Telling Your Data Story: Collection Through Reporting Marianne Moore, VDOE Paul Raskopf, VDOE...

Click here to load reader

  • date post

    26-Mar-2015
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    214
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of Telling Your Data Story: Collection Through Reporting Marianne Moore, VDOE Paul Raskopf, VDOE...

  • Slide 1

Telling Your Data Story: Collection Through Reporting Marianne Moore, VDOE Paul Raskopf, VDOE Elizabeth Evans Getzel, VCU-RRTC Transition Forum 2010 Roanoke, VA Slide 2 March 16 VTF 2010 Objectives: Understand the new language for the Secondary Indicators Know how the data will be collected Know what the data collection tools are and how they are used Become familiar with the analysis tools VDOE has developed Know how data is reported and begin to develop your data story. Slide 3 March 16 VTF 2010 You cannot tell your data story if you do not Understand the Indicators and how they influence your data story Know that there are more than four 1 through 8: FAPE in the LRE 9 &10: Disproportionate Representation 11 / Child Find: General Supervision 12 / Effective Transition (Part C to B) 13 through 14 / Effective Transition (Part B) 15 through 20 General Supervision Slide 4 March 16 VTF 2010 Graduation Indicator #1 Percent of youth with IEPs graduating from high school with a regular diploma States must report using the graduation rate calculation and timeline established by US ED under the Elementary Secondary Education Act (ESEA) calculation: Slide 5 March 16 VTF 2010 Graduation Rate the number of graduates in a given year divided by the number of graduates in that year, plus other completers that year, plus the number of 12 th, 11 th, 10 th, and 9 th grade dropouts. The numerator includes only Standard diplomas and Advanced Studies diplomas. It accounts for students that may take longer to graduate. Slide 6 March 16 VTF 2010 The percentage of students who graduate from secondary school with a regular diploma in the standard number of years. Section 1111(b)(2)(C)(vi) of ESEA Graduation Rate: ESEA Slide 7 March 16 VTF 2010 Graduation: ESEA Under 34 C.F.R. 200.19(b)(1)(iv), a regular high school diploma means the standard high school diploma awarded to students in a State that is fully aligned with the States Academic content standards and does not include a GED credential, certificate of attendance, or any alternative award. The term regular high school diploma also Includes a higher diploma that is awarded to students who complete requirements above and beyond what is required for a regular diploma. Slide 8 March 16 VTF 2010 Graduation See handout for other calculations Standard and Advanced Studies Diploma Graduates in Year X All Diploma Graduates & Completers + dropouts from the 12 th for Year X, 11 th grade Year X - 1, 10 th grade Year X - 2, & 9 th grade Year X- 3 Slide 9 March 16 VTF 2010 Graduation 200520062007200820092010 Target554345475053 Performance42434447 Slide 10 March 16 VTF 2010 Dropout Indicator #2 Percent of youth with IEPs dropping out of high school States must use the dropout data used in the ESEA graduation rate calculation and follow the timeline by US ED under ESEA Slide 11 March 16 VTF 2010 Dropout Dropout as an individual in grades 7-12 who was enrolled in school at some time during the previous school year and was not enrolled on October 1 of the current school year, or was not enrolled on October 1 of the previous school year although expected to be in the membership, has not graduated from high school or completed a state or district approved educational program and does not meet any of the exclusionary conditions: transfer to another public school district, private school or state or district approved education program, temporary school recognized absence due to suspension, illness or death. Slide 12 March 16 VTF 2010 Dropout Rate for Students with Disabilities 200520062007200820092010 Target1.931.911.891.871.851.83 Performance2.22.32.42.51 Slide 13 March 16 VTF 2010 Indicator 13: OLD Language 200520062007200820092010 Target100 Performance77708394 Percent of youth aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes coordinated, measurable, annual IEP goals and transition services that will reasonably enable the student to meet the post- secondary goals. Slide 14 March 16 VTF 2010 Indicator 13 Percent of youth with IEPs aged 16 and above with an IEP that includes appropriate measurable postsecondary goals that are annually updated and based upon an age appropriate transition assessment, transition services, including courses of study, that will reasonably enable the student to meet those postsecondary goals, and annual IEP goals related to the students transition services needs. There also must be evidence that the student was invited to the IEP Team meeting where transition services are to be discussed and evidence that a representative of any participating agency was invited to the IEP Team meeting with the prior consent of the parent or student who has reached the age of majority. (20 U.S.C. 1416(a)(3)(B)) appropriate measurable postsecondary goals annually updated based upon an age appropriate transition assessment transition services, including courses of study, that will reasonably enable the student to meet those postsecondary goals evidence that the student was invited to the IEP Team meeting evidence that a representative of any participating agency was invited to the IEP Team meeting with the prior consent of the parent or student who has reached the age of majority. annual IEP goals related to the students transition services needs Slide 15 March 16 VTF 2010 Indicator 13 Look at your Checklist. What questions will be used to compute your percent? 