Snippetz Issue 558

download Snippetz Issue 558

of 16

  • date post

    28-Mar-2016
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    216
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

description

SNIPPETZ IS COWBOYIN' UP!

Transcript of Snippetz Issue 558

  • 719-488-1400

    www.monumentcoins.commonumentcoins@gmail.com

    In the MONTEVERDE Center325 2nd St. Suite U,

    Monument Co

    NOW OPEN MONUMENT COINSBuy Sell TradeCoins, Gold & Silver

    WE BUY GOLD!GET 40% OR MORE IN CA$H FOR

    YOUR UNWANTED GOLD!

    Al Dobrick - 30 Years Exp

    by Gregory Stumpf

    Cowboyin Up!... Continued on Page 2

    SnIppeSnIppetztzSSnnIppppeeSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIpppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppppeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeetttttttzzttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttttzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzznnInnnnnnnnnnnIIIIIIIIIpppppppppppppppp zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzWEEKLY MAGAZINESNIPPETZ IS

    COWBOYIN UP!

    All your protection under one roof.

    1997 American Family Mutual Insurance Company and its SubsidiariesHome Office Madison, WI 53783

    www.amfam.comNA-07497 Rev. 1/03

    Larry E Stiltner Agency481 Hwy 105 Suite 212(719) 481-8382 BusMonument, CO 80132

    All your protection under one roof.

    1997 American Family Mutual Insurance Company and its SubsidiariesHome Office Madison, WI 53783

    www.amfam.comNA-07497 Rev. 1/03

    Larry E Stiltner Agency481 Hwy 105 Suite 212(719) 481-8382 BusMonument, CO 80132

    http://insurance-agency.amfam.com/CO/larry-e-stiltner/

    02180(17+,//&28175

  • Cowboyin Up!... Continued from Page 1

    2

    SnippetzALL RIGHTS RESERVED 2012

    PUBLISHED BYFUNDER ENLIGHTENING, INC.

    George Wilkins - Publisher

    PO Box 789 Monument, CO, 80132www.fepublications.com

    (719) 487-0484email: george@fepublications.com

    FEATURE ARTICLESSnippetz is Cowboyin Up!... 1

    Wedding Etiquette - Part 2Everyday Etiquette

    with Heather Buchman... 4

    Strange But True... 5

    Blue-Collar BluesSenior News Line... 7

    Moments In Time... 8

    Emergency Preparedness PlansSeries 8, Article 1

    Web Chat by Robyn... 14

    HEALTH 6Programming the Ear

    to End Dizziness To Your Good Health... 6

    HOME AND GARDEN 9Now Heres a Tip!

    by Jo Ann Derson... 6

    THE DINING GUIDEUpdating An Old Favorite:

    Avocado, Chicken and Rice Salad The Kitchen Diva... 9

    PUZZLES, TRIVIA,ENTERTAINMENT 12-13Trivia Test Sports Quiz Flash BackSuper Crossword Weekly Sudoku

    Couch Theater DVD PreviewsHueys Page (Comics)

    Salomes Stars (Weekly Horoscope)

    COMMUNITY CALENDARPAGE 15

    CLASSIFIED PAGE 15GREAT BARGAINS Find Your Treasure!Business / Employment Opportunities

    BUSINESS, FINANCEAND LAW

    Choosing a Financial Planner In God We Trust... 15

    SNIPPETZ

    WEEKLY MAGAZINE

    Cowboyin Up!... Continued on Page 3

    THIS WEEKIN SNIPPETZ

    make your vision a reality...15706 Jackson Creek Parkway, Monument 719.488.2544 www.trilakesprinting.com

    Printing | Design | Direct Mail

    Banners & Signs | Decals & Vehicle Wraps

    For All Your Real Estate Needs!

    FREE CONSULTATION719.964.3526

    NEED REAL ESTATE ADVICE?SHORT SALES FORECLOSURE LATE PAYMENTS

    LISTINGS SMART MARKET CHOICESREPRESENTING BUYERS AND SELLERS IN EL PASO COUNTY

    GOT FUNGUS?

    WE HAVE LASER TREATMENT!

    BOTOX$9 per unit

    LaserHair Removal

    Sun SpotRemoval

    Spider VeinsLaser Treatment

    50% OFFLimited Time O er

    BRING THIS ADAND SAVE $500.00

    All ten toes -6 medical laser treatments

    ONLY $399 (Regular $900)Limited Time O er

    Medical Facials & Peels

    Obagi Medical Skin Care

    Neocuti s Swiss Skin Care

    Microdermabrasion

    Dennis Kotelko, MDMedical Director

    Paula Brady, L.E., CLSParamedical Aestheti cianCerti ed Laser Specialist

    Injectables Certi ed

    FREE SKIN ORLASER CONSULTATION9164 Spruce Mountain Rd

    Unit BLarkspur, CO 80118720-379-3584

    spa-medica.net

    Skin and Laser Clinic

    One Toe - $99 (3 treatments)

    boy may imply a young man, the moniker has usually been hung on adult men; how-ever, many of the early cowboys started as young as 12 or 13 years old. As soon as they mastered the necessary skills such as horseback riding or equestrian skills along with roping, branding and even medical treatment of the cattle herd, a young boy could be hired as a cowboy. Many of these early day cowboys spent their entire lives working the herds.

