PERFORMING ARTS - NCDC

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PERFORMING ARTS TEACHER’S GUIDE SENIOR ONE PROTOTYPE LOWER SECONDARY CURRICULUM

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PROTOTYPE
LOWER SECONDARY CURRICULUM
SENIOR ONE
Published 2020
This material has been developed as a prototype for implementation of the revised Lower Secondary Curriculum and as a support for other textbook development interests.
This document is restricted from being reproduced for any commercial gains.
National Curriculum Development Centre P.O. Box 7002, Kampala- Uganda www.ncdc.co.ug
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Contents
Chapter 1: Arts Making in the Natural Environment .............................................................. 1
Chapter 2: Exploring the Basic Elements of Music ............................................................... 11
Chapter 3: Performing Arts in the Economy ......................................................................... 21
Chapter 4: Performing Arts Making Using African Styles ..................................................... 27
Chapter 5: Exploring the Elements of Music ........................................................................ 36
Chapter 6: Performing Arts in the Economy ......................................................................... 43
Chapter 7: Performing Arts in African Styles ........................................................................ 45
Chapter 8: Exploring the Basic Elements of Music ............................................................... 55
Chapter 9: Performing Arts in the Economy ......................................................................... 63
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Preface This Teacher’s Guide has been designed to enable the teacher to interpret the revised curriculum and use the accompanying learner textbook effectively. The Teacher’s Guide provides guidance on what is required before, during and after the teaching and learning experiences.
To ease the work of the teacher, all the activities and instructions in the Learner’s Book have been incorporated in this Guide but with additional information and possible responses to the activities. The guide has been designed bearing in mind the major aim of the revised curriculum which is to build in the learners the key competences that are required in the 21st century while promoting values and attitudes and effective learning and acquisition of skills, to prepare the learner for higher education and eventually the world of work.
This book has been written in line with the Revised Lower Secondary School Curriculum. The book has incorporated knowledge, skills partly required to produce a learner who has the competences that are required in the 21st century; promoting values and attitudes; effective learning and acquisition of skills in order to reduce unemployment among school graduates.
Associate Professor Betty Ezati Chairperson, NCDC Governing Council
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Preface This Teacher’s Guide has been designed to enable the teacher to interpret the revised curriculum and use the accompanying learner textbook effectively. The Teacher’s Guide provides guidance on what is required before, during and after the teaching and learning experiences.
To ease the work of the teacher, all the activities and instructions in the Learner’s Book have been incorporated in this Guide but with additional information and possible responses to the activities. The guide has been designed bearing in mind the major aim of the revised curriculum which is to build in the learners the key competences that are required in the 21st century while promoting values and attitudes and effective learning and acquisition of skills, to prepare the learner for higher education and eventually the world of work.
This book has been written in line with the Revised Lower Secondary School Curriculum. The book has incorporated knowledge, skills partly required to produce a learner who has the competences that are required in the 21st century; promoting values and attitudes; effective learning and acquisition of skills in order to reduce unemployment among school graduates.
Associate Professor Betty Ezati Chairperson, NCDC Governing Council
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Acknowledgements
This Teacher’s Guide has been designed to enable the teacher to interpret the revised curriculum and use the accompanying learner textbook effectively. The Teacher’s Guide provides guidance on what is required before, during and after the teaching and learning experiences.
To ease the work of the teacher, all the activities and instructions in the Learner’s Book have been incorporated in this Guide but with additional information and possible responses to the activities. The guide has been designed bearing in mind the major aim of the revised curriculum which is to build in the learners the key competences that are required in the 21st century while promoting values and attitudes and effective learning and acquisition of skills, to prepare the learner for higher education and eventually the world of work.
This book has been written in line with the Revised Lower Secondary School Curriculum. The book has incorporated knowledge, skills partly required to produce a learner who has the competences that are required in the 21st century; promoting values and attitudes; effective learning and acquisition of skills in order to reduce unemployment among school graduates.
Grace K. Baguma Director, National Curriculum Development Centre
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THEME FOR TERM 1: EXPLORING AND MAKING CONNECTIONS IN PERFORMING ARTS
Chapter 1: Arts Making in the Natural Environment
By the end of this chapter, the learner should be able to: a. identify and present Performing Arts that reflect African
contexts and influences. b. appreciate how the natural environment influences the arts
and preserves cultural heritage.
characteristics • Accompaniment • Costume • Prop • Choreograph • Cultural heritage • Environment
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Teacher Preparation You will need: voice, instruments, costumes, props, makeup, and space for the performance
Teacher Instruction Pair work
Use 5 minutes to guide and observe learners read the introductory notes of this activity in the Learner’s Textbook and as indicated below.
Introduction In this chapter, you are going to have learners sing Ugandan folk songs depicting the natural environment. You will ensure they employ appropriate vocal characteristics, accompaniment, costume and props. You will then guide them to choreograph appropriate dances to the songs. You will also guide them to retell the story in the song, identifying characters in it and then dramatizing it. You will then observe them brainstorm the basic African characteristics of Performing Arts within some performed pieces. Ensure they carefully explore how elements of the natural environment are reflected in the song, drama and dance as well as highlight aspects of cultural heritage in them.
Performing Ugandan Folk Arts
Music Uganda is inhabited by different ethnic groups, each with a musical tradition of its own. This traditional music inheritance has been orally transmitted from generation to generation for centuries. All the different ethnic groups continue to value and practice their respective traditional musical styles. Different groups use different vocal tones. In Bunyoro, the tone quality is called ‘Kuhugura’ and in Buganda, ‘eggono’. Can you suggest any others?
Ugandan music usually follows the pentatonic scale, but a few tribes also use a hexatonic scale. Most of the Ugandan vocal music is accompanied by traditional instruments.
Fig 1.1: Performing a Ugandan traditional folk song
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Teacher Preparation You will need: voice, instruments, costumes, props, makeup, and space for the performance
Teacher Instruction Pair work
Use 5 minutes to guide and observe learners read the introductory notes of this activity in the Learner’s Textbook and as indicated below.
Introduction In this chapter, you are going to have learners sing Ugandan folk songs depicting the natural environment. You will ensure they employ appropriate vocal characteristics, accompaniment, costume and props. You will then guide them to choreograph appropriate dances to the songs. You will also guide them to retell the story in the song, identifying characters in it and then dramatizing it. You will then observe them brainstorm the basic African characteristics of Performing Arts within some performed pieces. Ensure they carefully explore how elements of the natural environment are reflected in the song, drama and dance as well as highlight aspects of cultural heritage in them.
Performing Ugandan Folk Arts
Music Uganda is inhabited by different ethnic groups, each with a musical tradition of its own. This traditional music inheritance has been orally transmitted from generation to generation for centuries. All the different ethnic groups continue to value and practice their respective traditional musical styles. Different groups use different vocal tones. In Bunyoro, the tone quality is called ‘Kuhugura’ and in Buganda, ‘eggono’. Can you suggest any others?
Ugandan music usually follows the pentatonic scale, but a few tribes also use a hexatonic scale. Most of the Ugandan vocal music is accompanied by traditional instruments.
Fig 1.1: Performing a Ugandan traditional folk song
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Activity 1.1: Performing African traditional folk songs
You will need: voice, Ugandan traditional music instruments and space for the performance This activity will take 2 periods. 1. Pair learners, guide and observe them as they:
i) study Figure 1.1 and explain what they see in the picture. ii) explain what the people in the picture are doing and why. iii) tell where they think these people are.
2. Divide learners into four groups to:
i) identify and perform a Ugandan traditional folk song depicting their natural environment. Let them employ appropriate vocal characteristics and accompany their singing with suitable traditional music instruments.
ii) let each group present their work to the whole class. iii) write short notes about the objects they see in the picture explaining how these
can be used to make music. They should also discuss and write short notes about the message in the songs they have performed. Let these be the products for your classroom-based assessment. (Ensure teamwork, tolerance to one another and respect for others’ views)
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Performing Ugandan Traditional Folk Dances
Dance Like folk songs, Ugandan folk dances are an inheritance that has been transmitted from generation to generation for centuries. All the different ethnic groups continue to value and practice their respective traditional musical dances. Different ethnic groups use different motifs, instruments, costumes and props.
Fig 1.2: Performing a folk dance
Activity 1.2: Performing Ugandan traditional folk dances This Activity will take 2 periods. Divide learners into four groups, guide and observe them to:
i) prepare and perform the folk song they sung in Activity 1.1 or any other of their choice.
ii) choreograph a dance to the song and improvise costumes, props and appropriate accompaniment to it. Emphasize teamwork, cooperation and respect for one another at this point.
iii) perform the dances to the whole class. Emphasise time management here. iv) Write short notes on the following which will be the product for your classroom-
based assessment. a) What three features of Ugandan dance can you identify in the dance you
have just performed? b) On which function would you perform this dance? c) Explain how the elements of the natural environment are reflected in the
dance you have performed. d) Talk with examples about what you believe is the preserved and
highlighted aspects of cultural heritage in the dance piece.
