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  • Waste minimisation across the supply chain: areas to focus on

  • Waste minimisation

    Waste minimisation across the supply chain: areas to focus on

  • Waste minimisation across the supply chain: areas to focus on

    Waste minimisation

    This project, funded by the Construction Resources and Waste Platform (CRWP1), provides key recommendations in terms of achieving waste minimisation across the construction supply chain. For the purposes of this report, waste minimisation is defined as the reduction in the amount of waste arising from the construction process; diverting waste materials from landfill is not included within the scope. Waste minimisation is important from a business, cost and environmental perspective and it is increasingly apparent in Government policy and standards. To achieve effective waste reduction, the supply chain needs to work together.

    A number of issues have been assessed to assist in defining priorities for waste reduction. This includes the cost of certain construction materials/products. Those products/materials with a high purchase cost include certain floor coverings, tiles, bitumen and metals (especially zinc and aluminium). Therefore, there is more of a cost incentive to reduce the amount of waste arising from using these materials/products than those that may cost less.

    For wastage allowances, in-situ concrete has the largest at 10%, followed by timber and board products at insulation at 9.8% and then timber and board products

    at 9%. In terms of specifications, the highest wastage allowance is at 33% for repairing/renovating concrete flag paving, followed by 25% for worktops etc (timber) and also for in-situ concrete applications. Other issues analysed include the amount of waste diverted from landfill and the environmental impact of the waste/materials in terms of their manufacture and transport to site.

    The impact is expressed in terms of BREs Ecopoints per kg of material, with the usage of the raw materials in the product having the highest environmental impact in relation to transportation and waste management. The construction products/materials with a higher impact include floor coverings, metals, plastics and insulation

    When ranking these issues and aggregating them, those with the greatest impact include insulation, asphalt and tar, floor coverings (soft) then timber and board products. The data presented within this report can help organisations prioritise their waste reduction actions from a material perspective.

    Factsheets and case studies are also included for the construction supply chain: client, designers, main and trade contractors and suppliers/product manufacturers.

    1.The Construction Resources and Waste Platform was funded by Defra to provide support to businesses in the construction sector. For more information go to www.constructionwaste.info

    Waste minimisation across the supply chain: areas to focus on

    Executive Summary

  • Waste minimisation across the supply chain: areas to focus on

    Waste minimisation

    Index of Case Studies

    General Plasterboard Packaging Flooring InsulationBrick and block

    Client Case study 2

    Designer/architect

    Case study 3 Case study 1 Case study 1

    Main contractor

    Case study 1 Case study 5

    Trade contractor

    Case study 1 Case study 5 Case study 4

    Supplier Case study 1 Case study 5

    Product manufacturer

    Case study 1 Case study 6

  • Waste minimisation across the supply chain: areas to focus on

    Waste minimisation

    Wastage Rate Report Prepared forName Construction Resources and Waste Platform

    Prepared byName Katherine AdamsPosition Principal Consultant

    Approved on behalf of BREName Gilli HobbsPosition Director

    BRE Garston WD25 9XX T + 44 (0) 1923 664000 F + 44 (0) 1923 664010 E [email protected] www.bre.co.uk This report is made on behalf of BRE. By receiving the report and acting on it, the client - or any third party relying on it - accepts that no individual is personally liable in contract, tort or breach of statutory duty (including negligence).

