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  • Socio-ecological Production Landscapes and Seascapes (SEPLS)

    in Africa

  • iSocio-ecological production landscapes and seascapes (SEPLS) in Africa

    Socio-ecological Production Landscapes and Seascapes (SEPLS)

    in Africa

  • ii Socio-ecological production landscapes and seascapes (SEPLS) in Africa

    Citation:

    UNU-IAS & IR3S/UTIAS 2016, Socio-ecological production landscapes and seascapes (SEPLS) in Africa. United Nations University Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability, Tokyo.

    © United Nations University

    ISBN (Hardcopy): 978-92-808-4569-3

    ISBN (eBook): 978-92-808-4564-8

    Editors:

    Yaw Agyeman Boafo (The Integrated Research System for Sustainability Science The University of Tokyo)

    Kaoru Ichikawa (United Nations University Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability)

    To contact the editors please email: [email protected]

    Editorial support:

    Caecilia Manago (United Nations University Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability)

    William Dunbar (United Nations University Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability)

    Ayami Imai (United Nations University Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability)

    Cover photo credits:

    (main photo) Yaw Agyeman Boafo

    (bottom photos from left to right) William Olupot, A Rocha Ghana, Yaw Agyeman Boafo, Laikipia Wildlife Forum, Environmental Protection Information Centre

    Printed and designed by:

    Xpress Print Pte Ltd, Singapore

  • iiiSocio-ecological production landscapes and seascapes (SEPLS) in Africa

    Satoyama Initiative

    The Satoyama Initiative is a global effort, first proposed jointly by the United Nations University and the Ministry of the Environment of Japan (MOEJ), to realize “societies in harmony with nature” and contribute to biodiversity conservation through the revitalization and sustainable management of “socio-ecological production landscapes and seascapes” (SEPLS). The United Nations University Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability (UNU-IAS) serves as the Secretariat of the International Partnership for the Satoyama Initiative (IPSI), an international partnership of organizations working to realize the vision of the Satoyama Initiative. The activities of the IPSI Secretariat are made possible through the financial contribution of the Ministry of the Environment, Japan.

    UNU-IAS

    The United Nations University Institute for the Advanced Study of Sustainability (UNU-IAS) is a leading research and teaching institute based in Tokyo, Japan. Its mission is to advance efforts towards a more sustainable future, through policy-relevant research and capacity development focused on sustainability and its social, economic and environmental dimensions. UNU-IAS serves the international community, making valuable and innovative contributions to high-level policymaking and debates within the UN system. The activities of the institute are in three thematic areas: sustainable societies, natural capital and biodiversity, and global change and resilience.

    IR3S/UTIAS

    The Integrated Research System for Sustainability Science (IR3S) is a secondary research institute under the umbrella of the University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study (UTIAS) which combines the world-leading research institutes within the University of Tokyo. IR3S was founded with a vision of building a sustainable society through linking global, social and human systems. While maintaining and developing research centers of transdisciplinary sustainability science of the highest global standards, it also aims to build an international meta-network that links research and educational institutions in developed and developing countries.

    The views expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the view of the United Nations University or the University of Tokyo.

  • iv Socio-ecological production landscapes and seascapes (SEPLS) in Africa

    CONTENTS

    Foreword v

    Preface vi

    Chapter 1: Understanding the current status, trends and efforts at revitalization of socio-ecological production landscapes and seascapes in Africa Yaw Agyeman Boafo, Kaoru Ichikawa, William Dunbar, Caecilia Manago 01

    Chapter 2: Sacred forests: valorization of traditional knowledge associated with genetic resources for sustainable management Achille Orphée Lokossou, Bienvenu Mensah Bossou 12

    Chapter 3: The Bogo landscape in Cameroon drylands: contribution of local communities to adaptive management Marie-Laure Mpeck Nyemeck, Aimé Kamga Fogue, Mesmin Tchindjang, Martin Zeh Nlo 18

    Chapter 4: Home garden agroforestry practices in the Gedeo zone, Ethiopia: a sustainable land management system for socio-ecological benefits Sileshi Degefa 28