13 15 14 21 19 3 7a 7b Slide 16 March 16 VTF 2010 Indicator 13 Virginia Transition Requirements Checklist Online; Password Protected Online Tutorial 1:1 consultation via phone Limited face to face PD Self Assessment IEPs must be corrected in a timely manner Required data is extracted for the Annual Performance Report on JULY 15 Slide 17 March 16 VTF 2010 Indicator 13 It is a compliance indicator. Target is 100%. 20% 16 through 21 Across disabilities, proportionate Across schools Across settings Think dip stick JULY 15 FPM CAP: Correct actual IEP plus. Slide 18 March 16 VTF 2010 Indicator # 13 If you have NOT provided VDOE and the RRTC with contact information NAME, EMAIL, PHONE of contact person(s) You cannot get into the sites for both Indicators 13 & 14 Slide 19 March 16 VTF 2010 OLD Indicator #14 Language Percent of youth who had IEPs, are no longer in secondary school and who have been competitively employed, enrolled in some type of postsecondary school, or both, within one year of leaving high school. Slide 20 March 16 VTF 2010 Indicator 14 200520062007200820092010 Target60657085 Performance75.5 73.6 Slide 21 March 16 VTF 2010 New Language for Indicator #14 Percent of youth who are no longer in secondary school, had IEPs in effect at the time they left school and were: A. Enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school. B. Enrolled in higher education or competitively employed within one year of leaving high school. C. Enrolled in higher education or in some other postsecondary education or training program; or competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school. (20 U.S.C. 1416(a)(3)(B)) Slide 22 March 16 VTF 2010 1= # Higher Ed 2= #Competitive Employed 3 = #Postsecondary Education or Training 4 = # Other Employed # Other/Not Engaged (States are not required to report this #) A B C Total Respondents Slide 23 March 16 VTF 2010 School Leaver Leavers are students who exit school with a/an: Advanced Studies Diploma Standard Diploma Modified Standard Diploma Special Diploma Certification of Program Completion General Education Development Certificate (GED) General Achievement Diploma OR Drop Out age out of the eligibility for FAPE. Slide 24 March 16 VTF 2010 Definitions: Dropout An individual who was enrolled in school at some time during the previous school year and was not enrolled on October 1 of the current school year, or was not enrolled on October 1 of the previous school year although expected to be in membership; and has not graduated from high school or completed a state- or district-approved educational program; and does not meet any of the following exclusionary conditions: transfer to another public school district, private school, or state- or district-approved education program; temporary school-recognized absence due to suspension or illness or death. Slide 25 March 16 VTF 2010 Definitions: Competitive Employment It is, work in the (i) competitive labor market that is performed on a full-time (35 hours or more per week) or part-time (less than 35 hours per week) basis in an integrated setting; and (ii) for which an individual is compensated at or above minimum wage, but not less than the customary wage and level of benefits paid by the employer for the same or similar work performed by individuals who are not disabled. Slide 26 March 16 VTF 2010 Employment Either ninety (90) cumulative days or three months of continuous work at an average of 20 hours per week. 20 hours a week includes: 1)At least 20 hours a week for 90 cumulative days; 2)20 hours or more a week for 90 cumulative days; 3)An average of 20 hours a week for 90 cumulative days. Slide 27 March 16 VTF 2010 Employment If the youth is working less than 20 hours a week, even if employment has been for 90 cumulative days, it will be calculated assome other employment, because the youth is working 16 hours per week rather than 20 hours per week and thus not meeting the definition of competitive employment. Slide 28 March 16 VTF 2010 Definitions : Higher Education engaged in higher education means a student who is enrolled in a two- or four-year degreed program provided by a community or technical college (two-year) and/or college/university (four- or more year program). Other postsecondary education or training includes all other postsecondary education or training programs. These may include, but are not are limited, to: Compensatory education programs; High school completion document or certificate classes (e.g., Adult Basic Education