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Slide 2 PRESENTATION HEADER Presentation Title Placeholder PRESENTATION HEADER Presentation Title Placeholder Slide 3 The eQRm Framework Credential Recognition for International Engineering Graduates Instructors Name | Instructors Organization Slide 4 The eQRm Framework Presentation Objectives Explain the underlying issue Trace the evolution of eQRm Present the conceptual framework Identify key players Explain the program creation process Highlight an early adopter Establish the business case for eQRm adoption Share the participant experience Slide 5 Todays Agenda Morning Session Introduction IEEQ Origins and Development C O F F E E eQRm Conceptual Framework Essential Partnerships L U N C H Afternoon Session Program Creation Process C O F F E E An Early Adopter: Ryerson The Business Case Review and Conclusion Slide 6 The eQRm Framework Introductions Who are you? Why are you here? What would you like to accomplish? Slide 7 The eQRm Framework Why eQRm Programs Make Sense IEEs are an important resource There are current shortages of licenced engineers Tried and tested models already exist Engineering graduates become generous alumni Resources are available Slide 8 Questions? Comments? Slide 9 2. Foundations 2.1 The Issue Slide 10 The Issue Foundations Origins and Development of the Internationally-Educated Engineers Qualification (IEEQ) Program Slide 11 The Issue How to accommodate international engineering graduates who immigrate to Canada? Slide 12 The Issue How Big is the Challenge? Engineering Immigrants 1986-91: 12,000 1992-97: 35,000 Immigrant % of Engineering Workforce In BC: 19% In Ontario: 30% 2006 Engineering Registrants having received their engineering degrees from outside of Canada: 50% Slide 13 2.2 Engineers Canadas response: FC2I Slide 14 Engineers Canadas response: FC2I An Agenda for Change The profession should work together to: facilitate the integration of international engineering graduates into the profession, ensure that they can obtain their P.Eng. more quickly and efficiently, avoid lowering admission standards or compromising public safety. Slide 15 Engineers Canadas response: FC2I Credentials Recognition Foreign Credentials Recognition (FCR) Qualifications Recognition (QR) Slide 16 Engineers Canadas response: FC2I Federal Government Perspective Foreign Credentials Recognition should be: Fair Accessible Coherent Transparent Rigorous Slide 17 Engineers Canadas response: FC2I From Consideration to Integration (FC2I) An initiative of Engineers Canada and Engineering Licensing Bodies to: Develop new and improved processes to help IEGs obtain their license Assist IEGs to find engineering employment Slide 18 Engineers Canadas response: FC2I FC2I Phases Phase 1: understand the IEG experience examine provincial and territorial engineering licensing procedures learn from those who work with and employ IEGs Slide 19 Engineers Canadas response: FC2I FC2I Phases Phase II: Analyze Phase I information Identify areas for improvement Labour market study Employment Communications Licensing Build consensus Slide 20 Engineers Canadas response: FC2I FC2I Phases Phase III (current): Implement the recommendations Slide 21 2.3 A parallel response in Manitoba: IEEQ Slide 22 A parallel response in Manitoba: IEEQ Internationally-Educated Engineers Qualification program (IEEQ) engineering Qualifications Recognition model (eQRm) Slide 23 A parallel response in Manitoba: IEEQ IEEQ One-year U of M program Available to IEGs assigned 5 exams or fewer after assessment by APEGM IEGs take courses with other engineering students over an 8- month period Special Practicing Engineering in Manitoba course also required Four-month paid work term Slide 24 A parallel response in Manitoba: IEEQ FC2I Recommendations Addressed by IEEQ studying the feasibility of alternative evaluation systems creating a Working in Canada seminar promoting cross-cultural training studying best practices for integrating IEGs into the workplace developing a mentoring program. Slide 25 2.4 The Working in Canada Course Slide 26 The Working in Canada Course Practicing Professional Engineering in Manitoba Course Working in Canada Course Slide 27 The Working in Canada Course Working in Canada Course Why at University? IEGs are already well integrated into the student body Keeps all course activities at one location Facilitates development of a cohort network Provides a venue for information sharing Creates a sense of belonging Slide 28 The Working in Canada Course Working in Canada Course Alternatives to On-Campus Delivery Continuing Education course Immigrant Serving Agency delivery Workshops delivered by the Regulator or Engineering Society Distance Education Delivery by a specific Industry or Sector group Slide 29 The Working in Canada Course Working in Canada Course Background 90-120 minute timeslot, once per week over two university terms 26 classes in all, divided into four