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    Projects

    Setting up your Raspberry Pi

    How to set up and start your Pi for the �rst time

    Raspberry Pi

    Step 1 Introduction

    Here you’ll learn about your Raspberry Pi, what things you need to use it,

    and how to set it up.

    If you need to print this project, please use the printer-friendly version (https://projects.raspberrypi.org/en/projects/raspberry-pi-setting-up/print).

    Step 2 What you will need

    Which Raspberry Pi?

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    There are several models of Raspberry Pi (https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/), and for most people the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is the oneto choose.

    The Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is the newest, fastest, and easiest to use.

    The Raspberry Pi Zero and Zero W are smaller and require less power, so

    they’re useful for portable projects such as robots. It’s generally easier to

    start a project with the Raspberry Pi 3, and to move to the Pi Zero when

    you have a working prototype that the smaller Pi would be useful for.

    If you want to buy a Raspberry Pi, head to rpf.io/products (https://rpf.io/products).

    A power supply

    To connect to a power socket, the Raspberry Pi has a micro USB port (the

    same found on many mobile phones).

    You will need a power supply which provides at least 2.5 amps. We

    recommend using the o�cial Raspberry Pi power supply (https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/raspberry-pi-universal-power-supply/).

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    A micro SD card

    Your Raspberry Pi needs an SD card to store all its �les and the Raspbian

    operating system.

    You will need a micro SD card with a capacity of at least 8 GB.

    Many sellers supply SD cards for Raspberry Pi that are already set up with

    Raspbian and ready to go.

    A keyboard and a mouse

    To start using your Raspberry, you will need a USB keyboard and a USB

    mouse.

    Once you’ve set your Pi up, you can use a Bluetooth keyboard and mouse,

    but you’ll need a USB keyboard and mouse for setting up.

    A TV or computer screen

    To view the Raspbian desktop environment, you will need a screen and a

    cable to link the screen and the Pi. The screen can be a TV or a computer

    monitor. If the screen has built-in speakers, the Pi will be able to use these

    to play sound.

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    HDMI

    The Raspberry Pi has a HDMI output port that is compatible with the HDMI

    port of most modern TVs and computer monitors. Many computer

    monitors may also have DVI or VGA ports.

    DVI

    If your screen has a DVI port, you can connect the Pi to it using a HDMI-to-

    DVI cable.

    VGA

    Some screens only have a VGA port.

    To connect your Pi to such a screen, you can use a HDMI-to-VGA adapter.

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    Optional extras

    A case

    You may want to put your Raspberry Pi in a case. This is not essential, but

    it will provide protection for your Pi. If you’d like, you can use the o�cial

    case for the Raspberry Pi 3 (https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/raspberry-pi-3-case/) or Pi Zero or Zero W (https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/raspberry-pi-zero-case/).

    Headphones or speakers

    The large Raspberry Pi models (not the Pi Zero/Zero W) have a standard

    audio port like the one on your smart phone or MP3 player. If you want to,

    you can connect your headphones or speakers so that the Pi can play

    sound. If the screen you’re connecting your Pi to has built-in speakers, the

    Pi can play sound through these.

    An Ethernet cable

    The large Raspberry Pi models (not the Pi Zero/Zero W) have a standard

    Ethernet port to connect them to the internet. To connect a Pi Zero to the

    internet, you need a USB-to-Ethernet adaptor. The Raspberry Pi 3 and Pi

    Zero W can also be wirelessly connected to the web.

    Step 3 Set up your SD card

    If you have an SD card that doesn’t have the Raspbian operating system

    on it yet, or if you want to reset your Raspberry Pi, you can easily install

    Raspbian yourself. To do so, you need a computer that has an SD card port

    — most laptop and desktop computers have one.

    The Raspbian operating system via NOOBS

    Using the NOOBS software is the easiest way to install Raspbian on your

    SD card.

    Download NOOBS

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    Visit the Raspberry Pi downloads page (https://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads).

    You should see a box linking to the NOOBS �les. Click on the box.

    The simplest option is to download the zip archive of the �les. Make

    sure to pay attention to where you save the archive, so that you can

    �nd it again quickly.

    Format the SD card

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    Anything that’s stored on the SD card will be overwritten during

    formatting. So if the SD card on which you want to install Raspbian

    currently has any �les on it, e.g. from an older version of Raspbian, you may

    wish to back these �les up �rst to not lose them permanently.

    Visit the SD Association’s website and download SD Formatter (https://www.sdcard.org/downloads/formatter_4/index.html) forWindows or Mac.

    Follow the instructions to install the software.

    Insert your SD card into the computer or laptop’s SD card slot.

    In SD Formatter, select your SD card, and the format the card.

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    Extract NOOBS from the zip archive

    Next, you will need to extract the �les from the NOOBS zip archive you

    downloaded from the Raspberry Pi website.

    Find the downloaded archive — by default, it should be in your

    Downloads folder.

    Double-click on it to extract the �les, and keep the resulting

    Explorer/Finder window open.

    Copy the �les

    Now open another Explorer/Finder window and navigate to the SD card.

    It’s best to position the two windows side by side.