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Performing Ugandan Traditional Folk Dances
Dance Like folk songs, Ugandan folk dances are an inheritance that has been transmitted from generation to generation for centuries. All the different ethnic groups continue to value and practice their respective traditional musical dances. Different ethnic groups use different motifs, instruments, costumes and props.
Fig 1.2: Performing a folk dance
Activity 1.2: Performing Ugandan traditional folk dances This Activity will take 2 periods. Divide learners into four groups, guide and observe them to:
i) prepare and perform the folk song they sung in Activity 1.1 or any other of their choice.
ii) choreograph a dance to the song and improvise costumes, props and appropriate accompaniment to it. Emphasize teamwork, cooperation and respect for one another at this point.
iii) perform the dances to the whole class. Emphasise time management here. iv) Write short notes on the following which will be the product for your classroom-
based assessment. a) What three features of Ugandan dance can you identify in the dance you
have just performed? b) On which function would you perform this dance? c) Explain how the elements of the natural environment are reflected in the
dance you have performed. d) Talk with examples about what you believe is the preserved and
highlighted aspects of cultural heritage in the dance piece.
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Activity of Integration: Performing a Ugandan Traditional Drama
This activity will take 2 periods.
The District Inspector of Schools will visit your school next week. Your class has been chosen to entertain the guest. Task:
1. Write a short plan for the day. 2. Prepare a 15 minutes’ skit based on ideas from the natural environment. The
play should have some folk songs, mimicry and simple dances. Talk about your appreciation of the play depicting your natural environment.
Possible Responses
1. The short plan should include: i) Identification of the story as a material from the natural environment for
the play. ii) A class session to read the story and convert it into a script. iii) Rehearsal schedules for developing dialogue out of the story, casting,
directing and acting the play. iv) Making and finding costumes, props. v) Preparing/setting the stage. vi) Inviting the audience. vii) Presenting the play to the guests.
Activity 1.3: Performing African traditional drama
Divide learners into four groups to work out the following activities based on the folk song they sung in Activity 1.1. Guide and observe them:
i) retell the story in the song. ii) identify the characters in it and then dramatize it. iii) present the drama to the whole class. iv) brainstorm any three basic African characteristics of drama and report their
findings to the whole class. v) explain how the elements of the natural environment are reflected in the
drama they have performed. vi) talk with examples about what they believe is the preserved and highlighted
aspects of cultural heritage in the drama piece.
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2. Talk about your appreciation of the play depicting your natural environment.
i) Learners should discuss the story in terms of its genre whether it is a folk story or true story (nonfiction).
ii) Appreciate the materials that the costumes and props are made of i.e. leaves, skin, cloth, hat, stone, walking stick, basket, stool, etc.
iii) The space for staging and the scenery setting of the play in terms of the materials from the environment used whether open arena, assembly ground or built stage in the main hall, scenery setting may be by use of backdrops with artistic drawings, use of tree branches, plants and leaves, etc.
iv) Appreciate the use of some special effects of sound and light if any is used e.g. animal and bird cries and any other sounds from the natural environment.
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2. Talk about your appreciation of the play depicting your natural environment.
i) Learners should discuss the story in terms of its genre whether it is a folk story or true story (nonfiction).
ii) Appreciate the materials that the costumes and props are made of i.e. leaves, skin, cloth, hat, stone, walking stick, basket, stool, etc.
iii) The space for staging and the scenery setting of the play in terms of the materials from the environment used whether open arena, assembly ground or built stage in the main hall, scenery setting may be by use of backdrops with artistic drawings, use of tree branches, plants and leaves, etc.
iv) Appreciate the use of some special effects of sound and light if any is used e.g. animal and bird cries and any other sounds from the natural environment.
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Assessment Grid for Activity of Integration 1: Performing a Ugandan Traditional Drama
Chapter ONE
1. A plan for an arts performance
Score 3: Identifies necessities for the play: costumes, props, instruments, rehearsal time, the cast list, a dance, folk song, the stage, invitations, presentations schedules, etc. (any 6-7)
Score 3: Suggests the right content and cost of the necessities for the play: costumes, props, instruments, rehearsal time, the cast list, a dance, folk song, the stage, invitations, presentations, schedules, etc. (any 6-7)
Score 3: Logically relates the events of the arts performance in regard to schedules and agendas.
Learner earns one point if he/ she has added any relevant element unsolicited in the introduction.
Score 2: Identifies necessities for the play: costumes, props, instruments, rehearsal time, the cast list, a dance, folk song, the stage, invitations, presentations schedules, etc. (any 4-5)
Score 2: Suggests the right content and cost of the necessities for the play: costumes, props, instruments, rehearsal time, the cast list, a dance, folk song, the stage, invitations, presentations schedules, etc. (any 4-5)
Score 2: Somehow relates the events of the arts performance in regard to schedules and agendas.
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Chapter ONE
Basis of Assessment
Criteria 1 Relevancy
Criteria 2 Accuracy
Criteria 3 Coherence
Criteria 4 Excellence
Score 1: Identifies necessities for the play: costumes, props, instruments, rehearsal time, the cast list, a dance, folk song, the stage, invitations, presentations schedules etc. (any 1-3)
Score 1: Suggests the right content and cost of the necessities for the play: costumes, props, instruments, rehearsal time, the cast list, a dance, folk song, the stage, invitations, presentations schedules etc. (any 1-3)
Score 1: Lightly relates the events of the arts performance in regard to schedules and agendas.
2. A 15 minutes’ skit
Score 3: Appropriate choice of costumes, props, instruments and the stage to perform the skit following the planned cast, time, and audience.
Score 3: Appropriate use of body, costumes, props, instruments and the stage to perform the skit following the planned cast, time, and audience.
Score 3: Superior performance of the skit with ideas flowing in a logical manner.
Learner earns one point if he she has added any relevant element unsolicited in the introduction.
Score 2: A reasonable choice of costumes, props, instruments and the stage to perform the skit following the planned cast, time, and audience.
Score 2: A reasonable use of the body, costumes, props, instruments and the stage to perform the skit following the planned cast, time, and audience.
Score 2: Good performance of the skit with ideas flowing in a logical manner.
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Chapter ONE
Basis of Assessment
Criteria 1 Relevancy
Criteria 2 Accuracy
Criteria 3 Coherence
Criteria 4 Excellence
Score 1: Identifies necessities for the play: costumes, props, instruments, rehearsal time, the cast list, a dance, folk song, the stage, invitations, presentations schedules etc. (any 1-3)
Score 1: Suggests the right content and cost of the necessities for the play: costumes, props, instruments, rehearsal time, the cast list, a dance, folk song, the stage, invitations, presentations schedules etc. (any 1-3)
Score 1: Lightly relates the events of the arts performance in regard to schedules and agendas.
2. A 15 minutes’ skit
Score 3: Appropriate choice of costumes, props, instruments and the stage to perform the skit following the planned cast, time, and audience.
Score 3: Appropriate use of body, costumes, props, instruments and the stage to perform the skit following the planned cast, time, and audience.
Score 3: Superior performance of the skit with ideas flowing in a logical manner.
Learner earns one point if he she has added any relevant element unsolicited in the introduction.
Score 2: A reasonable choice of costumes, props, instruments and the stage to perform the skit following the planned cast, time, and audience.
Score 2: A reasonable use of the body, costumes, props, instruments and the stage to perform the skit following the planned cast, time, and audience.
Score 2: Good performance of the skit with ideas flowing in a logical manner.
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Chapter ONE
Score 1:
A fair choice of costumes, props, instruments and the stage to perform the skit following the planned cast, time, and audience.
Score 1: Could have used more appropriately the body, costumes, props, instruments and the stage to perform the skit following the planned cast, time, and audience.
Score 2: Fair performance of the skit with ideas flowing in a somewhat logical manner.
3. Write-up on the appreciation of the play.
Score 3: States the core issues seen in the play and related to the natural environment: genre of the story, communicatio n, language, costumes and props, space use, scenery setting, special effects like sound and light, etc. (Any 5-6)
Score 3: Explains with relevant examples the core issues seen in the play and related to the natural environment: genre of the story, communication, language, costumes and props, space use, scenery setting, special effects like sound and light etc. (Any 5-6)
Score 3: Superior Communicat ion of ideas in a flowing and logical manner.
Learner earns one point if he/ she has added any relevant element unsolicited in the introduction.
Score 2: States the core issues seen in the play and related to the natural environment:
Score 2: Explains with relevant examples the core issues seen in the play and related to the natural
Score 2: Basic Communicat ion of ideas in a flowing and logical manner.
