Tidbits of Cherokee County, July 2, 2012

8
E. MICHAEL VEREEN III “I Listen, I Care” 1 Attorney + Over 20 Years Experience = Personal Attention www.vereenlaw.com E. MICHAEL VEREEN III “I Listen, I Care” 1 Attorney + Over 20 Years Experience = Personal Attention www.vereenlaw.com 770-345-9449 Emory University Master of Law 770-345-9449 770-345-9449 Hyw 20 & 4000 Jay Green Rd. Canton, GA Hyw 20 & 4000 Jay Green Rd. Canton, GA BANKRUPTCY BANKRUPTCY Because A Smile Matters Dr. Jerry Smith ABO Board Certified Orthodontist Schedule your appointment today! 678-905-0300 BridgeMill in Canton • 3755 Sixes Rd. www.SmithSmile.com LAW OFFICES OF EDWARDS & JOHNSON LLC Call Today 770-345-8200 ACROSS FROM THE COURTHOUSE 270 East Main Street, Suite C, Canton, Georgia 30114 www.edwardsjohnsonlaw.com FREE IN PERSON DIVORCE CONSULTATION Publish a Paper in Your Area WANT TO RUN YOUR OWN BUSINESS? We provide the opportunity for success! Call 1.800.523.3096 (U.S.) 1.866.631.1567 (CAN) www.tidbitsweekly.com Got Belly Fat? Are your hormones making you fat? Lose 1lbs per day and up to 30 lbs in one month. Doctor Supervised Weight Loss Program Free Consult: Call Today (678) 445 - 2746 Limited Time offer: Until July 12 Don’t miss a single TIDBITS ISSUE!! emailed FREE Request by email to: [email protected] I want to be your... CHIROPRACTOR” CHIROPRACTOR Celebrating 30 years at this location If you like us, continue for as low as $79 ind-$99 family a Month unlimited adjustments (Not valid for personal injury worker’s comp or medicare) John I Kelly, D.C. 5461 BELLS FERRY RD. 770-928-8800 www.Kellychiro.net $39 New Patient OFFER Reg. $210 certain restrictions apply Daily Massage Chinese Massage 770-516-1898 300 Village Center Dr., Suite 110 Woodstock • Open 7 days 9am - 9pm FREE HOT STONE MASSAGE WITH ANY REGULAR MASSAGE SERVICE. Must present this coupon at time of service. Exp. 7/31/12 TIDBITS® TAKES A LOOK BACK AT THIS WEEK IN HISTORY by Kathy Wolfe This week has been an eventful one over the years! Follow along as Tidbits investigates several happen- ings that have occurred during the first week of July. • Happy Canada Day! July 1 commemorates the joining of the British North American colonies of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the province of Canada into a fed- eration of four provinces, an 1867 event. This act cre- ated the Dominion of Canada, and July 1 was officially declared Dominion Day. It wasn’t until 1982 that the holiday’s name was changed to Canada Day, when the British Parliament relinquished all political rights over Canada. Although countrymen had been singing “O Canada” since 1880, when the song was composed by Canada’s national musician Calixa Lavalee, it wasn’t proclaimed the country’s national anthem until Domin- ion Day, 1980. • On the first day of July in 1963, the U.S. Post Office in- stigated its new coding system to enable faster process- ing of mail. They dubbed it the Zoning Improvement Plan, or ZIP, for short. A five-digit code was assigned to every address across America, with the first number designating the geographical area, the second two dig- its identifying a regional center, and the last signifying which post office. Today, there are more than 42,000 ZIPs nationwide. turn to next page for more! LOVE GROWS HERE 5323 Bells Ferry Rd. Acworth, Georgia 30102 770-926-3558 www.heritagepres.com Heritage Presbyterian Church We Celebrate Easter Every Sunday! 8:45 am - Worship • 11:10 am - Worship 10:00 am - Sunday School NOW ENROLLING Heritage Preschool 770-924-0268 Suds Publishing, LLC www.tidbitscherokee.com 770-591-9256 [email protected] July 2, 2012 Volume 212 Week 27 Keller Williams Realty Consultants 695 Mansell Road Suite 120•Roswell, GA 30076 Jenni Vereen Let me open doors for you 404-455-7945 direct 678-287-4800 office Serving Buyers & Sellers in North Metro Atlanta Each Keller Wiiliams office is independently owned and operated BOARD YOUR PET FOR THE HOLIDAYS! ONLY $14 00 PER DAY Abundant Animal Care 2675 Ball Ground Hyw, Canton, GA 30114 770-479-0048 (Rabies is a 3 Yr. Shot) Laser Spay/Neuter Routine Vaccinations $15 EACH! Cats (Neuter) $50 EACH Dogs $99 EACH

description

The Neatest Little Paper Ever Read

Transcript of Tidbits of Cherokee County, July 2, 2012

Page 1: Tidbits of Cherokee County, July 2, 2012

E. MICHAEL VEREEN III“I Listen,

I Care”

1 Attorney + Over 20 Years Experience

= Personal Attentionwww.vereenlaw.com

E. MICHAEL VEREEN III“I Listen,

I Care”

1 Attorney + Over 20 Years Experience= Personal Attention

www.vereenlaw.com770-345-9449

Emory UniversityMaster of Law

770-345-9449770-345-9449Hyw 20 & 4000 Jay Green Rd. Canton, GAHyw 20 & 4000 Jay Green Rd. Canton, GA

BANKRUPTCYBANKRUPTCY

Because ASmile

MattersDr. Jerry Smith

ABO Board Certified Orthodontist

Dr. Jerry SmithSchedule your appointment today!