    Select all the �les in the NOOBS folder and drag them into the SD card

    window to copy them to the card.

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    Once the �les have all been copied over, you can eject the SD card.

    Step 4 Connect your Raspberry Pi

    Let’s get everything connected. It’s important to do this in the right order,

    so that all your components are safe.

    Insert the SD card you’ve set up with Raspbian (via NOOBS) into the

    micro SD card slot at the underside of your Pi.

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    Note: Lots of micro SD cards will come inside a larger adapter — you canslide the card out using the lip at the bottom.

    Find the USB cable for your mouse, and connect the mouse to a USB

    port on the Raspberry Pi (it doesn’t matter which one).

    Connect the keyboard in the same way.

    Look at the HDMI port on the Raspberry Pi — notice that it has a large,

    �at side on top.

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    Make sure your screen is plugged into a wall socket and turned on. Use

    a cable to connect the screen to the Pi’s HDMI port — use an adapter if

    necessary.

    Note: nothing will display on the screen, because the Pi is not running yet.

    If you want to connect the Pi to the internet via Ethernet, use an

    Ethernet cable to connect the Ethernet port on the Raspberry Pi to an

    Ethernet socket on the wall or on your internet router. You don’t need to

    do this if you’ll be using WiFi or if you don’t want to connect to the

    internet.

    Sound will come from your screen if it has speakers or you can connect

    headphones or speakers to the audio jack if you have them.

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    Step 5 Start up your Raspberry Pi

    Your Raspberry Pi doesn’t have a power switch: as soon as you connect it

    to a power outlet, it will turn on. Notice that the Pi’s micro USB power port

    has a longer �at side on top.

    Plug a micro USB power supply into a socket and connect it to you Pi’s

    power port.

    You should see a red LED light up on the Raspberry Pi, which indicates

    that the Pi is connected to power. As it starts up (this is also called

    booting), you will see raspberries appear in the top left-hand of yourscreen.

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    First-time startup with NOOBS

    If this is the �rst time you’re starting your Raspberry Pi with an SD card

    containing NOOBS, you will see the NOOBS installer. This software will

    walk you through installing the Raspbian operating system (OS).

    When the installer has loaded, it will o�er you a choice of which OS to

    install. Check the box for Raspbian, and then click Install.

    Click Yes in the warning dialogue box, and then sit back and relax.The Raspbian installation process will take a bit of time.

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    When Raspbian has been installed, click OK. Your Raspberry Pi willrestart, and Raspbian will then boot up.

    After a few seconds the Raspbian Desktop will appear.

    Step 6 Finish the setup

    When you start your Raspberry Pi for the �rst time, the Welcome toRaspberry Pi application will pop up and guide you through the initialsetup.

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    Click Next to start the setup.

    Set your Country, Language, and Timezone, then click Next again.

    Enter a new password for your Raspberry Pi and click Next.

    Connect to your WiFi network by selecting its name, entering the

    password, and clicking Next.

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    Note: if your Raspberry Pi model doesn’t have wireless connectivity, youwon’t see this screen.

    Click Next let the wizard check for updates to Raspbian and installthem (this might take a little while).

    Click Done or Reboot to �nish the setup.

    Note: you will only need to reboot if that’s necessary to complete anupdate.

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    Step 7 Where to �nd help

    If you’re having problems with your Pi, there are lots of ways you can get

    help and advice:

    Check out the help section (https://www.raspberrypi.org/help/)and the troubleshooting guide (https://www.raspberrypi.org/learning/troubleshooting-guide/) on the Raspberry Pi website

    The Raspberry Pi forum (https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums),including the Beginners (https://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewforum.php?f=91) section, is a great place to ask questions and getsupport from the Raspberry Pi community

    Call out on Twitter (https://twitter.com) using the hashtag #rpilearn,or submit a question on the Raspberry Pi Stack Exchange (https://raspberrypi.stackexchange.com/)

    You could also attend a free Raspberry Jam (https://rpf.io/jam)community event to talk to people about their experiences and get

    some �rst-hand help from fellow Raspberry Pi users

    Step 8 What next?

    Take a look at our Using your Raspberry Pi (https://projects.raspberrypi.org/en/projects/raspberry-pi-using) guide.

    Explore what you can do with your Raspberry Pi by creating some of

    our digital making projects (https://projects.raspberrypi.org), forexample:

    Robot antenna (https://projects.raspberrypi.org/en/projects/robot-antenna) — control a robot’s antenna light with a RaspberryPi and code blocks

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    Rock band (https://projects.raspberrypi.org/en/projects/rock-band) — learn how to code your own musical instrumentsTurtle race (https://projects.raspberrypi.org/en/projects/turtle-race) — race digital turtles against each otherPush button stop-motion (https://projects.raspberrypi.org/en/projects/push-button-stop-motion) — make your own stop-motion animation rig with a button and a Raspberry Pi CameraModule (https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/camera-module-v2/)

    Published by Raspberry Pi Foundation (https://www.raspberrypi.org) under a Creative Commons license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/).

    View project & license on GitHub (https://github.com/RaspberryPiLearning/raspberry-pi-setting-up)