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Chapter ONE
Basis of Assessment
Criteria 1 Relevancy
Criteria 2 Accuracy
Criteria 3 Coherence
Criteria 4 Excellence
genre of the story, communicatio n, language, costumes and props, space use, scenery setting, special effects like sound and light, etc. (Any 3-4)
environment: genre of the story, communication, language, costumes and props, space use, scenery setting, special effects like sound and light etc. (Any 3-4)
Score 1: States the core issues seen in the play and related to the natural environment: genre of the story, communicatio n, language, costumes and props, space use, scenery setting, special effects like sound and light etc. (Any 1-2)
Score 3: Explains with relevant examples the core issues seen in the play and related to the natural environment: genre of the story, communication, language, costumes and props, space use, scenery setting, special effects like sound and light etc. (Any 1-2)
Score 1: Communicat ion of ideas in a less coordinated manner.
Total /28
Chapter Summary In this chapter, the learner has learnt to perform music, dance and drama in Ugandan traditional styles using appropriate vocal characteristics, accompaniment, costume and props and depicting the natural environment.
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Chapter ONE
Basis of Assessment
Criteria 1 Relevancy
Criteria 2 Accuracy
Criteria 3 Coherence
Criteria 4 Excellence
genre of the story, communicatio n, language, costumes and props, space use, scenery setting, special effects like sound and light, etc. (Any 3-4)
environment: genre of the story, communication, language, costumes and props, space use, scenery setting, special effects like sound and light etc. (Any 3-4)
Score 1: States the core issues seen in the play and related to the natural environment: genre of the story, communicatio n, language, costumes and props, space use, scenery setting, special effects like sound and light etc. (Any 1-2)
Score 3: Explains with relevant examples the core issues seen in the play and related to the natural environment: genre of the story, communication, language, costumes and props, space use, scenery setting, special effects like sound and light etc. (Any 1-2)
Score 1: Communicat ion of ideas in a less coordinated manner.
Total /28
Chapter Summary In this chapter, the learner has learnt to perform music, dance and drama in Ugandan traditional styles using appropriate vocal characteristics, accompaniment, costume and props and depicting the natural environment.
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Chapter 2: Exploring the Basic Elements of Music
By the end of this chapter, the learner should be able to: a) appreciate and use basic music elements of pitch,
duration and tempo to create and present music pieces. b) understand the ways in which the natural environment
can be illustrated through the arts.
Key Words • Treble clef • Rhythm • Pitch • Stave • Key G major • Key signature • Simple duple
time • Elements of
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Time: This chapter will take 12 periods. Teacher Preparation You will need: Voice, music scores and space for the performances.
Teacher Instruction Use 10 minutes to pair, guide and observe learners:
i) sing a warm-up song of their choice. ii) read the learning outcomes on the chapter page and introductory notes on the
second page of chapter two in the Learner’s Textbook and as indicated below.
Introduction In this chapter, you are to explore and demonstrate the meaning and effects of the following musical elements: treble clef; stave, key signature of G major; simple duple time; eighth, quarter and half notes. You will then compose, read and write songs following the given elements. You will stage your composition and share ideas on how you will market it to the wider community.
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Time: This chapter will take 12 periods. Teacher Preparation You will need: Voice, music scores and space for the performances.
Teacher Instruction Use 10 minutes to pair, guide and observe learners:
i) sing a warm-up song of their choice. ii) read the learning outcomes on the chapter page and introductory notes on the
second page of chapter two in the Learner’s Textbook and as indicated below.
Introduction In this chapter, you are to explore and demonstrate the meaning and effects of the following musical elements: treble clef; stave, key signature of G major; simple duple time; eighth, quarter and half notes. You will then compose, read and write songs following the given elements. You will stage your composition and share ideas on how you will market it to the wider community.
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Pitch
What is pitch?
You learnt about pitch during your CAPE 1 lessons in Primary school. You drew the G clef and named the lines and spaces of the stave. You were learning to use pitch in music. In this section, you are going to learn more about pitch and use it to sing, compose and write music.
Activity 2.1: Identifying rhythm in songs This activity will take 70 minutes. 1. Guide and observe the learners:
i) sing the song ‘Butterfly tell me how you grow’. They may sing after you if they don’t know it.
ii) sing the song to syllables like wa, la, ku and then to “French rhythm names”
2. Mark the rhythm of the song by:
a) Clapping b) Stamping c) Snapping
3. Facilitate the learners to come up with a product in form of: a) Written rhythms of the song in their notebooks. Here is an example of the first
line/ the phrase. ta-te taa ta-te taa ta-te ta – te taa-aa
| || • Two rhythm passages of eight beats each including
; and rhythms e.g.
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Activity 2.2: Recognising pitch in songs This activity will take 2 periods. 1. Display lyrics of the song ‘Butterfly tell me how you grow’. 2. Guide and observe the learners to:
i) sing the song to sol-fa. ii) sing through the sol-fa on the music ladder upwards and downwards.
3. Divide the class into four groups and facilitate them to come up with a product in form of two written sol-fa passages of up to 8 notes without leaps e.g. d r m f m r r d (Be patient with learners as they engage in arguments to create their product)
4. Facilitate each group and have them engage in a 5 minutes’ conversation about music by presenting their work to the class and pitch their notes correctly.
Ensure the learners listen to each other’s views respectfully and work in teams.
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Activity 2.2: Recognising pitch in songs This activity will take 2 periods. 1. Display lyrics of the song ‘Butterfly tell me how you grow’. 2. Guide and observe the learners to:
i) sing the song to sol-fa. ii) sing through the sol-fa on the music ladder upwards and downwards.
3. Divide the class into four groups and facilitate them to come up with a product in form of two written sol-fa passages of up to 8 notes without leaps e.g. d r m f m r r d (Be patient with learners as they engage in arguments to create their product)
4. Facilitate each group and have them engage in a 5 minutes’ conversation about music by presenting their work to the class and pitch their notes correctly.
Ensure the learners listen to each other’s views respectfully and work in teams.
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Activity 2.3: Writing music on the treble stave 1. Guide and observe individual learners:
i) draw a treble stave. (5 minutes) ii) create at least five words out of letters A, B, C, D, E, F, G and arrange them
correctly on the treble stave.
2. Below is the example given:
3. Write the key signature of key F major on the treble stave(placing the sharp on
the top line F just after the clef and identifying the position of doh on line G. You may demonstrate to the learners how to find the position of doh by placing the ‘t’ to the position of the last sharp and then descend the scale.
4. Read the music on this stave, pitching correctly as they clap the rhythm.
5. Facilitate the learners to come up with a product in form of written music
compositions on the treble stave in F major as in the example number. The learners may use these sol-fa passages for pitch.
a. d r d r m m r r d
b. d r m f s f m r d
c. d d d r d r m r d
6. Facilitate the learners to make a conversation on their compositions by:
i) sight reading them. ii) sharing ideas about various ways of acquiring correct pitching.
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This activity will take 2 periods.
1. Pair and observe learners studying the following music excerpt and guide them to
do the activities that follow.
i) Sing the song to words over and over. ii) Sing the music over and over to sol-fa. iii) Clap the rhythm of the song while saying the French rhythm names. iv) Using 10 minutes, facilitate the learners to come up with a conversation about
identifying: a) How many systems are in the whole piece? b) The number of bars in the music passage. c) The bars with the highest and lowest notes. d) The key of the song.
Ensure learners exhibit a positive attitude to looking for solutions to problems and learning to learn.
2. Facilitate the learners to come up a product in form of:
i) written rhythm of second bar of the song in French rhythm names. ii) a written list of the three growth stages of a butterfly and the bars in the song
where this information is found. iii) a written copy of the music of the song in their notebooks.
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This activity will take 2 periods.
1. Pair and observe learners studying the following music excerpt and guide them to
do the activities that follow.
i) Sing the song to words over and over. ii) Sing the music over and over to sol-fa. iii) Clap the rhythm of the song while saying the French rhythm names. iv) Using 10 minutes, facilitate the learners to come up with a conversation about
identifying: a) How many systems are in the whole piece? b) The number of bars in the music passage. c) The bars with the highest and lowest notes. d) The key of the song.
Ensure learners exhibit a positive attitude to looking for solutions to problems and learning to learn.
2. Facilitate the learners to come up a product in form of:
i) written rhythm of second bar of the song in French rhythm names. ii) a written list of the three growth stages of a butterfly and the bars in the song
where this information is found. iii) a written copy of the music of the song in their notebooks.
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Activity 2.5: Listening to music (aural tasks)
This activity will take two periods.
1. Listen to two pieces of music played to you in key F major. 2. Compare the features of the two pieces regarding rhythm, pitch, tempo and length. 3. Identify the sections that reflect the aspects of the natural environment. 4. Listen to four played melodies of four bars in simple duple time and write them on
the treble stave in key F major.
