by:

AggiesSponsored by:

Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011Page 8 StatesmanSports

One year laterAggie lacrosse player reflects on debilitating car accident

MAX ALLEN SUSTAINED NEAR-FATAL injuries when a vehicle crashed into the passenger side of a Ford his friend was driv-ing. Photo courtesy of Sheree Allen

MAX ALLEN was in a medically-induced coma for 17 days following his car accident in 2010. Photo courtesy of Sheree Allen

USU LACROSSE’S MAX ALLEN was taken to Logan Regional Hospital and then transported by helicopter to McKay-Dee Hospital in Ogden. Photo courtesy of Sheree Allen

MEREDITH KINNEYsports senior writer

The NBA lockout is over, and I couldn’t ask for a better Christmas present than professional basket-ball to watch. College is great, don’t get me wrong, but what are college play-ers playing for if not to reach the NBA after gradu-ation? The NBA is the ultimate goal. A lockout would do more than just force play-ers into unemployment. It takes motivation away from the game. Every col-lege player has the dream of playing in the NBA, without that dream what are they playing for? They love the game and want to keep playing it. That’s why they are working toward professional ball. In the NBA the best teams have the best record. There’s no hand-outs to the most popular teams — the best teams win the finals. Oftentimes,

the NCAA features the big basketball schools and not necessarily the ones that deserve to be there. The NBA is much more fair than college ball.

[email protected]

State Your CaseThe NBA 2011-12 season is back on, but how

does it compare to March Madness?CURTIS LUNDSTROMstaff writer

Who needs the NBA when you’ve got the NCAA? Basketball at the college level is far more fulfilling. For starters you’ve got March Madness, which is the most exciting time of the year for sports. Sixty-eight teams from all over the country, all vying to become the next NCAA Champion and raise that coveted trophy. College basketball pro-vides endless thrills and gigantic upsets on any given night, at anytime of the year. Teams such as VCU, George Mason and Butler are just a few teams that have put on Cinderella’s slipper in the last decade, and that’s just during the tournament. This past weekend an un-ranked UNLV squad toppled top-ranked North Carolina, just one of a plethora of examples of David beating Goliath. Lastly, and most signifi-

cantly, the NCAA exhibits a love of the game of basket-ball. Players haven’t ensured themselves stardom or glory. It isn’t about the money being earned but about play-ing the game.

[email protected]

Page 9: Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011

November 22, 2011

Dear USU students and all Aggie fans,

All of us at Utah State University take great pride in the fact that the Spectrum is one of the toughest venues in all of sports for opposing teams. Our fans know how to bring down the house like no others, and every Aggie in the crowd and on the floor is motivated by the enthusiasm sup-porters bring to the game. We were disappointed and disturbed, however, during the recent basketball game against BYU. Some fans chose to conduct themselves in ways that went far beyond mere school rivalry, fair play and — most importantly — basic human decency. We have to be able to find some way to display incomparable enthusiasm and school spirit without resorting to crude language, outright vulgarity and deeply personal insults chanted at an opposing

player. It is inap-propriate for us to invite a guest to come into our home and then have to suf-fer the language and personal insults tossed at him. We have visited personally with both President Cecil Samuelson and Athletic Director Tom Holmoe and apolo-gized on behalf of the USU community. We take very seriously the promise we make to you when you arrive as students on campus: You will leave here having been held to high academic standards, and you will leave here having been held to high ethical standards. We hold our heads high as we tell your parents, our communities and you that

Views&OpinionWednesday, Nov. 30, 2011Page 9

www.utahstatesman.com

Free Speech

Zone

Last week an article in The Statesman covered the hike in marijuana arrests during the 2011 school year. This topic infuriated me — not because I’m particularly adamant on marijuana legalization, but because legal adults who choose to smoke weed are arrested and treated as criminals, often after peers turn them in. The bottom line is marijuana is illegal in Utah, but that doesn’t make arresting and prosecuting otherwise inno-cent users a correct or effective strategy for preventing its use. At various times and in various places, ridiculous — and sometimes beneficial — things have been illegal such as alcohol, eating ice cream in public and inter-racial marriage. Being a Latter-day Saint was considered illegal in Missouri at one point. Just because something is illegal does not make it morally wrong, and just because something is a law does not make it correct. Our laws are made by people, which means by default they are flawed and subject to scrutiny. America’s legal system is powerful, partially because it does have the potential to change and adjust along with cultural devel-opments. Thankfully, a societal evolution is accepting marijua-