678-905-0300BridgeMill in Canton • 3755 Sixes Rd.

www.SmithSmile.com

Schedule your appointment today!

678-905-0300BridgeMill in Canton • 3755 Sixes Rd.

www.SmithSmile.com

LAW OFFICES OF EDWARDS & JOHNSON LLC

Call Today

770-345-8200ACROSS FROM THE COURTHOUSE

270 East Main Street, Suite C, Canton, Georgia 30114www.edwardsjohnsonlaw.com

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DIVORCECONSULTATION

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September 6 - 12Page 1

Publish a Paper in Your AreaWANT TO RUN YOUR OWN BUSINESS?

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Call 1.800.523.3096 (U.S.)

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TIDBITS® GETS DIRTY WHILE

LABORING AWAYby Sarah Bates

This week Tidbits celebrates the working men and women of the world with an article everyone can appreciate. So take a break from the job for a bit, kick back and relax as we share some interesting work related Tidbits.• It can always be worse, right? The next time

you think you’re job’s rough, imagine being the cage cleaner at the zoo or an odor tester. Not too sure about just what that last one is? An odor tester is someone who makes sure that deodorant actually works. We’ll try not to think about the actual in-trial testing!

• What’s in a name really? Would you ever be a sweat box attendant? It’s not what it sounds like. Sweat Box Attendants wait on guests in the sweat boxes of spas. Although it’s probably a sweat breaking job, the tips are probably great - and if you don’t mind attending to businessmen in towels, it could make a great summer or part-time job!

• Do you know any Herpetologists? Or did you grow up wanting to study frogs, but didn’t know what to call it? Well, here’s your answer: herpetology is the study of amphibians. It is a branch of zoology, which is the study of animals. Another branch of zoology is Myrmecology, the study of those little six-legged picnic fiends. Yes, you guessed it - ants.

turn the page for more!

Q: How do employees likeworking at the clock factory?

A: Only time will tell

TABLE OF CONTENTSISSUE 2009.37

Laboring Awaypages 1-4

Tidbits Around the World: Greece

pages 5-6

S is for Science!pages 7-8

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TIDBITS® TAKES A LOOK BACK ATTHIS WEEK IN HISTORY

by Kathy WolfeThis week has been an eventful one over the years! Follow along as Tidbits investigates several happen-ings that have occurred during the first week of July.

• Happy Canada Day! July 1 commemorates the joining of the British North American colonies of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and the province of Canada into a fed-eration of four provinces, an 1867 event. This act cre-ated the Dominion of Canada, and July 1 was officially declared Dominion Day. It wasn’t until 1982 that the holiday’s name was changed to Canada Day, when the British Parliament relinquished all political rights over Canada. Although countrymen had been singing “O Canada” since 1880, when the song was composed by Canada’s national musician Calixa Lavalee, it wasn’t proclaimed the country’s national anthem until Domin-ion Day, 1980.

• On the first day of July in 1963, the U.S. Post Office in-stigated its new coding system to enable faster process-ing of mail. They dubbed it the Zoning Improvement Plan, or ZIP, for short. A five-digit code was assigned to every address across America, with the first number designating the geographical area, the second two dig-its identifying a regional center, and the last signifying which post office. Today, there are more than 42,000 ZIPs nationwide.

turn to next page for more!

LOVE GROWS HERE

5323 Bells Ferry Rd.Acworth, Georgia 30102

770-926-3558www.heritagepres.com

Heritage Presbyterian Church

We Celebrate Easter Every Sunday!8:45 am - Worship • 11:10 am - Worship

10:00 am - Sunday School

NOW ENROLLINGHeritage Preschool 770-924-0268

Suds Publishing, LLC • www.tidbitscherokee.com • 770-591-9256 • [email protected] 2, 2012 Volume 212 Week 27

Keller Williams Realty Consultants695 Mansell Road Suite 120•Roswell, GA 30076

Jenni VereenLet me open doors for you

404-455-7945 direct 678-287-4800 office

Serving Buyers & Sellers in North Metro Atlanta Each Keller Wiiliams office is independently owned and operated

BOARD YOUR PET FOR THE HOLIDAYS!ONLY $1400 PER DAY

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(Rabies is a 3 Yr. Shot)

Laser Spay/Neuter

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$50 EACH

Dogs $99 EACH

Page 2: Tidbits of Cherokee County, July 2, 2012

Page 2 • www.tidbitscherokee.com • Tidbits® of Cherokee CountyTHIS WEEK IN HISTORY (continued):

• “Don’t you think a stereo cassette player that you can lis-ten to while walking around is a good idea?” Those were the words of Sony’s chairman Masaru Ibuka back in 1979. Ibuka traveled extensively and loved music and pitched the idea to company officials. On July 1 of that year, the Sony Walkman hit retailers’ shelves.

