Reduced-order Modeling of Reacting Supersonic Flows in...

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Scramjet Nozzle Model Dalle, Torrez, Driscoll Vehicle Model Motivation MASIV Code Aerodynamic Model Flow Model Gas Model Scramjet Nozzle 1D Comparison 2D Comparison Conclusions Appendix Programs Performance References Reduced-order Modeling of Reacting Supersonic Flows in Scramjet Nozzles 46th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion Conference & Exhibit Derek J. Dalle, Sean M. Torrez, James F. Driscoll October 17, 2010 CC C S Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 1/29

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  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Reduced-order Modeling ofReacting Supersonic Flows in

    Scramjet Nozzles46th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE Joint Propulsion

    Conference & Exhibit

    Derek J. Dalle, Sean M. Torrez, James F. Driscoll

    October 17, 2010

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 1/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Canonical propulsion flowpath

    8 1a 1b1c

    1d 2a 3a 4a 4b 5a 6a

    Several inlet ramps for compression efficiencyArbitrarily shaped, variable-area ductFuel injection trough any number of portsJet mixing in combustorNozzle with recombination and external expansion

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 2/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Integration with hypersonic vehicle

    Three-dimensional vehicle with triangular panels

    Propulsion flowpath modeled as two-dimensional

    Vogel, J. M., Kelkar, A. G., Inger, G., Whitmer, C., Sidlinger, A., andRodriguez, A., Control-Relevant Modeling of Hypersonic Vehicles, 2009American Control Conference.

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 3/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Control design and evaluation

    Control of air-breathinghypersonic vehicles notwell studiedCFD not yet appropriatefor this problemImportant for our view ofoptimizationRequires very fast modelGoal is a vehicle modelthat can be used bycontrol designers on asingle computerInlet and combustormodels also developed

    6 6.5 7 7.5 8 8.5 9 9.5 10 10.50.03

    0.02

    0.01

    0

    0.01

    0.02

    0.03

    0.04

    M[1]F

    /(in

    u2 in

    Ain

    )[1]

    Installed Thrust

    Plot of thrust for various flight Mach numbers ofone scramjet design.

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 4/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    The Michigan/AFRL Scramjet In Vehicle code

    InletWave interactions solved using exact solutionExpansions discretizedArbitrary number of distinct regions tracked

    CombustorRealistic fuel-air mixing from jet lawsFinite-rate chemistry pre-tabulated from flamelet solutionsVariable fuel injection and duct area changeWill incorporate isolator to cover ram/scram transition

    NozzleUses same aerodynamic model as inletUses conditions from combustor (can be non-uniform)Incorporates finite-rate chemistry

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 5/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Information flow in MASIV

    Data flow

    Inlet Combustor Nozzle

    SAMURI SAMURI

    Force/Moment

    Design

    Conditions

    SolutionOptions

    Station 2

    Options SolutionStation 5

    MASIV

    User only interacts with green blocksDefault vehicle design provided

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 6/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Aerodynamic model (SAMURI)

    Supersonic AerodynamicModel Using RiemannInteractions

    Uses oblique shock theory

    Discrete expansion waves

    Arbitrary number of waveinteractions

    Accounts for caloricallyimperfect gas

    Any geometry with nodetached waves

    Two diamond airfoils in M = 2, = 0 flow

    Sample inlet geometry at M = 8

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 7/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Shock/expansion theory

    Oblique shocksPerfect-gas obliqueshock analyticsolutiona

    Cubic polynomial forsin where is thewave angleThree solutions

    Weak oblique shockStrong oblique shockEntropy-destroyingshock

    aThompson, M. J. A Note on theCalculation of Oblique Shock WaveCharacteristics. Journal ofAerospace Sciences. 1950 vol. 27,pp. 741-744

    control volume A

    control volume B

    Illustration of two control volumes around a diamond airfoil

    Net fluxes into A must be the sameas net fluxes into BDrag is not a function of the controlvolume used to compute it

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 8/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    The case for expansion shocks

    Discrete expansions

    Finite-strength waves aredifferent from continuousexpansionsOne degree of freedom (waveangle) and three constraints(mass and momentumconservation)

    Solution

    Use downstream state forextra degrees of freedomLeads exactly to the obliqueshock conditionsStill accurate if expansionsare split into several shocks

