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  • Interface: a journal for and about social movements Contents Volume 5 (1): i - iii (May 2013)

    i

    Interface volume 5 issue 1

    Struggles, strategies and analysis of

    anticolonial and postcolonial social movements

    Interface: a journal for and about social movements

    Volume 5 issue 1 (May 2013)

    ISSN 2009 – 2431

    Table of contents (pp. i – iii)

    Editorial

    Aziz Choudry, Mandisi Majavu, Lesley Wood, Struggles, strategies and analysis of anticolonial and postcolonial social movements (pp. 1 – 10)

    General material Call for papers (volume 6 issue 1): The pedagogical practices of social movements (pp. 11 – 13)

    Anticolonial and postcolonial social movements

    Dip Kapoor, Trans-local rural solidarity and an anticolonial politics of place: contesting colonial capital and the neoliberal state in India (peer reviewed article, pp. 14 – 39)

    Ian Hussey and Joe Curnow, Fair Trade, neo-colonial developmentalism, and racialized power relations (peer reviewed article, pp. 40 – 68)

    Julia Cantzler, The translation of Indigenous agency and innovation into political and cultural power: the case of Indigenous fishing rights in Australia (peer reviewed article, pp. 69 – 101)

    Hilde Stephansen, Starting from the Amazon: communication, knowledge and politics of place in the World Social Forum (peer reviewed article, pp. 102 – 127)

  • Interface: a journal for and about social movements Contents Volume 5 (1): i - iii (May 2013)

    ii

    David Austin, Aziz Choudry, Radha d’Souza and Sunera Thobani, Reflections on Fanon’s legacy (four short pieces, pp. 128 – 150)

    General articles

    Cynthia Cockburn, A movement stalled: outcomes of women’s campaign for equalities and inclusion in the Northern Ireland peace process (peer reviewed article, pp. 151 – 182)

    M. Dawn King, The role of societal attitudes and activists’ perceptions on effective judicial access for the LGBT movement in Chile (peer reviewed article, pp. 183 – 203)

    Paul Sneed, Infotainment and encounter in the pacification of Rocinha favela (peer reviewed article, pp. 204 – 228)

    Mark Stoddart and Howard Ramos, Going local: calls for local democracy and environmental governance at Jumbo Pass and the Tobeatic Wilderness Area (peer reviewed article, pp. 229 – 252)

    Anna Feigenbaum and Stevphen Shukaitis with Camille Barbagallo, Jaya Klara Brekke, Morgan Buck, Jamie Heckert, Malav Kanuga, Paul Rekret and Joshua Stephens, Writing in a movement: a roundtable on radical publishing and autonomous infrastructures (roundtable, pp. 253 – 271)

    Special contribution

    Tomás Mac Sheoin, Framing the movement, framing the protest: mass media coverage of the anti- globalisation movement (peer reviewed article, pp. 272 – 365)

    Reviews [single PDF] (pp. 366 – 388)

    Raúl Zibechi, Territories in resistance: a cartography of Latin American social movements. Reviewed by Colleen Hackett.

    Peter Dwyer and Leo Zeilig, African struggles today: social movements since Independence. Reviewed by Jonny Keyworth.

    D. Roderick Bush, The end of white supremacy: black internationalism and the problem of the color line. Reviewed by Hleziphi Naomie Nyanungo.

    Jean Muteba Rahier, Black social movements in Latin America: from monocultural mestizaje to multiculturalism. Reviewed by Mandisi Majavu.

  • Interface: a journal for and about social movements Contents Volume 5 (1): i - iii (May 2013)

    iii

    Christian Scholl, Two sides of a barricade: (dis)order and summit protest in Europe. Reviewed by Ana Margarida Esteves.

    Alice Te Punga Somerville. Once Were Pacific: Māori connections to Oceania. Reviewed by Ella Henry.

    General material List of editorial contacts [no PDF]

    List of journal participants [no PDF]

    Call for new participants [no PDF]

    Cover art

    Photo credit: Adrian A. Smith is an activist-scholar and image maker based in Canada. His written and photographic work engages with law and resistance. Adrian teaches in legal studies and political economy and is a member of Justicia For Migrant Workers, an anti-capitalist activist collective which supports migrant worker struggles. The cover image is taken at a political demonstration on Parliament Hill in Ottawa. To see more of his work please visit www.adriansmith.ca.

