Renewable Energy: Wind, Solar Thermal, Photovoltaics

Click here to load reader

  • date post

    22-Jun-2015
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    716
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

description

This 200-level seminar will discuss opportunities for integrating solar and wind energy into commercial construction projects. In this presentation, we will examine how to: 1. -Create and present a best option plan for owners or managers wishing to integrate renewable energy installations (ie Photovoltaics, Solar Thermal and Wind). The integration will include review of the renewable energy application in partnership with varied heating solutions (conventional, radiant, geothermal); 2. -Identify and calculate current local rebates and tax incentives for various renewable energy options, enabling delivery of rough costs associated with a renewable option; and 3. -Integrate various requirements for renewable in building design and planning processes. The two hour presentation will consist of Powerpoint with an encouraged Q&A exchange. 2 AIA Sustainable Design HSW/CEU will be offered for attending this seminar. Liz Argo, Director of Outreach and Media Development at Alteris Renewables Inc, will be delivering this seminar.

Transcript of Renewable Energy: Wind, Solar Thermal, Photovoltaics

  • Renewable Energy: Wind, Solar Thermal, and Photovoltaics

    Liz ArgoAlteris Renewables Outreach Director

  • This presentation is protected by US and International copyright laws. Reproduction, distribution, display and use of the presentation without written permission of the speaker is prohibited. Alteris Renewables Inc. - Earth Friendly Energy Group 2009formerly SolarWrights, WindWrights and Solar Works, Inc.Copyright Materials

  • Incorporating renewable energy systems into your residential, commercial and industrial projects Understand existing renewable energy optionsUnderstand $$ costs - applying current local rebates and tax incentivesUnderstand basic building requirements for optimal integration of renewable energy

  • Renewable EnergyPhotovoltaicsSolar Hot WaterSolar Space HeatingWind TurbinesGeothermal EnergyMicro-HydroBiomass

  • Renewable EnergyPhotovoltaicsSolar Hot WaterSolar Space HeatingWind TurbinesGeothermal EnergyMicro-HydroBiomass

  • Gulls Nest Condominiums12 Affordable Homes Units Cape Light Compacts Green Affordable Homes

  • Gulls Nest CondominiumsBuilt using: Energy Star and LEED guidelines Renewable Energy: Best option - PV, Wind or Solar Thermal

  • Provincetown = Wind TurbineGreat Wind Resource

  • Great Wind Resource

  • Residential Scale Wind Turbine on a 60 Monopole

  • 10 kW Residential Scale Wind Turbine on a 100 Self Supporting Lattice Tower

  • NorthWind 100 Wind Turbine on a 120 Tower

  • Large Community Wind Turbines1.5 MW

  • Vertical Axis Turbine Technology

  • Building Mounted Wind Generator IssuesAll wind turbines vibrate, and they transmit this vibration to the structure on which they're mounted.

    All rooftops create turbulence that interferes with the wind turbine's operation.

  • Building Mounted Wind Generator IssuesIndal Darrieus turbine on a school in eastern Canada circa 1980. The turbine operated briefly before it was removed because of the damage it caused to the building.

  • SitingThree rules for successful wind installation

    Good Height

  • SitingThree rules for successful wind installation

    Good HeightTall Tower

  • SitingThree rules for successful wind installation

    Good HeightTall TowerGet the turbine up high

  • SitingThree rules for successful wind installation

    Good HeightTall TowerGet the turbine up high

    Because the energy in wind is proportional to the cube of the wind speed ...

  • Does not include Annual Maintenance

    How much does Wind cost? Variables which will affect cost: - Height & Type of tower (tilt up, lattice, monopole) - Soil conditions for tower installation - Length of run from install site to power tie-in

    Size -Approximate Costs -2.5kW(in 12mph wind may provide 5,000kWh)$38,000.0010kW(in 12mph wind may provide 15,000kWh)$80,000.00100kW(in 12mph wind may provide 170,000kWh)Will require three phase power available$500,000.00

  • Massachusetts Residential Rebates for microwind turbines under 10kW- through the Small Renewables Initiative (SRI)

    The MTC announced its new SRI program in January. The rebates will be production based due to lower than anticipated production from previous installations.State incentive programs? Small Wind

  • Large WindMassachusetts Residential Rebates for turbines over 10kW- through the Commonwealth Wind Initiative

    The Grant is a twice yearly competitive grant program with awards ranging from $20,000 - $240,000.00.State incentive programs? Large Wind

  • Tax CreditsFederal Tax Credit New as of February 2009 30% of costs No limit for installations =< 100kW

    State Tax Credits Massachusetts: $1,000.00

  • Wind Considerations Neighborhood logistics are a greater consideration due to noise, flicker, and visual considerations.A wind installation in the appropriate location can provide the quickest payback.A significantly higher maintenance profile accompanies a wind installation. Zoning restrictions can make wind a lengthy installation effort.

