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Cambridge Happening’s At Barnette September 2017 Volume 3, Issue 1 CAMBRIDGE MATH: As part of Mrs. Huffman’s Cambridge Class, the students will be spending time each week working on an “I-Weekly” assignment. These assignments are based on looking at global issues around the world, while also learning about different countries and their cultures. Each week, the students will receive their I-Weekly through Classroom Google, and they will complete their I-Weekly assignment in their Cambridge Journal. Currently, the students are learning about the topic of “sharing,” while also discussing and discovering the country of Nepal. Below are the different components of the I-Weekly program: Picture Talk: In each I-Weekly, the first activity will be a picture or a video to explore, along with an activity explanation of how to explore into the picture or video. Through this introduction activity, the students will begin to activate their interest. Quotes: The quotes are meant to be thought provoking and offer an opportunity for journaling or reflection. This is a great opportunity for students to use supporting evidence based on their own thoughts from the quotes. Around the World: These questions are intended as an activator for students to consider what they know about their global society. Through this activity, students have

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Cambridge Happening’s At Barnette

September 2017 Volume 3, Issue 1

CAMBRIDGE MATH:As part of Mrs. Huffman’s Cambridge Class, the students will be spending time each week working on an “I-Weekly” assignment. These assignments are based on looking at global issues around the world, while also learning about different countries and their cultures. Each week, the students will receive their I-Weekly through Classroom Google, and they will complete their I-Weekly assignment in their Cambridge Journal. Currently, the students are learning about the topic of “sharing,” while also discussing and discovering the country of Nepal. Below are the different components of the I-Weekly program:

Picture Talk:In each I-Weekly, the first activity will be a picture or a video to explore, along with an activity explanation of how to explore into the picture or video. Through this introduction activity, the students will begin to activate their interest.

Quotes:The quotes are meant to be thought provoking and offer an opportunity for journaling or reflection. This is a great opportunity for students to use supporting evidence based on their own thoughts from the quotes.

Around the World:These questions are intended as an activator for students to consider what they know about their global society. Through this activity, students have the opportunity to collaborate and brainstorm together to find possible solutions as well as eliminate choices that are unreasonable or less feasible.

Flag Facts:The flag facts are a way to study symbols and images. We will explore why people may select certain colors, images, shapes, and words. Students can make connections between countries’ flags and countries’ beliefs as well as exploring deeper into the symbolism of a flag.

Statistics: This section is meant to explore into statistics and data as connected to people and events.

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Inquiry Questions: Through these questions, the students have the opportunity to explore non-familiar topics, while also examining multiple viewpoints and therefore have multiple answers. Currently, Mrs. Huffman’s Cambridge students are study place value and decimal concepts.

Below: Mrs. Huffman’s I-Weekly Display

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PAGE 3Below: Current Problem of the Day topics in Mrs. Huffman’s Room.

Below: Students in Ms. Walker’s classroom collaborating on their daily math discussions and work.

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Below: A sample of the Cambridge Problem of the Day that Ms. Walker’s students always begin their math block with.

Below: Students in Ms. Walker’s 4th grade class utilizing their technology to solve multi-step math problems.

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Below: One on one “quick check” conference with Ms. Walker to better support student understanding and learning.

CAMBRIDGE LITERACY:Below: Ms. McElhinney’s students have been studying and discussing their own ideas for the Cambridge Attributes.

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PAGE 6In Ms. McElhinny’s 4th grade classroom the students have been working on identify animal stereotypes as character traits within a fable. They have also been looking at how to determine what lessons can be learned from fables. As part of the Cambridge Attribute process, Ms. McElhinny’s students will often stop, and take a “reflection break” to self analyze their work.

Below: Ms. McElhinny’s students working on collaborative efforts to determine the main theme of their fables.

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In Mrs. Terry’s fifth grade Cambridge class, the recently participated in a “Close Reading” activity in which they collaborated with a partner to practice verbally summarizing the text they just read with a partner. Additionally, they had to come up with the overall theme. This is a great strategy to help them think deeper about their reading, as well as work on their verbal communication and collaboration skills.

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Above: As the students begin the second read, they begin to move into a deeper level of understanding as they discuss and determine the big idea and theme, but now with multiple pieces of evidence from the text to support their answers.

CAMBRIDGE SCIENCE:Below: Mrs. Key’s students have been discussing how to act and think like scientists in the real world.

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Mrs. Bouldin’s 4th grade students are currently studying and learning about electricity, conductors, and how charged objects can produce motion. Recently, the students participated in a great discussion on conductors and insulators. They were able to identify and determine what each of these were, as well as provide authentic examples. During the discussion, one student brought up an interesting question. She asked about whether or not the human body was a conductor or insulator. Mrs. Bouldin then posed this question back to the class and asked for evidence to prove their beliefs. One student explained that since our bodies are made up of mostly water, and since water is a conductor, then we are actually conductors. Another student explained that since we can feel a shock and then pass that shock on, we are indeed a conductor. The students also discussed how birds could stand on electrically wires without being shocked. Overall, a wonderful collaborative discussion based on strong, authentic examples.