• The year’s midpoint occurs on July 2, with 182 days passed and 182 yet to come (except in Leap years, which have one extra day in the first half). On this day in 1937, Amelia Ear-hart and her navigator Fred Noonan were heard from for the last time as they attempted to make the first round-the-world flight. Their last contact was from the vicinity of Howland Island in the Pacific Ocean.

• Chevrolet rolled its one-millionth Corvette off the assembly line in Bowling Green, Kentucky, on July 2, 1992. It was a white LT1 roadster with a red interior and black roof, car-rying a price tag of more than $31,000. Another automotive milestone took place on this day in 2005, when the very last Ford Thunderbird was manufactured. The Ford plant at Wixom, Michigan, produced the platinum car with black interior. Employees of the plant signed their autographs on the inside fender panels, and the two-seater was given to the greatgranddaughter of company founder Henry Ford, Josephine Ford.

• The Civil War’s Battle of Gettysburg took place July 1-3, 1863, the largest military battle in U.S. history. Confederate troops of 75,000 under Robert E. Lee met the 97,000 men of the Union Army commanded by George Meade in the small Pennsylvania town, population 2,400. By the end of the three-day conflict, more than 51,000 were dead, along with more than 5,000 horses. It’s estimated that 569 tons of ammunition were used in the assault, and 634 cannons were positioned throughout the 25-square-mile area. The Confederates were defeated in the battle, but it was not to be the end of the war. It raged on for nearly two more years, although Lee’s army never recovered from the devastation.

• The U.S. Second Continental Congress met from July 1-4, 1776, in Philadelphia’s Independence Hall to debate, revise and adopt the Declaration of Independence. The document had been drafted by Thomas Jefferson, listing grievances against the King of England and breaking ties between the colonies and the mother country. Fifty-six men later signed the document, and it was read publicly for the first time on July 8.

• It somehow seems appropriate that two of America’s found-ing fathers, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams, should pass away on July 4. Jefferson, the nation’s third president and author of the Declaration of Independence, and John Ad-ams, the second president, died within hours of each other in 1826, on the 50th anniversary of the adoption of the Dec-laration of Independence.

• An announcement at the July 4, 1939, Yankees game sad-dened baseball fans across the nation. Yankee first base-man Lou Gehrig stood before the crowd and announced his retirement from baseball after being stricken with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The 36-year-old called him-self “the luckiest man on the face of the earth” for having played 17 seasons in the major leagues. His amazing re-cord of 2,130 consecutive games endured for 56 years, and his record 23-career grand slams remains unbeaten. Gehrig passed away less than two years later, and his number “4” uniform was retired, making him the first player to be given this honor.

• The world’s first successful clone, Dolly the sheep, was born at Scotland’s Roslin Institute on July 5, 1996. She produced six lambs before her death in 2003. Dolly was stuffed and is displayed at the National Museum of Scotland in Edin-burgh.

• Woolton, England’s annual parish church garden fair was the site of a momentous meeting on July 6, 1957. In addition to the dog show and scheduled brass band, John Lennon’s Quarrymen had been invited to play. Fifteenyear- old Paul McCartney was in the audience and was so impressed with the music, he asked Lennon if he might play some tunes for him. Just two weeks later, McCartney was invited to join the Quarrymen, and the rest, as they say, is history.

• Chicago’s Comiskey Park was the site of Major League Baseball’s first All-Star game on July 6, 1933. The Ameri-can League defeated the National League by a score of 4 to 2.

• Sandra Day O’Connor grew up on an Arizona ranch, where she became an accomplished horsewoman at a young age. After graduating from Stanford University’s law school, she worked as Arizona’s assistant Attorney General, before making the move to politics as a state senator. On July 7, 1981, President Ronald Reagan appointed O’Connor as the first female justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, a position she retained until her retirement in 2006.

Page 3: Tidbits of Cherokee County, July 2, 2012

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TO YOUR GOOD HEALTHBy Paul G. Donohue, M.D.

Ways to Control Irregular HeartDEAR DR. DONOHUE: Last fall, my heart started to

jump around, and I took it that I had palpitations, although I wasn’t sure what palpitations were. It turns out I had atri-al fibrillation. Since then, I have been on many medicines for the atrial fibrillation plus Coumadin, a blood thinner. The Coumadin requires frequent trips to the lab. I have a hard time getting around. I don’t drive. My doctor sug-gests ablation. What are your thoughts? -- H.M.

ANSWER: Atrial fibrillation is in either first or second place when it comes to heart questions. It means the heart beats rapidly and irregularly. The rapid heart pumps less effectively, and the irregular beat promotes the formation of blood clots in the upper heart chambers. Those clots, or pieces of them, can be carried through the circulation to the brain, where they cause a stroke.

Treatment for atrial fibrillation aims to slow the heart, get it to beat regularly and prevent clots from forming if a regular rhythm cannot be attained.

Medicines sometimes can both slow the heart and re-store a normal rhythm. If a normal rhythm is not achieved, the patient will still do well if the heart beats slowly. That patient, however, must add to his or her treatment a blood thinner like Coumadin to prevent clots and a stroke.

Your doctor has suggested a way to restore a regular beat -- ablation. A heart doctor inches a special catheter -- a thin, pliable tube -- from a surface blood vessel to the heart. The catheter is equipped to emit radio waves, which make a series of scars to prevent the generation of erratic signals that spawn atrial fib. The result, when the proce-dure is effective, is a normal, regular heartbeat. The patient can then kiss Coumadin goodbye. My thoughts are that it’s worth serious consideration.

