The new yorker visual design

of 4 /4
Visual Design and Style Visual Design and Style The New Yorker Magazine The New Yorker Magazine The New Yorker Magazine The New Yorker Magazine James Petersen ETEC 620 Fall 2011

Transcript of The new yorker visual design

Page 1: The new yorker visual design

Visual Design and StyleVisual Design and StyleThe New Yorker MagazineThe New Yorker MagazineThe New Yorker MagazineThe New Yorker Magazine

James PetersenETEC 620Fall 2011

Page 2: The new yorker visual design

One uncommonly formal feature of the magazine's in-house style is the placement of diaeresis marks in words with repeating vowels—such as reëlected, preëminent and coöperate—in which the two vowel letters indicate separate vowel sounds.

The magazine also continues to use a few spellings that are otherwise little used, such as "focusses" and "venders".

The magazine also spells out the names of numbers, such as "twenty-five hundred" instead of "2500", even for very large figures. It also spells out professional sports leagues with periods, e.g. N.B.A.

Style - The New Yorker

Page 3: The new yorker visual design

Style IIThe New Yorker's signature display typeface, used for its nameplate and headlines and the masthead above The Talk of the Town section, is Irvin, named after its creator, the designer-illustrator Rea Irvin.

The body text of all articles in The New Yorker is set in Adobe Caslon.

Page 4: The new yorker visual design

Style IIIThe magazine does not put the titles of plays or books in italics but simply sets them off with quotation marks.

When referring to other publications that include locations in their names, it uses italics only for the "non-location" portion of the name, such as the Los Angeles Times or the Chicago Tribune.