  • Wind Considerations Neighborhood logistics are a greater consideration due to noise, flicker, and visual considerations.A wind installation in the appropriate location can provide the quickest payback.A significantly higher maintenance profile accompanies a wind installation. Zoning restrictions can make wind a lengthy installation effort.

  • Solar EnergyPV & ThermalSilentRequires no fuelEmission freePollution free No moving partsInexhaustible Resource

  • Household Energy Use as % of total household consumption

    Chart3

    0.61

    0.167

    0.033

    0.023

    0.05

    0.02

    0.1

    Annual Household Energy Usesin the Northeast

    Cooking 5%

    Electric A/C 2%

    Refrig. 3%

    Sheet1

    Annual Household Energy Uses

    Northeast US

    use% of totalBTU x 10^6*

    Space Heating61%71.4

    Water Heating17%19.6

    Refrig.3%3.9

    Electric Air Condit.2%2.7

    Cooking5%5.9

    Clothes Drying2%2.3

    Lighting & Appliances10%11.7

    Total100%117.2

    Source: EIA; 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

    *site energy

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet1

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    &A

    Page &P

    Annual Household Energy Usesin the Northeast

    Refrig. 3%

    Electric A/C 2%

    Cooking 5%

    Sheet2

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet3

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet4

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet5

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet6

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet7

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet8

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet9

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet10

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet11

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet12

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet13

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet14

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet15

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet16

    &A

    Page &P

  • Household Energy Use as % of total household consumption

    Chart3

    0.61

    0.167

    0.033

    0.023

    0.05

    0.02

    0.1

    Annual Household Energy Usesin the Northeast

    Cooking 5%

    Electric A/C 2%

    Refrig. 3%

    Sheet1

    Annual Household Energy Uses

    Northeast US

    use% of totalBTU x 10^6*

    Space Heating61%71.4

    Water Heating17%19.6

    Refrig.3%3.9

    Electric Air Condit.2%2.7

    Cooking5%5.9

    Clothes Drying2%2.3

    Lighting & Appliances10%11.7

    Total100%117.2

    Source: EIA; 2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey

    *site energy

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet1

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    &A

    Page &P

    Annual Household Energy Usesin the Northeast

    Refrig. 3%

    Electric A/C 2%

    Cooking 5%

    Sheet2

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet3

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet4

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet5

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet6

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet7

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet8

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet9

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet10

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet11

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet12

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet13

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet14

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet15

    &A

    Page &P

    Sheet16

    &A

    Page &P

  • SDHW Costs for Residential ProjectsSolar hot water systems cost around $12,000 before incentives - (to service two persons)There is a 30% Federal Tax Credit for Solar Hot Water SystemsThere is a $1,000 State Tax Credit for Solar Hot Water Systems (Massachusetts only)If you have natural gas, you may qualify for additional incentives from National Grid ($1,500)

  • Solar Domestic Hot Water System How does it work? Household Hot Water TankHot Water to House

  • Solar Domestic Hot Water System How does it work? About 1 collector per personHousehold Hot Water TankHot Water to House

  • Main Home Tank with Solar Supplement Storage Tank feed

  • Domestic Hot WaterClosed-loop vs. Drainback Systems

    Circulates Glycol mixture in a closed loopCirculates water (or glycol mixture) - Liquid drains into holding tank when not called onDisadvantage: Glycol can overheat when underutilizedDisadvantage: Collectors sit up at a slight angle off the roof and concern over freezing

  • Solar Drainback Hot Water HeaterNote slight tilt of collectors

  • VELUX Solar Domestic Hot Water SystemFlashed to roof just like a skylightClosed-loop

  • Household Energy Use as % of total household consumption

    Chart3

    0.61

    0.167

    0.033

    0.023

    0.05

    0.02

    0.1

    Annual Household Energy Usesin the Northeast

    Cooking 5%

    Electric A/C 2%

    Refrig. 3%

    Sheet1

    Annual Household Energy Uses

    Northeast US

    use% of totalBTU x 10^6*

    Space Heating61%71.4

    Water Heating17%19.6

    Refrig.3%3.9

    Electric Air Condit.2%2.7

    Cooking5%5.9

    Clothes Drying2%2.3

    Lighting & Appliances10%11.7

    Total100%117.2

    Source: EIA; 2001 Res