You can also get rid of Coumadin by switching to

Pradaxa, a blood thinner that doesn’t require lab testing. It’s new and is somewhat expensive.

The booklet on heartbeat irregularities explains atrial fi-brillation in detail. To order a copy, write to: Dr. Donohue -- No. 107W, Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. En-close a check or money order (no cash) for $4.75 U.S./$6. Canada with the recipient’s printed name and address. Please allow four weeks for delivery.

***DEAR DR. DONOHUE: I’m a 34-year-old male and

am going bald. What is your opinion on hair transplants? Do they last? How successful are they? -- L.K.

ANSWER: Male hair loss occurs because male hor-mones shrivel hair follicles, the home for each hair. The hair thins, is shorter and falls out well before its time. Sensitivity to this male hormone action is genetically pro-grammed, and in some men, it takes place at young ages.

Have you considered using minoxidil, which is applied to the scalp, or finasteride, an oral medicine?

Hair transplantation works well. The hair is taken from the back of the head, where hair follicles have a long life. It’s very successful.

It would be wise to check with a doctor to see if your hair loss really is something you inherited, or if it’s a sign of something else.

***Dr. Donohue regrets that he is unable to answer indi-

vidual letters, but he will incorporate them in his column whenever possible. Readers may write him or request an order form of available health newsletters at P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475.

(c) 2012 North America Synd., Inc. All Rights Reserved

Page 4: Tidbits of Cherokee County, July 2, 2012

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Joey Logano passed Mark Martin with a late “bump and run” to capture the Pocono 400, improving his chances to remain with Joe Gibbs Racing next sea-son, and perhaps beyond. (John Clark/NASCAR This Week photo)

Pupil Beats Teacher

Not only did the season’s 14th race come down to a battle between two driv-ers -- Joey Logano and Mark Martin -- separated in age by 31 years, but they are also the Sprint Cup Series’ best example of a pupil and a teacher. Martin, 53, was raving about Logano, 22, when the latter was 12.

In a sense, Logano nudged his biggest fan out of the way. He won at Pocono Raceway by what Martin himself referred to as the old “bump and run.”

“It has been acceptable in this racing for a long time,” Martin said. “It’s not how I would have done it, but certainly, if I’d have had a fast-enough car, he would have gotten a return. But I couldn’t quite keep up with him.” As Charlie Robison sang, “These are desperate times.” The general perception in the sport is that Lo-gano -- and in a sense, this seems ridicu-lous given his still-tender age -- is under some pressure to keep his ride once the season ends.

Whether that’s true or not -- or whether winning remedies whatever the situation truly is -- a victory has to help. Before-hand, the worry was whether or not Lo-gano could remain at Joe Gibbs Racing. Afterward, talk drifted ever so slightly in the direction of whether or not Logano wants to stay there. All of a sudden, he’s the one with options.

“No, I haven’t been informed on where I stand for next year yet, so it’s all up in the air,” Logano said. “Obviously, win-ning a race means a lot and it helps that out a ton. For sure, right now, my future is not set with anybody. You

need to go out there and win races, not like we always do, but to get this win means a lot.

“It’s at a perfect time, and I think us teaming up with Jason (Ratcliff, his crew chief) this year has been a really big help

for me, and able to make our whole team really work together really well, and it’s paying off. My hope is to obviously stay with what I’ve got and keep working with Jason, but you never know. Those things go back and forth and switch around a lot, and all I can do is stay focused on my job, and that’s driving the race car.”

Now the ball’s back in team president J.D. Gibbs’ court, and it might not be a bad idea to come up with a new contract offer. The price tag may be rising.

***Monte Dutton covers motorsports for

The Gaston (N.C.) Gazette. E-mail Mon-te at [email protected].

(c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

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PUBLIC SERVICEANNOUNCEMENTS

HERITAGE PRESBYTERIAN OPENS A CLOTHING CLOSETHeritage Presbyterian Church in Acworth on Bells Ferry Road, recently opened a Clothing Closet for people needing clothing in the Cobb and Cherokee areas. This clothing is given out free of charge and we rely solely on donations from parish-ioners and people in the area. Right now we are in dire need of children’s clothing ranging from kindergarten age to 6th or 7th grade. We are asking for gently-used, clean clothing. For donation address, please contact our church office at 770-926-3558. We can provide you with a tax donation form. CHEROKEE FRESH MARKETCherokee Farm Bureau, supporting local agriculture, spon-sors the event. Vendors may participate in selling items at no charge. Everyone must comply with Department of Agricul-ture regulations, but it’s easy for just about anyone to sell items from their own home gardens or share the products of Georgia-grown produce such as jams, jellies, or fresh-baked breads. The market runs every Saturday 8:30AM to about noon through September 1st. Our location is at 362 Stringer Road, Canton under the big yellow tent. Locals will recognize this as Cagle’s Family Farm, a local family farm operation. The Cagles not only provide the space, but family members also sell items from the farm at the Cherokee Fresh Market. There are farm tours on the second and fourth Saturdays every month timed to coin-cide with the market, so families can come out and enjoy what the farm has to offer and then take a piece of it home. Weekly special events will include a beginning gardener’s workshop on the opening Saturday of May 26th, a beekeeping introduc-tion on June 16th, and various other events familiar from years past, including tractor day and pie day. If you’re interested in buying or selling these local items or finding out more about these special events, the best way is to contact the Cherokee County Farm Bureau office at (770) 479-1481 or one of the lo-cal Farm Bureau members acting as event organizers: Liz Por-ter, 678-491-5843, [email protected], or Jared A. Chambers, 404-388-9986, jared_a_chambers @yahoo.com.WOODSTOCK ANGELSIf you knit, sew or crochet or want to learn, please come and visit our group. We are volunteers who make baby items (hats, booties and blankets and sweaters) for newborn babies at lo-cal hospitals. We meet at Woodstock Estates Assisted Living home on Professional Parkway in Woodstock, the 2nd Thurs-day of each month from 10 a.m. to 12 noon. We also do chemo hats and blankets for patients at Northside Hospital. We are in our 9th year of volunteering for this worthy cause. Please call Nancy at 678-324-6211 for more information.ELM STREET CuLTuRAL ARTS VILLAGE

