Osborne Gaebler says - nelsonmandelabay.gov.za · vii NMBM IDP Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality’s...

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Transcript of Osborne Gaebler says - nelsonmandelabay.gov.za · vii NMBM IDP Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality’s...

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Osborne Gaebler says :

“What gets measured gets done

If you don’t measure results, you can’t tell succes s from failure

If you can’t see success, you can’t reward it

If you can’t reward success, you are probably rewar ding failure

If you can’t see success, you can’t learn from it

If you can’t recognize failure, you can’t correct i t

If you can demonstrate results, you can win public support”

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It is important to note that Integrated Development Plans are the Five-year (05)

Development Plans of municipalities that are adopted at the beginning of Five-

year Council terms. This 2017 / 18 – 2021 / 22 IDP was adopted by the Council

of the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality at its sitting on 28 June 2017. The IDP

is reviewed annually. Certain aspects of the document will remain the same for

the duration of the 5-year period within which the IDP is in effect, with some

changes being made to aspects of it on a yearly basis.

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NELSON MANDELA BAY MUNICIPALITY (2016 DEMARCATION)

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

FOREWORD BY THE EXECUTIVE MAYOR ................... .........................................................1 FOREWORD BY THE CITY MANAGER ...................... .............................................................4 CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION ........................... ......................................................................6 1.1 CONTEXT AND OVERVIEW ..............................................................................................6 1.2 ABOUT NELSON MANDELA BAY ................................................................................. 10 1.3 VISION, MISSION AND BRAND PROMISE....................................................................... 10 1.4 POLITICAL STRUCTURE ............................................................................................... 15 1.5 ADMINISTRATION ....................................................................................................... 20 1.6 LEGISLATIVE AND POLICY MANDATES AND ALIGNMENT WITH LONG-TERM VISION ......... 22 1.7 BATHO PELE PRINCIPLES ........................................................................................... 32 1.8 IMPLEMENTING THE LONG-TERM DEVELOPMENT PLAN ................................................ 33 CHAPTER 2: SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS.................... ........................................................... 36 CHAPTER 3: METHODOLOGY ............................ ................................................................. 63 CHAPTER 4: SPATIAL STRATEGY ....................... ............................................................... 68 CHAPTER 5: DELIVERY APPROACH ...................... ............................................................ 93 5.1 CORPORATE SERVICES .............................................................................................. 93 5.2 CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER ....................................................................................... 95 5.3 INFRASTRUCTURE, ENGINEERING, ELECTRICITY AND ENERGY ...................................... 96 5.4 HUMAN SETTLEMENTS ............................................................................................. 101 5.5 PUBLIC HEALTH ....................................................................................................... 105 5.6 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, TOURISM AND AGRICULTURE (EDTA) ............................. 106 5.7 SPORTS, RECREATION, ARTS AND CULTURE ............................................................. 110 5.8 SAFETY AND SECURITY ............................................................................................ 112 CHAPTER 6: DELIVERY PLAN .......................... ................................................................. 115 CHAPTER 7: BUDGET ................................. ........................................................................ 221 CHAPTER 8: OVERSIGHT, REPORTING, MONITORING AND EVA LUATION ................ 288 8.1 EXECUTIVE MAYOR .................................................................................................. 288 8.2 CITY MANAGER ....................................................................................................... 289 8.3 MUNICIPAL PUBLIC ACCOUNTS COMMITTEE .............................................................. 290 8.4 RULES AND ETHICS COMMITTEE ............................................................................... 291 8.5 OFFICE OF THE AUDITOR-GENERAL .......................................................................... 291 8.6 AUDIT COMMITTEE ................................................................................................... 292 8.7 INTERNAL AUDIT AND RISK ASSURANCE ................................................................... 292 8.8 PERFORMANCE, MONITORING AND EVALUATION ....................................................... 293 8.9 SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT .................................................................................. 298 8.10 WARD COMMITTEES ................................................................................................. 299 8.11 SPECIAL SECTORS AND MAINSTREAMING ................................................................. 299 ANNEXURE “A” – Documented changes in the IDP

ANNEXURE “B” – Public Participation Report

ANNEXURE “C” – Ward Priorities

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LIST OF ACRONYMS

ACDP African Christian Democratic Party

ANC African National Congress

ATTP Assistance to the Poor

BEPP Built Environment Performance Plan

CBD Central Business District

CBOs Community Based Organisations

CGDS City Growth and Development Strategy

CIDZ Coega Industrial Development Zone

CITP Comprehensive Integrated Transport Plan

COPE Congress of the People (insert above CSIR)

CSIR Council for Scientific and Industrial Research

DA Democratic Alliance

DORA Division of Revenue Act

EC Eastern Cape

ECSECC Eastern Cape Socio-economic Consultative Council

EDTA Economic Development, Tourism and Agriculture

EFF Economic Freedom Fighters

EPWP Expanded Public Works Programme

ERP Enterprise Resource Planning

FLISP Finance Linked Individual Subsidy Programme

FWFWWTW Fish Water Flats Waste Water Treatment Works

GDP Gross Domestic Product

GGP Gross Geographic Product

GIS Geographic Information Systems

GRAP 17 Generally Recognised Accounting Practices

GV General Valuation

GVA Gross Value Added

HIV/AIDS Human Immunodeficiency Virus causing the Acquired

Immunodeficiency Syndrome

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HOVs High Occupancy Vehicles

HSDG Human Settlements Development Grant

HURP Helenvale Urban Renewal Programme

ICDG Integrated City Development Grant

ICT Information and Communication Technology

IDP Integrated Development Plan

IDZ Industrial Development Zone

IGR Intergovernmental Relations

IPTS Integrated Public Transport System

IUDF Integrated Urban Development Framework

KPA Key Performance Area

KPE Key Performance Element

KPI Key Performance Indicator

LED Local Economic Development

LLF Local Labour Forum

LSDF Local Spatial Development Framework

LTFS Long-Term Financial Strategy

LTFSP Long-Term Financial Sustainability Plan

LUMS Land Use Management System

MBDA Mandela Bay Development Agency

MFMA Municipal Finance Management Act

MOSS Metropolitan Open Space System

MSCOA Municipal Standard Chart of Accounts

MSDF Metropolitan Spatial Development Framework

MUM Management Union Meeting

MURP Motherwell Urban Renewal Programme

NDP National Development Plan

NDPG Neighbourhood Development Partnership Grant

NEMA National Environmental Management Act

NERSA National Energy Regulator of South Africa

NGO Non-governmental Organisation

NMBM Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality

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NMBM IDP Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality’s Integrated Development

Plan

NMBMM Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality

NT National Treasury (move to below NMBMM)

OHS & W Occupational Health, Safety and Wellness

PA Patriotic Alliance

PDP Provincial Development Plan

PDoHS Provincial Department of Human Settlements (move to

below PDP)

PE Port Elizabeth

PPE Property, Plant and Equipment

PMS Performance Management System

POS Public Open Space

PPP Public-Private Partnership

PTIG Public Transport Infrastructure Grant

QMS Quality Management System

RDP Reconstruction and Development Programme

SACN South African Cities Network

SAIMI South African International Maritime Institute

SANAS South African National Accreditation System

SANRAL South African National Roads Agency Limited

SAPS South African Police Services

SCOA Standard Chart of Accounts

SCU Sustainable Community Unit

SDBIP Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan

SDGs Sustainable Development Goals

SMMEs Small Medium and Micro Enterprises

SNDB Sub-National Doing Business

SOEs State Owned Enterprises

SOPs Standard Operating Procedures

SPLUMA Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Act

STATS SA Statistics South Africa

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SWOT Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats

TOD Transit Oriented Development

UDM United Democratic Movement

UFEC United Front Eastern Cape

UNS Urban Network Strategy

USDG Urban Settlements Development Grant

WWTW Waste Water Treatment Works

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FOREWORD BY THE EXECUTIVE MAYOR

The August 2016 Local Government elections delivered an exciting change of

administration to Nelson Mandela Bay. This historic about-turn and rejection of

the maladministration of the previous administration heralded in the new DA-

led coalition government in Nelson Mandela Bay.

The participating coalition partners and their respective parties had all

campaigned in one way or another on the offer of change and a commitment to

stopping corruption, growing our economy in order to create jobs, and

improving service delivery. These are the seminal issues that influenced the

electorate to vote against the status quo and to vote for change.

It was also perhaps predestined that in a city named after our iconic first

democratically elected President, Nelson Mandela, we would have to govern in

a coalition of different parties in a spirit of cooperation, reconciliation and united

interest to deal with the issues of all the citizens of the City and their respective

needs.

This change of administration brought not only much excitement, anticipation

and expectation; it brought a fresh approach to governance. Almost

immediately after our elections, we embarked on the most comprehensive

interaction with citizens ever across all sixty wards and all stakeholder

communities in an endeavour to craft a credible IDP, based on the actual needs

of all the communities in our City.

We also informed these communities unambiguously about what the objectives

of this new administration are.

We have built our new administration on six pillars, which will form the

foundation of what kind of city this new administration wishes to create in our

term of office.

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The first and probably most important pillar is to create an Opportunity City.

This is intended to create, facilitate and stimulate an economic environment that

is growing and able to provide job opportunities to especially our youth, who

are faced with 49% unemployment. As long as this situation prevails, we will

not be able to turn the current socio-economic conditions around. The

opportunity to find a job brings dignity and independence and breaks the cycle

of dependency in poor communities. This is our objective.

The next pillar, which is also directly linked to the one above, is creating a

Caring City. Our vision of a caring city is one that treats everyone with fairness

and that freedom and opportunity for all becomes a lived reality in our City.

Creating a Safe City is the next pillar of our strategy. This does not focus on

crime and the combating thereof only, even though the role of the Metro Police

Service is central to achieving this, in collaboration with the SAPS. A Safe City

is one that ensures that streets are illuminated, that roads are trafficable, so

that commuters are not dropped off kilometres from where they live, that

everyone has access to safe drinking water and safe electricity, and that women

and children do not feel more vulnerable than other sections of society.

We also aim to create an Inclusive City, which deals finally with the spatial

reality of the apartheid legacy, where we will do everything in our power to

transform “townships” into suburbs and make provision for social housing within

the confines of the inner-city and on vacant pieces of land in order to integrate

communities who have for generations been separated by political design and

kept apart from areas of economic opportunity.

Then, with regard to effective, efficient and economic government, we aim to

be an example of good governance by becoming an exemplary and Well Run

City. In this regard, we know where the bar is set in South Africa and, as the

leading party in this coalition, we will use the examples of best practice that we

have access to through the DA’s good governance department. We are

fortunate that we do not have to reinvent the wheel in this regard; we will select

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policies and practices that have yielded renowned results and apply these to

our unique circumstances and needs.

In conclusion, we also intend to ensure that we are a Forward Thinking City that

makes provision for multi-generational planning in order to avoid duplication or

negligence, which results in wasted expenditure. We also believe that a forward

thinking city is a Smart City and that every latest and practical application of the

electronic and information age should be incorporated into our systems and

daily operations in order to minimise bureaucratic bottlenecks and restrictive

administrative red tape.

We are determined to become a destination of choice for investment in

commerce by exploiting our niche economic and competitive advantage, such

as having two world-class ocean ports. Tourism is also one of our singularly

unique advantages in that we are rapidly becoming a sports tourism destination

of choice, based on our magnificent climate and world-class beaches situated

in a beautiful and safe bay that is home to some of our rarest ocean birds,

mammals and fish.

Nelson Mandela Bay is open for business and we are committed to improving

our image in the world’s network of economic and tourism supply and demand.

We recognise, too, the more and more important role major cities are playing

in driving regional economies and we plan to be the main catalyst in our regional

economic growth.

COUNCILLOR ATHOL TROLLIP

EXECUTIVE MAYOR

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FOREWORD BY THE CITY MANAGER

The IDP is a five-year strategic living document that is reviewed on an annual

basis. Following the 2016 Local Government elections, the newly constituted

Council approved the 2017/18 IDP and Budget schedule. This IDP was duly

subjected to public participation process, as prescribed by the Municipal

Systems Act. There was an extensive public participation process, which also

prioritised consultation with key sectors that are significant role players in the

economy of Nelson Mandela Bay, namely SMMEs and the manufacturing,

automotive, construction, Green Economy, Ocean Economy, tourism,

agriculture, transport and services sectors. This platform was also used to

share the new vision of the NMBM – “an iconic, friendly ocean City driven by

innovation, service excellence and economic development – a destination of

choice”.