    Contents

    1. Introduction 1

    1.1 Why waste minimisation is important 1

    1.1.1 Waste hierarchy 1

    1.1.2 True cost of waste 3

    1.1.3 Environmental savings 3

    1.1.4 Business benefits 3

    1.1.5 Policy/legislation drivers 4

    1.2 Cause of waste 7

    1.3 Supply chain focus 9

    2. Evaluation of datasets 12

    2.1 Typical construction materials 12

    2.2 Data sources 13

    2.3 Material costs 14

    2.4 Wastage allowances 16

    2.5 Amount of waste generated onsite 18

    2.6 Typical disposal routes 18

    2.7 Environmental impact 20

    2.8 Aggregation of issues 21

    3. Client factsheet 24

    4. Designers/architects 26

    5. Main and trade contractors 28

    6. Suppliers and product manufacturers 32

  • 2. Evaluation of datasets

    Waste minimisation across the supply chain: areas to focus on

    Waste minimisation

  • Waste minimisation across the supply chain: areas to focus on

    Page

    1

    Waste minimisation

    This project, funded by the Construction Resources and Waste Platform (CRWP2), provides key recommendations in terms of achieving waste minimisation across the construction supply chain. For the purposes of this report, waste minimisation is defined as the reduction in the amount of waste arising from the construction process; diverting waste materials from landfill is not included within the scope; however it should be noted that reducing waste quantities could lead to a greater diversion of waste from landfill.

    Recommendations are presented in terms of key materials to focus on looking at various datasets and actions across the supply chain. The actions apply largely to the new build construction process and are appropriate for commercial and residential projects.

    The key recommendations and actions have been developed through a literature review (predominately from material in the UK) and analysis of BRE datasets such as waste arisings, wastage rates and environmental impact. Much work has already been done by organisations (e.g. WRAP, Envirowise) on waste minimisation and as such this report seeks to pull this information together to assist the construction industry, in implementing waste reduction measures.

    1. Introduction

    2.The Construction Resources and Waste Platform was funded by Defra to provide support to businesses in the construction sector. For more information go to www.constructionwaste.info

    MaterialProduct

    WASTEONLY

    Reduction

    Re-use

    Recycling & composting

    Energy recovery

    Landfill

    Figure 1: The waste hierarchy

    1.1 Why waste minimisation is important1.1.1 Waste hierarchyThe waste hierarchy (as shown in Figure 1), has been a feature of UK waste policy since the 1990s and encourages policy makers and industry to consider it within their decision making by providing a framework.

  • Waste minimisation across the supply chain: areas to focus on

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    Waste minimisation

    An example of how the waste hierarchy can be applied to construction waste is shown in Figure 2. The waste hierarchy has now taken on increasing importance with the implementation of the Revised EU Waste Framework Directive3, according to which it should be applied in priority order in waste prevention and management legislation and policy. The priority order is: waste prevention; preparing for re-use; recycling; other recovery (e.g. energy recovery); and finally disposal. The

    3. DIRECTIVE 2008/98/EC OF THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND OF THE COUNCIL of 19 November 2008 on waste and repealing certain Directives; available here: http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/LexUriServ.do?uri=OJ:L:2008:312:0003:0003:EN:PDF

    revised Directive allows for departure from the hierarchy where that would deliver a better overall environmental outcome. The Directive has to be transposed in the UK by 12 December 2010. Member States should also provide waste prevention programmes by 2013 with the overall aim of breaking the link between economic growth and the environmental impacts associated with the generation of waste. Specific qualitative or quantitative benchmarks for waste prevention should be set.

    Figure 2: The waste hierarchy applied to plasterboard waste

    Design floor to ceiling heights to match board >sizes.Procure just enough for the job. >Store undercover to prevent weather damage >Only fit boards when building is water tight. >

    Can my plasterboard waste be reduced?

    Can my plasterboard waste be reused?

    Large pieces of offcuts could be reused >Surplus boards can be saved for the next job >

    Can my plasterboard waste be recycled?

    Segregate on site and sent to a recycler as raw >material for new plasterboard

    Can my plasterboard waste be sent for energy recovery?

    Not appropriate >

    Landfill Send to a monocell within a licensed landfill >

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    Yes

    No

    No

    No

    NoMaterialProduct

    WASTEONLY

    MaterialProduct

    WASTEONLY

    MaterialProduct

    WASTEONLY

    MaterialProduct

    WASTEONLY

    MaterialProduct

    WASTEONLY

  • Waste minimisation across the supply chain: areas to focus on

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    Waste minimisation

    4. From BRE waste studies 5. http://envirowise.wrap.org.uk/uk/Sectors/Construction/Sector-Services/True-Cost-of-Waste.341603.html 6. A Strategic Approach to Construction Waste, 2006, BRE available at www.bre.co.uk/filelibrary/pdf/rpts/waste/ConstructionWasteReport240906.pdf 7. Available at www.wastecalculator.co.uk