St. Clair Hospital HouseCall Vol III Issue 2

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St. Clair Hospital's community newsletter sharing new medical technologies, patient stories and health tips.

Transcript of St. Clair Hospital HouseCall Vol III Issue 2

  • VOLUME II, ISSUE 2

    I N S I D E T H I S I S S U E

    ASK THE DOCTOR

    da VINCI Si SURGERY PATIENT PROFILE

    ST. CLAIRS OUTPATIENT LOCATIONS

    ER RANKED AMONG BEST IN U.S.

    COMMUNITY OUTREACH

    SUMMER SWING

    ST. CLAIR DOCTORS RECEIVE TOP RATINGS

    CONTINUED ON PAGE 7

    VOLUME III, ISSUE 2

    Surgeons at St. Clair Hospital are now using state-of-the-art robotic technology,the da Vinci Si, to provide the benefits of minimally invasive surgery to agrowing number of patients.

    Named after the famous Italian engineer, mathematician and scientist Leonardo

    da Vinci, the da Vinci System uses the most advanced technology to enable surgeons

    to perform delicate and complex operations through a few tiny incisions with

    increased vision, precision, dexterity and control.

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    Raye J. Budway, M.D., a 2011Pittsburgh Magazine Top Doctor, relocated her practice to St. Clair in April.

    Dr. Budway specializes in general and

    breast surgery and will lead St. Clairs

    Breast Care Center.

    As a participating surgeon in the recent

    National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and

    Bowel Projects (NSABP) clinical trials, her

    work has contributed to changes in the

    treatment protocols for breast cancera

    disease which affects more than 200,000

    women each year. The NSABP, which is

    supported by the National Cancer Institute,

    has published studies that have led to the

    establishment of lumpectomy with radiation

    over radical mastectomy as the standard

    surgical treatment for breast cancer, and

    DRS. ARTHUR THOMAS and KEVIN BORDEAU are among a growinggroup of surgeons at St. Clair Hospital using the da Vinci Si, theworlds most advanced robotic-assisted surgery system.

    CONTINUED ON PAGE 2

    Next generation surgery using the da Vinci Si

    LEADING TEC NOLOGY

    CONTINUED GROWTNew surgeon bolsters St. Clairsbreast surgery program

  • shorter hospital stay, and quicker recovery and return to everyday

    life. And, in men who have their prostates partially or fully

    removed, robotic-assisted surgery also can mean a faster

    return to urinary continence, lower rates of urinary pain, and

    sustainable erections.

    From the surgeons perspective, the benefits of robotic-

    assisted surgery start with the ability to see inside the human

    body at 10 times magnification. Moreover, the da Vinci Sis endo

    wrists enable the surgeon to sew sutures more precisely than by

    hand. Robotic-assisted surgery is more beneficial over traditional

    laparoscopic surgery in anything that requires sewing, Dr. Thomas

    says.

    Dr. Bordeau says a key to the success of the robotic-assisted

    program at St. Clair is the operating room personnel who have

    undergone extensive training with the da Vinci Si system.

    Several teams have been trained.

    Dr. Bordeau says those teams, and he and the other surgeons

    performing robotic-assisted surgery, will benefit from having the

    newest and best system and the added advantage of learning

    from the best practices.

    Y o u n g b a s e b a l l a n d s o f t b a l l p i t c h e r s a r e s u f f e r i n g

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    Arthur D. Thomas, M.D. earned his medical degree at the University ofPennsylvania School of Medicine and completed a residency in urologyat the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Thomas is boardcertified by the American Board of Urology and practices as part of TheCenter for Urologic Care, P.C.

    Kevin P. Bordeau, M.D. earned his medical degree at Tufts UniversitySchool of Medicine in Boston and completed a residency in urology atthe Eastern Virginia Medical School. Dr. Bordeau is board certified bythe American Board of Urology and practices as part of Sholder & BordeauUrologic Associates.

