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  • Venmo is a mobile payment service that is now a part of PayPal. It allows users to transfer money between one another using a mobile phone app or web interface. In the third quarter of 2014, Venmo processed $700 million of payments between people.[1] Venmo strictly prohibits the use of their service to purchase merchandise.[2]

    Contents [hide] 1 Service2 History3 See also4 References5 External linksService[edit]Venmo is a mobile payment service that lets users transfer money to each other. Users sign up using their mobile app or on the Venmo website and they can find others who have created an account.

    Users have a Venmo balance that is used for their transactions. They can link their bank accounts, debit cards, or credit cards to their Venmo account. Credit cards have a 3% fee for each transaction.[3] Venmo has claimed that its security is bank grade, and that personal and financial data are encrypted and protected on secure servers to guard against any unauthorized transactions,[4] however, these security claims have been questioned by journalists, security researchers, and the California Office of Business Oversight.[5][6][7]

    A unique aspect of Venmo is its social aspect. When a user makes a transaction, the transaction details (stripped of the payment amount) are shared on the user's "news feed" and to the user's network of friends.[8] The transactions can be made private, but most users do not change the privacy settings.[9]

    History[edit]Venmo was founded by two friends, Andrew Kortina and Iqram Magdon-Ismail, who met as freshman roommates at the University of Pennsylvania. According to Kortina, the idea of Venmo originated when Magdon-Ismail forgot his wallet during a trip to visit Kortina. The process of settling their accounts was a hassle, so they started working on a way to send money through mobile devices. Their original prototype sent money through text messages, but they eventually transitioned from text messages to a mobile app.[10]

    In 2012, Braintree acquired Venmo for $26.2 million. In 2013, PayPal acquired Braintree for $800 million.[10] PayPal announced in October 2015 that it plans to let merchants accept payments through Venmo.[11]Venmo is a mobile payment service that is now a part of PayPal. It allows users to transfer money between one another using a mobile phone app or web interface. In the third quarter of 2014, Venmo processed $700 million of payments between people.[1] Venmo strictly prohibits the use of their service to purchase merchandise.[2]

    Contents [hide] 1 Service2 History3 See also4 References5 External linksService[edit]Venmo is a mobile payment service that lets users transfer money to each other. Users sign up using their mobile app or on the Venmo website and they can find others who have created an account.

    Users have a Venmo balance that is used for their transactions. They can link their bank accounts, debit cards, or credit cards to their Venmo account. Credit c

  • ards have a 3% fee for each transaction.[3] Venmo has claimed that its security is bank grade, and that personal and financial data are encrypted and protected on secure servers to guard against any unauthorized transactions,[4] however, these security claims have been questioned by journalists, security researchers, and the California Office of Business Oversight.[5][6][7]

    A unique aspect of Venmo is its social aspect. When a user makes a transaction, the transaction details (stripped of the payment amount) are shared on the user's "news feed" and to the user's network of friends.[8] The transactions can be made private, but most users do not change the privacy settings.[9]

    History[edit]Venmo was founded by two friends, Andrew Kortina and Iqram Magdon-Ismail, who met as freshman roommates at the University of Pennsylvania. According to Kortina, the idea of Venmo originated when Magdon-Ismail forgot his wallet during a trip to visit Kortina. The process of settling their accounts was a hassle, so they started working on a way to send money through mobile devices. Their original prototype sent money through text messages, but they eventually transitioned from text messages to a mobile app.[10]

    In 2012, Braintree acquired Venmo for $26.2 million. In 2013, PayPal acquired Braintree for $800 million.[10] PayPal announced in October 2015 that it plans to let merchants accept payments through Venmo.[11]Venmo is a mobile payment service that is now a part of PayPal. It allows users to transfer money between one another using a mobile phone app or web interface. In the third quarter of 2014, Venmo processed $700 million of payments between people.[1] Venmo strictly prohibits the use of their service to purchase merchandise.[2]

    Contents [hide] 1 Service2 History3 See also4 References5 External linksService[edit]Venmo is a mobile payment service that lets users transfer money to each other. Users sign up using their mobile app or on the Venmo website and they can find others who have created an account.