This vision is centred on six key pillars: The Well-Run City; The Opportunity

City; the Caring City; The Inclusive City; The Safe City; and The Forward

Thinking City. This IDP is the stepping stone towards achieving the vision of

the City, based on these six pillars. The issues and needs raised by the

communities from the six clusters in Nelson Mandela Bay, and the

representatives of children, youth, elderly and differently abled persons; as well

as key role-players in the Metro’s economy, are all aligned to the six pillars.

These stakeholders emphasised, amongst other things, the provision and

improvement of basic services; focus on early childhood development; the

visibility of the Metro Police; job creation; the empowerment of SMMEs and the

revitalisation of business hives; urgent engagement with Transnet to expedite

the relocation of the manganese ore facilities and fuel storage tanks in order to

develop the Harbour; strengthening collaboration within and amongst sectors;

and revamping dilapidated signage across the Metro.

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The expectations of our stakeholders require a change of mind-set in how we

conduct our business as the City administration – it cannot be business as

usual. This IDP is the beginning of a new journey that we are committed to

embrace. It responds to the issues raised by our stakeholders.

The only gap that we must close is the lack of active participation by sector

government departments in the IDP process. The significance of their

participation cannot be overemphasised, as they play a key role in the

development of our municipal space; therefore, collaboration with them is

important. We should therefore strive for the IDP not only to be seen as, but to

become a central planning tool for the three spheres of government.

Many thanks to our stakeholders who participated during the review process of

the IDP. Their inputs have enriched our five-year road map.

JOHANN METTLER

CITY MANAGER

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CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION

1.1 Context and overview

Municipalities are constitutionally mandated to prepare a five-year Integrated

Development Plan (IDP), which serves as a strategic action and service

delivery oriented resource and, as such, supersedes all other plans that inform

the developmental agenda in local government. Accordingly, the Nelson

Mandela Bay Municipality’s IDP outlook is guided by its developmental goals,

including the programmes of the provincial and national government.

The Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality’s IDP is a strategic planning instrument

that requires the participation and input of all Metro residents. As such, it

informs and guides all relevant planning, management, budgeting and decision-

making processes within the institution.

It has the potential to transform local communities in direct response to the

needs of our diverse communities and adapt to their changing demands and

expectations. And for this reason, communities are participating more

dynamically in decisions and resource allocation, especially around the

municipal budget and strategic planning initiatives. This is given expression

through active involvement, giving residents more say in the provision of

services and by enhancing customer satisfaction as the primary determinant of

our success in the provision of services.

The following role-players and stakeholders were consulted during the IDP and

Budget development and review processes of the Municipality:

• Communities of Nelson Mandela Bay

• Organised stakeholder groupings, e.g. Chambers of Commerce; NGOs;

civic groupings; unions; and ratepayers’ associations

• Institutions of Higher Learning and government sector departments

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• Surrounding municipalities

• Special sectors (youth, women, elderly people and people with

disabilities)

• Economic sectors

• Creative arts and heritage Organisations

• Municipal Councillors and officials; and

• Ward Committees

The current administration, under the hand of a multi-party coalition, is facing

the complex challenge of transforming the institution in order to eradicate the

legacy of apartheid and the dysfunctional state of affairs inherited from previous

administrations. It has engaged in a full evaluation of the functioning of every

aspect affecting the lives of communities in Nelson Mandela Bay. It spells,

succinctly, our vision and mission, which are given life and practical expression

through the six foundational pillars on which the Municipality’s developmental

priorities are hinged.

Our Constitution requires us as local government to be developmental – a

responsibility to structure and manage the administrative, budgeting and

planning processes that will give expression and priority to the basic needs of

communities and to promote their social and economic development. Hence

our IDP sets out a vision for the future of local government in Nelson Mandela

Bay, in line with legislation and the Constitution.

Our vision points to democratic local government in which the needs of all, but

especially the poor and vulnerable communities, are met with efficiency and

effectiveness. This will ensure that we are accountable and viable, and capable

of delivering sustainable services that meet the diverse needs of our

communities.

Our IDP, the strategic planning document against which this Council’s

performance is judged, is committed to its developmental vision and the

creation of a vibrant local sphere that spells a clean break from the past. It is

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an implicit acknowledgement of our electoral mandate, but also to ensure that

this mandate is constantly challenged and refreshed through oversight and

scrutiny by communities that will ultimately effect meaningful change. In a

nutshell, it is aimed and geared at restructuring and transforming municipal

governance to meet the demands, first and foremost of our communities, as

well as the demands of living in a globalised world.

Together with our communities, we have identified where we are and where we

want to be in the future. And to do this, we realize that we need to understand

the complexity of the challenges confronting our Metro and the significant

trends that influence the direction in which the future unfolds. All of this is

needed to be taken into account when establishing the strategic plan for the

future of our Metro. In doing so, we improved accountability and transparency

with residents in order to achieve the vision and commitment of the city on its

journey into the future. Developing accountability is a key aspect of our strategy

as we engage with our residents through honest and frank dialogue to gauge

expectations and measure performance around the needs of residents.

All of our efforts can succeed only if there is sufficient capacity within municipal

leadership to drive the process for change. Political leadership is crucial in

driving transformation and achieving the desired results in performance, as well

as the need to ensure appropriate staffing levels and build the capacity of

municipal employees.

This IDP is a bold and confident attempt to achieve the fundamental

reorganization and necessary change of municipal governance in Nelson

Mandela Bay, as directed by our communities and as required by legislation

and the Constitution. It has the innate potential to create a local government

environment that combines the best from within communities with best practice

from around the world that will stimulate socio-economic growth and play a key

role in attaining our developmental priorities as outlined.

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It is evident that we need new perspectives all the time to live up to the

expectations of communities. We need to think and dream big – harnessing our

collective dreams, knowledge, creativity and motivation in order to find new

ways to develop strategic city strategies for delivering prosperous and socially

harmonious environments for all our citizens and ensuring the evolvement of

Nelson Mandela Bay.

The enormous complexity of our Metro today means that the demands on

infrastructure and services are extremely challenging. Not only are the basic

needs of transport, housing, water and energy under strain, but new demands

are emerging in other areas. And for this reason, the IDP gives a holistic view

that seeks to measure the impacts on and of development in our city. It

envisages improving services to residents through rapid response and

innovative solutions that allow for more effective collaboration, resulting in

better communication and better services for our communities.

As the 21st century unfolds, and we move ever faster towards global economic

integration, our role as a city is to drive growth, prosperity and social wellbeing.

Nelson Mandela Bay must become a Well Run City; an Opportunity City; a Safe

City; an Inclusive City; a Caring City; and a Forward Thinking City – which

simply means a modern city, somewhere to grow, to develop and to enjoy. But

also a place to work, to educate, to socialize and to relax. At the same time,

social disunity, crime and poverty cannot be ignored. These factors motivate

the ongoing aspiration of a city that improves people’s lives and meet their

needs in all areas of life.

Change is real and the demands of the future are pressing on us all. We need

to lead with the vision and the dreams that will empower and inspire all our

people living in Nelson Mandela Bay. Our rapidly changing communities are

creating a need for strategic development that offers constant innovation and a

renewal of processes and people’s attitudes. And this is exactly what this IDP

encapsulates.

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1.2 About Nelson Mandela Bay

A mecca for both local and international beach sporting activities and outdoor

fun, Nelson Mandela Bay offers a bounty of rich pickings in many aspects. It

combines the best of all worlds – the economic opportunities and benefits of a

large city and the genuine, warm hospitality for which its residents are rightly

famous.

The city’s entry point showcases its monumental developmental aspirations

and capabilities, with the most modern deep-water port in the Southern

Hemisphere, the Port of Ngqura.

Nelson Mandela Bay is the hub of the automotive industry on the African

continent, with many major international vehicle and component manufacturers

based in the city. It is a preferred region for the manufacturing of

pharmaceuticals, flour, meat, frozen veggies, soft drinks, chocolates, cheese,

yoghurt, ice-cream, paper and leather products.

A paradise for nature lovers, nowhere else in South Africa does a city offer the

Big 7 wildlife, malaria-free game reserves and such warm, friendly people.

Furthermore, it carries the rich legacy of an area that saw the first meetings of

the Khoisan, British, Dutch, German and Xhosa people.

The landing place of the 1820 Settlers, it boasts some of the finest Victorian

and Edwardian architecture in South Africa.

1.3 Vision, Mission and Brand Promise

MISSION

To create Freedom, Fairness and Opportunity for all in NMBM; stop

corruption; create jobs; and improve service delive ry

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VISION

An iconic, friendly, ocean city driven by innovatio n, service excellence

and economic development – a destination of choice

BRAND PROMISE

One City One Future

The IDP is required to:

• link, integrate and coordinate plans and take into account proposals for

the development of the Municipality and the achievement of transversal

governance;

• align the resources and capacity of the Municipality with the

implementation of the Plan;

• form the policy framework and general basis of annual budgets;

• be developmentally oriented;

• comply with the provisions of Chapter 5 of the Municipal Systems Act;

• be compatible with national and provincial and provincial development

plan requirements, which are binding on the Municipality in terms of

legislation.

The NMBM’s IDP is anchored on six pillars; the foundations on which the

Municipality’s developmental priorities are hinged.

‘THE WELL RUN CITY’

This pillar pertains to all initiatives that cater for meeting the standard

operational expectations of the Municipality, including initiatives that address

human resources, systems, accountable governance and the financial viability

of the institution.

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Objectives :

Nelson Mandela Bay strives to:

• Transform the institutional systems, processes and organizational

structure to one of high performance in order to effectively deliver

basic services.

• Ensure that the Municipality is staffed throughout with a

motivated, committed and capable workforce.

• Ensure financial prudence and transparent governance and work

towards eradicating corruption.

‘THE OPPORTUNITY CITY’

The Opportunity City delivers on well-planned initiatives to enable and cultivate

job creation and economic opportunity, develop competitive advantage, and

ensure access to skills.

Objectives :

Nelson Mandela Bay strives to:

• Grow and diversify the local economy through the attraction of

new investment, skills development and facilitation of an enabling

environment for small business growth and job creation.

• Facilitate and promote infrastructure led growth, development

and tourism.

‘THE SAFE CITY’

This pillar speaks to all initiatives that address safety and security. It also

includes those that create environmental safety, as well as safety for residents

and tourists.

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Objectives :

Nelson Mandela Bay strives to:

• Deliver well-resourced and capacitated policing and emergency

services in order to ensure the safety of communities and visitors

• Provide infrastructure that improves the safety of communities

and visitors

• Improve the safety and security of Nelson Mandela Bay through

community, industry and civic organisation partnerships

‘THE INCLUSIVE CITY’

This pillar relates to initiatives to promote equality and social cohesion and that

enable informal means of mobility between communities.

Objectives :

Nelson Mandela Bay strives to:

• Ensure institutional accessibility, effective communication

channels for participatory and responsive governance

• Deliver spatial and built environment developments that promote

integrated neighbourhoods, inclusive communities and a well-

connected Nelson Mandela Bay.

• Deliver on transformation objectives, promote redress and foster

social cohesion.

‘THE CARING CITY’

In a Caring City, equality is strived for through ensuring that all residents have

access to delivery that promotes their well-being.

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Objectives :

Nelson Mandela Bay strives to:

• Provide for the social needs of communities and empowerment of

vulnerable people through provision of access to social services,

social development programmes and indigent support.

• Promote the health and well-being of all communities through the

spatially equitable provision of social infrastructure.

• Provide effective general environmental and public health

services.

• Provide dignified housing and sanitation and accelerate access to

improved services to indigent households in order to create safe

and decent living conditions for all residents.

‘THE FORWARD THINKING CITY’

The Forward Thinking City is concerned with institutional innovation, support

for research and development, and plans for future sustainability.

Objectives :

Nelson Mandela Bay strives to:

• Ensure multi-generational planning that promotes sustainable

economic growth through research and development, innovation

and the optimal use and development of technology.

• Develop an environmentally sustainable city through proactive

planning, and conservation of resources and the natural and built

environments.

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1.4 Political structure

The Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality is governed by a coalition government,

comprising the following political parties: the Democratic Alliance (DA), United

Democratic Movement (UDM), the Congress of the People (COPE), and the

African Christian Democratic Party (ACDP).

The political structure of the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality comprises the

Council, the Executive Mayoral Committee, the Portfolio Committees and the

Municipal Public Accounts Committee (MPAC), as described below.

1.4.1 Council

The role of a council in local government is that of lawmaker and, as such, it

focuses on legislation, participation and oversight. In addition, municipal

councils facilitate political discussions and debate in order to assist in decision-

making.

The Council of the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality is headed by the Speaker

and comprises 120 Councillors, elected through a mixed-member proportional

representation system. Altogether 60 of those Councillors were elected through

a voting process in the 60 wards that make up Nelson Mandela Bay. The

remaining 60 Councillors were selected from party lists, on the basis that the

total number of party representatives must be proportional to the number of

votes received.

