Viva La Causa: Teacher's Guide

Click here to load reader

  • date post

    28-Dec-2016
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    219
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of Viva La Causa: Teacher's Guide

  • TEACHERS GUIDE

  • TEACHERS GUIDEGrades 7 and Up

    tolerance.org

  • TABLE OF CONTENTS

    INTRODUCTION 7 INTO THE FILM: POWER TO THE PEOPLELesson 1 ExploringtheFilm 10Lesson 2 EconomicInjusticeAffectsUsAll 14 THROUGH THE FILM: TOGETHER WE STANDLesson 3 Farmworkers&theUnion 20Lesson 4 CommittingtoNonviolence 25Lesson 5 AlliesforJustice 31BEYOND THE FILM: LONG LIVE THE CAUSE Lesson 6 InjusticeonOurPlates 38Lesson 7 WorkerExploitationToday 41Lesson 8 TheImmigrationDebate 46

    RECOMMENDED RESOURCES 51

    CONTENT STANDARDS 53

    ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 58

    The lessons in this teachers guide support content standards. For a complete listing, please see pages 53-57.

  • INTRODUCTIONOnawarmeveningin1965,hundredsofMexicanfarmwork-ers packed into a church hall in the small farming town ofDelano, California. A momentous decision lay before themshould they join a strike against California grape growersstarted 11 days prior by their Filipino counterparts? Wouldthis improvetheirappallingworkingconditions in thefieldsandhelpthemearnenoughtofeedtheirfamilies?

    Thestruggleofthefarmworkerswasaboutmorethanwag-es.Itwasaboutrespect,justiceandequality;itwasaboutpit-tingthepowerlessagainstthepowerful.Twothousandwork-ers walked out of the fields. Eventually, tens of thousandsmore joined the fight. Together they would unite around la causaanddemandthattheirvoicesbeheard.

    The strike would unfold over five years, testing not justthewillofthefarmworkersortheirbossesinagriculture,buttheverymoralityoftheAmericanpeopleandtheircollectivewillingnesstoheedcorevaluesoffairnessandequality.

    Viva La Causa tells the story of how the powerless stoodup to the powerful and gained their victory, not by violenceandweapons,butbytheirstrongwill.Adedicatedcoalitionofpeoplefromdiverseclasses,racesandreligionsstoodtogetherforjustice,provingthatthemightiestwallsofoppressioncanbetoppledwhenpeopleareunitedandtheircauseisjust.

    Thefilmalsoservesasacall-to-action,alertinganewgen-eration to issues of worker exploitation that continue to un-foldthroughouttheUnitedStatesandtheworldtoday.

    MaterialsYourViva La Causapackage includesa39-minutevideoandthisaccompanyingteachersguide.

  • INTO THE FILM

    Power to the PeoPle

  • 10 viva la causa teachers guide

    LESSON ONE

    Exploring thE FilmObjectivesActiviteswillhelpstudents:

    Writedescriptivecompositionsbasedonvisualpromptsthatconnectsymbol-icallywithoneofthefarmworkersoralliesdepictedinViva La Causa.

    Understandanddeconstructthemainconceptsofthefilm,includingtheim-portance of labor unions, the basic tenets of nonviolence, and the power ofcollectiveactionacrosslinesofrace,class,genderandfaith.

    Understand that people from all walks of life have a role to play in socialchangeandthat,by joiningtogethertosupporta justcause, individualscanadvanceequalityandjustice.

    Essential Questions What responsibilities do individuals have to society? What responsibilities

    doessocietyhavetoindividuals? Whoseresponsibilityisittofightforthosewhoarebeingexploitedbysome-

    oneorsomethingmorepowerful? Whatfactorsmightmotivateyoutofightforacause? Whatcausessomesocialmovementstosucceedwhileothersfail? Howcanweaffectsocialchangeinanonviolentway? Whatdoesitmeantobeempowered?

    MaterialsOnephotoforeachstudent,foundhereonpage12.Teacherscancopythephotosheet,cutthephotosoutandlaminatethemaheadoftime,ifdesired.Additionalcopiesalsoareavailableforfreedownload(tolerance.org/viva).

    FrameworkViva La Causa tellsthestoryofadedicatedcoalitionofpeoplefromdiverseclasses,racesandreligionswhostoodtogetherforjustice,provingthatthemightiestwallsofoppressioncanbetoppledwhenpeopleareunitedandtheircauseisjust.Inthislesson,studentswillconnectwithfarmworkersandallieswhoparticipatedinla causaandexplorekeythemesofthefilm.

    Before Viewing the FilmAtleastonedaybeforeviewingthefilmandbeforeintroducingthelessontostu-dents,provideeachstudentwithaphoto.Asanin-classfree-writeorasahome-workassignment,askeachstudenttowriteashortdescriptionaboutthepersonwhoappearsonhisorherphoto,basedsolelyontheimageprovided.Promptscouldinclude:

    Whatdoesthispersondoforaliving? Whereweretheyborn,andwheredotheylive? Whatisthispersonpassionateabout?

    On the Day of the ViewingIntroducethefilmtostudentsusingtheframeworkabove,andaskstudentstotakeouttheirphotos.Viewthefilmasawholeclass.

    STANDARDSThis lesson supports standards and benchmarks in Language Arts, Civics, Economics, Consumer Science, and Business Education. For a complete listing, see pages 53-57.