Activity of Integration: Composing and Performing a Song
The Biology teacher would like to teach about plant roots using a song. The teacher needs your help to compose a tune to these words. The rhythm has been aligned to the words.
Task:
1. Compose a melody to the given words and rhythm using sol-fa without leaps. Start and end on doh.
2. Write your composition on the treble stave using key F major. 3. Sing your melody to sol-fa and then to words.
Possible Responses
1.
2.
3. Depends on each learner’s composition following the rhythm and words given.
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Assessment Grid for Activity of Integration 2
Chapter 2.
Criteria 4
Excellence Out put A four bar melody in simple duple time
1. A four bar simple duple melody in sol-fa notation
Score 3: Composes sol-fa notes of the diatonic major scale (in lower case) to the given rhythms passages.
Score 3: Aligns the pitch (with no leaps) to the given rhythms accurately and appropriately, starting and ending on doh
Score 3: Writes a tuneful and singable melody in conjunct movement.
The learner earns one point if he/she has added any relevant element that was unsolicited in the instruction
Score 2: Composes sol-fa notes of the diatonic major scale to the given rhythms with disregard to the conventional lower case.
Score 2: Aligns the pitch to the given rhythms producing a singable melody but with disregard to leaps, starting, and ending on doh.
Score 2: Writes a singable but not so tuneful melody that may be either in conjunct or disjunctive movement
Score 1: Composes sol-fa notes beyond the diatonic major scale to the given rhythms with disregard to the conventional lower case.
Score 1: Aligns the pitch to the given rhythms producing a rather un-singable melody and with disregard to the conjunct movement, starting and ending on other notes other than doh.
Score 1: Writes an un- singable and untuneful melody that may be either in conjunct or disjunct movement.
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Assessment Grid for Activity of Integration 2
Chapter 2.
Criteria 4
Excellence Out put A four bar melody in simple duple time
1. A four bar simple duple melody in sol-fa notation
Score 3: Composes sol-fa notes of the diatonic major scale (in lower case) to the given rhythms passages.
Score 3: Aligns the pitch (with no leaps) to the given rhythms accurately and appropriately, starting and ending on doh
Score 3: Writes a tuneful and singable melody in conjunct movement.
The learner earns one point if he/she has added any relevant element that was unsolicited in the instruction
Score 2: Composes sol-fa notes of the diatonic major scale to the given rhythms with disregard to the conventional lower case.
Score 2: Aligns the pitch to the given rhythms producing a singable melody but with disregard to leaps, starting, and ending on doh.
Score 2: Writes a singable but not so tuneful melody that may be either in conjunct or disjunctive movement
Score 1: Composes sol-fa notes beyond the diatonic major scale to the given rhythms with disregard to the conventional lower case.
Score 1: Aligns the pitch to the given rhythms producing a rather un-singable melody and with disregard to the conjunct movement, starting and ending on other notes other than doh.
Score 1: Writes an un- singable and untuneful melody that may be either in conjunct or disjunct movement.
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2. A four bar simple duple melody in staff notation.
Score 3: Uses the following in music: the treble stave, treble clef, the key signature of F major, time signature of simple duple time, staff rhythm symbols, bar lines and lyrics of the song. (any 6-7)
Score 3: Uses the following accurately: the treble stave, the treble clef, the key signature of F major, time signature of simple duple time, staff rhythm symbols, bar, lyrics of the song written below the stave and not cramping with the notes. (any 6-7)
Score 3: Produces an exceptionally balanced and unified song with equal bars, well placed bar lines, well- spaced and hyphen separated syllables of word.
Score 2: Uses the following in music: the treble stave, the key signature of F major, time signature of simple duple time, staff rhythm symbols and lyrics of the song. (any 4-5)
Score 2: Uses the following accurately: the treble stave, the treble clef, the key signature of F major, time signature of simple duple time, staff rhythm symbols, bar, lyrics of the song written below the stave and not cramping with the notes. (any 4-5)
Score 2: Produces a basically balanced and unified song with equal bars, well placed bar lines, well- spaced and hyphen- separated syllables of words
Score 1: Uses the following in music: the treble stave, the key signature of F major, time signature of simple duple time, staff rhythm symbols and lyrics of the song. (Any 1-3)
Score 1: Uses the following accurately: the treble stave, the treble clef, the key signature of F major, time signature of simple duple time, staff rhythm symbols, bar, lyrics of the song written below the stave and not cramping with the notes. (any 1-3)
Score 1: Produces a fairly balanced and unified song with equal bars, well placed bar lines, well- spaced and hyphen separated syllables of words
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3. A Performance of a four bar simple duple melody in sol- fa notation
Score 3: Sings the song to French rhythm names, sol-fa and words (All the three).
Score 3: Sings the song to words with accurate pitches and rhythm in all the bars.
Score 3: Sings the whole song to sol-fa and words steadily and consistently
Score 2: Sings the song to French rhythm names, sol-fa and words (Any two)
Score 2: Sings the song to words with accurate pitches and rhythms in most of the bars.
Score 3: Sings most of the sections of the song to sol- fa and words steadily and consistently
Score 1: Sings the song to French rhythm names, sol-fa and words (Any one)
Score 1: Sings the song to words but with inaccurate pitches and rhythms in most of the bars.
Score 3: Sings a few sections of the song to sol-fa and words steadily and consistently
Chapter Summary In this chapter, the learner has explored and demonstrated the meaning and effects of musical elements including the treble clef; stave, key signature of G major; simple duple time; eighth, quarter and half notes.
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3. A Performance of a four bar simple duple melody in sol- fa notation
Score 3: Sings the song to French rhythm names, sol-fa and words (All the three).
Score 3: Sings the song to words with accurate pitches and rhythm in all the bars.
Score 3: Sings the whole song to sol-fa and words steadily and consistently
Score 2: Sings the song to French rhythm names, sol-fa and words (Any two)
Score 2: Sings the song to words with accurate pitches and rhythms in most of the bars.
Score 3: Sings most of the sections of the song to sol- fa and words steadily and consistently
Score 1: Sings the song to French rhythm names, sol-fa and words (Any one)
Score 1: Sings the song to words but with inaccurate pitches and rhythms in most of the bars.
Score 3: Sings a few sections of the song to sol-fa and words steadily and consistently
Chapter Summary In this chapter, the learner has explored and demonstrated the meaning and effects of musical elements including the treble clef; stave, key signature of G major; simple duple time; eighth, quarter and half notes.
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Chapter 3: Performing Arts in the Economy
Figure 3.1: At the Uganda National Theatre Teacher Preparation You will need: newspapers, magazines, posters or the Internet.
Teacher Instruction Work in Small Groups
Use 5 minutes to guide and observe learners read the introductory notes of this chapter in the Learner’s Textbook and as indicated below.
Introduction In this chapter, you will learn to identify the employment and career opportunities in the Performing Arts industry. You will listen to or read about, where possible, people from the arts industry talk about career opportunities. From this research, you will make adverts and other publicity materials to celebrate the Performing Arts in your school and beyond.
By the end of this chapter, the learner should be able to understand the commercial roles of the Performing Arts and how these affect the natural environment.
Key Words • Career
industry
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Activity 3.1: Identifying career and making publicity for Performing Arts This activity will take 2 periods 1. Divide learners into four groups, guide and observe them:
i) research about what people from the arts industry talk about career opportunities. You may provide them with newspapers, magazines or the internet.
ii) make a short write-up of the findings in their notebooks.
2. Let them study the pictures in Figure 3.1 and: i) identify the roles the different people in it may be playing in the Performing Arts
industry. ii) Present the findings to (i) above in the class.
Activity of Integration: Preparing for a Commercial Arts Performance This activity will take two periods. Your school choir has qualified to present a two weeks’ commercial performance in the National Theatre at the end of this term. Plans are in high gear to see that this show is a great success. Its success will go a long way to popularize the school both in the community and the country. Task:
1. Identify and write about any six-professional people that will work towards the success of this performance.
2. In five ways, explain the range of audiences where the products of these performing art works could be sold.
3. Design a poster publicising this performance
Possible Responses
1. i) Producer: Gathers ideas for the performing group, composes the music for the
group, selects songs or the items to be performed, etc. (any two) ii) Booking Agent: Responsible for booking live performances and performance
venues. iii) Music Promoter: Responsible for publicizing a concert. iv) Music Publisher: Ensures the song writers and composers receive payment when
their songs are used commercially. v) Tour Manager: Manages transportation, scheduling, and the financial aspects of
the Performing Arts time on the road. vi) Theatre Manager: Manages the concert hall and oversees all activities and
employees in the venue.
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Activity 3.1: Identifying career and making publicity for Performing Arts This activity will take 2 periods 1. Divide learners into four groups, guide and observe them:
i) research about what people from the arts industry talk about career opportunities. You may provide them with newspapers, magazines or the internet.
ii) make a short write-up of the findings in their notebooks.