OurView

It’s a perennial expectation our society has come to overlook — a fundamen-tal anomaly some find in core values,

such as charity and good will. During this, largely the most popular Christian tradition, the holiday season — now highly monopo-lized by capitalist money-grubbers lurking in every crack and crevice of the economic spectrum — has become a time for good-hearted, God-fearing souls to reach out to his or her fellow human beings and clothe the naked, feed the hungry and tend to the sick and afflicted. We all expect to see the annual media reports depict a despondent Black man shuffling down the city sidewalk with a Santa cap covering his head, or the clip of a prominent local leader with his sleeves rolled up, passing out steaming crocks of soup at a homeless shelter in front of cam-eras. But what happens after the turkey, gravy, stuffing and cranberry sauce — the gift wrapping, the Black Friday freak-outs, the Cyber Monday madness and the angels get their wings every time a bell rings? How many good souls show up in late February or early March to lend a hand at the soup kitchens? Who raids their kitchen cupboards for cans of corn or green beans for the Boy Scouts’ curbside food drive? Which one of us is still wondering if hungry children wearing ill-fitting clothing are still warmly swaddled in the pre-spring breeze that may leave them shivering the way they do in December? Now, there’s nothing wrong or necessarily requisite of ulterior justification for jumping on the charity train and helping those who are down and out feel the warmth and hap-piness we easily find within the corona of the angel’s glow as she sits atop the tannen-baum in the family room. For all good inten-tions and heartfelt purposes, keep chugging on that Polar Express. Perhaps, a few months later when the carolers stop a-caroling and the wrapping paper has been recycled, take a moment to consider that vagrant or family you watched slurp down soup around the food co-op’s cafeteria table. The cold still bites in February. Kids still need shoes in May. Old folks are still lonely in August. Instead of spending that cache of charity and kindness in one fell swoop, save some giving for other times of year when those we see on TV reaping the holiday benevolence could still use a shoulder to lean on. We’ve all needed help at some time or another. With these tidings of happiness and joy, from ours to yours, happy holidays.

Spread holiday service

throughout the year

Editor in Chief

Catherine Meidell

Copy Editor

D. Whitney Smith

News Editor

Rob Jepson

Assistant News Editor

Megan Allen

Features Editor

Kellyn Neumann

Assistant Features Editor

Allee Evensen

Sports Editor

Tavin Stucki

Assistant Sports Editor

Tyler Huskinson

Photo Editor

Ani Mirzakhanyan

Assistant Photo Editor

Carl R. Wilson

Web Editor

Steve Kent

Editorial Board

Catherine MeidellRob JepsonKellyn NeumannTavin StuckiAni MirzakhanyanD. Whitney SmithSteve Kent

About letters

limited to 400 words.

shortened, edited or rejected for reasons of good taste, redun-dancy or volume of similar letters.

topic oriented. They may not be directed toward individuals. Any letter directed to a specific indi-vidual may be edited or not printed.

letters will be pub-lished. Writers must sign all letters and include a phone number or e-mail address as well as a student identifica-tion number (none of which is pub-lished). Letters will not be printed with-out this verification.

groups — or more than one individual — must have a sin-gular representative clearly stated, with all necessary identifi-cation information.

21 days before sub-mitting successive letters — no excep-tions.

delivered or mailed to The Statesman in the TSC, Room 105, or can be e-mailed to [email protected], or click on www.utah-statesman.com for more letter guide-lines and a box to submit letters.

AboutUs

Laws on marijuana use

are imperfect by nature

Lizzen Up

Liz Emery

Lizzen

Holding USU students to high standards

See Page 10

Words from the

Wise

Stan Albrecht

See MARIJUANA, Page 10

For those who have been around Aggie basket-ball for the bet-ter part of the last decade, having USU a d m i n i s t r a -tors say fans’ chants and signs at the Nov. 11 game against BYU went too far probably left you thinking, “Meh, we’ve done worse.” Whether or not you remember the guys who have had it as bad or worse than Brandon Davies got it, the idea of a public apology and especially the wording of which, was bad form on the parts of USU President Stan Albrecht and Athletics Director Scott Barnes. This is why:

1. Nowhere else in the U.S. would this be

over the line

Brandon Davies will get harassed every-where he goes this season. That is the target BYU painted on his chest and the account-ability he took on when he agreed to the honor code. There was a grand total of one chant that could even be considered as “over

the line.” The other side of the line was lightly tread, if at all. In the big picture of college bas-ketball, USU fans at their alleged worst, were still very mild in comparison to the rest of the college basketball world, and I’d rather hold USU to what is acceptable on a national stage rather than what BYU fans think is too mean.

