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Transcript of Trombone/Euphonium I - · PDF fileTrombone/Euphonium I Technique Packet Euphonium Topics...

  • Trombone/Euphonium I Technique Packet

    Euphonium Topics Trombone-Euphonium Doubling

    Fingering Charts Major Scales Long Tones

    Tuning Chords Technique No. 1 Technique No. 2 Technique No. 3 Technique NO. 4

    Articulation No. 1 Articulation No. 2 Articulation No. 3

    Amazing Grace (Phantom Regiment 1992) Canon (Phantom Regiment 2003)

    Adagio for Strings (Santa Clara Vanguard 2013)

  • Euphonium Topics

    by Master Sergeant Carlyle Weber

    Master Sergeant Donald Burleson

    The Musical Ambassadors of the ArmyWashington, DCWashington, DCW

    The United StatesArmy Field Band

    The United States Army Field Band4214 Field Band Drive Fort Meade, Maryland 20755-5330

    Phone: (301) 677-6586 Fax: (301) 677-6533E-mail: fl [email protected] Website: www.army.mil/fi eldband

  • The U.S. Army Field Band Euphonium Topics

    101

    Euphonium Topicsby

    Master Sergeant Carlyle WeberSergeant First Class Donald Burleson

    WHATS IN A NAME?

    What is the difference between a euphoniumand a baritone horn? While some people think thatthe difference is the number of valves or the num-ber of bells, the real difference is in the diameterof the tubing, or bore size. A European baritonehorn has a considerably smaller bore size than aeuphonium does, similar to the difference betweena cornet and a flugelhorn. The American-madebaritone horn has a bore size in between a Euro-pean baritone horn and a euphonium, but closerin size to a euphonium. The larger bore of the eu-phonium gives it a darker, fuller sound preferredby most professionals and advanced students.

    BASS AND TREBLE CLEF

    Unlike the music for other instruments in theband, music for the euphonium is printed in two dif-ferent forms: a non-transposing bass clef part like thetrombone, and a Bb transposing treble clef part sound-ing an octave below the trumpet, like the tenor saxo-phone. This can make it easy for either a tromboneplayer or a trumpet player to learn to play euphonium.

    In virtually all American band music, similarsounding bass and treble clef parts are available, soit is not essential for a beginning player to learn both.Many European band arrangements, however, havebass and treble clef parts that are differentin fact,they are often written for different instruments, withthe euphonium part in bass clef and the baritonepart in treble clef. Some solo music and much smallensemble and chamber music is only available in oneclef, usually bass. Also, a euphonium player whoreads both clefs can borrow solo and ensemble mu-sic and etudes from many other instruments includ-ing trombone, trumpet, clarinet, and cello. To learna diverse repertoire, euphonium players need toknow both bass and treble clefs.

    BREATHING AND SUPPORT

    In order to take a full, quick breath, thethroat has to be relaxed and open. The lungs mustexpand and fill first from the bottom. To do this,

    the diaphragm, a large muscle that separates thechest cavity from the abdominal cavity, mustpush forward and down, causing the stomach toprotrude slightly as the muscles around thewaist relax. When this is done, the lungs canexpand to their maximum extent, filling side-ways as well as downwards. The diaphragmshould move first to let the lower lungs fill. Theupper lungs fill last, although the whole processmust happen quickly and smoothly so that itfeels nearly simultaneous.

    When exhaling in order to produce a note, thebreath must be supported. During normal, quietbreathing, the diaphragm relaxes passively as theair gently escapes the lungs; however, while play-ing a wind instrument the waist muscles should becontracted. This forces the internal organs of theupper abdomen up against the diaphragm, increas-ing the pressure to push the air out of the lungs.This provides the breath support necessary toproject the tone.

    ARTICULATION

    For a normal attack, not accented and notlegato, the tip of the tongue should be pulleddownward from a point near the gumline of theupper front teeth. Depending on the shape of themouth, the actual point of contact might be theback of the teeth or a little farther back on theroof of the mouth.

    Sometimes tonguing problems are actuallylip problems. Harsh, clumsy, or indistinct articu-lation is frequently attributed to the lips. If theyare not set properly to vibrate at the correct pitch,the note either refuses to speak or sounds muddy.Tonguing harder or playing louder will not solvethe problem. Instead, the lips must accuratelypredetermine the desired pitch before the tongueinitiates the attack. The more precisely the playerthinks about the exact pitch, the better the lipswill be prepared to play, and the better the notewill speak.

  • 102

    Euphonium Topics

    RECOMMENDED RESOURCES

    Method Books

    Arbans CompleteConservatory Method (Treble Clef) ................... Jean Baptiste Arban, ed. Goldman and Smith

    (Carl Fischer)

    Famous Method forTrombone and Baritone (Bass Clef) ................. Jean Baptiste Arban, ed. Mantia & Randall

    (Carl Fischer)

    Melodious Etudesfor Trombone, Volumes I, II, and III ................. G. M. Bordogni, ed. Joannes Rochut

    (Carl Fischer)

    Technical Studies (Bass Clef) ........................... Herbert L. Clarke, ed. Claude Gordon(Carl Fischer)

    Lip Flexibility on the Trumpet .......................... Walter M. Smith (Carl Fischer)

    Method for Baritone........................................... Walter Beeler (Warner Brothers)

    70 Beginning and Early Studies ...................... David Uber (PP Music)

    Solo Literature

    Tom Binkleys Tune ............................................ H. Cowell (Presser)

    Aria and Allegro ................................................ Franz Joseph Haydn (Rubank)

    Song to the Evening Star .................................. Richard Wagner (Kendor)

    Andante and Allegro ..........................................J. Edouard Barat, arr. Forrest Buchtel(Southern Music)

    Morceau Symphonique, op. 88 .......................... Alexandre Guilmant (Warner Brothers)

    Andante et Allegro ............................................. J. Guy Ropartz (Carl Fischer)

  • The U.S. Army Field Band Euphonium Topics

    103

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    Long Tones

  • 104

    Euphonium Topics

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    Flexibility

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  • The U.S. Army Field Band Euphonium Topics

    105

    Scale Patterns

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  • 106

    Euphonium Topics

    Euphonium Warm-upsBass Clef

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  • The U.S. Army Field Band Euphonium Topics

    107

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  • 108

    Euphonium Topics

    Scale Patterns

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  • The U.S. Army Field Band Scale Supplement

    S1

    Scale SupplementThe fifteen major and minor scales make up our musical ABCs. Just as a person wishing to read

    learns the alphabet first, a musician cannot expect to master an instrument without first learning thebasic set of scales. By diligently practicing the major scales and all three forms of the minor scales, theywill become automatic, just like reading the alphabet. This will make playing, especially sight reading,much easier so that