(Formerly known as Towne Lake Arts Center)8534 Main St Woodstock, presents:

Aladdin and the Magic LampPoor Aladdin meets the Genie of the Ring and the Genie of the Lamp while trying to win the hand of a princess. A comic telling of the famous fairy tale. July 11-25 Wednesdays at 10am Sat-urdays and Sundays at 2pm All seats $9 online in advance or $11 at the door Held at City Center 8534 Main Street Woodstock www.elmstreetarts.org 678-494-4251.

Teen IMPROV CampWant to learn how to think on your feet? Perform an unscripted play in seconds? You’ll learn comic timing, scene building, group mind, and many other improv games and techniques used in shows like “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” No experience needed! Taught by Siobhan Brumbelow and Joe Lemmo of the iThink Im-prov Troupe. July 16-20, 2012 from 4:00-7:00pm Ages 13-18 Camp price is $100 for the week. Includes materials, shirt, and DVD of performance held on Friday, July 20th at 7:30pm. For details go to www.elmstreetarts.org or call 678-494-4251 Held at City Center 8534 Main St Woodstock.

Summer Drama CampsThe only drama camp of its kind in Metro Atlanta - often imitated but never duplicated! For ages 5-7 and 8-14, campers write, produce and perform a musical play in only 5 days! All mate-rials, DVD of final show, family and friends see your show for free. Learn skills for stage and for life. For details go to www.elmstreetarts.org or call 678-494-4251 Held at City Center 8534 Main St Woodstock.BALL GROuND NETWORKING GROuPIf you haven’t been to this networking group yet, please join us! We are a great group of businesses that support each other AND have fun doing it! We meet on Wednesday a.m. at 8:00 at the Freedom’s Light Church of God off Marion Spence Rd. In. Ball Ground. This is a great way to meet some other local business people and promote your Company! Contact Sheila Randall 678-454-4444.

BALL GROuND LIONS CLuBBall Ground Lions Club is alive & active! From a membership of 5 in January 2009, we have grown to 21 in January 2011. Many service projects have been completed this past year in-cluding adorning Downtown with American Flags on patriotic holidays; participating in Wreaths Across America at GA Na-tional Cemetery; sponsoring a local 12 year boy to attend sum-mer camp at GA Lions Camp for the Blind; and serving 23 chil-dren & 5 adults for Christmas. The Lions collect eyeglasses, cell phones & hearing aids for the disadvantaged. The primary focus for our Club is our local Community. If you would like to be involved in serving the needs of Ball Ground, please contact Sue Densmore, Membership Director at 678-773-1168. The more helping hands we have, the more we can accomplish. Our dues are affordable; the results are remarkable.PILOT CLuB OF CHEROKEE COuNTY The Pilot Club of Cherokee County, Inc. provides community service in Cherokee County. We have monthly dinner meet-ings on the 2nd Tuesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at IHOP in Canton (exit 19 off I-575). If you are looking for a way to meet other community leaders, give community SERVICE and have a great time doing it, and making lifelong FRIENDS, you belong in Pilot and WE NEED YOU! For more information about the Pilot Club of Cherokee County you may email us at [email protected] or call Sue McConnell, Membership Chair 770-752-9935 or Kirsten Jorgenson, President 404-202-6862.