    Control volume

    Control volume around an expansion withnexp = 1

    Net mass/momentum fluxinto control volume must bezeroSame for any other controlvolume that does not crossthe surface

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 9/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Discretized expansion waves

    DiscretizationMakes conditions a piecewiseconstant function of angleUsing angles based on Guassianquadrature minimizes A

    B(M() M())2 d

    Puts waves near edges of expansionGoal is to keep accuracy high andnexp low

    ConservationUse expansion shocksEstimate of state B will be slightlyinaccurate

    A

    B

    Smooth expansion with = 18.4and M = 1.5

    Sample expansion with nexp = 4

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 10/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Riemann problem

    Discontinuous regionscome in contact whenshocks intersectRegions B and C musthave the same pressureDensity and temperaturemay differFlow matches directionWaves separate regions Afrom B and D from CMain limiter of codeperformance

    Zoom in on a generic flow

    A

    B

    C

    D

    B

    A

    D

    A

    A

    D

    C

    D

    C

    Sketch of two interacting waves.

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 11/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Finte-rate chemistry

    A

    B

    C

    D D

    A

    C

    B

    D

    A

    Compatible with most reduced mechanismsMass fractions update periodically along streamlinesGenerates new regions with each chemistry updateConditions still considered constant in each polygonNo chemistry across width of wave

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 12/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Reduced chemical mechanism

    Hydrogen-Air combustion mechanisma

    33 one-way reactions and 14 species (including Argon)Program contains interpreter to use any mechanism

    aJachimowski, C. J. An analytic study of the Hydrogen-Air reaction mechanism with application to SCRAMJETcombustion. NASA Technical Paper 2791, 1988

    1 H2 +O2 2OH

    2 H+O2 OH+O

    3 O+H2 OH+H

    4 OH+H2 H2O+H

    5 2OH H2O+O

    6 H+OH+M H2O+M

    7 2H+M H2 +M

    8 H+O+M OH+M

    9 H+O2 +M HO2 +M

    10 HO2 +H H2 +O211 HO2 +H 2OH

    12 HO2 +H H2O+O

    13 HO2 +O O2 +OH

    14 HO2 +OH H2O+O215 2HO2 H2O2 +O216 H+H2O2 H2 +HO217 O+H2O2 OH+HO218 OH+H2O2 H2O+HO219 H2O2 +M 2OH+M

    20 2O+M O2 +M

    21 2N+M N2 +M

    22 N+O2 NO+O

    23 N+NO N2 +O

    24 N+OH NO+H

    25 N+NO+M HNO+M

    26 H+HNO NO+H227 O+HNO NO+OH

    28 OH+HNO NO+H2O

    29 HO2 +HNO NO+H2O230 HO2 +NO NO2 +OH

    31 H+NO2 NO+OH

    32 O+NO2 NO+O233 NO2 +M NO+O+M

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 13/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Nozzle geometry

    Nozzle may have smooth surfacebut modeled as a series of flatramps hereSignificant expansion ratio andflow dominated by expansion fansLower exhaust plume boundaryaffected by freestream pressureand wave interactionsPotentially affected byrecombination of radical speciesfrom the combustorDifficult to define optimum buteasy to obtain good performance

    H4

    H5

    H6

    L5y

    x

    Sample scramjet nozzle geometry

    Corresponding solution (temperature)

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 14/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Geometry and boundary conditions

    GeometryGeometry from last slideMostly external expansionExpansion ratio of 5Emphasizestwo-dimensional flow

    ConditionsFlight Mach number of 1810% dissociationVery high exit velocitySelected to emphasizerecombination

    Property Freestream Post-combustor 0.001966 kg/m3 0.002240 kg/m3

    p 149.1 Pa 1094 PaT 264.2 K 1400 Ku 5865 m/s 5131 m/s

    YN2 0.755590 0.734173YO2 0.231522 0YAr 0.012888 0.012523

    YH2O 0 0.227974YH 0 0.001417

    YOH 0 0.023913

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 15/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Validation models

    SAMURI with chemistryTwo-dimensional waveinteraction modelJachimawski chemicalmechanismInviscid solutionMost accuratereduced-order model

    SAMURI without chemistryTwo-dimensional waveinteraction modelFrozen chemistryInviscid solutionFastest model

