Switchcraft Straight Toggle Switchcraft Short Toggle...

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George Ellison --- Switchcraft Toggle Switches 8/4/17 - DATE TITLE PAGE ADOC DRAWN ASSY PN © Tone Shapers, Inc. - All Rights Reserved PAGE 1 of 1 Switchcraft Straight Toggle This is the switch that Gibson traditionally used in carved-top Les Pauls (Standard, Custom, Deluxe). This is a long switch, so care should be taken to ensure it will fit in your guitar. Deep nut required. Switchcraft Short Toggle This is similar to the switch above, though it is shorter overall while having a longer threaded bushing. Gibson is now using this switch in many of the current Les Paul models. It’s also a good choice for shallower guitars where the switch above is too long to fit, but where a straight switch is desired. Switchcraft Right-Angle Toggle This switch is the shallowest of the three, so it’s the switch that’s often found in thinner Gibson guitars such as SGs and ES-335s. Deep nut required. above the guitar’s top, making the installation of the stock knurled nut impossible. The solution is to use the deep nut shown below. As you can see, the threads inside the deep nut extend down into the hole in order to engage the switch’s threaded bushing. This nut is not needed on the Short toggle, since it has a longer threaded bushing (.34”). Mounting Switchcraft Toggles Switchcraft’s toggle switches were originally designed to mount to thin metal panels, such as electronic equipment control panels of the 1940s and 1950s. The long Switchcraft toggles were used on Les Pauls beginning in 1952, and as Gibson introduced other, thinner guitars like the Les Paul Special, ES-335, and SG in the later 1950s and 1960s, they started using the right-angle version of the Switchcraft toggles. Regarding the original Straight and Right Angle toggles, the fact that the switches were originally designed to mount to thin metal panels causes a problem, as the tops of wooden guitars are not as thin as sheetmetal panels. The threaded bushing of the Switchcraft toggles is not long enough for the threads to protrude
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Transcript of Switchcraft Straight Toggle Switchcraft Short Toggle...

  • George Ellison

    ---

    SwitchcraftToggle Switches

    8/4/17

    -

    DATE TITLE

    PAGE

    ADOC

    DRAWN

    ASSY PN

    Tone Shapers, Inc. - All Rights Reserved PAGE 1 of 1

    Switchcraft Straight ToggleThis is the switch that Gibson traditionally used in carved-top Les Pauls (Standard, Custom, Deluxe). This is a long switch, so care should be taken to ensure it will fit in your guitar.

    Deep nut required.

    Switchcraft Short ToggleThis is similar to the switch above, though it is shorter overall while having a longer threaded bushing. Gibson is now using this switch in many of the current Les Paul models. Its also a good choice for shallower guitars where the switch above is too long to fit, but where a straight switch is desired.

    Switchcraft Right-Angle ToggleThis switch is the shallowest of the three, so its the switch thats often found in thinner Gibson guitars such as SGs and ES-335s.

    Deep nut required.

    above the guitars top, making the installation of the stock knurlednut impossible.

    The solution is to use the deep nut shown below. As you can see, the threads inside the deep nut extend down into the hole in order to engage the switchs threaded bushing. This nut is not needed on the Short toggle, since it has a longer threaded bushing (.34).

    Mounting Switchcraft TogglesSwitchcrafts toggle switches were originally designed to mount to thin metal panels, such as electronic equipment control panels of the 1940s and 1950s. The long Switchcraft toggles were used on Les Pauls beginning in 1952, and as Gibson introduced other, thinner guitars like the Les Paul Special, ES-335, and SG in the later 1950s and 1960s, they started using the right-angle version of the Switchcraft toggles.

    Regarding the original Straight and Right Angle toggles, the fact that the switches were originally designed to mount to thin metal panels causes a problem, as the tops of wooden guitars are not as thin as sheetmetal panels. The threaded bushing of the Switchcraft toggles is not long enough for the threads to protrude