ATLANTA WW II ROuND TABLEThe Atlanta WW II Round Table meets on the third Thursday of each month September through June. Lunch meetings are at the Petite Au Berge Restaurant, 2935 N. Druid Hills Rd., Atlanta, GA. Meeting start time is 11:30AM. Please call Adju-tant John Kovach at 770-928-4579 for additional information or visit our Web Site at: http://www.atlantawwiiroundtable.org All those interested in the living history of WW II, all veterans and non-veterans are welcome.GARDENING WITH THE MASTERS 2012 SEMINARSPrograms are held at the following locations: Hickory Flat Li-brary (HF) 2740 East Cherokee Drive, Canton; Senior Cen-ter (SC) 1001 Univeter Road, Canton; Ball Ground Commu-nity Center (BG) 250 Civic Drive, Ball Ground; Rose Creek Library (RC) 4476 Towne Lake Parkway, Woodstock; YMCA (Y) 151 Waleska Street, Canton; Woodmont Golf Club (WGC) 3105 Gaddis Rd., Canton; Porter farm (P), McLaughlin home (M). Saturday morning programs start at 10:00 am and Tues-day evening programs start at 7:00pm. Programs are free of charge, unless otherwise noted or if supplies are necessary. Pay close attention to day of week, time & location. Limited seating, registration is encouraged. If we do not have ten (10) registered one week prior to the seminar, the seminar will be cancelled. To register call the Extension office, (770)479-0418, email: [email protected] , fax information to (770)479-0565 or visit our website www.caes.uga.edu/extension/cherokee.Daylilies--Saturday, June 16 (M) Visit an expert grower at home to learn how to successfully incorporate daylilies into your landscape.Waterwise Gardening--Saturday, July 14 (RC) Learn how to maximize water use in your garden and landscape during dry conditions.Fall & Winter Vegetable Gardening--Saturday, August 18 (RC)What to plant, when to plant it, and how to care for a bountiful tasty harvest!Composting & Vermiculture--Tuesday, August 28 (WGC) Turn yard waste & kitchen scraps into “gold”.SHADE GARDENING--Saturday, September 8 (BG) Learn the plants that live best in shade or partial shade.GARDENING ON A SHOESTRING--Tuesday, September 25 (WGC) Gardening for those who don’t want to spend a lot of money, but don’t mind getting their hands dirty.FRUIT & BERRY GARDENING--Saturday, October 13 (HF)Learn how to add and care for edible plants in your land-scape.

DEAR PAW’S CORNER: Our town has des-ignated a small park near my home as a place where dogs are allowed. It’s not an official dog park, and because it also has a playground at one corner, many of us who visit have agreed that, if children are present, our dogs will be on leashes so as not to cause a problem. We’ve found the best way to allow our dogs to run free is to show up very early, when kids aren’t pres-ent. And we pick up after our dogs so the park remains a pleasant place for all.

But there’s one person who doesn’t respect this agreement. He lets his dog poop wherever and never picks up after it, brings his dog at all hours and lets it run off the leash when kids are around. Is there anything we can do to stop this? -- Naomi in Newton, Mass.

DEAR NAOMI: Have you approached him di-rectly? If he doesn’t know that you and other fel-low dog-owners have set up unwritten rules on managing the dogs’ conduct, he won’t know about

the leash rule you’ve established. Remind him that it’s good manners and common sense to pick up after his dog, particularly in a park where kids run and play. In many communities, it’s a ticketable of-fense not to pick up after your dog.

If he ignores the request, make it again. Explain that the rules were put together in order to keep the park open to dogs -- if there are too many com-plaints, the city could ban pets from the park. If you can’t convince him, your group may have to form a more official club with written rules, in or-der to negotiate with both the city and boorish dog owners.

Send your questions or tips to [email protected], or write to Paw’s Corner, c/o King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Orlando, FL 32853-6475. For more pet care-related advice and information, visit www.pawscorner.com.

(c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

PAWS CORNERBy Sam Mazzotta

Confronting a Rude Dog-Park Denizen

Page 7: Tidbits of Cherokee County, July 2, 2012

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ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Be pre-pared to face some challenges stirred up by an envious colleague. Your best defense is the Arian’s innate honesty. Stick with the truth, and you’ll come out ahead.TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Your sensitivity to the needs of others is ad-mirable. But be careful to avoid those who would take unfair advantage of your good nature, especially where money is involved.GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Having an optimistic attitude is fine, as far as it goes. But don’t be lulled into a false sense of confidence. There are still problems to deal with before you can totally relax.CANCER (June 21 to July 22) You might feel somewhat “crabby,” as you fuss over plans that don’t seem to work out. Maybe you’re trying too hard. Ease up and let things happen without forcing them.LEO (July 23 to August 22) Heed that keen Leonine instinct. It’s trying to tell you to delay making a decision until you’re sure there are no hidden prob-lems that could cause trouble later on.VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) This is a good time to reach out to those who might be nursing hurt feel-ings over recent events. Best advice: Ignore any pettiness that could delay the healing process.LIBRA (September 23 to October 22)

Your understanding helps a colleague get through a difficult period. Although you didn’t do it for a reward, be as-sured that your actions will be repaid down the line.SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) You score some high marks in the workplace, which will count in your favor when you face the possibility of changing direction on your current ca-reer path.SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Your goal lies straight ahead. Stay focused on it and avoid distractions that could throw off your aim and cause potentially detrimental delays.CAPRICORN (December 22 to Janu-ary 19) Keep that burst of exuberance in check and resist pushing through your new project before it’s ready. In your personal life, a family member again needs help.AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Paying attention to your work is important this week. But so are your relationships with those special people in your life. Make time for them as well.PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Good news. Someone is about to repay a long-standing debt. But be warned. That same someone could try to charm you into lending it back unless you say no and mean it.BORN THIS WEEK: You are sensi-tive to matters that involve your home and family. You would make a fine family-court judge or social worker.

