Safe Sleep for your Baby - Ireland's Health Service 4 Always place your baby on their back to sleep,

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Transcript of Safe Sleep for your Baby - Ireland's Health Service 4 Always place your baby on their back to sleep,

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    Key Points 4 Always place your baby on their back to sleep, both night and day. 4 Keep your baby smoke free during pregnancy and after birth. 4 The safest place for your baby to sleep at night is in a cot in your room. 4 Place your baby with their feet to the foot of the cot. 4 Make sure your baby’s head and face stays uncovered when asleep. 4 Keep the cot free of soft objects and anything loose or fluffy. 4 Breastfeed your baby, if possible.

    ✖ Don’t smoke during pregnancy. ✖ Don’t smoke or allow anyone to smoke in the home or in the car. ✖ Never fall asleep in bed with your baby if you or your partner smokes. ✖ Never share a bed with your baby when you have taken alcohol or drugs

    (including medication that may make you drowsy). ✖ It is not safe to bed share if your baby is less than three months old or

    was born prematurely or had a low birth weight. ✖ Never fall asleep with your baby on a sofa or an armchair. ✖ Don’t let your baby get too hot.

    Safe Sleep for your Baby Reduce the Risk of Cot Death

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    What is cot death? Cot death is another name for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). It is the sudden and unexpected death of a seemingly healthy baby during sleep. No cause of death can be found, even after a post-mortem examination. However, cot death does not only happen in a cot. It may happen in a pram, bed, car seat, baby seat or anywhere a baby is sleeping. A seemingly healthy baby is put down to sleep and when next checked they are found dead. There has been no sound or sign of a struggle. Cot Death is:

    • sudden and unpredictable • a recognised medical disorder • one of the main causes of death in babies from four weeks

    to one year of age • most common between two and four months of age

    (although it can happen to older babies) • only diagnosed when all other causes of death are ruled out • not caused by immunisations • not caused by vomiting or choking • not suffocation.

    Because we do not know what causes cot death, we cannot completely prevent it. But research has shown that you can take steps to significantly reduce the risk of cot death. If you follow the advice in this booklet you will help reduce your baby’s risk as much as possible.

    Please share this information with everyone who looks after your baby: family, friends, child-minder, crèche, babysitter etc.

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    to circulate)

    Cellular blanket (allows air

    Back to sleep

    Always place your baby on their back to sleep, both night and day.

    Babies who sleep on their tummies have a higher risk of cot death. Always place your baby to sleep on their back, both night and day. This does not increase the risk of choking if they vomit.

    If a baby vomits/spits up while sleeping on their back, it will go back down the oesophagus as it is underneath the trachea (gravity).

    When babies are sleeping on their tummy any vomit will pool at the opening of the trachea making it easier for the baby to choke.

    Make sure everyone who looks after your baby uses the back to sleep position.

    It is not safe to place your baby on their side to sleep because they may roll onto their tummy.

    When your baby is older and able to roll from back to front and back again, let them find their own position to sleep. However you should still place them on their back at the start of sleep time.

    Trachea

    Oesophagus Trachea

    Oesophagus

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    Plagiocephaly (flat head) If your baby always lies with their head in the same position they might develop a ‘flat head’, this is known as plagiocephaly.

    You can prevent this when putting your baby down to sleep, by turning their head so that sometimes they face left and sometimes they face right.

    Sleep positioners and other similar products including pillows Do not use sleep positioners and other similar products as they do not prevent cot death or flat head and are a suffocation risk.

    Pillows and cushions of any kind are not necessary and should not be used as they are a suffocation risk.

    Elevating your baby’s sleep surface does not reduce reflux and is not recommended.

    Keep the cot free of soft objects and anything loose or fluffy (e.g. cot bumpers, duvets, toys, wedges, bedding rolls, etc.).

    Sitting and carrying devices Baby seats, car seats, slings, carriers and other similar products are not recommended for routine sleep for your baby.

    Sleeping in a sitting position can cause your baby’s head to fall forward and restrict their airway making it difficult for them to breathe.

    If your baby falls asleep in a sitting position they should be placed on their back to sleep as soon as possible. Babies should not be left sleeping unsupervised while in a seated position.