2. Their smack versus our smack

Do not think that our own teams don’t get heckled hard when they go on the road. They do. I’ve heard from some USU players that it’s usually the kind of heckling that a place like BYU would demand multiple apologies for. In USU’s case, our students just make life a much bigger living hell for opposing teams when they take their turn coming to our house. USU’s head basketball coach Stew Morrill even said he takes comfort in knowing no matter how badly he gets heckled on the road, he knows when that team comes to Logan the USU students will give it to them a lot worse than he’d had it. When USU students can crack on an opposing team with unmatched efficiency than other schools, don’t go punishing Aggie fans for being the best at something where so many other fans fall short.

BYU game heckling was mild at best

See SPECTRUM, Page 10

Be our Guest

Matt sonnenberg

Page 10: Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011

NOW OPEN!

HOURS OF OPERATIONMONDAY-FRIDAY: 7:00am-MidnightSATURDAY: 10:00am-Midnight

CLOSED ON SUNDAYS

More  coming

Help  Wanted

Summer  Jobs

Apartments

Announcements

www.utahstatesman.com

ClassifiedAds www.a-bay-usu.com

na use, which hopefully means peaceful smokers will no lon-ger be legally harassed over an issue that may decrease crime rates, rather than raise them. But it’s not happening fast enough, and more than 40 students this semester have suffered the con-sequences. Everyone has heard the trag-ic stories resulting in the stu-pid actions of drunk individu-als. These individuals may have caused property damage, per-sonal injury and even the loss of another person’s life, but I haven’t heard one story of some-one getting really high, starting a fight or dying of marijuana poisoning. Not to say there aren’t rare instances someone does some-thing reckless after smoking pot

— but you’re better off starting a food fight if you’re looking to cause personal injury. A few col-lege kids sitting at home flying high don’t do much of anything. Marijuana is also suppos-edly a gateway drug. Anyone who takes English 2010 knows the logical fallacy of the “slip-pery slope,” a term referring to the cause and effect of one’s actions, which is only used to create a sense of fear and urgen-cy. If marijuana is a gateway drug, what is a gateway to marijua-na? Smoking cigarettes? If so, is inhaling campfire smoke a gateway to that? Of course, not. Individual choice solely deter-mines the recreational activities one pursues, and marijuana isn’t a gateway to harder drugs any

more than watching porn is a gateway to acting out violently or committing sexual crimes. Though marijuana isn’t addic-tive or dangerous, those who choose to use it are arrested, jailed, fined and humiliated. Great individuals who get good grades and work hard in school are forced to put their education on hold to deal with criminal charges. Their faces are plas-tered on the newspapers, their names thrown around like can-nabis pollen in the wind by peers who break the law as much as anyone else. To those who tattle on your smoker friends by calling the police, I view your decision with utter contempt. You’re not call-ing the police because weed is illegal. If that were the cause,

you’d turn yourself in every time you committed a minor traffic violation, which coincidentally can be more dangerous than getting baked on your couch. No, the police are called out of vainglorious self-righteous-ness — the same kind of sancti-monious behavior that led angry, unjustified whites to protest integration, and the same kind that led angry Missourians to kill Mormons in the 1800s. You may choose not to smoke weed, but the conferral of your morals onto others is superflu-ous. If you don’t like the smell, talk to the smokers. They’ll prob-ably acquiesce your request and seek out another venue, obliging politely. Think more than twice before you dial 9-1-1 on your room-

mate, who deserves harsh legal action just as much as you do when you’re speeding on your way to work every day. Smoking weed isn’t going to ruin their life, but getting charged with drug possession will. Although they are ultimately responsible for their actions, they’ll have you to thank — the individual who turned them in — for the unreasonable conse-quences.

3. BYU being BYU

Everyone knows BYU fans are quite the com-plainers, whether it’s about officiating, oppos-ing fans or any other variable that might put their own team at a perceived disadvantage. And if all else fails for them, their new go-to move is throw down the “classless” accusa-tion. No matter how much they try and dish out smack on an opposing team, whenever it comes back their way, anyone who throws it back their way lacks class.

Caving in to BYU’s cries of “classlessness” by throwing their own students under the bus 11 days after the game doesn’t exactly scream sincerity, nor does it earn administrators any favor with the fans they sold out in the process.