    SUGGESTED GRADE LEVELS7 AND UP

  • viva la causa teachers guide 11

    Afterviewingthefilm,discuss: Whatkindofinjusticesdidtheworkershopetoundobygoingonstrike?How

    didtheseinjusticesunderminetheirhumanity?(Workers endured long hours without rest breaks, had little access to water or restrooms, had toxic pesticides sprayed on them, and endured hard labor for very little pay and no health benefits. These injustices communicated to the workers that they were sub-human and not deserving of even the most common dignities offered to others.)

    Whatisnonviolence,andwhatrolediditplayinthestruggle?(Nonviolence is a philosophy of resistance where you do no physical harm to others. Those in the movement leveraged nonviolent strategies to dismantle the stranglehold of the growers.)

    Why did the strikers need help from others? What kinds of things did thestrikersaskthemtodoinsupportofla causa?Whyweretheactionsofthesealliesimportant?(The strikers felt there was power in numbers, and they felt that the more di-verse their movement was, the more people outside the movement might listen to their cause. Others were invited to join them in striking, boycotting and picketing. The actions of allies were important because they told the workers they were not alone and that their actions were supported by moral people everywhere.)

    Whatfactorsmotivatedpeopletogetinvolvedinla causa?(They wanted a fair wage and good working conditions for themselves. They also re-alized that rights won today for themselves would be enjoyed by future generations. Many people of faith became involved in the cause because it was a way to physically manifest their faith. For many, being involved in the cause was a moral imperative.)

    Whatdidworkersgainasaresultofthestrikeandboycott?(Pragmatically, they won cold drinking water in the fields, rest periods, grievance procedures, pesticide controls, a hiring hall, a wage increase and the right to be represented by a union. Morally and spiritually, they won dignity and the realiza-tion that a group dedicated to a cause can make a difference.)

    Whatdidournationgainintheprocess?(Our nation gained a measure of dignity by treating the workers with the respect they deserved. The movement highlighted the need for, and value of, labor unions.)

    The title of the film is Viva La Causa, which means Long live the cause. Whatmessageisthefilmmakertryingtosendtoyou?(The filmmaker is highlighting the fact that worker exploitation continues and that we must remain vigilant in securing justice for workers who continue to be exploited today.)

    Closing ActivityAskstudentstoreflectagainontheirphotosandrefertotheircompositions.Askvolunteerstoshareelementsfromtheircompositionsandwhattheylearnedabouttherealindividualwhilewatchingthefilm.Howwerestudentsfirstimpressionssimilartoanddifferentfromthepersonsactuallives?Howdidtheindividualsup-portla causa?Asaclass,discusshowittooktheactionsoftheseindividualsandtensofthousandsmoretobringjusticetofarmworkers.

  • HANDOUT viva la causa: the story of csar chvez and a great movement for social Justice

    vivalacausateaching tolerance

  • viva la causa: the story of csar chvez and a great movement for social JusticeHANDOUT

    viva la causaTeaching Tolerance

    Roberto Bustoswasafoundingunionmem-berandstrikerwhoalsoservedascaptainofthehistoricmarchfrom

    DelanotoSacramentoin1966.

    Richard Estrada Chvez,brotherofunionco-founderCsarChvez,volunteeredasafulltimeunionactivistandboy-

    cotter.HealsodesignedtheUFWsBlackEaglelogo.

    LeRoy Chatfieldleftreli-giouslifetojointhefarm-workermovement,playedakeyroleinChvezsfastfornonviolenceandran

    boycotteffortsinLosAngeles.

    Ed Chierawasagradu-atestudentatStanfordUniversitywholefttovol-unteerasaresearcherfortheunionandlaterserved

    asaboycottorganizerinNewYorkandothercitiesintheUnitedStates.

    Jerry Cohenwasthegen-eralcounselfortheunionandplayedpivotalrolesinthestrikeandboycottandintheeventsthatled

    uptothecontractsigningsin1970.

    Carolina Franco de Vasquezbeganworkinginthefieldswhenshewasjust12yearsoldandservedasapicketcaptain

    duringthestrike.Shewasalsoaboy-cotterinLosAngelesandNewYork.

    Wendy Greenfieldbecameavolunteerwhenshewasjust14.Wendyandher

    highschoolfriendspressuredgrocerystoriesinandaroundSyosset,N.Y.,toremovegrapesfromtheshelves.Theireffortsweresuccessful.

    Vivian Harriswasaboy-cottorganizerinOaklandandplayedakeyroleingettinggrapesoutoftheBayArea.

    Rev. Chris Hartmire,aPresbyterianmin-ister,wasdirectoroftheCaliforniaMigrantMinistry(laterthe

    NationalFarmWorkerMinistry),whichhelpedcreateanetworktosupportstrikers,boycotters,volun-teersandorganizers.

    Dolores Huertaco-found-edtheUnitedFarmWorkerswithCsarChvezandcoinedthephraseSiSePuede(Yes

    WeCan).

    Emilio J. Huerta,sonofunionco-founderDoloresHuerta,wasjustachildduringthestrike,buthestillparticipatedinmany

    ofitsactivities,includingleafletinginthefields.

    Lori de Len,daughterofunionco-founderDoloresHuerta,wasjust13yearsoldwhenthestrikebe-gan.Still,shetookaction

    asapicketer,boycotterandElTeatroCampesinomember.Shealsohelpedcareforhersixsiblings.

    Andy Imutanwasanorigi-nalstrikerandamemberoftheFilipinounionthat

    launchedthestrike.Hewasavicepresid