PARENT-EDUCATION PROGRAMS' IN CITY SCHOOL · PDF filePARENT-EDUCATION PROGRAMS' IN CITY...

Click here to load reader

  • date post

    13-Aug-2018
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    213
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of PARENT-EDUCATION PROGRAMS' IN CITY SCHOOL · PDF filePARENT-EDUCATION PROGRAMS' IN CITY...

  • UNITED STATES .DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIORHAROLD L. ICKES : SECRETARY

    OFFICE OF EDUCATION : J. W. STUDEBAKERCOMMISSIONER

    PARENT-EDUCATION PROGRAMS'

    IN CITY SCHOOL SYSTMS

    BEING CHAPTER 1.)' OF VOLUME I OF THE

    BIENNIAL SURVEY OF DUGATION IN THE

    UNITED STATES : 1934-36

    Ca *... N ,

    vii\\

    t. .0,r4r ;:/ V

    BULLETIN, 1937, No. 2[ADVANCE PLGES1

    BY

    ELLEN C. LOMBARDO

    Associate Specialist in Parent Education

    r

    Ql

    . INITED &TATE/

    GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICEWASHINGTON : 1939

    sr

    he sale bit the SuPerintendeat, meats; Washington, D. C. - 40 a nice 10 mt.O CO

    t

    IN

    o

    (

    s.

    4it

    .

    i..-Z

    ,

    . ;

    Ob.

    .. .., .. t.. ... . . . ..

    .... .. . -

    ; 4-. ': t ... : ... ,.-...; : ,. ... .:. re , . . . .. I. ,.. ....- -.

    .'. f .. .1 : 4 4

    .6H"..,*-14-i-z- :-..;.::_*-:CL-Z-;...:ar.s--...' --1-2::. ...i.....411L.:14.2.--Uif.licei1.4 =.:1;:-k :---.1.21*...-. '..1;..t.L.-_,----, -",_%k--....t4f ."1"-_/ ..

    'ta

    t .

    O

  • FOREWORD .

    I. INTRODUCITIO.N

    Contentscs

    . I

    I I. PURPOSES AND ACTIVITIES OF PARENT *EDUCATION

    PROGRAMS . .

    Page

    1

    I I CHARACTERISTItS OF PARENT EDUCATION I RO-

    GRAMS. . 4

    Programs conducted as an element of adult educa-tion . . 5

    Programs conducted within home economics, de-, partments. . . . . 1 2Programs conducted is cooperativi. projects . 17

    Iv. INAUGURATION ALA PROGRAM OF PARENT EDUCA-

    TION . .

    Financing a parent education program .Qualifications and duties of 4ii director .

    . . ,

    / Finding lay leaders : . .Organizing the' program . . .Organizing focal study gro.ups . . . .Methods of conducting study groups

    v. OUTCOMES OF PARENT 'EDUCATION WORK SEEN BY

    CITY SUPERINTENDENTS OF SCHOOLS .

    Vt. SUMMARY 6 p 40

    VII. REFERENCE MATERIALS PREPARED WITHIN STATEOR LOCAL PROGRAMS OF PARtNT EDUCATION

    VI I ' A.PFIENDIX .IMO

    lap

    4

    19

    71

    .2122

    *h232424

    III

    - 30

    31

    34

    .

    . 3

    I .

    . I I .I

    : . .. . .

    . .

    . .

    .

    .

    .

    I

    .

    '

    17

    I .

    .' .

    t; 1641...-. .fad/A..

    41.

    ... s

    .

    e .. . -... t t , - .... f.' ! ; 1 i. . 5 , : -. ,, , . ''' :-.,

    1:........_!_' ......t-...:..._.: -J- le-....4. .Sr.......1.- %h....22' - ..e. ......*.t . ?t.ti.,-, :.!.-s. 2 '... f -'' .... s...4. 7 . ! 7- 4--......-:-. "."-....- -....-11...-.- -e- ,..-..-: -,.-,.-- 2.......1 --.21.,

    ,- ,

    s.

    .#.

    . *

    ,

    .

    I

    I I

    .

    . .

    . .

    . .,

  • -r

    c

    s

    & ,,

    1.

    1

    4.

    411.

    :;

    4*.

    . ....71...7` s 3

    .r, k sA.A., ......r ,,,, al ,t - .- it . .iif_." ti.*., . : an e SI: ". .

    illi AI% ..b ... -. ...

    s

    .

    t.*

    b.

    .4

    _

    5.

    ,

    '-'.:: 'Ns t

    t*.

    o

    II

    . C

    .. 7

    Ikr

    1P.

    b . . .. 414.'-4-4. '

    %.4. P If

    : 14. "7

    . 5

    .'4

    t -

  • Foreword

    THE TERM "parent education" signifies many activities which.41ave sprung up to meet new needs in education during the past 12years. Some of these activities go on in colleges and universitieswhere advanced students are Prepared to take professional leader-shiP in parent education, in nAtional. State, and local situations.Other activities in this field are carried On in State departmentsof education, in city school systems, in governmental agencies,and in private organizations.