Of the 120 Councillors serving in Nelson Mandela Bay, 37 are females and 83

are males. The Democratic Alliance has the largest number of seats (57),

followed by the African National Congress (ANC) (50 seats); the Economic

Freedom Fighters (EFF) (6 seats); the United Democratic Movement (2 seats);

and the Congress of the People, the Patriotic Alliance (PA), the United Front

Eastern Cape (UFEC), African Christian Democratic Party (ACDP) and the

African Independent Congress (AIC) (1 seat each).

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The table below illustrates the above narrative.

Source: Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality Corporate Services Directorate

1.4.2 Executive Mayoral System

The Executive Mayor’s role and responsibilities include identifying and

prioritising community needs and drafting strategies to deliver on those needs.

In addition, he has oversight of the delivery of services by the administrative

structure of the City.

The Executive Mayor is supported by the Speaker, the Chief Whip and a

Mayoral Committee that comprises 10 members, each of whom chairs a

Portfolio Committee. The Municipality has a functional Municipal Public

Accounts Committee (MPAC) in place, which performs an oversight role in

respect of both the political and administrative structures.

TABLE: Political party seat allocation and gender distribution

POLITICAL PARTY ALLOCATION

OF SEATS

GENDER DISTRIBUTION

MALE FEMALE

Democratic Alliance 57 43 14

African National Congress 50 32 18

Economic Freedom Fighters 6 3 3

United Democratic

Movement

2 1 1

Cope 1 0 1

African Christian Democratic

Party

1 1 0

African Independent

Congress

1 1 0

Patriotic Alliance 1 1 0

United Front Eastern Cape 1 1 0

TOTAL 120 83 37

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COUNCILLOR PORTFOLIO

Councillor Retief Odendaal Budget and Treasury

Councillor Shirley Sauls Constituency Services

Councillor Annette Lovemore Corporate Services

Councillor Andrew Whitfield Economic Development,

Tourism and Agriculture

Councillor Athol Trollip Executive Mayor

Councillor Jonathan Lawack Speaker

Councillor Werner Senekal Chief Whip

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COUNCILLOR PORTFOLIO

Councillor Nqaba Bhanga Human Settlements

Councillor Masixole Zinto

Infrastructure and

Engineering, Electricity

and Energy

Councillor Lance Grootboom Public Health

Councillor John Best Safety and Security

Councillor Rano Kayser Roads and Transport

Councillor Siyasanga Sijadu Sports, Recreation,

Arts and Culture

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COUNCILLOR PORTFOLIO

Councillor Yoliswa Yako

Municipal

Public Accounts

Committee (MPAC)

1.4.3 Office of the Chief Whip

The Office of the Chief Whip of Council has existed in the Nelson Mandela Bay

Municipality since 2003. Its primary purpose, namely maintaining discipline

amongst Council members, has evolved over many decades through custom

and precedent in many legislatures around the world. The Office of the Chief

Whip has been adapted to local conditions since the inception of parliamentary

democracy in 1994. The contact point between the executive and legislative

spheres of the Municipality is the Office of the Chief Whip.

The Office of the Chief Whip focuses on the following:

• Building better relations between the various political parties represented

in Council.

• Political management of Council meetings.

• Management of the majority and Coalition caucuses.

The relationship between the political parties is enhanced through bi-monthly

internal meetings, as well as multi-party Whippery meetings. The multi-party

Whippery is the forum in which all parties represented in Council discuss the

order of business in Council and determine which items serving before it will

require debate.

The Office is also responsible for recommending to the Executive Mayor

Councillors to serve on Committees and represent the institution on external

bodies. In being a responsive coalition government, the Office also deals with

addressing and resolving complaints that come directly from communities or

through the Municipality’s Petitions Office.

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1.5 Administration

The Administration of the City is headed by the City Manager, Mr Johann

Mettler, who is also the Accounting Officer.

ACCOUNTING OFFICER TITLE

Mr Johann Mettler City Manager

The City Manager is appointed by the municipal Council and appoints an

Executive Management Team to assist him in running the administration. He

is, inter alia, responsible for implementing the IDP, which is the institution’s

five-year service delivery plan.

The Executive Management Team comprises 10 senior managers, each

responsible for a portfolio, which largely matches the corresponding political

portfolio.

The organisational structure of the City is presently being reviewed. The current

organisational structure is as follows:

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Executive Mayor

Chief Operating Officer

City Manager

Chief Financial Officer 60 Ward

Committees

Community

Chief of Staff

Executive Directors

Budget and Financial Control Expenditure Management and Financial Control Revenue Management and Customer Care Supply Chain Management

Treasury and Financial Support

Communications Integrated Development Plan Legal Services Monitoring and Evaluation Policy, Strategy and Research Risk Management Uitenhage/Despatch Office

Administrative Services Asset Management Constituency Services Corporate HR Services Facilities Management Labour Relations Municipal Information Systems Human Resources Transformation Human Resource Management Services Office of the Speaker

Directorate: Corporate Services

Fresh Produce Market and Urban Agriculture Sector Development Special Projects Trade and Investment

Directorate: Economic

Development, Tourism

and Agriculture

Distribution Technical Services Projects Retail and Commercial

Management

Directorate: Electricity and

Energy

Development and Support Housing Delivery Land Planning and Management Social Development, Education and Administration

Directorate: Human

Settlements

Design and Implementation Special Projects and Strategic Operations Roads, Stormwater and Transportation Support Services Water and Sanitation Integrated Public

Transport Services

Directorate: Infrastructure and

Engineering

Administration Environmental Health Environmental Management Occupational Health, Safety and Wellness Parks and Cemeteries Waste Management HIV/IADS and TB Multi- sectoral Response

Directorate: Public Health

Disaster Management Fire and Emergency Services Security Services Traffic and Licencing Services

Metro Police

Directorate: Safety and Security

Motherwell Urban Renewal Programme Integrated Poverty Alleviation Expanded Public Works Programme Helenvale Urban Renewal Programme Walmer Urban Renewal Programme Technical and Operators Coordination

Directorate: Special Programmes

Speaker Chief Whip

Internal Audit and Risk Assurance

Beaches, Resorts and Support Services Libraries, Arts and Culture Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Art Museum Red Location Museum

Sports and Recreation

Directorate: Sports, Recreation,

Arts and Culture

ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE OF NELSON MANDELA BAY MUNI CIPALITY

NELSON MANDELA BAY COUNCIL

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1.6 LEGISLATIVE AND POLICY MANDATES AND ALIGNMENT WITH LONG

TERM VISION

The legislative and policy mandates that influence the activities of local government

are numerous, encompassing international, national, provincial and regional

influences. It is important that there is a direct linkage between the activities at a local

government level and the broader strategic policy and legislative environment in order

that a common vision for the development of South Africans and Nelson Mandela Bay

residents can be achieved.

This section demonstrates the direct linkage between Nelson Mandela Bay’s six pillars

of action and the following legislative and policy directives, whilst acknowledging that

there are numerous other mandates that are adhered to:

• Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

• National Development Plan (NDP) 2030

• Integrated Urban Development Framework 2016

• Eastern Cape Vision 2030 – Provincial Development Plan (PDP)

• Medium-Term Strategic Framework Outcomes

• Batho Pele Principles

1.6.1 The Sustainable Development Goals

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is a set of 17 global goals with 169

targets, for achievement by 2030. The goals were adopted in 2015 by the 194

countries of the United Nations’ General Assembly. South Africa is a member country.

The following diagram shows the linkage between the 17 goals and the 6 pillars.

Through the effective delivery of the 6 pillars, Nelson Mandela Bay will in turn

contribute towards the achievement of the 17 sustainable development goals.

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Linkage between Sustainable Development Goals and t he 6 Pillars

No Poverty

Zero Hunger

Good Health and Well-being

Quality Education

Gender Equality

Clean Water and Sanitation

Affordable and Clean Energy

Decent Work and Economic

Growth

Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure

Reduced Inequalities

Sustainable Cities and

Communities

Partnerships for the Goals

Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions

Life On Land

Life Below Water

Climate Action

Responsible Consumption

and Production

Well Run City

Opportunity City

Safe City

Inclusive City

Caring City

Forward Thinking City

Pillar 1:

Pillar 2:

Pillar 3:

Pillar 4:

Pillar 5:

Pillar 6:

24

1.6.2 National Development Plan 2030

The National Development Plan (NDP) of South Africa was produced by the National

Planning Commission in 2011. It aims through its implementation to eliminate poverty

and reduce inequality by 2030. The Plan focuses on a number of thematic areas,

which together will transform South African society in combination with capable

institutions, a growing economy, increased capacity and leadership, and partnerships.

The thematic areas all have identified objectives and a number of actions that will give

rise to the transformation of the status quo. The following diagram shows the linkage

between the major thematic areas of the National Development Plan and the six Pillars

of Nelson Mandela Bay. By demonstrating these linkages, the actions of Nelson

Mandela Bay in achieving the objectives of the National Development Plan can be

easily identified.

25

Linkage between National Development Plan 2030 and the 6 Pillars

Well Run City

Opportunity City

Safe City

Inclusive City

Caring City

Forward Thinking City

Pillar 1:

Pillar 2:

Pillar 3:

Pillar 4:

Pillar 5:

Pillar 6:

Economy and Employment

Economic Infrastructure

Environmental Sustainability and Resilience

Inclusive Rural Economy

SA in the Region and World

Transforming Human Settlements

Improving Education, Training and Innovation

Health Care for All

Social Protection

Building Safer Communities

Building a Capable and Developmental State

Fighting Corruption

Nation Building and Social Cohesion

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1.6.3 Integrated Urban Development Framework (IUDF)

The IUDF responds directly to the vision outlined in the National Development Plan

and is a policy framework to guide future growth and management of urban areas. It

is designed to effect spatial transformation through reorganising the urban system in

order that cities can become more inclusive, resilient and liveable.

Four overall strategic goals are pursued in the IUDF namely:

Spatial Integration – new spatial forms

Inclusion and access- access to social and economic opportunities

Growth – inclusive sustainable economic growth and development

Governance- enhanced state capacity and citizens for collaboration around spatial

and social integration.

The above inform priorities of 9 policy levers identified as follows:

1. Integrated urban planning and management

2. Integrated transport and mobility

3. Integrated sustainable human settlements

4. Integrated Urban Infrastructure

5. Efficient land governance and management

6. Inclusive economic development

7. Empowered active communities and

8. Efficient Urban governance.

9. Sustainable finances

27

Source: COGTA 2016

The IUDF can be seen to directly linked to all six pillars of the IDP.

The Eastern Cape Development Plan is grounded in the National Development Plan,

but has specifically been developed taking cognizance of the critical priorities that face

the Eastern Cape. The Plan was developed in 2014 and involved collaboration with

citizens, organisations and institutions within and outside of the Eastern Cape.

The following principles underpin the implementation of the Eastern Cape

Development Plan:

• Understanding context

• Social justice

• Spatial equity and justice

• Intergenerational equity

• People centred development

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• Keeping the public good public

• Distributed agency and shared agenda setting

• Integrated coordination and efficiencies

• Resourcing the PDP

Arising from the above, five related goals have been developed for the Eastern Cape.

Each goal has a vision, key objectives and strategic actions. The goals are

interrelated. The Plan has a specific focus on rural development, due to the specific

absence of spatial equity in the Eastern Cape.

The following diagram shows the linkages between the five goals and the 6 pillars.

The linkages are important to identify the role of Nelson Mandela Bay in achieving the

Provincial Development Plan, as Nelson Mandela Bay is the largest City with the

strongest regional influence in the Eastern Cape.

29

Linkage between Provincial Development Plan and the 6 Pillars

Well Run City

Opportunity City

Safe City

Inclusive City

Caring City

Forward Thinking City

Pillar 1:

Pillar 2:

Pillar 3:

Pillar 4:

Pillar 5:

Pillar 6:

A growing inclusive and equitable economy

An educated, empowered and innovative citizenry

A healthy population

Vibrant equitably enabled communities

Capable, conscientious and accountable institutions

30

1.6.4 Medium-Term Strategic Framework Outcomes

The Medium-Term Strategic Framework is an expression of Government’s

Programme of Action. In terms of the Programme of Action, ten strategic priority areas

have been identified. In order to achieve the strategic priorities, twelve Key Outcomes

with accompanying Outputs and Activities have been identified. This has led to the

conclusion of ministerial performance agreements related to the strategic priority

areas. As a result of this, various structures are in place to coordinate the

implementation of the outcomes, review progress and decide on interventions when

needed.

