Person-centred therapy today and tomorrow : Vision , challenge and growth

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Person-centred therapy today and tomorrow: Vision, challenge and growth Mick Cooper BAPCA 2011 [email protected] With thanks to Art Bohart, Maureen O’Hara, Peter Schmid and Katherine McArthur
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Person-centred therapy today and tomorrow : Vision , challenge and growth. Mick Cooper BAPCA 2011 [email protected] With thanks to Art Bohart, Maureen O’Hara, Peter Schmid and Katherine McArthur. Aims. To present a personal view of: Current challenges - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Person-centred therapy today and tomorrow: Vision, challenge and growthMick CooperBAPCA 2011

[email protected]

With thanks to Art Bohart, Maureen OHara, Peter Schmid and Katherine McArthur

AimsTo present a personal view of:Current challengesHow we can meet (and grow through) the current challengesBased on a personal vision of the PCA

Draws from new introduction to The Handbook of Person-Centred Psychotherapy and Counselling (2nd ed., due late 2012)A personal vision of the person-centred approach: Core valuesContributing to greater social wellbeing and equity

Developing ways of engaging with people that are deeply respectful and valuing

A personal vision of person-centred therapy: PrinciplesClients as resourceful, agentic humans as worthy of respect as their therapists

Non-pathologisingResponsive to individual clients: Relational responsiveness over standardised techniques

THE CHALLENGES1. The rise of evidence based therapiesTherapeutic practices only valid to the extent that they have been proved to workPerson-centred therapies tend to lack the right sort of evidence (i.e., manualised, experimental RCTs for specific psychological disorders)

1. The rise of evidence based therapiesIdeology of EBTs has become dominant in many countries: e.g., UK (NICE), Germany, USA

UK: publicly-funded person-centred services decommissioned/under threatGermany: PCA is gradually and increasingly disappearing from sight

Direct impact on provision of PCA 2. Dilution of person-centred values practices in haphazard syncretismEveryone does empathy, UPR, congruence these daysJust the basicsMoves towards integrative practices -- away from single-orientation specialisms

PCA principles and values lost in bland mish-mash of practicesAttempts from within the PCA field to integrate, unsystematically, other practicesAnything goes3. Global social, environmental and economic threatsPCA doesnt operate in a vacuumNo world, no PCA!Is person-centred therapy achieving its potential if so much of world is not?GROWTH:

MEETING THE CHALLENGES1. Consolidating and developing the PCA evidence-baseDisseminating the evidence that does exist for PCA therapiesBecoming familiar with it ourselves

1. Consolidating and developing the PCA evidence-baseDeveloping and enhancing the evidence-baseTaking responsibility for generating evidence (no-one is going to do it for us): MSc, PhD, service evaluationConducting research that counts1. Consolidating and developing the PCA evidence-baseRandomised controlled trials (RCTs): e.g., BACPs funding of trial of IAPT-based Counselling for depressionKatie McArthurs PhD pilot trial of school-based humanistic counselling

1. Consolidating and developing the PCA evidence-baseResearch that counts:

Systematic reviews of PCA evidenceCase studiesDeveloping PCA measuresQualitative studies of helpful factors in PCA

Improved PCA practices

2. Articulating, and taking forward, the PCAs unique contributions to the melting pot of therapeutic practicesWhat is our unique contribution?2.1. A humanising commitmentKeeping to the fore a deep respect for clientsReconceptualising psychological distress in non-pathologising terms: e.g., Margaret Warners difficult processes 2.2. Understanding clients as active agents of changeClient as instigator not subject - of changeTherapist as catalyst, not causePowerful research supportLinks to related approaches, such asDuncan, Hubble, Miller

2.3. Non-directivityThe therapeutic importance of supporting clients to take the lead

2.4. Deep relatingMore than a working alliance, but the healing power of a deep and enduring connectednessRelational depthDialogue2.5. Wellbeing as self-concordancePCA is one of the few orientations to emphasise the therapeutic value of being true to ourselvesSupporting people to prize their own diversity and uniqueness: whether personality, sexuality, ethnicity, etc.Strongly supported by social psychological research: Sheldon, Kasser, Self-determination theory

2. Articulating, and taking forward, the PCAs unique contributions to the melting pot of therapeutic practices, throughDiscussing with colleagues/Ensuring these contributions arent neglectedDeveloping new theories/practicesResearch, e.g..

Findings from contemporary RD research (e.g., Knox, Wiggins, Murphy, McLeod) Most therapists, and many clients, experience moments of RD in therapyExperiences of RD are strikingly similar across individuals: e.g., timelessness, aliveness, immersion, soul-to-soul encounterThere tends to be a high level of matching between a therapists, and a clients, experiencing of RDFindings from contemporary RD research (e.g., Knox, Wiggins, Murphy, McLeod) Both clients and therapists report that the experience of RD is associated with positive outcomes quantitative evidence (Wiggins, 2011) suggests that it may be a key predictorFor RD to take place, therapists need to be experienced as genuinely caring and realbut clients needs to choose to open themselves up to the therapist 3. Developing person-centred principles as a basis for integrative practicesDeep respect for clients can be basis for new integrative practices: ResponsivenessOpennessCollaborationTransparencyE.g., David Cains Collaborative person-centered psychotherapy

Pluralistic approach to therapyTo try and develop ways of conceptualising, and practising, therapy that Maximise empowerment of clientsAllows therapists to be open to and draw on their knowledge, skills and resourcesRespects the work of other therapists whatever their orientation

Pluralistic approach: Basic assumptionsLots of different things can be helpful to clientsIf we want to know what is most likely to help clients, we should explore it with themPluralistic approachEmphasis on collaborating/meta-communicating with clients over aims and methods of therapyCan be both:Meta-therapeutic framework for conceptualising therapeutic fieldIntegrative practice

PCT4. Taking PCA concepts and practices back into the socio-political realmDeveloping Rogers political work in the fields of:PeaceworkEmancipatory learningOrganisationsSustainable communitiesLinking to service user organisations (Sanders)

CONCLUSIONBeing expansiveChallenges can lead toAnxietyDefensiveness and shutting down

Our biggest contemporary challenge may be to see current challenges as opportunities rather than threatsGrowth through adversityCurrent challenges offer us an opportunity to: Improve our practice and theoryDevelop our unique potentialEnhance our contribution to the therapeutic and global community

The challenge of being person-centred in a person-centred wayExperientialfieldRigid self-Concept as Person-centredTherapistFlexibleOpen-mindedResponsiveCreativeGrowingAttuned to our corevalue and principles:Deeply ourselvesThank [email protected]

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