2. Let them study the pictures in Figure 3.1 and: i) identify the roles the different people in it may be playing in the Performing Arts
industry. ii) Present the findings to (i) above in the class.
Activity of Integration: Preparing for a Commercial Arts Performance This activity will take two periods. Your school choir has qualified to present a two weeks’ commercial performance in the National Theatre at the end of this term. Plans are in high gear to see that this show is a great success. Its success will go a long way to popularize the school both in the community and the country. Task:
1. Identify and write about any six-professional people that will work towards the success of this performance.
2. In five ways, explain the range of audiences where the products of these performing art works could be sold.
3. Design a poster publicising this performance
Possible Responses
1. i) Producer: Gathers ideas for the performing group, composes the music for the
group, selects songs or the items to be performed, etc. (any two) ii) Booking Agent: Responsible for booking live performances and performance
venues. iii) Music Promoter: Responsible for publicizing a concert. iv) Music Publisher: Ensures the song writers and composers receive payment when
their songs are used commercially. v) Tour Manager: Manages transportation, scheduling, and the financial aspects of
the Performing Arts time on the road. vi) Theatre Manager: Manages the concert hall and oversees all activities and
employees in the venue.
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vii) Director of Marketing: Works to promote live events by advertising the event. viii) Stage Manager: Makes sure that the day to day operations of a concert hall run
smoothly. ix) Music Journalist: Writes music criticism and music news for print, online and
broadcast media. 2.
i) Everyone: Recordings of these works can be marketed to everyone through social, print and broadcast media.
ii) Demographics can also determine the audience. Products of this performance can be sold to parents, teachers and students from other schools.
iii) Other audiences could be targeted by location. For example, a song can easily be marketed in the area of the language it is performed.
iv) Attitude and opinion. Some audiences are targeted based on how people feel. Products from these school performances could sell better to audiences concerned with education.
v) Lifestyle. A lifestyle is how people spend their time. For example, these products could target people who enjoy spending weekends in theater to relax.
3. Any design of a poster with: i) Name of school ii) Name of the show iii) Venue for the performance iv) Date for the performance v) Fee vi) Initials of poster designer (optional)
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Assessment Grid for Activity of Integration 3 Chapter 3
Basis of assessment
Criteria 1 Relevancy
Criteria 2 Accuracy
Criteria 3 Coherence
Criteria 4 Excellency
1. Profession als in the Performin g Arts industry
Score 3: Identifies 5-6 professionals in the Performing Arts industry particularly relevant to this kind of performance.
Score 3: Assigns duties of 5-6 professionals appropriately
Score 3: Explains duties of 5-6 professionals in a logical way.
Learner earns one point if he/she has added any relevant element unsolicited in the instruction.
Score 2: Identifies 4-3 professionals in the Performing Arts industry particularly relevant to this kind of performance
Score 2: Assigns duties of 4-3 professionals appropriately
Score 2: Explains duties of 4-3 professionals in a logical way.
Score 1: Identifies 1-2 professionals in the Performing Arts industry particularly relevant to this kind of performance
Score 1: Assigns duties of 1-2 professionals appropriately
Score: 1 Explains duties of 1-2 professionals in a logical way.
2. Market places for Performing Arts products
Score 3: Identifies 5-6 situations where Performing Arts products can be marketed.
Score 3: Writes about 5-6 market places using appropriate terms and examples
Score 3: Writes about 5-6 market places using convincing and flowing ideas.
Score 2: Identifies 3-4 situations where Performing Arts products can be marketed.
Score 2: Writes about 3-4 market places using appropriate terms and examples
Score 2: Writes about 3-4 market places using convincing and flowing ideas.
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Assessment Grid for Activity of Integration 3 Chapter 3
Basis of assessment
Criteria 1 Relevancy
Criteria 2 Accuracy
Criteria 3 Coherence
Criteria 4 Excellency
1. Profession als in the Performin g Arts industry
Score 3: Identifies 5-6 professionals in the Performing Arts industry particularly relevant to this kind of performance.
Score 3: Assigns duties of 5-6 professionals appropriately
Score 3: Explains duties of 5-6 professionals in a logical way.
Learner earns one point if he/she has added any relevant element unsolicited in the instruction.
Score 2: Identifies 4-3 professionals in the Performing Arts industry particularly relevant to this kind of performance
Score 2: Assigns duties of 4-3 professionals appropriately
Score 2: Explains duties of 4-3 professionals in a logical way.
Score 1: Identifies 1-2 professionals in the Performing Arts industry particularly relevant to this kind of performance
Score 1: Assigns duties of 1-2 professionals appropriately
Score: 1 Explains duties of 1-2 professionals in a logical way.
2. Market places for Performing Arts products
Score 3: Identifies 5-6 situations where Performing Arts products can be marketed.
Score 3: Writes about 5-6 market places using appropriate terms and examples
Score 3: Writes about 5-6 market places using convincing and flowing ideas.
Score 2: Identifies 3-4 situations where Performing Arts products can be marketed.
Score 2: Writes about 3-4 market places using appropriate terms and examples
Score 2: Writes about 3-4 market places using convincing and flowing ideas.
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Chapter 3
Basis of assessment
Criteria 1 Relevancy
Criteria 2 Accuracy
Criteria 3 Coherence
Criteria 4 Excellency
Score 1: Identifies 1-2 situations where Performing Arts products can be marketed.
Score 1: Writes about 1-2 market places using appropriate terms and examples
Score 1: Writes about 1-2 market places using convincing and flowing ideas.
3. A poster to publicize the music show
Score 3: Designs the poster with 5-6 of the following: Name of school, Name of the show, Venue for the performance, Date for the performance, Fee, Initials of poster designer, etc.
Score 3: Designs the poster with 5-6 of the following appropriately positioned: Name of school, Name of the show, Venue for the performance, Date for the performance, Fee, Initials of poster designer, etc.
Score 3: Designs the poster with 5-6 of the following in given logical letter font, size and colour; Name of school, Name of the show, Venue for the performance, Date for the performance, Fee, Initials of poster designer, etc.
Score 2: Designs the poster with 3-4 of the following: Name of school, Name of the show, Venue for the performance, Date for the performance, Fee, Initials of poster designer etc.
Score 2: Designs the poster with 3-4 of the following appropriately positioned: Name of school, Name of the show, Venue for the performance, Date for the performance, Fee, Initials of poster designer etc.
Score 2: Designs the poster with 3-4 of the following given in logical letter font, size and colour: Name of school, Name of the show, Venue for the performance, Date for the performance, Fee, Initials of poster designer, etc.
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Chapter 3
Basis of assessment
Criteria 1 Relevancy
Criteria 2 Accuracy
Criteria 3 Coherence
Criteria 4 Excellency
Score 1: Designs the poster with 1-2 of the following: Name of school, Name of the show, Venue for the performance, Date for the performance, Fee, Initials of poster designer etc.
Score 1: Designs the poster with 1-2 of the following appropriately positioned: Name of school, Name of the show, Venue for the performance, Date for the performance, Fee, Initials of poster designer etc.
Score 1: Designs the poster with 1-2 of the following given logical letter font, size and colour: Name of school, Name of the show, Venue for the performance, Date for the performance, Fee, Initials of poster designer etc.
Total 28
Chapter Summary In this chapter, the learner has learnt to:
i) identify the employment and career opportunities in the Performing Arts industry. ii) make adverts and other publicity materials to celebrate the Performing Arts in
their school and beyond.
Chapter 3
Basis of assessment
Criteria 1 Relevancy
Criteria 2 Accuracy
Criteria 3 Coherence
Criteria 4 Excellency
Score 1: Designs the poster with 1-2 of the following: Name of school, Name of the show, Venue for the performance, Date for the performance, Fee, Initials of poster designer etc.
Score 1: Designs the poster with 1-2 of the following appropriately positioned: Name of school, Name of the show, Venue for the performance, Date for the performance, Fee, Initials of poster designer etc.
Score 1: Designs the poster with 1-2 of the following given logical letter font, size and colour: Name of school, Name of the show, Venue for the performance, Date for the performance, Fee, Initials of poster designer etc.
Total 28
Chapter Summary In this chapter, the learner has learnt to:
i) identify the employment and career opportunities in the Performing Arts industry. ii) make adverts and other publicity materials to celebrate the Performing Arts in
their school and beyond.
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THEME FOR TERM 2: EXPLORING, MAKING AND MARKETING PERFORMING ARTS IN THE COMMUNITY
Chapter 4: Performing Arts Making Using African Styles
Figure 2.1: performing a folk dance
Teacher Preparation You will need: voice, instruments, costumes, props, makeup, and space for the performance.
By the end of this chapter, the learner should be able to: a. appreciate and simulate African styles into own works of
Performing Arts. b. identify and present artworks that reflect African contexts
and influences. c. trace African art styles in Ugandan art works.