    The Office of Education has followed the trend of the parenteducation movement and has issued from time to time reportsand descriptions .of some of the activities that seem to besuccessful.

    The folloWing report deals particularly with the activities incity school systems. Superintendents of schools, especiallythose who expect to start a program of parent education, willfind the answers to some of their questions in this brief review ofwork in this field. The report should also prove helpful to allthose working for the development of improved methods of childcare and training, better home-school cooperation, and moreunderstanding of the problems of family relationships.

    BESS GOODYKOONTZ,

    Assistant Commissioner of Edtkafion.

    .A

    A ._

    dIP

    a.

    ,

    wt,

    !

    f

    VI

    4/1* :t. a. -e.1.. Is,

    ''sN.11

    ;-

    4.

    4110

    i.

    es

    COb

    .-

    ;

    eC"'"

    . .

    14#

    O

    4

  • Chapter IXPARENT-EDUCATION PROGRAMS IN

    CITY SCHOOL SYSTEMS

    I. Introduction

    DURING the past 10 years programs in parent education havebeen inc.reasingly established by superintendents of schools asintegral parts of city schoolssystems. These programs are nowin progress in at least 38 cities of the United States. Perhaps thefeature that characterizes the work of parent education in thepuhlic schools is the active cooperation of parent-teacher asso-ciations and other corrimunity organizations upon%which asuperintendent must depend for the promotion of interest andenthusiasm if continuity in the programs is to be insured.

    The establishment of a parent-education program provides away by which parents may get accurate information on theprogram and policies of the superintendept; it helps parents toimprove their methods of guidance at home; and it shows themhow, as a group and individually, they may cooperate successfullywith sChool authorities in meeting school needs. Such a pro-gram for parents furnishes instruction in mental health orhygiene which will be of practical value in solving their ownpersonal problems.

    This chapter has been prepared to answer inquiries of schooladministrators and others as to what constitutes a parent-educa-tion program, how and for vaom it function;, what it costs,what it accomplishes, and what superintendents of schools thinkof parent education as they observe its progress in their ownschool systems.

    Specific information for this study was gathered throughquestionnaires which the Office of Education sent to super-intendents of schools in 300 selected cities, each of whom hadexpressed an interest in parent education or had reported thatprojecis were already established in their schools.

    In addition, 13 cities having parent-education work werevisited by the staff member in charge of parent education in the

    Jo.

    .

    a

  • OD

    .14

    BIENNIAL sURVEY vr EDUCATION, 1934-36

    Office of Education. During these visits -conferences were heldwith superintendents and directors in charge of the work, ndthrough first-hand observation of Methods and practices inter-pretations have been made which would not have been poss/kleotherwise. .

    Throu0 correspondence and printed reports, the informationfor this chapter was still further amplified.

    k

    Mib

    '4406

    a

    .

    4

    T.

    oir

    *

    t

    ,,

    .

    r r. f 5 t' 4"- -%:i:k%4

    411

  • II. Purposes and ctivities of ParentEducation, Programs

    IN GENERAL TERMS, a parent educatio:n program in a local com-munity under the sponsorship of the public schools is a combina-tion of promotional, adrilinistrative, teaching, and cooperativeactivities for the instruction of parents and for the development ofleaders of parents' groups.

    Reports indicate that many different activities constiwte theprogram of parent education in the various city school systems.One activity, however, that of leading classes or groups of parents,was reported unanimously by the superintendents replying to thequestionnaire. In some cities three types of groups are receivinginstruction: Groups of potential leaders, groups of lay leadeisin service, and groups of parents.

    Study groups are formed and instruction in such fields as childdevelopment and mental 111}-giene is offered to parents. Ihesubject matter used in study groups is chosen to provide for theneeds which exist in the local situation. It is hoped that throughreading, instruciion, and discussion parents will be able to obtainan objective view of themselves and an understanding of- theirrelationship to their children. Specifically the program isdesigned to show parents better ways of guiding their childrenby giving them authoritative information about child growthand developMent; to help them to understand the principles bywhich the problems of family life may' be solved; and, finally, togive them an understanding of-what the school isedoing for theirchildren and of how they may coOperate with the school.

    PI Activity projects have beenqundertaken in many cities by thestudy groups. Estahlishingriaiay groups, suinmer playgrounds,hobby shows, arranging and -Asupervising trips for the schoolchildren, making toys for young children and prparing exhibitsof group work are examples of the projects in which the groupsengage.

    Some groups maintain a library which is kept at the school andin some places the public libramfurnishes boxes of books for themembers to use. Committees of the study groups review books,pamphlets, or clippings, and 'plan programs, work for betterhome and school relationshiPs, take care of the library, look upabsentees, and serve in many other capacities.

    1588830-39-24

    3

    II

    ar. C

  • III. Characteristics of Parent EducationPrograms

    ONE imisortant characteristief programs in parent educationCommon to ll cities in all States, which has been mentionedpreviously, is the active support and cooperation of parent-teacherassociations without which leaders would find