The following diagram shows the linkage between the 6 pillars and the twelve

outcomes for 2014 to 2019:

31

Linkage between Medium-Term Strategic Framework Out comes and the 6 Pillars

Well Run City

Opportunity City

Safe City

Inclusive City

Caring City

Forward Thinking City

Pillar 1:

Pillar 2:

Pillar 3:

Pillar 4:

Pillar 5:

Pillar 6:

1: Improved basic education

2: Long and Healthy Life for All

3: All People Are and Feel Safe

4: Decent Employment Through Inclusive Economic Growth

5: Skilled and Capable Workforce

6: Efficient, Competitive and Responsive Economic Infrastructure

7: Vibrant, Equitable and Sustainable Rural Communities with

Food Security

8: Sustainable Human Settlements and Improved Quality of Life

9: Responsive, Accountable, Effective and Efficient Local

Government

10: Environmental Assets and Natural Resources Protected and

Enhanced

11: Better South Africa and Better and Safer Africa and World

12: Efficient, Effective and Development Orientated Public

Service and Empowered, Fair and Inclusive Citizenship

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1.7 Batho Pele Principles

The White Paper on Transforming Public Service Delivery was produced in 1998. In

that document, the Batho Pele (or People First) initiative was outlined. It aimed to

make municipal officials who operate in the service delivery environment more service

orientated, strive for excellence, and commit to continuous improvement for the benefit

of all citizens. It also aimed to hold officials accountable for the level of services that

they deliver.

The legislative framework identifies the need to determine service standards, define

outputs and targets, and benchmark against 18 performance standards internationally.

Monitoring and evaluation mechanisms were also introduced to continuously measure

progress.

The following eight principles were identified:

• Consultation – Citizens should be consulted on the level and quality of the

public services they receive and, wherever possible, should be given a choice

about the services that are offered.

• Service standards and targets – Citizens should be told what level and quality

of public services they will receive so that they know what to expect.

• Access – All citizens should have equal access to the services to which they

are entitled.

• Courtesy – Citizens should be treated with courtesy and consideration.

• Information – Citizens should be given full, accurate information about the

public services they are entitled to receive.

• Openness and transparency – Citizens should be told how municipalities are

run, how much they cost, and who is in charge.

• Best value – Public services should be provided economically and efficiently in

order to give citizens the best possible value for money.

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• Dealing with complaints – If the promised standards of service are not

delivered, citizens should be offered an apology, a full explanation and a

speedy and effective remedy, and when complaints are made, citizens should

receive a sympathetic and positive response.

In pursuing the pillars of a Well Run City, an Inclusive City and a Caring City, the

Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality will strive to implement the above principles.

In line with Section 29 of the MSA and 21 (1) (b) MFMA, the IDP and Budget Time

Schedule was adopted by Council in its seating on 28 August 2017. It is available on

the NMBM Website at: www.nelsonmandelabay.gov.za.

1.8 IMPLEMENTING THE LONG-TERM DEVELOPMENT PLAN

The Metro’s political and administrative leadership, communities and economic sector

groups consulted throughout the development of this long term plan have high

ambitions for a bright future for Nelson Mandela Bay. This Municipality is determined

to achieve those ambitions throughout Port Elizabeth, Uitenhage and Despatch. It is

generally accepted that progress cannot proceed across all fronts simultaneously and

at equal pace – the essence of strategy is the optimal prioritisation and making of

choices regarding which elements of an envisioned future are most practically pursued

in each phase of its realisation. In this way, each set of milestones can be achieved

through advance from the solid foundation of delivery preceding it. The purpose of this

section of the plan is to set out broad phasing for the implementation of strategy.

This long-term development plan adopts a fifteen-year perspective. It therefore covers

the period of three Integrated Development Plans:

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(a) IDP 1, passed in June 2017, covering the 2017/18 to 2021/22 financial years;

(b) IDP 2, to be passed in June 2022, covering the 2022/23 to 2026/27 financial

years; and

(c) IDP 3, to be passed in June 2027, covering the 2027/28 to 2031/32 financial

years.

Each new IDP builds systematically on the achievements of its predecessors, through

essential progress in each of the following development focus areas:

• Governance and organization-led development

• Infrastructure-led development

• Opportunity-led development

• Infrastructure-led development

• Development for resilience

• Development through lifestyle offering

• Development through conservation of our natural, built and cultural assets

• Safety-enabled development

• People-oriented development

• Technology-led development

1.8.1 Development for Resilience

Building a successful Nelson Mandela Bay means that we have to make sustainable

choices about how we develop. Nelson Mandela Bay will grow. Our choice is therefore

not whether we grow, but how well we grow. Making Nelson Mandela Bay better

should always come before making it bigger, but we will get bigger. This plan sets its

sights on building consensus around change by painting a picture of the city’s future.

In order to ensure balanced prioritization of “people, planet and profit”, the costs and

benefits of every development undertaken need to be carefully assessed to ensure

that for every decision the implications are well understood and planned for.

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The concepts of resilience and sustainability from a planning perspective enable us to

broaden our vision in consideration of economic, environmental and social implications

together, rather than using a single perspective. It encourages decision making that is

long-range, democratic, participatory and respectful of all stakeholders and aspects of

what a sustainable future Metro should embody. Such a focus aligns with the Metro

pillar of a Forward Thinking Metro - which requires that planning be geared to meet

the needs of today without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their

needs.

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CHAPTER 2: SITUATIONAL ANALYSIS

This chapter describes the development context of the Nelson Mandela Bay

Municipality and identifies the City’s strengths, opportunities, weaknesses and threats

within this context and the ability of the City to perform in terms of the six pillars that

have been identified by the leadership, namely:

• The Well Run City

• The Opportunity City

• The Safe City

• The Inclusive City

• The Caring City

• The Forward Thinking City

2.1 Location

The Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality is the larger of two metropolitan municipalities

located in the Eastern Cape Province. It covers an area of 1959,02 km².

Statistics South Africa (STATS SA) describes Nelson Mandela Bay as follows:

“ Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality is located on the south-eastern coast of Africa in

the Eastern Cape. It is one of eight Category A municipalities in South Africa. In 2001,

the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality was formed as an administrative

area covering Port Elizabeth, the neighbouring towns of Uitenhage and Despatch, and

the surrounding agricultural areas. Nelson Mandela Bay is a major seaport and

automotive manufacturing centre.

The Coega Industrial Development Zone (IDZ) is situated within the Nelson Mandela

Bay Metropolitan Municipality. The initiative is a multi-billion dollar industrial

development complex customised for heavy, medium and light industries. It is adjacent

to a deepwater port, the Port of Ngqura, and covers 110 km² of land. The city’s unique

37

advantage of possessing two ports, namely Port Elizabeth Harbour and Ngqura,

creates an opportunity for the city to establish a strong and vibrant maritime sector”.

2.2 Population and human development

The current population of Nelson Mandela Bay is 1 271 776 (STATS SA), with a growth

rate of 1.36%, which is lower than that of other metropolitan areas, such as Ekurhuleni

(2.47%) and Tshwane (3.1%). Nelson Mandela Bay is characterized by a youthful

population, with the age group of 5 to 14 years dominating.

The total number of households is 365 973, of which 21 668 are estimated to be

informal households (STATS SA).

Nelson Mandela Bay has the lowest proportion of informal households among South

African Metropolitan Municipalities, having significantly reduced the numbers since

2001 (SACN, 2016). In addition, the average number of people per household

declined from 4,25 in 1996 to 3,55 in 2011.

The life expectancy among Nelson Mandela Bay residents is 59,3 years and 53,7

years for females and males respectively. This is the same as for Buffalo City. By

comparison, Cape Town has a life expectancy of 70,1 and 64,2 years, while

Mangaung has a life expectancy of 52,7 and 49,6 years for females and males

respectively (SACN, 2016).

Regarding education, in 2011, 19,7% of Nelson Mandela Bay’s population had

attained matric, whilst 6,8% had a higher education (SACN, 2016).

In analysing non-school going residents, 3% had no schooling, 13% had Grade 7 or

less (Primary School level), while 75% had a school education of Grade 12 or less

(Secondary School level) (STATS SA, 2011).

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2.3 Poverty and the economy

Between 2001 and 2011, the total number of people living below the poverty line

decreased from 46% to 29% (SACN, 2016).

The Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality assists the poorest of the poor among its

residents with an indigent subsidy (Assistance to the Poor Scheme), which covers the

costs of free basic services. The number of indigent households subsidized, grew

from 71 551 in 2013 to 115 934 during 2017. Altogether 31% of formal households in

Nelson Mandela Bay are dependent on the municipal indigent subsidy.

Over the period 2001 to 2011, the Nelson Mandela Bay’s economy and average

household income grew slower than those of other South African metropolitan

municipalities.

Nelson Mandela Bay is the driver of the Eastern Cape economy, contributing 41,81%

of the provincial Gross Geographic Product (GGP) (Global Insight, 2013). The

unemployment rate dropped from 46,4% in 2001 to 36,6% in 2011. The Eastern Cape

Province’s average unemployment rate was 37,4% in 2011 (SACN, 2016).

The largest economic sectors in Nelson Mandela Bay Metro are manufacturing,

finance, community services and transport. Community services, trade and

manufacturing sectors are the sectors that create the most employment in the Metro.

Two single sectors, “Manufacturing and Community”, and “Social and Personal

Services”, make up more than half (58,1%) of the Metro’s GVA (Gross Value Added),

with “Financial and Related Services”, (Transport and Trade) contributing a further

37%. The automotive sector accounts for more than 50% of the Metro’s manufacturing

sector (ECSECC, 2012).

A Doing Business in South Africa Survey (SNDB) was undertaken in 2015 among all

South African Metropolitan Municipalities. The survey measured the performance of

cities in relation to the cost of doing business over five indicator areas impacting on

the ease of conducting business in South Africa.

39

The indicator areas focused on regulations relevant to the life cycle of a small to

medium sized domestic business and were built on standardized case scenarios. This

allowed an equal and fair comparison of all cities in the study. The indicators

assessed, were:

• Dealing with construction permits

• Starting a business

• Registering property

• Getting electricity

• Enforcing contracts

Within these indicators, the length of time, financial cost and number of procedures

were evaluated. Of the five indicators, three namely, dealing with construction permits,

registering property and getting electricity, were within the direct control of

municipalities.

The aim was to improve the indicators over time prior to the next survey, which will

take place in 2018. The following is the result recorded in respect of Nelson Mandela

Bay in relation to the afore-stated three municipal indicators:

• Dealing with construction permits – Nelson Mandela Bay is the overall

second best performer in the country after Cape Town in this area. Analysis

has shown that it is the cost of building plans that needs to be re-evaluated to

bring the City in line with other local authorities.

• Registering property – In terms of this indicator, the Nelson Mandela Bay

Municipality performed above average and was rated fifth best in the country.

The Municipality will need to address the time taken to issue rates clearance

certificates in order to perform better. The aspect of Deeds Office clearance

also affected this indicator.

• Getting electricity – In this indicator, the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality

performed the worst of all South African Metropolitan Municipalities in terms of

time and cost. The Municipality requires five procedures to be completed

(which is average), but these procedures take 333 days to complete, which is

40

106% longer than the average of other cities. Cost is also a factor that could

be improved.

The City has developed an Action Plan that is being monitored for improvement across

these critical indicators. All Metro Action Plans are being monitored at national level

by National Treasury.

2.4 Safety

In a 2016 South African Cities Report titled “State of Urban Safety in South Africa”, the

importance of urban safety in cities is highlighted. Cities are “places not only of

opportunity, but also of inequality and high levels of violence and crime”. The Report’s

findings confirm that crime and violence in South Africa are heavily concentrated in

urban areas.

Although crime statistics have their limitations, the following statistics for Nelson

Mandela Bay are relevant from the aforementioned Report:

• The murder rate in Nelson Mandela Bay decreased from approximately 60

murders per 100 000 to 48 murders per 100 000 between 2005 and 2015.

During this period, Buffalo City and Nelson Mandela Bay recorded the highest

murder rate of all South African Metropolitan Municipalities; however, these

cities also experienced the greatest decrease over the 10-year period.

• The statistics for assault with intent to inflict grievous bodily harm decreased

from 650 to 420 per 100 000 over the 10-year period from 2005 to 2015;

mirroring a similar decline in the statistics of most other Metropolitan

Municipalities and the national average.

• From 2005 to 2015, robberies at residential premises in Nelson Mandela Bay

increased from approximately 10 to 50 per 100 000. This is consistent with the

trend for robberies at non-residential premises as well as the national and metro

trends.