(c) 2012 King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Grandparent Scam

There’s a new twist on an old scam on seniors. The “grandparents scam” has taken a very creative turn. In the typical grandparents scam, a “grandchild” will

call his grandparent and claim that there’s an emergency and that money must be wired to solve the problem. Dif-ferent versions have the grandchild either in jail, stuck in a foreign country, in an accident ... it doesn’t matter, but money needs to be sent immediately.Generally a “Hi, grandma” is enough to convince a se-

nior that it is indeed his or her grandchild on the phone. Too many times the grandparent doesn’t ask enough questions. And too often, thousands of times a year, the grandparent will send the money ... to scammers. It’s not the grandchild on the line -- it’s thieves.Now there’s a new version of this scam. Not only do

the thieves know the grandchild’s name and school, they have his or her voice asking you for money for the emergency.You can thank the Internet for that. If a grandchild has

posted anything online that includes their voice, scam-mers can use that recording to create an emergency

message, all in your grandchild’s voice. All of these scams have some things in common. It’s

an emergency. Money must be wired right away. If it’s not the grandchild, the scammer could claim to be an attorney or another relative. And there is a need for se-crecy (“Don’t tell mom!”) You do need to consult others, though. If you get a

call like this, contact the grandchild’s parents and ask what’s going on. If they’re not home, call the police.Do not send money. These thieves work out of foreign

countries, and you will never get your money back.

Matilda Charles regrets that she cannot personally answer reader questions, but will incorporate them into her column whenever possible. Write to her in care of King Features Weekly Service, P.O. Box 536475, Or-lando, FL 32853-6475, or send e-mail to [email protected].

(c) 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

FIREWORKSWhat better way to celebrate Indepen-dence Day than with fireworks? Here’s some information about the dynamic displays that light up the night sky.• It’s thought that gunpowder originated inChina about 1000 A.D. Firecrackers con-sisted of bamboo shoots filled with black powder and were used to celebrate the new year. Early fireworks were not the colorful ones we know today, rather just loud explosions designed to scare away evil spirits.• China remains the largest producer of fireworks, making about 90 percent of the world’s supply. America imports close to $200 million worth of fireworks each year and manufactures over $230 million of fireworks as well.• Color was first added to fireworks in Italy in the 1830s. Different metals are responsible for the variety of colors we see lighting up the sky. Copper creates blue, barium produces green, calcium is responsible for orange, and sodium makes yellow. The addition of aluminum and titanium will add bright white to the display, and a mix of strontium salts and lithium salts will produce red.• Sparklers were created around 1880, andwhile they may seem tame in comparison to other fireworks, sparklers actually burn at temperatures exceeding 2,000° F., over 15 times the boiling point of water. Just three sparklers burning together produce the same heat as a blowtorch! Children under five receive the most injuries from this source.• The black powder used in the manu-facture of fireworks is classified as “low explosive.” This means its detonation velocity is about 100 yards per second.

Dynamite falls into the category of “high explosive” with a speed of greater than 1,000 yards per second.• The illegal M-80 fireworks, which sim-ulate the sound of gunfire, are officially known as “military rifle fire simulators.”• A record-setting fireworks display was set off in Portugal in 2006, consisting of 66,326 fireworks.• When King Louis XVI of France mar-ried Marie Antoinette in 1770, an impres-sive fireworks show of 20,000 rockets followed the ceremony to celebrate the union. More than 200,000 people packed Paris’ Place de la Concorde to view the display. However, tragedy struck after-ward when a stampede occurred as people left the area, resulting in 800 deaths.• Those who manufacture and set off fire-works must wear only cotton clothing, due to the fact that static electricity in synthetic fabrics can ignite firecrackers.• Recent studies have shown that colored smoke from fireworks can be damaging to the cells that line the lungs. Breathing the smoke can be toxic to the epithelial cells, with orange cited as the most dangerous, followed by violet, red and yellow.• Every year, Disney World produces upwards of 1,000 fireworks shows. Be-ginning in 2004, Disney started using compressed air rather than gunpowder to launch fireworks, resulting in a reduction of smoke and fumes. This, along with electronic timers, increased the accuracy of the timing, enabling perfect choreogra-phy to music.• Although there are more than 6,000 fire-worksrelated injuries in the United States every year, the rate is actually on the de-cline, probably because the public’s pref-erence has switched from the backyard variety to large professional shows.

Page 8: Tidbits of Cherokee County, July 2, 2012

Page 8 • www.tidbitscherokee.com • Tidbits® of Cherokee County

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Little River ES Raises Money for St. Judes Children’s Hospital

—27—

HOLLYWOOD — NBC is taking a cue from “Grimm” to give us a show about —cannibalism! And who’s better known than Hannibal the Cannibal from “Silence of the Lambs”? NBC has ordered 13 “Hannibal” epi-sodes for mid-season and cast 46-year-old Danish actor Mads Mikkelsen in the lead role. The Cannes Film Festival jury just hand-ed Mikkelsen top acting honors for “The Hunt,” in which he skillfully played a man faced with public hys-teria after being accused of child molestation.

Mikkelsen took on James Bond in 2006’s “Casino Royale,” and was the leader of the King’s Guard in 2010’s “Clash of the Titans.” In August, he films “Thor 2” with Chris Hem-sworth, Natalie Portman and — what do you know — Anthony Hopkins! Who better to get Hannibal Lecter tips from than the man who won his Oscar for creating him? We’ll see “Hannibal” long before “Thor 2” is released in November 2013. There’s gonna be a lot more vegetarians after this show comes out!