    Not all cowboys back in the day were hard-working honest men. During the Revolu-tionary War, American fi ghters who op-posed the independence movement were referred to as cowboys. The most famous of them, Claudius Smith, was an outlaw who was called the cow-boy of Rama-pos because he stole oxen, cattle, horses and any other livestock from the colonists and gave them to the British forces.

    The fi rst cowboys who tended and herded cattle were Spanish, and they changed and evolved into the traditional cowboy in Mex-ico. The Mexican cowboys migrated north into New Mexico and Texas and along with them the archetype of the American cow-boy, which prevails today.

    GEOGRAPHY IS KEY

    The Texas Cowboy is the embodiment of all the traditional cowboy trappings from

    the clothing to the music to that all too fa-miliar east Texas twang. The Texas cowboy is so ubiquitous that it has now become the American cowboy. But in days gone by there were several other cowboy types that bear mentioning.

    The California coast in the late 1800s be-came the birth place of the buckaroos. A buckaroo is generically the same as the traditional American cowboy, the only dif-ference being the name. Many have specu-lated the word is derived from bucking to describe what might happen when break-ing a horse. The term stuck and in many cases is freely interchanged with the term cowboy.

    The Florida cowhunter or cracker cow-boy is another derivation of the cowboy defi ned by location. They got that name from the smaller breed of cattle they raised called the cracker cow, which weighed in around 600 pounds. The cracker cow had large horns and hooves and was signifi -cantly shorter than the cattle being raised in the American southwest. Distinctly differ-ent than the Texas and California cowboys of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the cracker cowboy carved out his own unique style of cattle tending. The one key tool missing from the cracker cowboy was the lasso the western cowboys used to capture cattle.

    The Florida cowhunter used bullwhips and dogs to herd and capture cattle so their sad-dle did not have the classic big horn. They typically wore high boots that would reach their knees to protect them from snakes, and most of them wore wool or straw hats. Because of the heavy rainfall in Florida, ponchos were also considered a must-have part of the cracker cowboy attire.

    The Hawaiian cowboy is called paniolo.

    Paniolo may be a Hawaiian pronunciation for the Spanish word, espanol (Spanish). The Hawaiian cowboys came into their glory in the early 1800s when they began to round up wild cattle that had been im-ported to the islands. The cattle had mul-tiplied profusely and were wreaking havoc with the local crops. The paniolos job was to round them up and herd them into deep pits. After keeping them there for about a week, they were domesticated by various means, mostly using food and water as positive reinforcement. Today the Paniolo still work their herds and have more of the traditional Spanish look in their attire and saddles.

    THEN VERSES NOWThere are many similarities between the cowboys of the Wild West days and the modern day cowboy. They both still ride horses, and true cowboys from both eras work their cattle herds and engage in cattle drives. The difference is the cattle drive of the olden days took a dozen horses to trans-port cattle 300 or so miles to the stockyards in Kansas City, St. Louis and Denver. These days it takes a 350 horsepower diesel truck to do the same thing.

    Whereas the horse was the cowboys pri-mary mode of transportation, today it might be an ATV to tend the cattle herds and a trusty four-wheel drive pickup truck. Cowboys still use the lasso, and although they are used less for day-to-day duties, they still are an important tool in the cow-boy tool chest, especially for rodeo cow-boys who compete in cattle roping compe-titions.

  • 3SNIPPETZ

    WEEKLY MAGAZINE

    Cowboyin Up!...Continued from Page 2

    The place to turn for ShelterInsurance protection for

    your auto, home, and life.

    Michael D. Ahlers66 Second St. Ste. B P.O. Box 1212

    Monument, CO 80132-1212(719) 481-2550 Cell: (719) 209-4534

    www.shelterinsurance.com/michaelahlers

    Were Your Shield, Were Your Shelter!

    THE ORIGINAL

    FARMERS MARKET

    FOR INFORMATION CALL: (719) 213-3323

    EVERY SATURDAY AT MONUMENT PLAZA(behind Rosies Diner)

    PEACHES SATURDAY!!SATURDAY - 8:00AM - 1:00PM

    ROCKY FORD PRODUCENO GMO!

    NEW FRESH BAKED GOODS!

    Ju ly 21st , 2012 10:30 am - 2 :30 pm

    Come one, come all! Families, friends and neighbors are invited

    to celebrate with us at Benet Pinesthis summer for a day of music, food, and fun.

    For more information and to reserve tickets, email jmiller@benethillmonastery.org or call 719-633-0655 ext. 116

    Benet Hill Monastery * 3190 Benet Ln. * Colorado Springs, CO 80921* PH:719-633-0655, ext.116The Monastery is situated in a rural woodland setting of Black Forest

    located in northeast Colorado Springs, off Highway 83.

    SAVE

    THE DA

    TE SAVETHE DATE

    A L L P R O C E E D S S U P P O R T T H E W O R K S A N D M I N I S T R I E S O F T H E B E N E T H I L L S I S T E R S

    Footba