4. Did it ever get too hostile?

Last year, while standing outside the Marriott Center in Provo, waiting for the Hurd buses, the aggression from BYU fans didn’t exactly create a safe environment for Utah State fans. BYU fans were getting in USU students’ faces, making threats and talking constant smack

well after the game ended. Signs and chants don’t exactly rob visiting fans of their sense of security the way we experienced it in Provo that night.

5. Don’t sell out your die-hards

The die-hard fans are most likely your future donors. Yes, they’re also the ones who will toe the line and go too far, but in my opinion, that line still has never been fully crossed. The national perception of USU student fans is they’re the best in the nation. Caving in to the BYU fans’ cries of foul play and throwing

the die-hard fans under the bus to seemingly tarnish the fans’ image was the absolute wrong move. I believe that all Nov. 11 did was reaffirm what we already knew: Utah State basketball fans are the elite in the U.S. Keep it up Utah State.

Utah State University is a place that changes lives for the better. What comes next? We have already begun to redouble our efforts by working closely with the Hurd leadership, our cheer squads, ASUSU leaders and our fans them-selves to discuss the principles of good sportsmanship and the defini-tion of Aggie good sportsmanship. Surely we can find ways to exhib-it extraordinary — and extraordi-narily loud — school spirit while at the same time being extraordinary examples of character and integrity. We pride ourselves on these prin-ciples of behavior both in and out of the classroom. This is an important issue that must be addressed quickly. Utah State University has the greatest fans in the world. Let that tradition continue.

From WORDS, Page 9

From BE OUR GUEST, Page 9

Don’t punish the fans who give Utah State’s student section its national recognition

From LIZZEN UP, Page 9

Mariuana not dangerous, punishments are draconian and ineffective at best

Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011Page 10 Views&Opinion

— Liz Emery is a senior majoring in

English creative writing. Her col-

umn appears every Wednesday.

Comments can be sent to her at

[email protected].

— Matt Sonnenberg is a USU alumnus who

graduated in the spring of 2011. He started

a publication distributed at USU basketball

games called The Refraction and is now active-

ly updating his USU athletics blog www.sage-

brushspot.com. Comments on his column can

be sent to [email protected].

— Stan Albrecht is the president of

USU and compiled this letter with

Athletics Director Scott Barnes.

Comments on this letter can be sent

to [email protected].

Page 11: Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011

Answers elsewhere in this issue!

Welcome Back Special!20% Off! entire bill.

Good untilSept. 20

Corn dogs 2 for $1.50 Pizza Stix 2 for $2

Mon-‐Thur 11-‐9:30 753-‐7889Fri-‐Sat 11-‐10:30

Sun. 12-‐9:30 890 N. Main St.

www.formosalogan.comDine in or take out

‘The  Best  Photo  I  Took  All  Summer’Photo  Contest

There  will  be  Prizes!  More  details  coming,  so  get  your  best  photos  ready!

[email protected],

1436 North

1200 East

JUST OFF

CAMPUS!

“Foothill

Mart”

Home of the 89¢ 44 oz. Fountain Drink!

[email protected]

John Kroes

Dave Blazek

[email protected]

Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011

www.utahstatesman.com

FunStuff www.a-bay-usu.com

TimeOut Page 11

Argyle Sweater

The STATESMAN Crossword!

Check it out! All the clues,

all the answers come from from

this issue of The Statesman.

Bring it in to TSC 105 or snap

a photo with your phone and email to states-

[email protected]. Deadline Thursday noon.

Those with correct answers

will be eligible for a drawing for a $10 Winger’s

gift certificate!

Read & Play!

Page 12: Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011

Ka-pow! Graphic Novel Exhibition- All Day

Screening for Sensory Test - All DayThe AIDS Memorial Quilt- All DayUSU’s Biggest Loser Competition- All DayBone Marrow Registration Drive- 11 to 4

p.m HPER 110 USU Meditation Club- noon to 1 p.m.

TSC 335 The Joy of Depression - 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.

TSC 310Perspectives Club Meeting- 2:15 to 3:30

p.m. TSC 309Ted Jensen- 3 to 4 p.m. Alumni HouseThen and Now: the Face of HIV AIDS Community Panel-3 to 4 p.m. TSC

BallroomTodd Nickey and Amy Kehoe- 4 to 5:30

p.m. Performance HallDr. Jayne Belnap- 6 to 7 p.m. ENGR 103Men’s Basketball vs. Denver- 7 p.m.

