Sep 2011 CAP Safety Meeting

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Sep 2011 CAP Safety Meeting. Lt Col Larry Brockshus MN Wing/SE. Overview. Core Values National Preparedness Month Satiety Training Opportunity Aircraft Safety Mishaps Personally Injury Mishaps School Busses. Core Values. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Transcript of Sep 2011 CAP Safety Meeting

  • Sep 2011 CAP Safety MeetingLt Col Larry BrockshusMN Wing/SE

  • OverviewCore ValuesNational Preparedness MonthSatiety Training OpportunityAircraft Safety MishapsPersonally Injury MishapsSchool Busses

  • Core ValuesA leadership change is a perfect time to review our valuesWe must incorporate Core Values into our operations. Seek and value the inputs of all CAP members, Region and National leadership, Air Force employees, and CAP-USAF oversight.

  • Core ValuesCAP Core Values: Integrity, Volunteer Service, Excellence, and RespectAir Force Core Values: Integrity First, Service Before Self, Excellence in All We Do

  • As of: 1200 Hours 15 November 2001*Moral Traits of IntegrityAccountabilityDont shift blame The buck stops here.JusticeSimilar acts get similar rewards/punishmentsSelf RespectDo not bring discredit upon selfHumility Sobered by awesome responsibility of taskThe higher the position/rank, the greater the humility

  • As of: 1200 Hours 15 November 2001*ServiceProfessional Duties Take Precedence Over Personal DutiesBehaviorsRule followingDo ones dutyRespect for OthersPlace troops ahead of personal comfortCritical for an effective work environmentDiscipline and Self ControlAnger--Refrain from public displays of angerAppetites--Sexual overtures to those you out rank; chemical abuse Religious tolerance--Religion is a matter of individual conscienceDo not indulge in selfpity, discouragement, defeatismFaith in the SystemAvoid the view that you know better than those above you Strike a tone of confidence and forward looking optimismTo lose faith in the system is to place Self before Service

  • As of: 1200 Hours 15 November 2001*ExcellenceSustained passion for continuous improvement and innovationProduct/Service ExcellencePersonal ExcellenceComplete professional trainingStay physically and mentally fitCommunity Excellence (Members of an organization working together to reach a common goal)Trust and Mutual RespectIndividuals have fundamental worth. Discriminate on performance onlyGive the Benefit of the DoubtInnocent until proven guilty

  • September is National Preparedness MonthBe Red Cross Ready ChecklistKnow what emergencies or disasters are most likely to occur in my area.Have a family emergency plan and practice it.Keep an emergency preparedness kit on hand.Get trained in first aid and CPR/AED.Take action to help my community prepare.Donate blood or platelets in my community

  • Maneuvering Flight Seminar Opportunity"Maneuvering, Approaches, and Landings; A Risk Management Approach" Topic: Maneuvering, Approaches, and Landings; A Risk Management Approach On Saturday, September 24, 2011 at 10:00 AM Location: Lake Superior College - Airport Facility 4525 Airport Approach Road Duluth, MN 55811 Select Number: GL1540245Description: Join us for a relaxed, interactive presentation, applying Risk Management Approach tools in the Maneuvering, Approach, and Landing phases of flight. The sponsor for this seminar is: Minnesot FAASTeamThe following credit(s) are available for the WINGS/AMT Programs:Basic Knowledge 3 1.00

  • Most recent Aircraft Damage 12 Aug. PILOTS FIRM LANDING DAMAGED THE TAIL RING BUT DAMAGE WAS NOT FOUND UNTIL NEXT DAY.24 Aug. A CIVILIAN PILOT RENTS PART OF THE SAME HANGER THAT A CAP AIRCRAFT IS PARKED IN. THE PILOT DINGED THE AILERON WHILE MOVING THE CAP AIRCRAFT. HE WAS PUSHING THE CAP PLANE BACK INTO THE HANGAR, AND "NOT USING THE WINCH". HE HIT THE RIGHT AILERON ON THE HANGER DOOR FRAME.

  • August Personal Injury Mishaps29 Aug. CADETS WERE PLAYING "CAPTURE THE FLAG"IN THE WOODED AREA . DURING THIS ACTIVITY THERE WERE TWO TYPES OF INJURIES INVOLVING 4 CADETs. ONE CADET SCRAPED HIS LEFT EYEBROW ON A BRANCH. THE OTHER 3 WERE YELLOW JACKET STINGS.25 Aug. CADETS HIS RIGHT FOOT SLIPPED OFF THE STEP AND HE TWISTED HIS RIGHT ANKLE . 20 Aug. SENIOR MEMBER RECEIVED BURN TO UPPER LEFT ARM WHILE REMOVING A PAN FROM THE OVEN.19 Aug. CUT FINGER DURING WORKING IN KITCHEN. 18 Aug. SENIOR MEMBER STEPPED OFF CURB, TWISTED ANKLE, FELL ON GROUND.

