Shellfish Farm Cultivation in Scotland 2004 The shellfish aquaculture industry is of significant...

Shellfish Farm Cultivation in Scotland 2004 The shellfish aquaculture industry is of significant economic
Shellfish Farm Cultivation in Scotland 2004 The shellfish aquaculture industry is of significant economic
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Transcript of Shellfish Farm Cultivation in Scotland 2004 The shellfish aquaculture industry is of significant...

  • Fisheries Research Services is an agency of the Scottish Executive

    FRS Marine Laboratory PO Box 101 375 Victoria Road Aberdeen AB11 9DB UK

    tel +44 (0)1224 876544 fax +44 (0)1224 295511

    enquiries@marlab.ac.uk http://www.frs-scotland.gov.uk

    Fisheries Research Services

    Shellfish Farm Cultivation in Scotland 2004

    Introduction The culture of shellfish plays an important role in the

    economy of remote rural communities of the Scottish

    highlands and islands. The principal species cultured are

    the common mussel (Mytilus edulis) and the Pacific oyster

    (Crassostrea gigas). Smaller quantities of king scallop

    (Pecten maximus), queen scallop (Chlamys opercularis)

    and native oysters (Ostrea edulis) are grown.

    Manpower Total manpower engaged in shellfish cultivation increased

    during 2002-2004. The total number employed in 2004

    was 402. This increase was largely due to an expansion

    in mussel cultivation at Shetland.

    Production Shellfish cultivation first sales value in 2004 was

    approximately £6 million. One hundred and seventy-five

    companies operated 309 sites, 152 of which produced

    for the table market. The remaining 157 held either juvenile

    stock or were fallow.

    Over the past three years the number of producing sites

    and companies has increased. One hundred and ten

    companies in 2004 produced shellfish for sale.

    Mussels The common mussel is the most intensively cultivated

    species of shellfish in Scotland. The main cultivation

    method is from natural spat* settlement on ropes

    suspended from long-lines or rafts.

    '95 '96 '97 '98 '99 '00 '01 '02 '03 '04 260

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    Distribution of Scottish shellfish production sites, 2004

    No . o

    f s ta

    ff

    *spawn of shellfish

    Orkney 13 (2)

    Western Isles 37 (14)

    Shetland 94 (45)

    Active

    (Producing)

    Several Orders

    Strathclyde 99 (54)

  • Fisheries Research Services is an agency of the Scottish Executive

    FRS Marine Laboratory PO Box 101 375 Victoria Road Aberdeen AB11 9DB UK

    tel +44 (0)1224 876544 fax +44 (0)1224 295511

    enquiries@marlab.ac.uk http://www.frs-scotland.gov.uk © Crown copyright

    Fisheries Research Services

    Pacific Oyster Although the Pacific oyster is farmed in Scottish waters

    it is a non-native species and is unable to reproduce due

    to prevailing low water temperatures. Growers are

    dependent on supplies of spat from hatchery and nursery

    beds in England and Guernsey.

    The main method of cultivation is in net bags laid on

    trestles sited in the inter-tidal zone down to low water

    mark. The bags require frequent inspection and turning

    to maintain optimum growing conditions and reach

    marketable size in three years.

    King and Queen Scallops King and queens scallops rely on natural spat settlement

    and are on-grown in pearl and lantern nets suspended

    from long-lines. With the introduction of Several Order

    fisheries there is now an increasing number of scallops

    being on-grown on the seabed. Scallops reach market

    size in four years and queens in 18 months.

    The shellfish aquaculture industry is of significant economic importance to Scotland and in particular to local communities

    in many of the more remote areas.

    Regional variation

    Production of Pacific oyster, king and queen scallop has

    focussed on the west coast of the Scottish mainland.

    Production for the table (000s) by species and region, 2004

    Pacific oyster King scallop Queen scallop

    Shetland 2 0 63

    Orkney 20 0 0

    Western Isles 0 0 0

    Highland 736 56 54

    Strathclyde 2,828 29 1,001

    Regional variation

    There is considerable regional variation in mussel

    production. Traditionally, production was located in the

    south west and Highland regions, however in recent years

    the industry has successfully expanded in the Shetland

    Islands. In 2004 Shetland’s production accounted for

    52% of the Scottish total.

    Percentage Scottish mussel production by region, 2004

    The attached spats contine to grow on the lines until they

    reach marketable size within 24-30 months.

    Production (tonnes)

    During 1995-2004 mussel production increased almost

    five-fold to over 4,000 tonnes. A large proportion of the

    Scottish production is exported.

    0

    1,000

    2,000

    3,000

    4,000

    5,000

    To nn

    es

    Mussel (tonnes)

    '95 '96 '97 '98 '99 '01'00 '02 '03 '04

    Trends in production for Pacific oysters, queens, scallops and native oysters

    Shetland

    Western Isles

    Highland

    Strathclyde

    01,0002,0003,0004,000

    '95 '96 '97 '98 '99 '01'00 '02 '03 '04

    Native oyster (000s)

    Pacific oyster (000s)

    N um

    be r (

    00 0s

    )

    Scallop (000s)

    Queen (000s)

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