Sara quinn writing_across_platforms_atlanta_press_club

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  • SARA QUINN / THE POYNTER INSTITUTE FOR MEDIA STUDIES The importance of writing in the digital age
  • Writingisthecommon denominatorinmedia.
  • Whatsortofwritingisneededfor:
  • Whatsortofwritingisneededfor: socialmedia?
  • Whatsortofwritingisneededfor: socialmedia? anewspaper?
  • Whatsortofwritingisneededfor: socialmedia? anewspaper? aTVnewsreport?
  • Whatsortofwritingisneededfor: socialmedia? anewspaper? aTVnewsreport? tabletoramobilephone?
  • How do you read?
  • How do you read? a novel?
  • How do you read? a novel? a breaking news story?
  • How do you read? a novel? a breaking news story? about buying a new camera?
  • How do you read? a novel? a breaking news story? about buying a new camera? about medical symptoms for child?
  • How do you read? a novel? a breaking news story? about buying a new camera? about medical symptoms for child? about the best weekend getaway?
  • Instapaper.com
  • Instapaper.com Longform.org
  • Instapaper.com Longform.org Longreads.com
  • http://plympton.com/
  • 98% 80% 71% 66% 62%73% 65% 56% 50% 52% 75% 66% 55% 49% In our study, more text was read online, regardless of length. 1 THRU 4 INCHES 5 THRU 7 INCHES 8 THRU 11 INCHES 12 THRU 18 INCHES 19 OR MORE INCHES Online Tabloid Broadsheet Story length: 67% Averagepercentofstoryread
  • Doesthismeanthat allonlinestories shouldbelong?
  • Nope. Tobepractical,itreallydepends onthedeviceandthesituation.
  • Whatdopeoplewant? Howmuchtimedotheyhave? Wheredotheywantit?
  • Abrandnewobservation whilestudyinghowpeople readoniPadsandtablets:
  • Anoverallaverageofaminuteandahalf (98.3seconds)wasspentonthefirststory apersonselectedtoread. THE BEHAVIORS:
  • Anoverallaverageofaminuteandahalf (98.3seconds)wasspentonthefirststory apersonselectedtoread. Ofthepeoplewhodidnotfinishreadingastory, theyreadforanaverageof78.3seconds beforeleavingthestoryentirely. THE BEHAVIORS:
  • Anoverallaverageofaminuteandahalf (98.3seconds)wasspentonthefirststory apersonselectedtoread. Ofthepeoplewhodidnotfinishreadingastory, theyreadforanaverageof78.3seconds beforeleavingthestoryentirely. Wevebeencallingthisthebailoutpoint. THE BEHAVIORS:
  • Anditmightbeagoodbenchmark forestablishingagoldcointokeep thereaderengagedabouthalfway throughalongstory. THE BEHAVIORS:
  • Thiscouldbeasimplepulloutquotefrom someonewhohasyettoappearinthestory. THE BEHAVIORS:
  • Thiscouldbeasimplepulloutquotefrom someonewhohasyettoappearinthestory. Or,aninformativevisualelementthatkeeps thereaderinterested. THE BEHAVIORS:
  • Thiscouldbeasimplepulloutquotefrom someonewhohasyettoappearinthestory. Or,aninformativevisualelementthatkeeps thereaderinterested. Oraquicksummary ofkeypointstohelpthe readerfeelsatisfiedwith whattheyvelearned. THE BEHAVIORS:
  • Howdoyouread whenyouaresearching?
  • Scanningreadersaresearchingthepage, ratherthanreadingwordforword.
  • Whentheyarelookingforinformation,they readsubheadsandthefirstwordsofparagraphs.
  • Somemightcallthisinformationforaging. OntheWeb,wehuntforfacts.
  • Whenpeoplearelookingforinformation,they readsubheadsandthefirstwordsofparagraphs.
  • Therearetimeswhenyou mightwanttokeepthings shortandsweet.
  • Ourbuddy,RoyPeterClark arguesthatanystorycanbe toldwellinjust
  • Ourbuddy,RoyPeterClark arguesthatanystorycanbe toldwellinjust 800words
  • Afewtipsforwriting:
  • Neverburythelead. You cant usually afford to bury the lead because if you do, few readers will get to it.
  • Dontpileon. In an effort to seem as current as possible with breaking news, sites will often put the latest development in a story at the top no matter how incremental the development.
  • Writetightandlively. Write actively, not passively.
  • Writetightandlively. Good broadcast writing uses primarily tight, simple declarative sentences and sticks to one idea per sentence.
  • Writetightandlively. Good broadcast writing uses primarily tight, simple declarative sentences and sticks to one idea per sentence. It avoids the longer clauses of print writing.
  • Writetightandlively. Good broadcast writing uses primarily tight, simple declarative sentences and sticks to one idea per sentence. It avoids the longer clauses of print writing. Youre writing for the ear. How can you help the listener to see what youre saying?
  • Writetightandlively. Writing for the web, tablet and mobile should be a cross between broadcast and print -- tighter and punchier than print -- more literate and detailed than broadcast writing
  • Putthepowerattheend. This is a broadcast tip. Its also magical for print.
  • Putthepowerattheend. This is a broadcast tip. Its also magical for print. Powerful stories have powerful sentences.
  • Putthepowerattheend. This is a broadcast tip. Its also magical for print. Powerful stories have powerful sentences. Identify the most important or surprising part of every sentence and order the information accordingly.
  • SEO Searchengineoptimization
  • Writesearchableheadlines.
  • Writesearchableheadlines. Punny headlines need context. Your head will likely be read on a mobile phone, too. Your audience is global.
  • Doesthisworkfordigital?
  • Doesthiswork?
  • Writesearchableheadlines. Most people dont go to your homepage to find what they want to read, they use RSS feeds, etc.
  • Writesearchableheadlines. Most people dont go to your homepage to find what they want to read, they use RSS feeds, etc. Be realistic about what people will search for.
  • Writesearchableheadlines. Most people dont go to your homepage to find what they want to read, they use RSS feeds, etc. Be realistic about what people will search for. Use unique, proper nouns: places, people, things.
  • Writesearchableheadlines. The first one to four words are the most important.
  • Writesearchableheadlines. The first one to four words are the most important. Be clear and concise. You have just a few seconds.
  • Bestraightforward. When people click on something thats not worth it, they lose trust in you as a source and are less likely to come back and click on things in the future.
  • Writetheinvisibletext. About 10 percent of text is read only by machines. Its called metadata, and its incredi