  • School Busses are BackThe greatest risk is not riding the bus, but approaching or leaving the bus.When driving in neighborhoods with school zones, watch out for young people who may be thinking about getting to school, but may not be thinking of getting there safely. Slow down. Watch for children walking in the street, especially if there are no sidewalks in neighborhood. Slow down. Watch for children playing and congregating near bus stops. Be alert. Children arriving late for the bus may dart into the street with out looking for traffic.

  • School Busses are BackLearn and obey the school bus laws in your state. Learn the "flashing signal light system" that school bus drivers use to alert motorists of pending actions:Yellow flashing lights indicate that the bus is preparing to stop to load or unload children. Motorists should slow down and prepare to stop their vehicles. Red flashing lights and extended stop arms indicate that the bus has stopped, and that children are getting on or off. Motorists must stop their cars and wait until the red lights stop flashing, the extended stop sign is withdrawn, and the bus begins moving before they can start driving again.

  • School Busses are BackTeach Your Children Get to the bus stop at least five minutes before the bus is scheduled to arrive. When the bus approaches, stand at least three giant steps (6 feet) away from the curb, and line up away from the street.Wait until the bus stops, the door opens, and the driver says that it's okay before stepping onto the bus.If you have to cross the street in front of the bus, walk on the sidewalk or along the side of the road to a point at least five giant steps (10 feet) ahead of the bus before you cross. Be sure that the bus driver can see you, and you can see the bus driver.

  • School Busses are BackTeach Your ChildrenUse the handrails to avoids falls. When exiting the bus, be careful that clothing with drawstrings, and book bags with straps don't get caught in the handrails or doors. Never walk behind the bus. Walk at least three giant steps away from the side of the bus. If you drop something near the bus, tell the bus driver. Never try to pick it up because the driver may not be able to see you.

  • Stay Safe

    **Anger or drinking in public leads subordinates to question the leaders ability to lead. Losing control or being drunk removes all doubt.

    SERVICE BEFORE SELF Service before self tells us that professional duties take precedence over personal desires. At the very least it includes the following behaviors: Rule following. To serve is to do one's duty, and our duties are most commonly expressed through rules. While it may be the case that professionals are expected to exercise judgment in the performance of their duties, good professionals understand that rules have a reason for being, and the default position must be to follow those rules unless there is a clear, operational reason for refusing to do so. Respect for others. Service before self tells us also that a good leader places the troops ahead of his/her personal comfort. We must always act in the certain knowledge that all persons possess a fundamental worth as human beings. Discipline and self-control. Professionals cannot indulge themselves in self-pity, discouragement, anger, frustration, or defeatism. They have a fundamental moral obligation to the persons they lead to strike a tone of confidence and forward-looking optimism. More specifically, they are expected to exercise control in the following areas: Anger. Military professionals and especially commanders at all echelons are expected to refrain from displays of anger that would bring discredit upon themselves and/or the Air Force. Appetites. Those who allow their appetites to drive them to make sexual overtures to subordinates are un fit for military service. Likewise, the excessive consumption of alcohol casts doubt on an individual's fitness, and when such persons are found to be drunk and disorderly, all doubts are removed. Religious toleration. Military professionals must remember that religious choice is a matter of individual conscience. Professionals, and especially commanders, must not take it upon themselves to change or coercively influence the religious views of subordinates. Faith in the system. To lose faith in the system is to adopt the view that you know better than those above you in the chain of command what should or should not be done. In other words, to lose faith in the system is to place self before service. Leaders can be very influential in this regard: if a leader resists the temptation to doubt `the system', then subordinates may follow suit. *3) EXCELLENCE IN ALL WE DO Excellence in all we do directs us to develop a sustained passion for continuous improvement and innovation that will propel the Air Force into a long-term, upward spiral of accomplishment and performance. True quality is embodied in the actions of Air Force people who take decisive steps to improve processes and products; who capitalize on quality as a leverage tool to enhance products, achieve savings, and improve customer service; and who exemplify our core values of integrity first, service before self, and excellence in all we do. General Fogleman Product/service excellence. We must focus on providing services and generating products that fully respond to customer wants and anticipate customer needs, and we must do so within the boundaries established by the tax paying public. Personal excellence. Military professionals must seek out and complete professional military education, stay in physical and mental shape, and continue to refresh their general educational backgrounds. Community excellence. Community excellence is achieved when t