    Chapter 5: Torwards sustainable livelihood and environental management in the Gilgil Gibe 1 catchment: Oromia Region, Jimma Zone, Ethiopia Zeleke Tesfaye 37

    Chapter 6: Compound farming systems in semi-arid Ghana: a socio-ecological production landscape in decline Yaw Agyeman Boafo, Romanus Ziem, Abdallah Alhassan 44

    Chapter 7: The Weto socio-ecological production landscape in the mid-Volta region George Ortsin 52

    Chapter 8: Community sacred forest in the Effutu traditional area, Central region, Ghana Jacqueline Kumadoh 59

    Chapter 9: Kaya forests: role in climate change adaptation among the Mijikenda community Chemuku Wekesa, Leila Ndalilo, Krystyna Swiderska 66

    Chapter 10: Conservation for tourism in Kenyan rangelands: a new threat to pastoral community livelihoods Mordecai O. Ogada 75

    Chapter 11: Improving natural resource management and biodiversity conservation in the Laikipia county ecosystem, Kenya Josephat M. Musyima 83

    Chapter 12: Parklands, pasturelands, paddy rice fields, and coffee gardens as existing or potential agricultural socio-ecological production landscapes William Olupot 91

    Chapter 13: Natural resources management by Rwoho forest edge communities, Uganda Imran Ahimbisibwe 101

  • vSocio-ecological production landscapes and seascapes (SEPLS) in Africa

    FOREWORD

    Over the last three decades, humans have acknowledged the growing imbalance in their relationship with nature and their central role in heralding this ongoing change. The evidence showing the rapid and irreversible decline and degradation of ecosystems and their services and loss of biodiversity across many socio-ecological regions of the world is ubiquitous. Thus, the many global agreements, policies and protocols, strategies, plans, programs, and projects aimed at documenting, communicating, and developing understanding as well as sharing knowledge on the importance of biodiversity and ecosystem services for human well-being form a step in the right direction. The Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA) was one such international effort, the findings of which provided the basis for a new perspective on ecosystems. Such findings should be mainstreamed into policy and decision-making and should engage multi-level stakeholders to be useful and effective on the ground at the local level.

    It is against this backdrop that I have been highly impressed with the effort of the Satoyama Initiative (SI) through the International Partnership for the Satoyama Initiative (IPSI). IPSI was established at the 10th Conference of Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD-COP 10) during 2010 in Nagoya, Japan, with the aim of contributing to the realization of societies in harmony with nature through the conservation and advancement of socio-ecological production landscapes and seascapes (SEPLS) at the local level. As chair of the IPSI Steering Committee, I have witnessed the active engagement and collaboration of the initiative with multi-sectoral and multi-stakeholder partners from academia, development agencies, non-governmental organizations, and government agencies to compile, synthesize, and share knowledge on the state, trends, and future of SEPLS across the world, thereby leading to the building of unique case studies.

    This publication aims at contributing to the knowledge and understanding of the benefits of SEPLS in terms of sustainability and human well-being, the current state and threats to SEPLS and its impact to biodiversity and ecosystems, as well as efforts toward revitalization in Africa. The majority of the case studies presented in this publication are based on presentations made by invited experts from Africa at the first Satoyama Initiative Regional Workshop in Africa, which was held in Accra, Ghana, from August 10 to 12, 2015.

    I would like to congratulate the authors for their submissions and commend them for painstakingly addressing the comments and suggestions on the earlier drafts of their manuscripts. Compiling this publication will not have been possible without their commitment and dedication. I heartily thank the IPSI Secretariat at UNU-IAS for the tireless work, commitment, and execution of the Satoyama Initiative.

    I recommend this publication to the general reading public, development practitioners, scientists, and policy and decision-makers. I am optimistic that the information placed in this publication will go a long way in creating awareness, informing policy and decision-making processes on biodiversity and ecosystem services in order to facilitate further sustainable use and management of production landscapes and seascapes across Africa.

    Prof. Alfred Oteng-Yeboah Chairman, Ghana