***

Woody Allen is com-ing home after making his past three films in London

(“You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger”), Paris (“Mid-night in Paris”) and Italy (“To Rome With Love”). His next, still untitled film will star stand-up comics Louis C.K. and Andrew Dice Clay, as well as “30 Rock’s” Alec Baldwin (also in “To Rome with Love”), Oscar winner Cate Blanch-ett, “Will & Grace’s” Bob-by Cannavale and “Green

Lantern’s” Peter Sars-gaard. It’s being shot in Barcelona, Paris and Rome, as well as New York and San Francisco.

Woody also has signed former “Doogie Howser, M.D.’s” Max Casella to co-star. Where has Max been since “Doogie” ended in ‘93? He played opposite Johnny Depp in “Ed Wood” (‘94) and played Pvt. Papa-relli in “Sgt. Bilko” (‘96). In

1997, he created the role of Timon on Broadway in “The Lion King,” for which he won a Theatre Guild Award. In ‘99 he did “Analyze This” with Robert DeNiro and Billy Crystal, and in 2000, he did the revival of “The Music Man.” In ‘02 he joined “The Sopranos” (in its 3rd season) as Benny Fazio, did the ESPN series “The Bronx Is Burning” in ‘07, voiced the penguin in the animated “The Little Mermaid II: Return to the Sea,” was in “Leather-heads” with George Cloo-ney (2008) and now appears as Leo D’Alessio on HBO’s “Boardwalk Empire.”

Max lives in NYC with his wife and two children, while his “Doogie” co-star Neil Patrick Harris lives in L.A. with his husband, David Burtka, and their two children ... talk about going in different direc-tions!

Woody also has adapted “Bullets Over Broadway” as a musical, and it’ll open — on Broadway — some-time in 2013. It’s worth a shot!

Send letters to Tony Rizzo’s Hollywood, 8306 Wilshire Blvd., No. 362, Beverly Hills, CA 90211.

© 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

Mads Mikkelsen

1. Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted ............ (PG)animated2. Prometheus ............ (R)Noomi Rapace, Michael Fassbender3. Snow White and the Huntsman .....(PG-13)Kristen Stewart, Chris Hemsworth4. Men in Black III .........................(PG-13)Will Smith, Tommy Lee Jones5. Marvel’s The Avengers ..............(PG-13)Robert Downey Jr., Chris Evans6. The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel ...(PG-13)Judi Dench, Bill Nighy7. What to Expect When You’re Expecting (PG-13)Cameron Diaz, Jennifer Lopez8. Battleship ........(PG-13)Taylor Kitsch, Alexander Skarsgard9. The Dictator ........... (R)Sacha Baron Cohen, Jason Mantzoukas10. Moonrise Kingdom .............(PG-13)Bruce Willis, Edward Norton

© 2012 King Features Synd., Inc.

King Features Weekly Service

June 18, 2012

In order to decrease the number of students checking into school late, the Holly Springs PTA kicked off an incentive program following Fall Break. Every Holly Springs ES stu-dent without any late check-ins their name put into a hat, and one student’s name from each grade was drawn. With the support of Ashley Limousine and Shane’s Rib Shack, the seven students whose names were drawn enjoyed a limousine ride and lunch with Principal Dr. Dianne Stein-beck on Wednesday, May 16, 2012. The school saw a dra-matic decrease in late check-ins. From left to right: Mallory Richmond, Dr. Dianne Steinbeck, Ava Miller, Sheridan Clark, Dietrich Winant, Maddison Hardwick, Megan Gehrsitz and Gabriel Gunter

Ball Ground Elementary to OpenIn New School Building

Holly Springs ES Reduces Late Check-Ins

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Little River Elementary School recently held a fundraiser sponsored by the Student Council in support of St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. The Student Council on May 10, 2012 presented a check for $3,668.67 to St. Jude’s that was accepted on the hospital’s behalf by Andrew Vassil and his family and Ellison White, a St. Jude representative. Andrew is a cancer survi-vor who received treatment at St. Jude and lives in the local area. “This fundraiser was about much more than raising money for the hospital, it was about increasing awareness and allowing children the opportunity to be a part of something special that helps others,” Principal Christian Kirby said. PHOTO 1: Students from left to right, front row: Maariya Moiz, Isabelle Keenum, Derrick Novak, Paige Ewald and Rick Miroshkin; second row: Mason Sass, Lawson Campagna, Kyla Anderson, Chase Begin, Jacob Morrison, Chase Lussier, Caleb MacCracken, Erika Addington, Kirklyn Thacker and Macy Kelly; and back row: Andrew Vassil, Dina Vassil, Vince Vassil, Principal Christian Kirby, Angelica Millen, Amani Moin, Ethan Anderson, Mary Martha Milcoff, Meghan Salain, Lauren Faucett, Chandler Furr and Ellison White.

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The Cherokee County School District is preparing to open the new/replacement Ball Ground Elementary School for the 2012-13 School Year. Construction of the new/replacement Ball Ground ES was funded by Education SPLOST (Special Purpose Local Option Sales Tax) revenues. The new school is 146,403 square feet constructed on 25 acres and has the capacity to serve 1,200 students.