    Two-dimensional CFDCommercial CFD++packageJachimawski chemicalmechanismViscous solutionApproximately 300,000cells

    Quasi-1D modelFind plume usingSAMURIOne-dimensional solutionJachimawski mechanismInviscid solution

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 16/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Exhaust plume

    0 1 2 3 4 5

    0.0

    0.5

    1.0

    1.5

    2.0

    2.5

    x [m]

    y[m

    ]

    Very similar plumeRecombination makes plume slightly biggerViscosity seems to not have a noticeable effect

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 17/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Importance of two-dimensional model

    0 1 2 3 4 5

    200

    400

    600

    800

    1000

    x [m]

    p[P

    a]

    Quasi-1D

    CFD

    2D, no chemistry

    2D, with chemistry

    Pressure

    0 1 2 3 4 5

    800

    900

    1000

    1100

    1200

    1300

    1400

    x [m]

    T[K

    ]

    Quasi-1D

    CFD

    2D, no chemistry

    2D, with chemistry

    Temperature

    Very similar pressure results for all 2D models

    Slight temperature increase in initial part of nozzle due tochemistry

    Pressure is approximately constant across boundary layer

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 18/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Importance of boundary layer

    Boundary layer has ahuge effect

    Velocity isapproximately thesame as thrust

    Chemistry has smalleffect

    Very large kineticenergies compared torecombination heatrelease

    0 1 2 3 4 5

    5150

    5200

    5250

    5300

    5350

    5400

    5450

    x [m]

    u[m

    /s]

    Quasi-1D

    CFD

    2D, no chemistry

    2D, with chemistry

    Velocity plot

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 19/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Mass fraction results

    0 1 2 3 4 50.228

    0.230

    0.232

    0.234

    0.236

    0.238

    x [m]

    Y H2O

    Quasi-1D

    CFD

    2D, no chemistry

    2D, with chemistry

    YH2O plot

    0 1 2 3 4 5

    0.005

    0.010

    0.015

    0.020

    x [m]

    Y OH

    Quasi-1D

    CFD

    2D, no chemistry

    2D, with chemistry

    YOH plot

    Approximately similar results

    Something causes H2O to dissociate in CFD

    Error in 2D model seems to be due to missing boundary layers

    Accuracy of 1D model is likely a coincidence

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 20/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    2D temperature plots

    CFD

    1400

    1000

    400

    400

    18001400

    1200

    SAMURI

    Maximum temperature 2700 K

    Similar results in inviscid regions

    Large boundary layer

    Note shock wave starting at cowl trailing edge

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 21/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    2D x-velocity plots

    CFD

    5500

    5000

    5700

    5600

    SAMURI

    Maximum velocity 5865 m/s

    Similar results in inviscid regions

    Large boundary layer

    Can calculate viscous drag using control volume

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 22/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    2D plots of OH mass fraction

    CFD

    0.002

    0.022

    0.022

    0.0020.004

    0.008

    0.016

    SAMURI

    Accurate in the 1D region near inflow

    Reaction rate higher in high-temperature boundary layers

    More time to recombine in lower velocity regions

    Plots for other species very similar

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 23/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Conclusions

    MASIV

    SAMURI wave model able to analyze nozzles

    Capable of analyzing finite-rate chemistry

    Computational time less than one second

    Nozzle flow physics

    Viscosity very important

    Has usual effects on temperature, velocity, and thrustAlso plays a role in recombination

    Two-dimensional nature of flow more important than justdetermining the exhaust plume

    Energy due to recombination small compared to kinetic energy

    Recombination happens very quickly in most nozzles

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 24/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Acknowledgments

    MACCCS group, Scott G. V. Frendreis, Matt L. Fotia,Torstens Skujins, Nate Falkiewicz, Carlos E. S. CesnikAFRL/AFOSR, Michael W. Oppenheimer, MichaelA. Bolender, David B. DomanThis research was supported by U.S. Air Force ResearchLaboratory grant FA 8650-07-2-3744 for the Michigan AirForce Research Laboratory Collaborative Center forControl Science.This research was also supported by NASA grantNNX08AB32A, administered by Donald Soloway, technicalmonitor.