modules: Understanding Culture and Cultural Differences The Organization & Regulation of Professional Engineering in Canada Employability & Employment Maintenance Engineering Law & Engineering Ethics Participants are typically between 30 and 50 years of age Course is continually evaluated and modified Slide 30 The Working in Canada Course Working in Canada Course The Primary Instructor Registered as a P.Eng. Background in industry Formal education in post-secondary teaching and curriculum development Personal experience with immigration and foreign residency Slide 31 The Working in Canada Course Working in Canada Course Use of Guest Speakers Helps to address diverse content Reinforces and validates challenging messages Expands opportunities for students to meet Canadian practicing engineers Slide 32 The Working in Canada Course Working in Canada Course Industry Tours 3-4 tours of typical Canadian engineering environments Tours limited to 10 participants to encourage interaction between students and the hosts Slide 33 The Working in Canada Course Working in Canada Course English Language Support Participants are required to take the Canadian Language Benchmark Assessment (CLBA) Provincial CLBA locations available at: http://www.tcet.com/clba/locs.aspx Access provided to an on-going English language training program Access to up to 10 hours of an ESL tutors time Slide 34 The Working in Canada Course Working in Canada Course Approach to Course Instruction Value placed on participant knowledge Sage on the Stage approach to instruction is avoided Class interaction is encouraged Attention given to cognitive, behavioural, and affective outcomes Learning built on and reinforced over time In-class activities complemented by personal readings and assignments Slide 35 The Working in Canada Course Working in Canada Course Evaluation The individuals participation in class Quizzes Grading of critiques, papers and presentations Personal reflections on learning assignments Interviews with the instructor and counsellors Slide 36 The Working in Canada Course Working in Canada Course Results to Date 9-24 months after taking the course, participants believe they would not be in the same career position without having attended IEEQ Participants perceive IEEQ to be a time-effective alternative to Confirmatory Exams Two of the three cohorts identified support mechanisms within IEEQ as a program strength. Participants perceive IEEQ as a vehicle to transition and integration into Canadian professional engineering The Working in Canada course model is a best practices in recognition and integration programs for immigrant professionals Slide 37 Questions? Comments? Slide 38 Coffee Break Slide 39 3. eQRm Conceptual Framework 3.1 Guiding Principles Slide 40 Guiding Principles The Next Step: eQRm Slide 41 Guiding Principles The Regulatory Context P.Eng. = Academic Qualifications + Four years supervised experience Slide 42 Guiding Principles Assigned Exams Generally a long process The IEG normally undertakes the process alone Exams are a one-shot opportunity None of the immigrants other needs are addressed Slide 43 Guiding Principles Recommended Structural Features Foreign Credentials Recognition External Partnerships Alignment with Access Programs Slide 44 3.2 Licensure Paths Slide 45 Licensure Paths Need to be considered Academically Qualified Need 48 months of acceptable engineer work experience (at least 12 months in Canada) Slide 46 Licensure Paths Where Assessment of Academic Credentials is Required Proficiency Exams Required DETAILS Confirmatory Exams Required DETAILS Assessment of Academic Credentials This is a review of the transcript and course syllabi (course outlines) from the original bachelor degree in engineering The two most likely outcomes are: 1. Complete the Proficiency Exams DETAILS 3. Complete the Confirmatory Exams DETAILS 4. Oral Interview DETAILS 2. Take the Courses at the University of Manitoba DETAILS 6. Internationally Educated Engineers Qualification (IEEQ) Program DETAILS 5. Take the Courses at the University of Manitoba DETAILS Slide 47 Licensure Paths Where Assessment of Academic Credentials is Required CONTINUE PRESENTATION Proficiency Exams Required DETAILS Confirmatory Exams Required DETAILS Assessment of Academic Credentials This is a review of the transcript and course syllabi (course outlines) from the original bachelor degree in engineering The two most likely outcomes are: 1. Complete the Proficiency Exams DETAILS 3. Complete the Confirmatory Exams DETAILS 4. Oral Interview DETAILS 2. Take the Courses at the University of Manitoba DETAILS 6. Internationally Educated Engineers Qualification (IEEQ) Program DETAILS 5. Take the Courses at the University of Manitoba DETAILS Slide 48 Licensure Paths Where Assessment of Academic Credentials is Required Proficiency Exams Required (Upgrading to the level of a bachelor-level engineering degree from an accredited Canadian program). BACK Slide 49