    About Interface

    Interface: a journal for and about social movements is a peer-reviewed journal of practitioner research produced by movement participants and engaged academics. Interface is globally organised in a series of different regional collectives, and is produced as a multilingual journal. Peer-reviewed articles have been subject to double-blind review by one researcher and one movement practitioner.

    The views expressed in any contributions to Interface: a journal for and about social movements are those of the authors and contributors, and do not necessarily represent those of Interface, the editors, the editorial collective, or the organizations to which the authors are affiliated. Interface is committed to the free exchange of ideas in the best tradition of intellectual and activist inquiry.

    The Interface website is based at the National University of Ireland Maynooth.

    http://www.adriansmith.ca/

  • Interface: a journal for and about social movements Editorial Volume 5 (1): 1 - 10 (May 2013) Choudry, Majavu,Wood, Anticolonial and postcolonial social movements

    1

    Struggles, strategies and analysis of anticolonial and postcolonial social movements

    Aziz Choudry, Mandisi Majavu, Lesley Wood As a political idea and a philosophical concept, postcolonialism has gained some level of popularity, particularly in academic circles. However, many grassroots activists and social movements from countries with colonial histories have not incorporated the concept in their vocabulary or political toolbox. Yet besides the knowledge and analysis that they are producing in their own struggles, activists in some of these movements are paying renewed attention to the ideas of anti-colonial thinkers such as Frantz Fanon and Amilcar Cabral, whose work calls into question the conceptual accuracy and appropriateness of the terms ‘postcolonialism’ and ‘postcolonial’ to describe the nature of the world today and the limits of liberation achieved. Theory building and critique is also coming from Indigenous scholars and activists (L.T. Smith, 1999; Venne, 2004; Jackson, 2004, 2007; Coulthard, 2011; Watson, 2007; A.Smith, 2005) and critical race feminists (Thobani, 2007) based in settler-colonial states such Australia, Canada, Aotearoa/New Zealand and the USA.

    There may be many reasons for a less-than-enthusiastic embrace of the term ‘postcolonial’ by such social movements. One reason is that postcolonial theorists tend to use opaque academic jargon to discuss what some may consider to be commonplace concerns. Another may be, according to Dirlik (1994: 329), that the popularity of the concept ‘postcolonial’ has

    less to do with its rigorousness as a concept or with the new vistas it has opened up for critical inquiry than it does with the increased visibility of academic intellectuals of Third World origin as pacesetters in cultural criticism.

    An example is that according to Henry Louis Gates Jr. (1991: 457), “Frantz Fanon has now been reinstated as a global theorist.” This is partly because postcolonial theorists such as Homi Bhabha have made Fanon fashionable in global academic circles. Yet unlike those postcolonial critics who use Fanon to give their writings an element of authenticity and radicalism, many social movements are engaging with thinkers like Fanon and Cabral to search for liberating theory.

    Notwithstanding the insistence by some scholars that postcolonialism is not a temporal concept the term postcolonial remains, in part, a problematic concept because colonialism still exists, something which many movements are all too aware. Indian journalist and activist Chakravarthi Raghavan (1990), for example, described economic globalization through the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT - now the World Trade Organization (WTO)) as ‘recolonization’ of the nominally independent states of the Third World. This frame is quite common in both scholarly literature and activist networks in the

  • Interface: a journal for and about social movements Editorial Volume 5 (1): 1 - 10 (May 2013) Choudry, Majavu,Wood, Anticolonial and postcolonial social movements

    2

    Third World (Shiva, 1997; Bagchi, 2005; D’Souza, 2006) – although some, such as the late Eqbal Ahmed (interviewed in Barsamian, 2000) ask whether it is accurate to talk of recolonization when they question if there was ever ‘decolonization’ in any real sense of the word.

    ‘Neo-colonialism’ is also used to describe 21st century colonialism. According to Pan-Africanist and Ghanaian independence movement leader Kwame Nkrumah (1965), neo-colonialism occurs when a country’s economic system and political policy is directed by outside forces. Although this direction can take various shapes, neo-colonialist control tends to be exercised through economic means. Radha D’Souza (2006) (see elsewhere in this issue) argues that the ‘development project’ is a post-war project of the elites, serving to reconstitute relations between the colonies and imperial powers and consolidat