SpectrumThe Forgotten Carols- 7:30 p.m Kent

Concert HallUSU Jazz Ensembles- 7:30 p.m.

Performance Hall

The AIDS Memorial Quilt- All DayBig Band Swing Club, 7 p.m., HPER 215World AIDS Day on the Patio, 10 a.m.-2

p.m., TSC PatioWintersongs, 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m., USU Chamber Singers, Women’s Choir and

University Chorale, St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church, 725 S. 250 E., Hyde Park.

Twentieth Century, 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m., Chase Fine Arts Center, Morgan Theatre

World AIDS Day Interfaith Service and Candelight Vigil, 7 p.m.-8 p.m., St. John’s Episcopal

www.utahstatesman.com

The Starting Small Exhibit featuring art collections owned by USU students opens Nov. 7 until Dec. 1 from 9 -5 p.m. in the Tippetts Exhibit Hall. An opening reception will be held Nov. 11 from 5-7 p.m. in the Tippetts Exhibit Hall.

Come join in the third annual USU’s Biggest Loser Competition. 20 contestants will compete to earn points and win amazing prizes. This nine-week competition will consist of weekly workout activities and health lectures to promote healthy living. Applications are available in the Service Center (TSC 332) or by request via email: [email protected]. Applications are due by De. 9. Competition starts Jan. 16. $25 - Students. $35 - Everyone Else. $45 - Couples

Study Abroad in Amman, Jordan during Summer 2012! (USU Faculty Led Program) - study Arabic Language. Information Session on Dec. 6, 3:30-4:30 PM, Old Main 119. Study Abroad in Santiago, Dominican Republic during Summer 2012! (USU Faculty Led Program) - study Spanish Language. Information Session on Dec. 7, 2:30-3:30 PM, Old Main 227. Your exciting experience awaits. Discover the World.

We are looking for participants for our next Sensory test that will be held next semester. If you are willing to participate, please stop by the NDFS Department between November 18 and Dec 20 and fill out a questionnaire. We will give a free ice-cream coupon for your participation. If you have

Art exhibit You Need to Know:

Weight loss

Study Abroad info

StatesmanBack BurnerWednesday, Nov. 30, 2011

More Calendar and FYI listings, Interactive

Calendar and Comics at

WednesdayNov. 30

ThursdayDec. 1

Page 12

tysoncole@aggiemail

G&G McCoy

Today’s Issue

Today is Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2011. Today’s issue of The Utah Statesman is published especially for Amber Pett, a freshman major-‐ing in early childhood development from Clinton, Utah.

WeatherHigh: 34° Low: 23°Skies: Cloudy with a

70 percent chance of

snow showers.

Today in History: The first modern instance of a meteorite striking a human being occured at Sylacauga, Alabama, when a meteorite crashed through the roof of a house and into a living room, bounced off a radio, and struck a woman on the hip.

Almanac

Utah StatesmanThe

questions, send me an e-mail: [email protected] Watch for a Holiday Celebration on Thursday, Dec. 15 at 10:30 a.m. in the Edith Bowen Auditorium. The children of Sound Beginnings preschool celebrate the season. Sound Beginnings is a preschool here on campus for children with hearing loss. Come see the amazing obstacles these children have overcome as they put on a truly magical holiday program. An Interfaith World AIDS Day Service of Remembrance will be held on Thursday, Dec. 1 at 7 p.m. at St John’s Episcopal Church. Other communities of faith will also be participating. Featured speakers will be Dr. H.Wayne and Sandra Schow of Pocatello. Dr. Schow is the author of “Remembering Brad: On the Loss of a Son to AIDS.” The book details the couple’s journey with their son, a young gay LDS man who was diagnosed with AIDS and who returned home to Idaho to die. Friday Dec. 2 is the Cache Valley Gallery Walk from 6-9 p.m. You can stroll around various downtown business and art galleries to take in wonderful artwork and gingerbread house displays. This is a great way to kick off the holiday season. See a participating downtown business (most are) and you can pick up a map at each location. Caffe Ibis Activities: Live Music by Acoustic Blue at Caffe Ibis, Dec. 4. Todd Milovich, Alex Tarbet, and Dan Fields play the blues. !If you missed them last time, this is your chance to make it up to yourself. !A must see! Phone: 4357534777. Also, Gallery Walk at Caffe Ibis, Oil Paintings by Ryan Cannon and amazing fingerpicking guitarist, Austin Weyand plays for the Gallery Walk, Dec. 2.

Sensory test