41

• With regard to residential burglaries, Nelson Mandela Bay went from the

highest score in 2005 (with 915 per 100 000), to the fifth highest of the eight

South African Metropolitan Municipalities in 2015, at just over 600.

• All South African Cities recorded increases in total crime rates between 2005

and 2015; in 2015, Nelson Mandela Bay recorded the fourth highest overall

crime rate of the eight Metros.

2.5 Overview of basic services

Nelson Mandela Bay is noted for having achieved a high level of access to basic

services in comparison to other Metros.

(a) Water

All formal households have access to water through an erf connection. Altogether

100% of households located in informal settlements within the urban edge receive

water through communal standpipes within a 200 m radius of every erf and through

water tanks. Communities occupying private land illegally are not guaranteed water

access.

(b) Sanitation

All formal households are connected to waterborne sanitation. Informal areas are

serviced by the bucket sanitation system. Altogether 16 317 buckets are still in

circulation to informal settlements as a means of sanitation (this represents a marked

decrease from the 23 479 buckets in circulation in 2012).

A revised strategy to achieve the total elimination of the bucket system is being

implemented. This will see the replacement of the bucket system by communal

ablution block facilities.

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(c) Solid Waste Management (Refuse Removal)

Altogether 100% of formal and informal households receive a domestic waste

collection service (excluding informal areas on privately owned erven and erven not

earmarked for human settlements development).

(d) Electricity

Altogether 100% of households in formally demarcated residential areas have access

to electricity. Solar panels were installed in some informal settlements for electricity

generation; however, some informal settlements remain unconnected to an electricity

supply, and the plan is to provide a 20 amp supply to these settlements to ensure

basic electricity provision to all households.

(e) Housing

The following is the housing situation in Nelson Mandela Bay –

• A high level of households live in formal housing (85%).

• A high level of households live in owned formal housing (57%).

• 12% of households live in informal housing conditions (in informal settlements and

back-yards shacks).

• New family formation to 2020 is estimated to be very low (7% between 2011 and

2020 (0.6% p.a.)).

This housing situation is a-typical of most Metros in South Africa, which are generally

characterised by lower income home ownership, higher levels of informal housing

conditions, and higher new family formation (Shisaka, 2017).

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2.6 THE SIX PILLARS – DELIVERY APPROACH

The City has undertaken an introspective analysis in order to guide the preparation of

this IDP. Key considerations include the best possible use of available resources

(budget, human resources, infrastructure, skills and assets); how capacity,

infrastructure and skills could be built to address gaps, including using strategic

partnerships; and current and new activities that could potentially serve to develop a

competitive advantage for the Metro.

The following represents an institutional analysis of the six pillars identified.

44

PILLAR 1: THE WELL RUN CITY

STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES

• A strong performance management

system, which is deadline driven and

monitored, is in place.

• Management Union Meetings

(MUMs) have been introduced for

unions to meet the management of

each directorate to address matters

concerning their members.

• Public participation processes have

been rigorous in developing this IDP.

• Commitment exists to address the

need for a central planning office.

• Institutionalisation of labour

engagement has been achieved

through Local Labour Forum (LLF)

meetings, which comprise labour,

Councillors and management.

• Asset management functions are

well coordinated.

• There is a reliable internal network

and dedicated Information and

Communication Technology (ICT)

support.

• The NMBM plays an active role in

professional engineering and other

networks.

• There is effective communication

and working relationship with

Councillors.

• The current organisational structure

is outdated in respect of the needs of

the City.

• Fragmented ICT systems and weak

ICT governance and data recovery

impact on performance.

• Turnaround time in respect of

responding to consumer queries.

• Lack of appropriate online e-

governance systems.

• Ineffective solutions for electricity

theft (including tampering and illegal

connections) and non-revenue

water.

• Dependence on consultants and

contractors because of high level of

vacancies in directorates.

• There is a need for an audit of

equipment for basic services.

• Large and growing maintenance

backlogs, resulting in service gaps

and future problems.

• Lack of consistent marketing and

publicity of positive activities and

initiatives resulting in

misconceptions.

• The Scientific Services Laboratory

requires accreditation to conduct a

wider range of analysis.

45

• Functional call centres have been

established to reduce complaint

turnaround time.

• The Scientific Services Division

offers the only laboratory in the

metropolitan area with a broad scope

of analysis and trained scientists.

• A strong interdepartmental reference

group exists for integrated Spatial

Strategy development and

implementation (BEPP Team).

• Emphasis is placed on capacity

building and training of staff (this

includes internal apprenticeship

programmes and graduate

learnership programme).

• E-recruitment has been successfully

implemented in the 2017/18 financial

year which has reduced the

turnaround time for the filling of

vacancies;

• The revised recruitment policy now

also allows for the recruitment of

positions from Grades 1 – 11 to be

considered on internally within the

institution. This encourages internal

promotion and career development.

• 23 Corporate Services policies were

revised and implemented in 2017/18.

• No single spatial plan for the city

exists, resulting in fragmented

responsibility for planning processes.

• Staff capacity is lacking in certain

• service delivery areas.

• Poor work culture and ethos in some

parts of the institution.

• Inconsistent application of human

resources policies.

• Poor planning, resulting in under-

expenditure of the budget.

• Inefficient Supply Chain

Management processes.

• High levels of unauthorised,

irregular, fruitless and wasteful

expenditure of the Budget.

• Inaccurate billing, creating distrust in

the institution among residents.

• High dependence on grant funding

availed by National/Provincial

Government Departments.

• Inefficient budget spending.

46

OPPORTUNITIES THREATS

• Improvement of Supply Chain

Management processes for greater

efficiency.

• Promotion of partnerships with

provincial and national government

and non-governmental organisations

to serve the City’s interests.

• To become a SMART City.

• Centralising the strategic plans of the

City in one centre to create synergy,

alignment and seamless processes.

• Improving institutional image through

positive publicity and connection to

constituents can result in improved

internal and external stakeholder

relations.

• Enhancing performance through

innovative performance

management.

• Exploring new revenue possibilities

and alternative sources of funding to

inter alia reduce reliance on grants.

• New emphasis by the leadership on

accountability through compliance

with transparency requirements.

• Adjustment of the repairs and

maintenance budget to ensure

that buildings, offices are safe

and secure environments for

staff, Councillors and the public

who utilises it.

• Revenue associated with National

and Provincial Government grants

and subsidies is neither realistic nor

sustainable.

• Politicisation of community meetings

results in ineffective communication.

• Poor communication on housing

delivery plans undermines effective

planning to deliver basic services,

such as water and sanitation.

• Highly unionised environment can

threaten roll-out of processes.

• Inadequate budget to address

infrastructure maintenance backlogs.

• Increasing urbanisation has

increased demand for services, both

formal and informal, which

outweighs the current ability to meet

those demands.

• Protracted Supply Chain

Management processes slow down

operations.

• Strong silo mentality in different

directorates hinders effective intra-

directorate service delivery.

• Loss of institutional memory through

resignations and retirement of staff.

• Non-payment of debt by government

departments and the community.

• Increased loss of revenue as a result

of illegal electricity connections.

47

• Decline in the economy increasing

unemployment and poverty.

• Non-achievement of the budgeted

revenue collection rate.

• Inability of consumers to financially

afford municipal tariffs, resulting in

loss of revenue.

The results of the institutional analysis in respect of the Well Run City indicate that

the following areas need to be prioritized:

• Building on the strengths of the existing administration and optimising the

organizational structure for effective governance and service delivery.

• Scrutinizing existing and developing new processes to increase the

sustainability and efficiency of the organization.

• Leveraging partnerships to assist the City in achieving its developmental

priorities.

• Actively nurturing positive relationships between staff, Councillors, unions,

private sector and other stakeholders.

48

PILLAR 2: THE OPPORTUNITY CITY

STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES

• Smart City Wifi in townships allows

for local economic development and

expansion of other related projects.

• Well-run Infrastructure Skills

Development Grant Training

Programme developing young

technicians and technologists.

• Competitive tariffs to support

businesses.

• Bursaries and learnerships offered

for study in key professions/fields.

• High level of intake and exposure of

interns.

• Water and sanitation infrastructure,

as well as litter picking and grass

mowing, projects in place to support

economic development.

• Expanded Public Works Programme

(EPWP) in place.

• Programmes that promote the

development of local sporting talent

have been developed.

• Economic infrastructure foundation is

already comprehensive (accessibility

by rail, road, airport, two ports).

• Economic zones exist (IDZ, Logistics

Park, industrial areas).

• IPTS planning of launch phase at

advance stage.

• Ineffective capitalisation of some

municipal partnerships.

• Lack of internal coordination and

alignment of development

objectives.

• Insufficient resources at Training

Centre.

• Management of Expanded Public

Works Programme (EPWP) not

strong enough.

• Absence of fiscal and economic

feasibility studies for major projects.

• Lack of integrated planning in the

region and inadequate coordination

with provincial and national

operations.

• Inefficient and ineffective use of

internal and external resources, as

well as misalignment of events and

tourism assets.

• Lack of budget for the upgrading

and maintenance of facilities.

• Excessive cost of contract security

to safeguard landmarks.

49

• Institutions of higher learning are all

available within Nelson Mandela Bay

(University, TVETS Colleges).

• Tourism and sporting infrastructure

exists in the City.

• Green Economy Strategy

development of photo voltaic (pv),

wind and other renewable energy

projects.

• Iconic brand name (Nelson Mandela

Bay).

• Establishment of the Strategic

Events Committee.

• Sport and cultural events contribute

to the City’s Gross Domestic

Product.

• Blue Flag Beaches are a tourist

attraction.

• Delivery of incident free international

and national events, such as the

annual Ironman Competition, has

built Nelson Mandela Bay’s

reputation as a competent and

reliable host city.

OPPORTUNITIES THREATS

• Transformation of the spatial form of

the city for more efficient and

equitable development.

• Improved coordination of internal

and external resources to optimise

positive economic impact.

• Water shortages.

• Education system unresponsive to

the needs of the market (supply and

demand).

• Cost of doing business and red tape

(regulatory and business application

processes).

50

• Increase revenue from the lease of

assets and infrastructure, e.g. fibre

networks.

• Strengthen relationships with all

stakeholders, particularly in the

tourism and industrial sectors.

• Establish linkages with surrounding

local authorities to align spatial and

economic development initiatives

and interventions.

• Skills development support in priority

sectors.

• Prioritisation of Township Economy

Development.

• Development of tourism

opportunities with other partners

focusing on projects such as the

Eco-Tourism Route and the Apple

Express.

• Destination marketing, which

includes programmes such as the

Tourist Ambassador Programme

and Fair Trade Tourism.

• Attract more national and

international events.

• City’s role in meaningful economic

development can be expanded.

• Lack of internal and external

coordination and alignment,

resulting in a misalignment of

development objectives.

• High level of crime, tarnishing the

reputation of NMBM as a tourist

destination.

• Vandalism of facilities and non-

adherence to norms and standards

for the development of facilities.

• Junk status of the South African

economy and its local impacts.

• National political and administrative

instability.

The results of the institutional analysis in respect of the Opportunity City indicate that

the following areas need to be prioritized:

• Capitalizing on the competitive advantages that the City has to offer, whilst

simultaneously investing in competitively differentiating Nelson Mandela Bay.

51

• Optimizing the use of partners and other stakeholders to increase opportunity

for all residents.

• Building and strengthening existing initiatives to train and develop local youth,

the unemployed and the talented.

• Clarifying and improving the role of the City in job creation, poverty alleviation

and local and regional economic development.

52

PILLAR 3: THE SAFE CITY

STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES

• Safe City prioritised in strategic

planning documents.

• Strategic spatial plans prioritise

access/mobility, which are elements

of safety.

• A Metro Police Force is in place.

• Monitoring of safe drinking water,

river water and swimming water

supplied to residents, as well as the

monitoring of air and noise pollution.

• CCTV cameras installed on high-

mast lights in townships.

• LED lighting provides high lighting

levels and longer life spans.

• City is well covered by fire,

emergency and disaster

management services.

• A comprehensive set of by-laws

exist and the enforcement of by-laws

is monitored.

• Non-governmental Organisations

(NGOs), Community Based

Organisations (CBOs) and other

organisations perform safety

functions (example: life-saving

clubs).

• Pollution of rivers and public places.

• Many areas are without functional

street or public lighting.

• Lack of adequate strategies exist for

addressing cable theft.

• Lack of recognition that safety is a

corporate responsibility, not a silo

responsibility.

• Safety element of spatial strategy is

not well articulated as a focus area.

• Succession planning and

institutional memory retention needs

attention.

53

OPPORTUNITIES THREATS

• Planning for safe, resilient and

sustainable human settlements.