Key Words • Characters • Folklore • Themes • Patterns • Motifs • Skit • Traditional tale • Story sequence
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Teacher Instruction Pair work
Use 5 minutes to guide and observe learners read the introductory notes of this activity in the Learner’s Textbook and as indicated below.
Introduction In this chapter, you are going to study African traditional folk songs regarding key themes, characters and any story sequence. You are going to use some of the ideas relating to the songs to compose your own additional songs. You will also study African traditional dances to identify key themes, motifs and patterns and then use some of your own ideas from it to create new related dances.
Likewise, you are to study African traditional tales from folklore and identify features and compare these to those identified in the song and dance. From these, you are to create and perform a skit relating to a key theme in the traditional tale. You will learn to create your own Performing Arts using African styles, to entertain and educate your school community.
Composing the Arts in African Traditional Style Music Much of Uganda’s music is inspired by themes, characters and story sequences from African traditional folk songs. There are many cultural troupes in Uganda today that perform on wedding functions, corporate events, etc. Whereas performers utilise the already known traditional music skills, a lot of creativity and innovation is required for them to survive competition. They design new music forms, costumes and props to differentiate themselves from other troupes.
Figure 2.2: Performing Ugandan traditional folk songs
29
Teacher Instruction Pair work
Use 5 minutes to guide and observe learners read the introductory notes of this activity in the Learner’s Textbook and as indicated below.
Introduction In this chapter, you are going to study African traditional folk songs regarding key themes, characters and any story sequence. You are going to use some of the ideas relating to the songs to compose your own additional songs. You will also study African traditional dances to identify key themes, motifs and patterns and then use some of your own ideas from it to create new related dances.
Likewise, you are to study African traditional tales from folklore and identify features and compare these to those identified in the song and dance. From these, you are to create and perform a skit relating to a key theme in the traditional tale. You will learn to create your own Performing Arts using African styles, to entertain and educate your school community.
Composing the Arts in African Traditional Style Music Much of Uganda’s music is inspired by themes, characters and story sequences from African traditional folk songs. There are many cultural troupes in Uganda today that perform on wedding functions, corporate events, etc. Whereas performers utilise the already known traditional music skills, a lot of creativity and innovation is required for them to survive competition. They design new music forms, costumes and props to differentiate themselves from other troupes.
Figure 2.2: Performing Ugandan traditional folk songs
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Composing Dance in African Traditional Style
Activity 1.3: Composing drama using African traditional drama styles This activity will take 2 periods: Divide learners into four groups, guide and observe them:
i) select a Ugandan traditional tale that they know well or read a script of an African traditional tale from folklore.
ii) identify features and compare them to those they identified in the song and dance.
iii) create and perform a 10 minutes’ skit from this, relating to a key theme in the traditional tale considering the exposition, climax and resolution and using the
Activity 4.1: Composing music in African traditional style
You will need: voice, Ugandan traditional music instruments and space for the performance Divide learners into four groups. Prepare a recorded folk song or a live performance for them to:
i) Listen or watch a live performance and identify the key themes, characters and story sequence in the song.
ii) Use some of the ideas relating to the theme, the characters or story sequence and compose their own song in the African traditional style.
iii) Design, practice and perform their music piece to the rest of the class. iv) With the whole class, discuss what distinguishes Ugandan folk songs from other
African folk songs in general.
Dance Like much of Uganda’s music, Ugandan dances are inspired traditional folk dances. Performers simulate themes, motifs and patterns and then use some of these ideas to create new related dances. There are many dances that have been created in this manner especially through the national music festivals. This item is popularly known as ‘Creative Dance’ and many talented Ugandans have earned a living from this skill.
Activity 1.2: Composing dances in African Traditional Style
Divide learners into four groups. Prepare a film of an African folk dance or a live performance for them to:
i) watch a film or live performance of an African traditional dance and identify key themes, motifs and patterns.
ii) use some of the ideas from it and create a new related dance. iii) design, practice and perform their dance piece to the rest of the class. iv) with the whole class, discuss what distinguishes Ugandan folk dances from other
African folk dances in general.
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elements of role, focus, action, tension, time, and space. As a whole class, discuss what distinguishes Ugandan folk drama from other African traditional drama in general.
Possible Responses
Activity of Integration: Performing Original Arts Compositions in African Style
A Community Performing Arts group is coming to stage a concert at your school. You are to perform a ‘curtain raiser’ in the concert. Task:
i) Design a 10 minutes’ art work in African traditional style, integrating the music, dance and drama pieces you composed this term.
ii) Perform the art work with appropriate costumes, props and stage design. iii) Make a short write-up on the effect of the performance to the whole school.
Arts A Group is coming to stage a concert at your school. You are to perform a ‘curtain raiser’ in the concert.
Task:
i) Expect the learners to design a 10 minutes’ art work in African traditional style, integrating the music, dance and drama pieces composed this term.
a. The learners should be able to compose own song, create a dance and a play based on the characteristics of the African style such as the use of improvisation in terms of costumes, props, dialogue and staging. etc.
b. The learners should exhibit skill of singing i.e. taking lead roles, working together to perform as they act.
ii) Expect the learners to perform the art work with appropriate, costumes, props and stage design.
iii) Expect learners to make a short write-up on the effect of the performance to the whole school.
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elements of role, focus, action, tension, time, and space. As a whole class, discuss what distinguishes Ugandan folk drama from other African traditional drama in general.
Possible Responses
Activity of Integration: Performing Original Arts Compositions in African Style
A Community Performing Arts group is coming to stage a concert at your school. You are to perform a ‘curtain raiser’ in the concert. Task:
i) Design a 10 minutes’ art work in African traditional style, integrating the music, dance and drama pieces you composed this term.
ii) Perform the art work with appropriate costumes, props and stage design. iii) Make a short write-up on the effect of the performance to the whole school.
Arts A Group is coming to stage a concert at your school. You are to perform a ‘curtain raiser’ in the concert.
Task:
i) Expect the learners to design a 10 minutes’ art work in African traditional style, integrating the music, dance and drama pieces composed this term.
a. The learners should be able to compose own song, create a dance and a play based on the characteristics of the African style such as the use of improvisation in terms of costumes, props, dialogue and staging. etc.
b. The learners should exhibit skill of singing i.e. taking lead roles, working together to perform as they act.
ii) Expect the learners to perform the art work with appropriate, costumes, props and stage design.
iii) Expect learners to make a short write-up on the effect of the performance to the whole school.
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Assessment Grid for Activity of Integration 4
Chapter 4
Basis of Assessment
Criteria 1 Relevancy
Criteria 2 Accuracy
Criteria 3 Coherence
Criteria 4 Excellency
Output A Performance of an original arts composition in African style
1. A design of an art work in African style.
Score 3: Identifies 5-6 of the following items for the performance: songs, music instruments, a dance, a skit, costumes, props, stage and an auditorium
Score 3: Uses correctly 5-6 of the following items for the performance: songs, music instruments, a dance, a skit, costumes, props, stage and an auditorium
Score 3: Performs with 5-6 of the following items integrated in a logical and flowing manner: songs, music instruments, a dance, a skit, costumes, props, stage and an auditorium
Learner earns one point if he/she has added any relevant element unsolicited in the instruction.
Score 2: Identifies 3-4 of the following items for the performance: songs, music instruments, a dance, a skit, costumes, props, stage and an auditorium
Score 2: Uses correctly 3-4 of the following items for the performance: songs, music instruments, a dance, a skit, costumes, props, stage and an auditorium
Score 2: Performs with 3-4 of the following items integrated in a logical and flowing manner: songs, music instruments, a dance, a skit, costumes, props, stage and an auditorium
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Chapter 4
Basis of Assessment
Criteria 1 Relevancy
Criteria 2 Accuracy
Criteria 3 Coherence
Criteria 4 Excellency
Score 1: Identifies 1-2 of the following items for the performance: songs, music instruments, a dance, a skit, costumes, props, stage and an auditorium
Score 1: Uses correctly 1-2 of the following items for the performance: songs, music instruments, a dance, a skit, costumes, props, stage and an auditorium.
Score 1: Performs with 1-2 of the following items integrated in a logical and flowing manner: songs, music instruments, a dance, a skit, costumes,
t
2. A performan ce of a contempo rary art work in African style.
Score 3: Appropriate choice and use of props, costumes, instruments, songs and stage that enhanced performance
Score 3: Outstanding accuracy in expressions, styles, tempo, phrasing and dynamics throughout the performance.
Score 3: Superior blend and balance of music dance, drama and accompanime nt and appropriate choice of props and costumes achieved throughout the performance both within and between sections.
