Regulation of Computer Games

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  • 1. Regulation of Computer Games Sam, Hannah, Wada
  • 2. Examples According to out-law.co, in 2005 the gaming industry witnessed an enormous amount of pressure from critics over titles such as Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas. Some examples of video games that have been intensely criticised: Tomb Raider (1996)- criticised for an unauthorized software patch nicknamed 'Nude Raider' was created by fans which allowed players to play as a nude version of Lara Croft (complete with graphic nudity). Ethnic Cleansing (2002)- this game contained racially motivated violence- white supremacist theme. Grand Theft Auto series (1997- present)- Sexual themes, drug use, racism, nudity, language, drunk driving, violence (against civilians and law enforcement officers). Manhunt and Manhunt 2 (2003, 2007)- Violence and gore. Manhunt gained significant controversy after it was alleged that the game inspired a teenager to commit a murder. It has been labelled as possibly the most violent video game ever made.
  • 3. Case study (Doom, 1993) Doom is a 1993 science fiction horror-themed first-person shooter video game by id Software. Doom is well known for its high level of graphic violence and satanic imagery, attracting a broad range of groups which generated controversies. This lead to Doom being enlisted as one of the top ten most controversial games of all time by Yahoo! Games. It was criticized by religious organizations for its diabolic undertones and was dubbed a "mass murder simulator" by critic and Killology Research Group founder David Grossman.
  • 4. Critics Even though there has been a lot of criticisms going around regarding violent video games, some people still believes that we need to see violence to understand what it is like and to be able to distinguish between the right and wrong. Their belief have been echoed by Martin Barker, a media effects researcher, who states: We need to see violence as it is part of real life and helps us to understand the world we live in. we are able to make a distinguish between real and on screen violence.
  • 5. Douglas Gentile argues Another Media effect researcher, Douglas Gentile argues Barkers point, he offers a range of scientific proof that antisocial and dangerous behaviour increases due to playing violent video games.
  • 6. Newspaper Article: http://www.theguar dian.com/commenti sfree/2013/dec/31/ grand-theft-auto-5torture-violencevideo-games
  • 7. Our point of view We believe that video games dont provoke people to be violent. They should be responsible enough to distinguish between real and made up violence. It alspo sometimes depends on parents to teach them the difference between real and unreal.