• Innovative electrification and the

removal of illegal connections can

reduce non-technical losses and

electrocution incidents.

• Sustainable Community Planning

and precinct planning for the BEPP

present an opportunity to

specifically address safety aspects

at local level.

• Partnerships can be formed with

community stakeholders to address

specific community safety issues.

• Lack of lighting, which encourages

criminal activity.

• Illegal dumping into local rivers,

resulting in the pollution of these

resources.

• E.coli leaks into rivers, due to aging

infrastructure.

• The current lack of safety for

tourists, communities and

businesses.

• Perception of and actual high levels

of crime in public places.

• Lack of enforcement of legislation

and municipal by-laws.

The results of the institutional analysis in respect of the Safe City indicate that the

following areas need to be prioritized:

• Safety needs to be integrated in all departmental plans and activities from an

early stage.

• The City needs to nurture and promote community initiatives that contribute

towards the safety of residents.

• The City needs to form partnerships with other agencies such as the South

African Police Services (SAPS) and community safety forums in an effort to

improve safety.

• The City needs to ensure that all by-laws and legislation can be enforced for

the safety of residents and visitors.

• The City needs to address its human resources, maintenance and procurement

capacity to be appropriate for the areas of safety.

54

PILLAR 4: THE INCLUSIVE CITY

STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES

• Sustainable Community Planning

Methodology was specifically

designed to promote inclusion and

integration in planning processes

and plans.

• Built Environment Performance Plan

(BEPP) inter alia addresses spatial

fragmentation through integrated

City development.

• Spatial Development Framework at

city-wide level addresses inclusion.

• IDP processes have prioritised

effective participation and

stakeholder involvement.

• Initiatives exist to provide free wifi /

broadband access at all libraries

and some civic buildings, and in

some township areas.

• Ward Committee System to ensure

inclusivity of residents in decision-

making processes.

• Regular engagements with the

community by the Executive Mayor

through diverse communication

channels and platforms, such as

radio, TV and print media.

• Lack of alignment within the

Municipality for inclusive planning

and development.

• Inner-city degeneration and decay.

• No funding currently exists for full

wifi / broadband access roll-out to all

communities.

• Numerous settlements are located

on private ground and cannot be

provided with municipal services.

• Broad marketing of the City’s

strategic plans is needed to make

them more widely understood.

• No special measures exist for the

prioritisation of the needs of

vulnerable groups.

• Lack of an integrated, safe public

transport system.

OPPORTUNITIES THREATS

• Better and more inclusive public

participation in built environment

interventions (planning and

• Residents in informal settlements

lack security of tenure and positive

involvement in civic processes.

55

implementation) and general civic

processes.

• Implementation of integrated

residential and mixed use

development.

• Development of the inner city as a

24-hour centre for all.

• Funding is being sought from

National Government to provide

electricity to informal areas outside

the Housing Programme.

• Public-Private Partnership (PPP)

process is under way to obtain

external service provider to provide

Smart City / WiFi to all communities.

• Possibility to establish public-private

partnerships towards integrated

development.

• Availability of private and public

buildings in Inner-City areas that can

be utilised for inner-city rejuvenation.

• Sports, arts and culture activities can

promote social cohesion and nation

building.

• Perpetuating development of

unsustainable townships with no or

limited access to social facilities and

amenities, due to poor alignment

with government departments in

housing projects (Intergovernmental

Relations (IGR)).

• Lack of continued feedback and on-

going communication with

stakeholders, leading to lack of

understanding of plans, as well as

mistrust of city strategic planning

processes.

• Current housing delivery model

promotes urban sprawl.

• Unsustainable housing delivery

models with predominantly

Reconstruction and Development

Programme (RDP) housing, as

opposed to other typologies and in

prioritised areas.

• Limited availability of strategic and

well located land for inner-city

densification.

The results of the institutional analysis in respect of the Inclusive City indicate that the

following areas need to be prioritized:

• Broad inclusive communication on all municipal processes, programmes and

plans.

• The use of technology to improve the accessibility of information and

communication with all residents and stakeholders.

56

• Developing intergovernmental relations and other partnerships for the delivery

of the full range of developmental needs and priorities of communities.

• Institutional organization around all planning and development initiatives for the

development of integrated and sustainable communities.

• The inclusion of marginalized and vulnerable groups in civic plans, processes

and products.

57

PILLAR 5: THE CARING CITY

STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES

• EPWP is fostering work

opportunities.

• Established and co-ordinated co-

operatives exist.

• Basic energy grants have been

made available from National

Government to provide energy to

deserving communities.

• Basic services are provided to the

indigent in respect of water,

electricity, sanitation and refuse

removal.

• IDP participation processes aim to

reach all groups in NMBM - special

efforts are made to reach poor and

vulnerable groups.

• Playground equipment is provided

on public open spaces (POS).

• Parks and cemeteries are being

beautified.

• Solar geysers were provided to

homes that were part of the housing

programmes.

• A detailed plan to eradicate the

bucket toilet system has been

formulated.

• A highly functional Operations

Centre exists for reporting water and

sanitation related service delivery

problems.

• The transition from poverty relief to

sustainable social entrepreneurs still

needs to be made.

• All programmes are funded through

National Grants rather than through

external funding.

• Lack of socio-economic facilities and

amenities persists in many poor

areas.

• Lack of availability of land for

burials.

• Illegal occupation of RDP houses.

• No special measures exist for the

prioritisation of the needs of

vulnerable groups.

• Inadequate provision of dignified

sanitation solutions, with 16 317

bucket toilets still in place.

• Lack of services to communities

located in informal settlements on

private land.

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• “War of Waste” Project fostering a

sense of pride and community

responsibility.

• Litter-picking project resulted in the

creation of jobs.

OPPORTUNITIES THREATS

• Partner with other relevant

structures and institutions to create

a climate of cooperation.

• Presence of private sector with

corporate social investment budgets

allows sharing of goals and

resources.

• Enhance access to social facilities

and amenities through integrated

development planning.

• Slow implementation of Small

Medium and Micro Enterprises

SMMEs (construction sector)

development programme.

• Inability to afford sustainable social

services and amenities for low

income households.

• Perpetuating development of

unsustainable townships with no or

limited access to social facilities and

amenities due to poor alignment

with government departments in

housing projects (IGR).

• Land invasion poses a threat to city

development plans.

• Lack of participation in municipal

processes around planning and

decision-making by poor and

vulnerable groups.

The results of the institutional analysis in respect of the Caring City indicate that the

following areas need to be prioritized:

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• Creating an environment that promotes and ensures participation and the well-

being of vulnerable and marginalized groups in municipal processes around

planning and decision-making.

• Ensuring the provision of adequate services and amenities to all communities.

• Creating partnerships and seeking funding sources for improved social

amenities.

• Ensuring that city planning processes promote spatial justice and equitable

access (physically, socially and economically).

• Reviewing municipal operations to ensure efficient responses to community

complaints, applications and queries.

60

PILLAR 6: THE FORWARD THINKING CITY

STRENGTHS WEAKNESSES

• Partnership with Innovation Forum

and local University.

• Public-private and City-to-City

partnerships for learning and

knowledge sharing.

• Development infrastructure plans

and spatial development framework

are in place.

• Imminent completion of the

Nooitgedagt Coega Low Level

Scheme (Phase 2).

• “War on Waste” Cleaning Campaign

on-going to eliminate illegal

dumping.

• Spatial planning documents promote

sustainable planning, proactive

planning and conservation.

• Relations with Council for Scientific

and Industrial Research (CSIR).

• Innovative off-grid power supply

solutions for informal settlements to

address basic service issues within

those areas.

• Environmental issues are a strong

element of strategic spatial plans.

• Outdated City-wide Information and

Communication Technology (ICT)

Strategy.

• Lack of skills in innovation and

research.

• Lack of funding to implement long-

term projects.

• Absence of resourced research

component in the city.

• Absence of a Long-term Financial

Sustainability Strategy.

• Lack of a well-articulated, properly

prioritised Capital Investment

Framework attached to the BEPP

and SDF.

• Renewable/Alternative energy use

decreases demand for electricity; as

a result, electricity profit margins are

shrinking.

OPPORTUNITIES THREATS

• International collaboration.

• Review and update all planning

instruments, with a view to

innovation and forward thinking.

• Absence of research capability within

the Nelson Mandela Bay

Municipality, including the lack of

61

• Investigating revenue growth ideas,

such as the sale of data, as an

additional utility.

• Organisational review can address

the need for centralised strategic

planning function.

• The establishment and location of

South African International Maritime

Institute (SAIMI) and other research

institutes.

• Groundwater exploration at Coega

Kop to investigate an alternative

water source.

• Partnership in respect of innovative

technologies with private and public

entities.

• Completing Long-term Financial

Sustainability Strategy.

• Identifying and exploring innovative

approaches to municipal operations

and activities.

accreditation of the Scientific

Services Division.

• Lack of coordinated strategic

planning for a single City Plan.

• Funding and implementation of

Nooitgedagt Scheme being

controlled by National Department of

Water and Sanitation.

The results of the institutional analysis in respect of the Forward Thinking City indicate

that the following areas need to be prioritized:

• Aligning the organizational structure to meet the demands of an innovative and

forward thinking and planning City.

• Prioritizing the need for sustainability in all its dimensions (physical, social and

economic) in the planning and operations of the Municipality.

The above situational analysis, which provides the city context, current status of

service delivery and the introspective Strength, Weaknesses, Opportunities and

62

Threats (SWOT) analysis for each of the six pillars will, when combined with the results

of the comprehensive public participation undertaken, provide the foundation for the

activities to be conducted, as expressed in this IDP.

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CHAPTER 3: METHODOLOGY

The Municipality’s leadership set in motion a strategy to prepare an Integrated

Development Plan that would change the face of Nelson Mandela Bay. With a strong

commitment to improving service delivery, stopping corruption and growing the

economy to create jobs, it was incumbent on the government to completely reform the

administration and its systems.

Chapter Seven (7) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, Act 108 of 1996,

Chapter Four (4) and Five (5) of Local Government Municipal Systems Act, 32 of 2000

and, Chapter Four (4) of the Municipal Finance Management Act Number 56 of 2003

compels municipalities to engage communities in public participation. This should not

only be done as a compliance exercise but also as a serious engagement with

communities in order for all programmes that a municipality is implementing within the

five (5) year cycle of its Integrated Development Planning (IDP) to be informed by the

priorities of its citizens.

The 2018/19 IDP / Budget public participation programme was approved by the

Strategic Planning Steering Committee that was established by the Executive Mayor

to oversee the whole planning and implementation processes. The residents took the

current administration into their confidence through comprehensive feedback and

guidance at over 20 public meetings across the Metro. The Executive Mayor and his

Executive were given a clear direction, underpinned by a political vision for change

and progress.

For the first time in the Metro’s history, a method of recording and rating ward priorities

was implemented at the first round of IDP and Budget public participation meetings,

which took place during 18 to 24 August 2017. After reviewing the other major

statutory documents, residents were asked to review the Council-noted list of ward

priorities for their ward and assign a value of importance to each priority (with High,

Medium and Delivered when possible).

The Municipality comprehensively consulted with the community and the economic

sectors of the Metro to get inputs on how to best tackle the challenges faced in growing

64

the economy. The inputs received from community and the economic sectors

provided critical direction for the City in pursuing inclusive growth and development

going forward.

Table 1 presents a summary of the 13 most commonly raised issues by the

communities during the public participation meetings held in August 2017, listed in

ranked order:

TABLE 1: PRIORITIES FREQUENTLY RAISED IN WARD MEET INGS DURING

IDP/ BUDGET REVIEW IN AUGUST 2017

PRIORITIES RAISED WARDS

1. Provision of street lights

(High-mast lights)

4, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 28, 29, 30,

31, 32, 33, 34, 35 & 36 (19)

2. Construction of sports

fields and upgrading /

maintenance of existing

ones

4, 11, 13, 14, 15, 18, 20, 21, 22, 24, 28, 31, 32,

33, 34 & 36 (16)

3. Rectification of houses 4, 10, 18, 21, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 30, 31, 33, 34,

35 & 36 (15)

4. Provision of houses 4, 11, 12, 13, 15, 18, 24, 25, 27, 30, 31, 32, 33,

34 & 36 (15)

5. Tarring of roads and

construction of speed

humps

4, 11, 12, 13, 14,1 5, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 &

36 (14)

6. Provision and upgrade of

Clinics

14, 25, 27, 31, 32, 36, 41, 42, 43, 49, 55 & 60

(12)

7. Illegal dumping 12, 15, 24, 26, 28, 30, 31, 32, 34 & 36 (10)

65

8. Rectification of pre-1994

Houses

4, 14, 15,17, 18, 20, 21, 25 & 36 (10)

9. Upgrading and

maintenance of sewerage

system

4, 15, 20, 26, 27, 28, 29 & 36 (8)

10. Visibility of Metro Police 12, 13, 14, 15, 18, 20, 27 & 34 (8)

11. Skills development 4, 13, 14, 27, 28, 28, 31, 33 & 36 (8)

12. Construction and

Upgrade of Police

Stations

4, 11, 29, 31, 33, 35 & 36 (7)

13. Construction and

upgrade of Libraries

9, 23, 40, 48,58 & 60 (6)

Table 1 shows that, of the 60 Wards in the NMBM, 19 (31,67%) prioritized the provision

of street lights, 16 (26, 67%) the provision and upgrade of sporting facilities, 15 (25%)

wanted houses, 15 (25%) were concerned about the rectification of houses, and a

further 10 (15%) raised the issue of the rectification of houses built before 1994.