33
Chapter 4
Basis of Assessment
Criteria 1 Relevancy
Criteria 2 Accuracy
Criteria 3 Coherence
Criteria 4 Excellency
Score 1: Identifies 1-2 of the following items for the performance: songs, music instruments, a dance, a skit, costumes, props, stage and an auditorium
Score 1: Uses correctly 1-2 of the following items for the performance: songs, music instruments, a dance, a skit, costumes, props, stage and an auditorium.
Score 1: Performs with 1-2 of the following items integrated in a logical and flowing manner: songs, music instruments, a dance, a skit, costumes,
t
2. A performan ce of a contempo rary art work in African style.
Score 3: Appropriate choice and use of props, costumes, instruments, songs and stage that enhanced performance
Score 3: Outstanding accuracy in expressions, styles, tempo, phrasing and dynamics throughout the performance.
Score 3: Superior blend and balance of music dance, drama and accompanime nt and appropriate choice of props and costumes achieved throughout the performance both within and between sections.
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Chapter 4
Basis of Assessment
Criteria 1 Relevancy
Criteria 2 Accuracy
Criteria 3 Coherence
Criteria 4 Excellency
Score 2: Basic choice and use of props, costumes, instruments, songs and stage that enhanced performance
Score 2: Basic accuracy in expressions, styles, tempo, phrasing and dynamics in most sections of the performance.
Score 2: Blend and balance of music dance, drama and accompanime nt and appropriate choice of props and costumes basically achieved throughout the
f
Score 1: Some sense of choice and use of props, costumes, instruments, songs and stage.
Score 1: Occasional accuracy in expressions, styles, tempo, phrasing and dynamics in many sections of the performance.
Score 1: Blend and balance of music dance, drama and accompanime nt and appropriate choice of props and costumes rarely achieved throughout the performance both within and between sections.
3. A write-up on the effect of the performan ce to the whole school.
Score 3: Identifies 5-6 effects such as: Positive mindset, reducing stress, improved memory, improved team work, more school engagement,
Score 3: explains with relevant examples and correct English any 5-6 effects such as: positive mindset, reducing stress, improved
Score 3: explains in a logical manner 5-6 effects such as: positive mindset, reducing stress, improved
34
Chapter 4
memory, improved team work, more school engagement, maintaining better attendance records, improved reading comprehensio n, improved communicatio n skills, etc.
Score 2: identifies 3-4 effects such as: positive mindset, reducing stress, improved memory, improved team work, more school engagement, maintaining better attendance records, improved reading comprehension, improved communication skills, etc.
Score 2: explains with relevant examples and correct English any 3-4 effects such as: positive mindset, reducing stress, improved memory, improved team work, more school engagement, maintaining better attendance records, improved reading comprehension , improved communication skills, etc.
Score 2: explains in a logical manner 3-4 effects such as: Positive mindset, Reducing stress, Improved memory, improved team work, more school engagement, Maintaining better attendance records, improved reading comprehensio n, improved communicatio n skills, etc.
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Chapter 4
memory, improved team work, more school engagement, maintaining better attendance records, improved reading comprehensio n, improved communicatio n skills, etc.
Score 2: identifies 3-4 effects such as: positive mindset, reducing stress, improved memory, improved team work, more school engagement, maintaining better attendance records, improved reading comprehension, improved communication skills, etc.
Score 2: explains with relevant examples and correct English any 3-4 effects such as: positive mindset, reducing stress, improved memory, improved team work, more school engagement, maintaining better attendance records, improved reading comprehension , improved communication skills, etc.
Score 2: explains in a logical manner 3-4 effects such as: Positive mindset, Reducing stress, Improved memory, improved team work, more school engagement, Maintaining better attendance records, improved reading comprehensio n, improved communicatio n skills, etc.
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Chapter 4
Score 1: Identifies 1-2 effects such as: positive mindset, reducing stress, improved memory, improved team work, more school engagement, maintaining better attendance records, improved reading comprehension, improved communication skills, etc.
Score 1: Explains with relevant examples and correct English any 1-2 effects such as: positive mindset, reducing stress, improved memory, improved team work, more school engagement, Maintaining better attendance records, improved reading comprehension , improved communication skills, etc.
Score 1: explains in a logical manner 1-2 effects such as: positive mindset, reducing stress, improved memory, improved team work, more school engagement, maintaining better attendance records, improved reading comprehensio n, improved communicatio n skills, etc.
Total 28
Chapter Summary In this chapter, the learner has learnt to perform music dance and drama in Ugandan traditional styles using appropriate vocal characteristics, accompaniment, costume and props and depicting the natural environment.
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Chapter 5: Exploring the Elements of Music
Teacher Preparation You will need: voice, music scores and space for the performances.
Teacher Instruction Work in small groups
Use 5 minutes to guide and observe learners read the introductory notes of this activity in the Learner’s Textbook and as indicated below.
By the end of this chapter, the learner will be able to use basic music elements of pitch, duration and tempo to appreciate, study and present music in simple time.
Key words • Key F major • Key signature • Simple
quadruple time • Elements of
music • Vertebrates • Bar • System
Chapter 5: Exploring the Elements of Music
Teacher Preparation You will need: voice, music scores and space for the performances.
Teacher Instruction Work in small groups
Use 5 minutes to guide and observe learners read the introductory notes of this activity in the Learner’s Textbook and as indicated below.
By the end of this chapter, the learner will be able to use basic music elements of pitch, duration and tempo to appreciate, study and present music in simple time.
Key words • Key F major • Key signature • Simple
quadruple time • Elements of
music • Vertebrates • Bar • System
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Introduction In this chapter, you are going to apply the key of F major and its key signature and explain how it is related to other keys. You will use the treble stave and Major Key of F to
compose, write and read two bar melodies in simple quadruple time with notes without leaps. You may use any available music software.
You will compare your melodies with those of other people and suggest ways for them to be improved. You are also going to study pieces of music to identify and explain the building blocks (elements) of music in them. These elements will include pitch, duration and tempo.
You will also order pieces of music according to which you think is the most complex, explaining your reasons. All these will make you competent in composing and performing western music to entertain and educate the community.
Activity 5.1: Identifying rhythm in songs
Divide the class into four groups:
i) Sing the song ‘vertebrates’. They may sing after you if they don’t know it. ii) Sing the song for 5 minutes to French rhythm names and then mark its rhythms
by: a) clapping b) stamping c) snapping
iii) Write the French rhythms of the song in their notebook and match them with rhythm in staff notation. (5 minutes)
iv) Compose five rhythm passages of eight beats each using ; ; rhythms. v) Read their compositions by use of French rhythm names and clapping. vi) Compose sol-fa notes (without leaps) to the rhythm passage below and write
their composition on the treble stave in key F major.
vii) Sing the song you have composed.
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Activity 5.4: Studying written music Guide and observe learners study the song ‘vertebrates’ in the learners’ textbook and:
i) sing the whole song to sol-fa appropriately. ii) use French rhythm names to write the rhythm of the second system. iii) identify the length of the song verse in terms of bars. iv) identify the bar they think is more complex and explain their answer. v) tell the number of systems the whole piece has. vi) identify the different classes of vertebrates giving three examples of each and
naming the bars in which they are found. vii) sing the section of the song below and write sol-fa notes above it.
Activity of Integration 5: Composing and performing songs to the ‘if’ clauses in English language.
Your cousin in Primary Six would like use songs to learn about the ‘if’ clauses in English language. He/she requests you to compose songs to the sentences below so that he/she sings and remembers the three ‘if’ clauses. The rhythm has been aligned to the words.
Task:
1. Compose a melody to each of the given sentences and rhythms using sol-fa without leaps. You may start on ‘doh’ and end on ‘me’
2. Write each of your composition on the treble stave using key G major. 3. Sing the songs and ask your teacher to record them.
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Activity 5.4: Studying written music Guide and observe learners study the song ‘vertebrates’ in the learners’ textbook and:
i) sing the whole song to sol-fa appropriately. ii) use French rhythm names to write the rhythm of the second system. iii) identify the length of the song verse in terms of bars. iv) identify the bar they think is more complex and explain their answer. v) tell the number of systems the whole piece has. vi) identify the different classes of vertebrates giving three examples of each and
naming the bars in which they are found. vii) sing the section of the song below and write sol-fa notes above it.
Activity of Integration 5: Composing and performing songs to the ‘if’ clauses in English language.
Your cousin in Primary Six would like use songs to learn about the ‘if’ clauses in English language. He/she requests you to compose songs to the sentences below so that he/she sings and remembers the three ‘if’ clauses. The rhythm has been aligned to the words.
Task:
1. Compose a melody to each of the given sentences and rhythms using sol-fa without leaps. You may start on ‘doh’ and end on ‘me’
2. Write each of your composition on the treble stave using key G major. 3. Sing the songs and ask your teacher to record them.