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 25/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    2D Aerodynamic Model

    SAMURI data flow

    Geometry

    Preprocess

    Set x = xmin

    Geometryand states

    Set y = ymin

    Update wavepositions

    x = xmax

    no

    Find next x y = ymaxyes

    Find next y

    no

    Find type ofinteraction

    Solve

    Wait forexit signalExit

    yes

    Output

    Conditions

    Basically a sweep through the flow domainOnly works for supersonic flowAll of the flow physics in the Solve block

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 26/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Comparison of SAMURI and CFD

    Results from CFD++.

    Results from reduced-order model.

    Pressure contours; darkest is p/p = 90

    Maximum error is about 6%

    CFD model included viscosity

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 27/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Bibliography

    Vogel, J. M., Kelkar, A. G., Inger, G., Whitmer, C., Sidlinger, A., andRodriquez, A., Control-Relevant Modeling of Hypersonic Vehicles, 2009American Control Confernce, 2009.

    Oppenheimer, M. W., Skujins, T., Bolender, M. A., and Doman, D. B., AFlexible Hypersonic Vehicle Model Developed with Piston Theory, 2007Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference and Exhibit, AIAA Paper No.2007-6396, August 2007.

    Bolender, M. A. and Doman, D. B., Nonlinear Longitudinal DynamicalModel of an Air-Breathing Hypersonic Vehicle, Journal of Spacecraftand Rockets, Vol. 44, No. 2, 2007, pp. 374-387.

    Chavez, F. R. and Schmidt, D. K., Analytical Aeropropulsive/AeroelasticHypersonic-Vehicle Model with Dynamic Analysis, Journal of Guidance,Control, and Dynamics, Vol. 17, No. 6, 1994, pp. 1308-1319.

    OBrien, T. F., Starkey, R. P., and Lewis, M. J., Quasi-One-DimensionalHigh-Speed Engine Model with Finite-Rate Chemistry, Journal ofPropulsion and Power, Vol. 17, No. 6, 2001, pp. 1366-1374.

    Jachimowski, C. J., An analytic study of the Hyrdogen-Air reactionmechanism with application to SCRAMJET combustion, NASATehcnical Paper 2791, 1988

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 28/29

  • Scramjet NozzleModel

    Dalle, Torrez,Driscoll

    Vehicle ModelMotivation

    MASIV Code

    AerodynamicModelFlow Model

    Gas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison

    2D Comparison

    Conclusions

    AppendixPrograms

    Performance

    References

    Papers by our group

    Torrez, S. M., Dalle, D. J., and Driscoll, J. F., Dual Mode Scramjet Design toAchieve Improved Operational Stability, 46th AIAA/ASME/SAE/ASEE JointPropulsion Conference and Exhibit, 2010.Dalle, D. J., Fotia, M. L., and Driscoll, J. F., Reduced-Order Modeling ofTwo-Dimensional Supersonic Flows with Applications to Scramjet Inlets, Journalof Propulsion and Power, Vol. 26, No. 3, 2010, pp. 545-555.Frendreis, S. G. V., Skujins, T., and Cesnik, C. E. S., Six-Degree-of-FreedomSimulation of Hypersonic Vehicles, AIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference& Exhibit, 2009, AIAA Paper 2009-5601.Torrez, S. M., Driscoll, J. F., Dalle, D. J., and Fotia, M. L., Preliminary DesignMethodology for Hypersonic Engine Flowpaths, 16th AIAA/DLR/DGLR/International Space Planes and Hypersonic Systems and Technologies Conference,2009, AIAA Paper 2009-7289.Dalle, D. J., Frendreis, S. G. V., Driscoll, J. F., and Cesnik, C. E. S., HypersonicVehicle Flight Dynamics with Coupled Aerodynamics and Reduced-order PropulsiveModels, AIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference and Exhibit, 2010.Frendreis, S. G. V., and Cesnik, C. E. S., 3D Simulation of a Flexible HypersonicVehicle, AIAA Atmospheric Flight Mechanics Conference & Exhibit, 2010.

    CCCS

    Scramjet Nozzle Model, JPC 2010 29/29

    Vehicle ModelMotivationMASIV Code

    Aerodynamic ModelFlow ModelGas Model

    Scramjet Nozzle1D Comparison2D Comparison

    ConclusionsAppendixProgramsPerformanceReferences