A SPATIAL REPRESENTATION OF THE 13 MOST FREQUENTLY RAISED

PRIORITIES BY THE RESIDENTS DURING PUBLIC MEETINGS IN AUGUST 2017

66

The Municipality has aligned this information with the 2018/19 Ward-based budgets

and will look to fully entrench the ratings system into all public participation

engagements going forward.

The leadership committed to deliver on six pillars: Well-Run City; Opportunity City;

Caring City; Inclusive City; Safe City; and Forward-Thinking City. It was decided over

a number of engagements between the senior political and administrative leadership

that the final IDP would express a number of chapters customised in a way that would

directly respond to the express commitment to the six pillars identified.

67

The IDP therefore reflects on the status quo of the institution in respect of the six

pillars, as determined through a SWOT analysis. Based on the ambitions of the

current leadership, both political and administrative, as well as the feedback from the

intensive public participation sessions, an appropriate delivery plan has been

formulated that responds directly to the six pillars and the strategic objectives

identified.

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CHAPTER 4

SPATIAL STRATEGY

4.1 INTRODUCTION

The spatial strategy of the Municipality is embedded in three interrelated strategic

documents; these are:

• The Metropolitan Spatial Development Framework (MSDF).

• The Sustainable Community Planning Methodology.

• The Built Environment Performance Plan (BEPP).

This Chapter outlines the key features of these three strategic documents, which

together form the spatial strategy of the City. The documents exist as separate

documents, and the MSDF and BEPP are required to be legally compliant.

The Metropolitan Spatial Development Framework (MSDF) is the primary spatial plan

of the City and represents the spatial manifestation of the IDP. All matters of a spatial

nature concerning the Municipality are encapsulated in the MSDF. It includes the

aforementioned Sustainable Community Planning Methodology and the Built

Environment Performance Plan.

The initial MSDF was approved by Council in 2009; a second version was approved

in December 2015. A Draft MSDF exists, and this Chapter includes the revised Spatial

Development Framework Strategy. The Spatial Planning and Land Use Management

Act 2013 (SPLUMA) sets the legal framework for the SDFs of South African

municipalities. A new and legally compliant SDF will be adopted within the 2018/19

financial year following the adoption of the new post-election IDP. The core principles

of the SDF have remained intact over multi-year periods and political cycles.

69

The Sustainable Community Planning Methodology is an international award-winning

planning methodology developed and implemented in the Nelson Mandela Bay

Municipality (NMBM), to enhance the levels of sustainability and integration of

development within the City and to reduce the effects of entrenched segregation. It

promotes the analysis and planning of the City in what is termed Sustainable

Community Units (SCUs), which apply to both new and existing areas and aim to

ensure that any development is examined through the lenses of housing, work,

services, transport and character / identity, in order that the need for travel is reduced

and that essential services in the above categories are available within walking

distance of all households within an SCU.

The Built Environment Performance Plan (BEPP) is an annual requirement of the

Division of Revenue Act, which aims to bring about practical spatial restructuring of

the country’s Metropolitan Cities through defining and actively implementing an Urban

Network Strategy (UNS) that defines CBDs and hubs connected by Integration Zones,

where access is prioritised Transit Oriented Development (TOD) as well as catalytic

projects and high density mixed-use developments are promoted. The BEPP also

focuses on the implementation of Growth Nodes and the eradication of Informal

Settlements. The BEPP is required to release various grant funding from National

Treasury and can be seen to represent the capital urban investment strategy of the

city, especially of the conditional grants. The NMBM 2018/19 - 2021/22 Built

Environment Performance Plan is available on the municipal website:

www.nelsonmandelabay.gov.za.

4.2 NMBM METROPOLITAN SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK

The Metropolitan Spatial Development Framework (MSDF) and the associated, more

detailed, Local Spatial Development Frameworks (LSDFs) seek to guide overall

spatial form and identify current and future desirable land uses within the Municipality

at a broad level in order to give physical effect to the vision, goals and objectives of

the IDP.

The MSDF identifies major transport routes, future transport links, environmentally

important areas and key potentials and constraints. The MSDF also aims to sequence

70

future development areas in a manner that makes the best use of infrastructure

services and limits the leap-frogging of development and the unnecessary expansion

of infrastructure networks.

The legal importance of the MSDF is contained, inter alia, in the Spatial Planning and

Land Use Management Act 2013 (SPLUMA), Chapter 4, which states that:

“a Municipal Planning Tribunal or any other authority required or mandated to make a

land development decision in terms of this Act or any other law relating to land

development, may not make a decision which is inconsistent with a municipal spatial

development framework, unless if site specific circumstances justify a departure from

such provisions.”

4.2.1 Rationale for Spatial Planning

The MSDF must give effect to the development principles contained in the Spatial

Planning and Land Use Management Act, 2013 (SPLUMA). These are:

• Spatial justice.

• Spatial sustainability.

• Efficiency.

• Spatial resilience.

• Good administration.

4.2.2 SDF processes

The following processes of the SDF support sustainable development within the

Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality:

• Analysis of spatial opportunities, constraints, patterns and trends.

• Identification of the need for spatial restructuring and land reform.

• Provision of spatial solutions to developmental issues.

• Identification of national spatial development principles and their spatial

application in the NMBM.

71

• Understanding of and allowance for the spatial implications of social, economic

and environmental sustainability.

• Production of a document to guide decision-making on developable and non-

developable areas, including the sequencing of development.

• Creation of a framework for public and private investment decisions to facilitate

investor confidence.

4.2.3 Priority Areas

The MSDF provides strategic guidance in respect of areas on which the Municipality

should focus the allocation of its resources. In order to assist in prioritising projects

and allocating resources, the following elements of the MSDF are isolated as

geographic entities that give guidance as to where the priority capital investment areas

lie. These areas are:

• Core economic areas

• Infill priority areas

• Strategic development areas

• Service upgrading priority areas

The MSDF is also supported by a number of sectoral plans and topic-specific planning

documents, which include the following:

• Strategic Environmental Assessment.

• Urban edge/Rural management and urban densification policies.

• Demographic Study update.

• Land Use Management System (LUMS).

• Human Settlements Implementation Plan.

72

4.2.4 Spatial Overview of Nelson Mandela Bay

The Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality (NMBM) was the first metropolitan municipality

in the Eastern Cape Province and is one of eight metropolitan municipalities in South

Africa. The Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality covers an area of 1959,02 square

kilometres and is bordered by the Sundays River in the north, the Van Stadens River

in the south west and the Greater Uitenhage/Despatch areas towards the west of the

metropolitan area.

Nelson Mandela Bay Overview: Urban and Natural Envi ronment

The demarcation process as provided for in the Demarcation Act (Act 27, 1998)

caused the disestablishment of seven separate local authority administrations and the

formation of the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality (NMBMM). The most

significant administrations incorporated were Port Elizabeth, Uitenhage, Despatch and

a portion of the Western District Council.

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4.2.5 Proposed Metropolitan Structure

Structuring the Plan

The spatial structuring of the Plan is based on the following factors:

• Available land and its features.

• Envisaged population growth.

• Economic development.

• Principles guiding integration, efficiency and sustainability.

The following considerations have been used to determine the basic structure of the

Plan:

• Land earmarked for new development, including low income housing, has been

selected on the basis that vacant land within and close to the existing built-up

areas must be utilised first, while further outlying areas are considered for

development only once more centrally located land has been taken up. This

will encourage more efficient use of existing infrastructure before network

extensions are required. It will also discourage the leap-frogging of

development, which is expensive from a bulk services provision perspective.

• Land uses are to be arranged in a manner that promotes the development and

use of an efficient public transport system. Densification and a mix of land uses

along major transport corridors can achieve this objective.

• Access to green recreational zones from residential areas has been given

special attention. Natural, sensitive areas have been identified for protection

and additional green spaces have been set aside for recreational use, as well

as other uses that are of an ecological nature.

• Certain land uses, such as large industrial areas, are kept away from residential

areas, due to the heavy traffic, air pollution and noise generated by industrial

operations.

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• Existing economic nodes, such as the Coega IDZ, as well as the Uitenhage and

Port Elizabeth main industrial areas and existing commercial centres as

employment nodes; therefore, structuring elements.

• Further transport links are proposed to promote integration and overall

accessibility; linking major centres and industrial areas with residential areas is

important, taking into account the limitations resulting from valleys, rivers and

escarpments.

• Public transport corridors have been proposed linking economic areas. The

future growth direction from Motherwell would thus be to the west, in the

direction of Uitenhage, with the Coega IDZ providing employment opportunities

for the adjacent residential areas of Motherwell.

• Main arterial roads and rail links for private and public transport between the

different urban areas are most easily arranged in east-west directions.

Linkages in the north-south direction as well as inland are impeded by valleys,

rivers and escarpments and are consequently mainly limited to coastal

corridors. It is important that cross city linkages are explored to improve

accessibility.

• It is vital to reserve land for future communication links through the urban zones.

This is especially important when building between existing developments to

make the urban structure denser and more efficient. Such reserves will serve

to avoid future transport problems and the additional cost of creating new links

through development areas.

• The approach was therefore on pedestrian movement and public transport and

the provision of access to services and job opportunities.

Primary Structuring Elements

Apartheid planning consigned most South Africa cities to the principles of segregation,

separate development and unequal access to resources. Such planning divided cities

and left places of work and economic opportunities far from the place where the

majority of the population live. Measures and strategies need to be put in place to

actively restructure the city. The following elements are important considerations in

achieving this.

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Activity Nodes

Nodes are places of high accessibility, characterised by a concentration of mixed use

activities, such as retail, office, entertainment, community facilities and residential

components. Such places are usually located at strategic transport interchanges.

These Nodes are regarded as priority areas for densification, integration,

intensification and the improvement of environmental quality. Nodes are mostly

targeted for public and private investment, as they can enhance economic

opportunities and enable more efficient service delivery intensifying activities.

Urban Network Strategy

NMBM Urban Nodes

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Urban Corridors / Activity Spines

Urban corridors are a combination of structuring elements that reinforce a hierarchy of

nodes. They have varying development intensities and widths. Mixed used activities

should be created and promoted within such corridors/spines to also include different

modes of transport. This minimises travelling costs and the costs of transport

infrastructure by increasing accessibility to employment opportunities, especially for

previously disadvantaged communities.

The city structure needs to be developed in a manner that uses infrastructure more

efficiently and minimises the need to extend infrastructure networks unnecessarily.

Transportation infrastructure is the most expensive infrastructure in urban

development and extensions to road and rail networks therefore need to be kept to a

minimum.

Residential and commercial densities along transportation routes need to be increased

at strategic locations (i.e. near development nodes) in order to transform major routes

into activity or development corridors and create an environment conducive for

sustainable human settlements.

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NMBM Activity Corridors

Activity spines can be defined as concentrated urban development along movement

routes that are typically also major public transport routes. Development can either

take the form of continuous linear development or a series of nodes along the activity

spine.

Natural Open Space and Green System

The Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality’s open space network plays a fundamental role

in shaping the city through the conservation of ecological resources, which are

amongst the major structuring elements guiding the development of the city. The open

space network has spatial, social and technical dimensions.

The open space and green system within the Metro provides a diverse range of

environments, characterised by conservation areas, recreational activities, corridor

parks, watercourses, ridges, heritages sites, etc. Existing natural environmental

resources are economic assets, as they promote liveability and the vitality of

communities. The open space and green system should be protected and enhanced

to ensure that the benefits of local ecosystems are maximised.

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Consolidation and Densification

A consolidation and densification approach promotes more compact urban

development and maximises the efficiency of areas that are well serviced and centrally

located.