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Possible Responses
1. Compose a melody to each of the given sentences and rhythms using sol-fa
without leaps. You may start on ‘doh’ and end on ‘me’ If one
If two
If three
2. Write your compositions on the treble stave using key G major.
3. Observe the learner sing his/her compositions, interpreting pitch and rhythm
appropriately. The recordings of the songs you make are the products of the leaners’ work for the assessment of this item.
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Assessment Grid for Activity of Integration 5 Chapter 5 Basis of
assessment Criteria 1 Relevancy
Criteria 4
Excellence Out put A four bar melody in simple duple time.
1. A four bar simple duple melody in sol-fa notation.
Score 3: Composes sol-fa notes of the diatonic major scale (in lower case) to the given rhythms passages.
Score 3: Aligns the pitch (with no leaps) to the given rhythms accurately and appropriately, starting and ending on doh.
Score 3: Writes a tuneful and singable melody in conjunct movement.
Learner earns one point if he/she has added any relevant element that was unsolicited in the instruction.
Score 2: Composes sol-fa notes of the diatonic major scale to the given rhythms with disregard to the conventional lower case.
Score 2: Aligns the pitch to the given rhythms producing a singable melody but with disregard to leaps, starting, and ending on doh.
Score 2: Writes a singable but not so tuneful melody that may be either in conjunct or disjunct movement.
Score 1: Composes sol-fa notes beyond the diatonic major scale to the given rhythms with disregard to the conventional lower case.
Score 1: Aligns the pitch to the given rhythms producing a rather unsingable melody and with disregard to the conjunct movement, starting and ending on other notes other than doh.
Score 1: Writes an unsingable and untuneful melody that may be either in conjunct or disjunct movement.
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Assessment Grid for Activity of Integration 5 Chapter 5 Basis of
assessment Criteria 1 Relevancy
Criteria 4
Excellence Out put A four bar melody in simple duple time.
1. A four bar simple duple melody in sol-fa notation.
Score 3: Composes sol-fa notes of the diatonic major scale (in lower case) to the given rhythms passages.
Score 3: Aligns the pitch (with no leaps) to the given rhythms accurately and appropriately, starting and ending on doh.
Score 3: Writes a tuneful and singable melody in conjunct movement.
Learner earns one point if he/she has added any relevant element that was unsolicited in the instruction.
Score 2: Composes sol-fa notes of the diatonic major scale to the given rhythms with disregard to the conventional lower case.
Score 2: Aligns the pitch to the given rhythms producing a singable melody but with disregard to leaps, starting, and ending on doh.
Score 2: Writes a singable but not so tuneful melody that may be either in conjunct or disjunct movement.
Score 1: Composes sol-fa notes beyond the diatonic major scale to the given rhythms with disregard to the conventional lower case.
Score 1: Aligns the pitch to the given rhythms producing a rather unsingable melody and with disregard to the conjunct movement, starting and ending on other notes other than doh.
Score 1: Writes an unsingable and untuneful melody that may be either in conjunct or disjunct movement.
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Chapter 5 Basis of assessment
Criteria 1 Relevancy
Criteria 2 Accuracy
Criteria 3 Coherence
simple duple melody in staff notation.
Score 3: Uses the following in music: the treble stave, treble clef, the key signature of G major, time signature of simple duple time, staff rhythm symbols, bar lines and lyrics of the song. (any 6-7)
Score 3: Uses the following accurately: the treble stave, the treble clef, the key signature of G major, time signature of simple duple time, staff rhythm symbols, bar, lyrics of the song written below the stave and not cramping with the notes. (any 6-7)
Score 3: Produces an exceptionally balanced and unified song with equal bars, well placed bar lines, well- spaced and hyphen separated syllables of word.
Score 2: Uses the following in music: the treble stave, the key signature of G major, time signature of simple duple time, staff rhythm symbols, lyrics of the song. (any 4-5)
Score 2: Uses the following accurately: the treble stave, the treble clef, the key signature of G major, time signature of simple duple time, staff rhythm symbols, bar, lyrics of the song written below the stave and not cramping with the notes. (any 4-5)
Score 2: Produces a basically balanced and unified song with equal bars, well placed bar lines, well- spaced and hyphen separated syllables of word
Score 1: Uses the following in music: the treble stave, the key signature of G major, time signature of simple duple time, staff rhythm symbols, lyrics of the song. (any 1-3)
Score 1: Uses the following accurately: the treble stave, the treble clef, the key signature of G major, time signature of simple duple time, staff rhythm symbols, bar, lyrics of the song written below the stave and not cramping with the notes. (any 1-3)
Score 1: Produces a fairly balanced and unified song with equal bars, well placed bar lines, well- spaced and hyphen separated syllables of word
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Criteria 1 Relevancy
Criteria 2 Accuracy
Criteria 3 Coherence
3. A
Performance of a four bar simple duple melody in sol-fa notation.
Score 3: Sings the song to French rhythm names, sol-fa and words (All the three)
Score 3: Sings the song to words with accurate pitches and rhythm in all the bars.
Score 3: Sings the whole song to sol-fa and words steadily and consistently
Score 2: Sings the song to French rhythm names, sol-fa and words (any two)
Score 2: Sings the song to words with accurate pitches and rhythms in half of all the four bars.
Score 2: Sings most of the sections of the song to sol-fa and words steadily and consistently
Score 1: Sings the song to French rhythm names, sol-fa and words (Any one)
Score 1: Sings the song to words but with inaccurate pitches and rhythms in most of the bars.
Score 1: Sings a few sections of the song to sol-fa and words steadily and consistently
Chapter Summary In this chapter, the learner has learnt to use the treble stave and Major key of F to
compose, write and read two bar melodies in simple quadruple time with notes without leaps.
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Criteria 1 Relevancy
Criteria 2 Accuracy
Criteria 3 Coherence
3. A
Performance of a four bar simple duple melody in sol-fa notation.
Score 3: Sings the song to French rhythm names, sol-fa and words (All the three)
Score 3: Sings the song to words with accurate pitches and rhythm in all the bars.
Score 3: Sings the whole song to sol-fa and words steadily and consistently
Score 2: Sings the song to French rhythm names, sol-fa and words (any two)
Score 2: Sings the song to words with accurate pitches and rhythms in half of all the four bars.
Score 2: Sings most of the sections of the song to sol-fa and words steadily and consistently
Score 1: Sings the song to French rhythm names, sol-fa and words (Any one)
Score 1: Sings the song to words but with inaccurate pitches and rhythms in most of the bars.
Score 1: Sings a few sections of the song to sol-fa and words steadily and consistently
Chapter Summary In this chapter, the learner has learnt to use the treble stave and Major key of F to
compose, write and read two bar melodies in simple quadruple time with notes without leaps.
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Chapter 6: Performing Arts in the Economy
Figure 6.1: At the Uganda National Theatre Teacher Preparation You will need: voice, instruments, costumes, props, makeup, and space for the performance.
Teacher Instruction
Pair work
Use 5 minutes to guide and observe learners read the introductory notes of this activity in the Learner’s4 Textbook and as indicated below.
Introduction In this chapter, you are going to perform a known song or dance piece of your choice. You will practice this and consider what would make your performance worthy of a public performance. You are going to discuss ways that this art work could be marketed in your own community. You will talk about the art works that appeal to communities and what preferences you have of your own for exhibitions and performances. You will
By the end of this chapter, the learner should be able to: a. understand the sales and marketing components required
in Performing Arts. b. appreciate the ways in which the arts effect one’s own and
others’ identity.
performance • Exhibition • Profit
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collect examples of articles and programmes that describe art exhibitions. You will make calculations of cost and examine materials required, including exhibition spaces that enable art forms to be presented to the public in a profitable manner. In all, you will be able to market performing art works for profit.
Activity 3.1: Identifying career and making publicity for Performing Arts
Divide the class into four groups, guide and observe as they: i) identify and perform either a song, a dance or a drama piece of their choice ii) present their performance to the class. iii) explain what they would consider making their performance worthy of a public
performance. iv) present their discussion to the class in the next lesson. v) discuss ways that this art work could be marketed in their community. vi) discuss what art works appeal to communities and what preferences they have of
their own for exhibitions and performances. vii) collect examples of articles and programmes that describe art exhibitions. viii) make calculations of cost and examine materials required, including exhibition
spaces that enable art works to be presented to the public in ways that earn profits.
Activity of Integration: Marketing Performing Art Works for Profit Mkoma Troupe is one of the successful Performing Arts groups in Kyetume Town Council. They perform music, dance and drama of African and Western genres. They currently use modern technology to record and market their products in addition to the live performances they stage for different audiences.
1. Suggest the Performing Arts components of sales and marketing for Mkoma troupe.
2. Make a successful sales brief and marketing plan for Mkoma’s Performing Art works.
3. Write a short plan for their Performing Arts performance.
Chapter Summary In this chapter, the learner has learnt to market performing ar