    Users have a Venmo balance that is used for their transactions. They can link their bank accounts, debit cards, or credit cards to their Venmo account. Credit cards have a 3% fee for each transaction.[3] Venmo has claimed that its security is bank grade, and that personal and financial data are encrypted and protected on secure servers to guard against any unauthorized transactions,[4] however, these security claims have been questioned by journalists, security researchers, and the California Office of Business Oversight.[5][6][7]

    A unique aspect of Venmo is its social aspect. When a user makes a transaction, the transaction details (stripped of the payment amount) are shared on the user's "news feed" and to the user's network of friends.[8] The transactions can be made private, but most users do not change the privacy settings.[9]

    History[edit]Venmo was founded by two friends, Andrew Kortina and Iqram Magdon-Ismail, who met as freshman roommates at the University of Pennsylvania. According to Kortina, the idea of Venmo originated when Magdon-Ismail forgot his wallet during a trip to visit Kortina. The process of settling their accounts was a hassle, so they started working on a way to send money through mobile devices. Their original prototype sent money through text messages, but they eventually transitioned from text messages to a mobile app.[10]

  • In 2012, Braintree acquired Venmo for $26.2 million. In 2013, PayPal acquired Braintree for $800 million.[10] PayPal announced in October 2015 that it plans to let merchants accept payments through Venmo.[11]Venmo is a mobile payment service that is now a part of PayPal. It allows users to transfer money between one another using a mobile phone app or web interface. In the third quarter of 2014, Venmo processed $700 million of payments between people.[1] Venmo strictly prohibits the use of their service to purchase merchandise.[2]

    Contents [hide] 1 Service2 History3 See also4 References5 External linksService[edit]Venmo is a mobile payment service that lets users transfer money to each other. Users sign up using their mobile app or on the Venmo website and they can find others who have created an account.

    Users have a Venmo balance that is used for their transactions. They can link their bank accounts, debit cards, or credit cards to their Venmo account. Credit cards have a 3% fee for each transaction.[3] Venmo has claimed that its security is bank grade, and that personal and financial data are encrypted and protected on secure servers to guard against any unauthorized transactions,[4] however, these security claims have been questioned by journalists, security researchers, and the California Office of Business Oversight.[5][6][7]

    A unique aspect of Venmo is its social aspect. When a user makes a transaction, the transaction details (stripped of the payment amount) are shared on the user's "news feed" and to the user's network of friends.[8] The transactions can be made private, but most users do not change the privacy settings.[9]

    History[edit]Venmo was founded by two friends, Andrew Kortina and Iqram Magdon-Ismail, who met as freshman roommates at the University of Pennsylvania. According to Kortina, the idea of Venmo originated when Magdon-Ismail forgot his wallet during a trip to visit Kortina. The process of settling their accounts was a hassle, so they started working on a way to send money through mobile devices. Their original prototype sent money through text messages, but they eventually transitioned from text messages to a mobile app.[10]

    In 2012, Braintree acquired Venmo for $26.2 million. In 2013, PayPal acquired Braintree for $800 million.[10] PayPal announced in October 2015 that it plans to let merchants accept payments through Venmo.[11]Venmo is a mobile payment service that is now a part of PayPal. It allows users to transfer money between one another using a mobile phone app or web interface. In the third quarter of 2014, Venmo processed $700 million of payments between people.[1] Venmo strictly prohibits the use of their service to purchase merchandise.[2]

    Contents [hide] 1 Service2 History3 See also4 References5 External linksService[edit]Venmo is a mobile payment service that lets users transfer money to each other. Users sign up using their mobile app or on the Venmo website and they can find others who have created an account.

  • Users have a Venmo balance that is used for their transactions. They can link their bank accounts, debit cards, or credit cards to their Venmo account. Credit cards have a 3% fee for each transaction.[3] Venmo has claimed that its security is bank grade, and that personal and financial data are encrypted and protected on secure servers to guard against any unauthorized transactions,[4] however, these security claims have been questioned by journalis