    Tummy Time Tummy time helps your baby to strengthen their muscles and helps to prevent flat head. It is important to begin from birth. When your baby is awake place them on their tummy on a firm flat surface, while you supervise.

    Never leave your baby alone on their tummy and If your baby falls asleep when on their tummy, be sure to place them onto their back.

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    Smoke-free zone for your baby Do not smoke during pregnancy.

    Smoke-free zone for your baby Do not smoke during pregnancy.

    Smoking during pregnancy greatly increases your baby’s risk of cot death. If you smoke during pregnancy your baby is more likely to be born prematurely or have low birth weight. Premature and low birth weight babies have a higher risk of cot death.

    Your baby’s risk goes up with every cigarette you smoke a day and with every smoker in your home. So if you and your partner both smoke, your baby’s risk is higher than if only one of you smoke. If you can’t quit completely try to cut down the number of cigarettes you smoke daily.

    Remember…

    The more you smoke, the higher the risk. You are twice as likely to succeed in giving up smoking if you get support to quit.

    For more information and support on quitting smoking, phone the National Smokers’ Quitline on FREEPHONE 1800 201 203 FREETEXT QUIT to 50100 or visit the website www.quit.ie

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    Smoke-free zone for your baby Do not smoke during pregnancy.

    Smoking during pregnancy increases your baby’s risk of cot death.

    If you smoke during pregnancy your baby is more likely to be born prematurely or have low birth weight. Premature and low birth weight babies have a higher risk of cot death.

    Remember… The more you smoke, the higher the risk.

    0

    x3

    x5

    x7

    x9

    1-9 Number of cigarettes smoked per day

    10-19 20+

    x11

    x13

    x15

    RISK OF COT DEATH

    Your baby’s risk goes up with every cigarette you smoke a day and with every smoker in your home.

    So if you and your partner both smoke, your baby’s risk is higher than if only one of you smoke.

    For information and support on quitting smoking, phone the National Smokers' Quitline on Callsave 1850 201 203 Monday - Saturday, 7am-8pm

    or visit the website www.quit.ie

    SIDS A5 booklet 2011:Layout 1 09/12/2011 14:23 Page 4

    4

    Smoke-free zone for your baby Do not smoke during pregnancy.

    Smoking during pregnancy increases your baby’s risk of cot death.

    If you smoke during pregnancy your baby is more likely to be born prematurely or have low birth weight. Premature and low birth weight babies have a higher risk of cot death.

    Remember… The more you smoke, the higher the risk.

    0

    x3

    x5

    x7

    x9

    1-9 Number of cigarettes smoked per day

    10-19 20+

    x11

    x13

    x15

    RISK OF COT DEATH

    Your baby’s risk goes up with every cigarette you smoke a day and with every smoker in your home.

    So if you and your partner both smoke, your baby’s risk is higher than if only one of you smoke.

    For information and support on quitting smoking, phone the National Smokers' Quitline on Callsave 1850 201 203 Monday - Saturday, 7am-8pm

    or visit the website www.quit.ie

    SIDS A5 booklet 2011:Layout 1 09/12/2011 14:23 Page 4

    4

    Smoke-free zone for your baby Do not smoke during pregnancy.

    Smoking during pregnancy increases your baby’s risk of cot death.

    If you smoke during pregnancy your baby is more likely to be born prematurely or have low birth weight. Premature and low birth weight babies have a higher risk of cot death.

    Remember… The more you smoke, the higher the risk.

    0

    x3

    x5

    x7

    x9

    1-9 Number of cigarettes smoked per day

    10-19 20+

    x11

    x13

    x15

    RISK OF COT DEATH

    Your baby’s risk goes up with every cigarette you smoke a day and with every smoker in your home.

    So if you and your partner both smoke, your baby’s risk is higher than if only one of you smoke.

    For information and support on quitting smoking, phone the National Smokers' Quitline on Callsave 1850 201 203 Monday - Saturday, 7am-8pm

    or visit the website www.quit.ie

    SIDS A5 booklet 2011:Layout 1 09/12/2011 14:23 Page 4

    4 5

    Smoke-free zone for your baby Do not smoke during pregnancy.

    Smoking during pregnancy greatly increases your baby’s risk of cot death. If you smoke during pregnancy your baby is more likely to be born pre