    LEADING TEC NOLOGYCONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

    The da Vinci is currently being used at St. Clair for urology

    procedures, such as prostatectomies (removal of the prostate

    gland, most often due to cancer), but the system is also designed

    for gynecology, cardiothoracic, head and neck and general

    surgery procedures. Gynecological surgeons at St. Clair are

    expected to be the next users of the new system.

    The da Vinci Si consists of four interactive robotic arms that

    are controlled by a surgeon who is seated at a console in the

    operating room. Three of the arms are for tools, such as a

    grasper and scissors, the fourth holds an endoscopic camera

    with two lenses that give the surgeon a 3-D image (at 10 times

    magnification) during the procedure. The system seamlessly

    translates the surgeons hand, wrist and finger movements into

    precise, real-time movements of surgical instruments. Every

    surgical maneuver is under the direct control of the surgeon.

    Repeated safety checks prevent any independent movement

    of the instruments or robotic arms.

    St. Clair urological surgeons, Arthur D. Thomas, M.D. and

    Kevin P. Bordeau, M.D., both of whom have years of experience

    with the da Vinci system, completed the Hospitals first robotic-

    assisted surgeries in April, performing radical prostatectomies

    on area men suffering from prostate cancer.

    Dr. Thomas says that in the last two years, robotic-assisted

    laparoscopic radical prostatectomies have become the No. 1

    treatment choice for localized prostate cancer, supplanting open

    surgery and various radiation options. The benefits of this

    minimally invasive surgery include less pain and blood loss, a

    Please see Patient Profile on Page 4.

  • m o r e i n j u r i e s f r o m o v e r u s e a n d i m p r o p e r t e c h n i q u e .

    Q:Im hearing more stories of youngbaseball and softball pitchers sufferingshoulder and elbow injuries. What is causing this jump in injuries?

    A: Travel and instructional teams have recently becomepopular in baseball and softball. In addition to their school

    and summer teams, some boys and girls are playing more

    baseball and softball than ever. More play may result in

    better performance. But for some, more play means more

    injuries, especially at the shoulder and elbow.

    Pitch count is very important. Most professional starting

    pitchers throw only 100 balls a game, then rest for five days.

    But some Little Leaguers throw many more, especially if they

    are the best pitchers on their respective teams. And while the

    windmill pitch used in softball may be somewhat safer than

    the overhead baseball pitch, I am seeing more girls with injuries

    after pitching several games in a week.

    Many dont know that pitching effectiveness comes from

    pitch placement and variation in pitch speed as much as simply

    bringing the heat. Effective starting pitchers in the big

    leagues rarely throw as hard as they can. Pitching mechanics

    are also very important to minimizing injury and several hours

    with a good pitching instructor is often time well spent in

    effectiveness and in avoiding or limiting injury.

    Throwing a ball causes huge forces at the shoulder and

    elbow that can easily cause injury. Anterior instability is the

    ball of the shoulder sliding out the front from its normal

    position. It can occur when the shoulder is placed beyond the

    limit of its normal range of motion. This may occur when a ball

    player reaches back to throw really hard. Throwers with

    anterior instability will report pain and sometimes a sensation

    ASK THE DOCTOR

    of the shoulder

    sliding out.

    Achy pain that

    persists for

    several hours

    or days after

    throwing is

    common. The

    medial collateral

    ligament (MCL)

    of the elbow

    can also be

    injured from

    throwing. This

    ligament is on the inside of the elbow and injury initially results

    in pain with hard throws. Pitch velocity is lost. A pop with

    immediate sharp pain is felt on the inside of the elbow if the

    MCL tears. Fortunately, this is uncommon and most patients

    have mild shoulder and elbow injuries. Then, a proper

    rehabilitation program and rest for a few weeks to a few

    months is often effective as first

    treatment. If this does not

    work, their evaluation by

    an orthopedic surgeon

    with expertise in shoulder

    and elbow problems is the

    next best step.

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    DR. PATRICK MCMAHON

    Please see Dr. McMahonsbiography on Page 8.

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    rST. CLAIR HOSPITALMT. LEBANON1000 Bower Hill RoadPittsburgh, PA 15243

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