This approach contributes to the restructuring of the urban environment and

discourages urban sprawl by promoting development that is adjacent to existing urban

areas. Furthermore, it promotes the more efficient use of the existing infrastructure,

especially at urban centres and along urban corridors.

Growth Management / Urban Edge

Most urban areas in South Africa are characterised by urban sprawl; citizens spend a

lot of time and money travelling long distances to work, shops, schools and social

facilities. Local authorities are also required to invest large amounts in providing and

maintaining excessive infrastructure. A tool of the spatial development framework for

growth management is the demarcation of an urban growth boundary or urban edge.

The “urban edge” is a conceptual boundary that delineates the urban area in order to

contain physical development and sprawl and re-direct growth towards a more

integrated, compact and efficient urban form, guided by detailed plans.

The delineation of an urban edge achieves a more efficient and sustainable

municipality through the –

• Containment of urban sprawl.

• Intensification of development.

• Integration of urban areas.

• Protection of valuable agricultural, natural and cultural resources.

• Optimum use of existing resources in established urban areas, such as bulk

service infrastructure, roads and public facilities.

• Reduced need for commuting, as well as reduced commuting distances.

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4.3 SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY PLANNING AND METHODOLOGY

The existing pattern of development in Nelson Mandela Bay is the result of historical

segregation-based planning. The structuring not only separates different racial

groupings in geographical terms, but has also resulted in huge disparities in standards

of living, as well as access to infrastructural services, employment, and cultural and

recreational facilities. As these imbalances serve as constraints for redevelopment,

they should be addressed and rectified.

The NMBM developed and introduced this planning methodology to assist the city in

dealing with the creation of a more sustainable city. The methodology is an integral

part of the MSDF, LSDF and precinct planning that is undertaken.

Sustainable Community Units (SCUs) have been introduced to achieve a more

balanced structure in Nelson Mandela Bay, in order to reduce discrepancies in terms

of service provision and standards; promote integration in socio-economic and

functional terms; and provide for economic activities and employment opportunities.

The urban area of Nelson Mandela Bay has been divided into a number of planning

units or entities, known as Sustainable Community Units. These are defined by the

distance that an average person can comfortably walk in half an hour, i.e. a 2 km

radius.

The planning methodology aims to provide the requirements for a minimum standard

of planning and living within those areas; in other words, amenities, facilities and job

opportunities must be within walking distance of all residents. All SCUs in Nelson

Mandela Bay are to be linked by a public transport network, which will ensure that all

areas are accessible to all communities by means of public transport, which is also

required in terms of the Integrated Transport Plan.

Basic municipal facilities and services should be provided within walking distance of

residential areas; higher order facilities can be located further away.

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Distance to Facilities

The SCU planning methodology concept identifies the need to make higher levels of

sustainability and integration in Nelson Mandela Bay its primary focus. The basis for

sustainable community planning lies in the development principles adopted at national,

provincial and local government levels, as supported by legislation and government

policies.

The Municipality’s Sustainable Community Planning methodology covers both existing

and future areas of development. A fundamental principle of this plan is to have work

opportunities closer to places of residence in order to reduce the need to travel. This

is to be achieved through the planning of new areas to accommodate more than just

housing developments, but also through a paradigm shift, in location of new

settlements closer to rather than further away from places of employment and social

and public amenities. Peri-urban areas, in which settlements exist, are also planned

according to the Sustainable Community Planning methodology, with a view to

providing local job opportunities.

The development goals and principles of particular importance for spatial planning in

SCUs are:

(a) Poverty alleviation and the satisfaction of basic needs.

(b) Focus on special needs groups (HIV and AIDS affected/infected persons,

children, the elderly, and persons with disabilities).

(c) Gender equality and equity.

(d) The environment (physical, socio-economic).

(e) Participation and democratic processes.

(f) Local economic development.

(g) Accessibility (public transport and pedestrian focus).

(h) Mixed-use development.

(i) Corridor development.

(j) Safety and security.

(k) Variation and flexibility.

(l) Appropriate densification.

(m) Reducing urban sprawl.

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To achieve both sustainability and integration, the following functional elements need

attention in relation to the above principles:

(a) Housing

(b) Work

(c) Services

(d) Transport

(e) Community

(f) Character and identity

Focusing on these six elements, minimum standards are pursued to achieve an

acceptable planning quality, which will result in an improved quality of life for residents

in these areas (for more detail on the planning methodology outlined above, refer to

the Sustainable Community Planning Guide, dated June 2007; also available on the

municipal website: (www.nelsonmandelabay.gov.za).

4.4 THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT PERFORMANCE PLAN (BEPP)

The development of a Built Environment Performance Plan (BEPP) is a requirement

of the Division of Revenue Act (DoRA) in respect of the various infrastructure grants

related to the built environment of metropolitan municipalities. It is submitted to

National Treasury in order to, inter alia, access the following conditional grants:

• Integrated City Development Grant (ICDG)

• Urban Settlements Development Grant (USDG)

• Human Settlements Development Grant (HSDG)

• Public Transport Infrastructure Grant (PTIG)

• Neighbourhood Partnership Development Grant (NDPG)

• Integrated National Electrification Grant (INEP)

The BEPP aims to demonstrate the use of these grants for the purpose of spatial

restructuring through targeting capital expenditure in areas that will maximise the

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positive impact on citizens, leverage private sector investment, and support growth

and development towards a transformed spatial form and a more compact city.

The BEPP is complementary to the Municipality’s key strategic documents, which

include the Integrated Development Plan (IDP), the Budget, the Spatial Development

Framework (SDF) and the Comprehensive Integrated Transport Plan (CITP). The

BEPP directly complements the MSDF, and the MSDF must embrace the BEPP.

The BEPP focuses on three main areas:

• An Urban Network Strategy (UNS), including Integration Zones and catalytic

projects.

• Economic/Growth nodes.

• Informal settlements and marginalised areas.

4.4.1 Urban Network Strategy / Integration Zones an d Catalytic Projects

Spatial targeting and the elimination of spatial inequalities, as envisaged in the

National Development Plan, is an underlying principle of the Urban Network approach,

hence the focus on the catalytic development of under-serviced city areas.

The Urban Network Strategy identifies a number of network elements (CBD, hubs,

growth areas) and allows for the identification of Integration Zones that link CBDs and

hubs in which catalytic development is encouraged.

4.4.1.1 Township Cluster

For the purposes of the BEPP, the townships of Nelson Mandela Bay have been

clustered into six clusters.

The density and income characteristics of these clusters are illustrated in the figures

below, which highlight the higher densities and lower income levels of the Northern

Townships (clusters), with Ibhayi displaying the highest density per hectare.

Motherwell has the highest percentage of the population earning less than R3 183 per

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month. The population numbers and densities in the Southern Clusters are noticeably

smaller and lower than those of the Northern Clusters.

Urban Network Strategy: Cluster Densities (Persons/ Ha)

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Urban Network Strategy - Income Levels per Cluster

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4.4.1.2 Identification of urban network elements of the Urban Network Strategy

(UNS)

The major elements of the Urban Network Strategy are illustrated and explained in

more detail below.

Urban Network Strategy Framework

CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICTS (CBDs)

The Urban Network Framework identifies the CBDs of Port Elizabeth, Uitenhage and

Despatch as important nodes.

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PRIMARY NETWORK / TRANSPORT LINKS

MAJOR ARTERIES

The primary transport network includes three of the five major transport arteries, being

Harrower / Stanford Road, Provincial Route R75 and the Khulani Corridor.

Other primary arteries are Old Cape Road (R101), Provincial Route R10, Heugh /

Buffelsfontein Road, the William Moffatt Expressway, and the N2.

ROAD NETWORK

Public transport serves the metropolitan area along the following existing and planned

routes:

• North-South linkage between the PE CBD and Motherwell via Ibhayi; along the

Khulani Corridor.

• North-West linkage between the PE CBD and Bloemendal / Bethelsdorp, along

Stanford Road.

• South-West linkage between the PE CBD and the Western Suburbs, via Old

Cape Road.

RAIL NETWORK

There is an existing passenger rail link between the PE CBD and Uitenhage.

There is an existing passenger rail link between the PE CBD and Motherwell /

Markman.

A passenger rail link between Port Elizabeth CBD and Motherwell via a proposed new

Motherwell Rail Corridor parallel to Tyhinira Street (Motherwell) is planned. There is

a long-term possible linkage between Coega and Uitenhage.

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A narrow-gauge rail line exists between Humerail (Port Elizabeth) and Loerie.

OTHER ACTIVITY CORRIDORS

The Nelson Mandela Bay Urban Network further identifies other existing mixed use

activity corridors that are important. These are:

• Walmer Boulevard, Heugh Road and Buffelsfontein Road

• Walmer Main Road

• William Moffatt Expressway

• Cape Road

URBAN HUBS

PRIMARY URBAN HUBS

The Primary Hubs are:

• Port Elizabeth / Uitenhage / Despatch CBD

• Njoli / Ibhayi Hub

• Zanemvula (Chatty Jachtvlakte) Hub.

4.4.1.3 Integration Zones

Two integration zones are identified, linking the CBD and Primary Hubs. The

Integration Zones traverse the poorest parts of the city, where catalytic development

intervention is prioritised.

These Integration Zones are described below:

Integration Zone 1 Khulani / Njoli:

This Integration Zone includes the Khulani Corridor, as well as the Motherwell Node.

It links the Inner City area and the Njoli Hub and incorporates a portion of the Khulani

Corridor between Stanford Road and Njoli Square.

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Integration Zone 2: Stanford Road to Uitenhage:

This Integration Zone 2 along Stanford Road is a link between Integration Zone 1 and

Chatty Jachtvlakte. Environmental and spatial constraints make it a very narrow

corridor with limited scope for catalytic and development intervention. These would

be limited to modal interchanges along Stanford Road, such as the Cleary Park Modal

interchange.

4.4.2 Growth Areas

Four growth areas have been identified:

• Walmer / Summerstrand Growth Area

• Fairview West Growth Area

• Motherwell Growth Area

• Baywest Growth Area

The Urban Network Framework includes the following Secondary Hubs:

• Kenako / Vista

• Red Location

• Jachtvlakte / KwaNobuhle

• Wells Estate

Other Nodes identified, include:

• Greenacres / Newton Park Node

• Walmer Node

• Great Westway (Makro / Framesby / Westering) Node

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4.4.3 Catalytic Programmes

The Catalytic Programmes of the BEPP reflect interventions that include

developments that are:

• Within defined Integration Zones.

• Private and public sector initiatives in their implementation.

• Inner-city, mixed use, social, commercial and residential development

initiatives.

• Informal settlements and marginalised area upgrading.

• Linkage projects, such as critical road infrastructure, to ensure a proper linkage

between the Integration Zones and the rest of the city.

The following map shows the location of the selected catalytic programmes in relation

to the Integration Zones of the Urban Network Strategy.

Catalytic Programmes

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It is the intention to move the catalytic projects as quickly as possible from the planning

to the implementation phases.

The NMBM is characterised by slow economic growth; therefore, it can be concluded

that positive change will be slow. In view of this, the City does not have the opportunity

for many economic and “game-changing” projects. It is important therefore to focus

efforts on a limited number of strategic projects that will have maximum impact. In

addition, because of the extreme poverty of the city, poor areas need to be targeted

for investment and development. The City is spatially divided, due to its geography

and historic patterns of development. Linkage projects to increase access must

therefore also be prioritised.

4.5 INFORMAL SETTLEMENTS AND MARGINALISED AREAS

4.5.1 Management and Upgrading of Informal Settleme nts

The Municipality has a dedicated programme for the elimination of informal

settlements, as contained in the Informal Settlements Upgrading Plan (NMBM: Human

Settlements Directorate, 2008). The Plan was developed in 2008 and included 81

informal settlements. Although 51 informal settlements now remain and are contained

in a matrix of in situ upgrading / destination areas, programmed over time, prioritised

and implemented according to the availability of funding.

In terms of municipal policy, the relocation of informal settlements happens as a last

resort. Where an informal settlement can be formalised in situ, this is done. Of the

105 originally identified informal settlements, 34 informal settlements were upgraded

in situ. In some instances, due to density, not everyone in the informal settlements

can be accommodated in situ. In these cases, the remaining residents are relocated

to locations situated as close-by as possible. Informal settlements in stressed areas,

such as under power lines, on tip-sites, in floodplains or other such areas, are

relocated to new areas. To accommodate these communities, 9 Greenfield sites have

been prepared and serviced. In order to accommodate the total need for new

development, 16 Greenfield sites have been programmed for completion in terms of

the approved Human Settlements Plan.

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The Informal Settlements Upgrading Plan is part of the NMBM Human Settlements

Plan. The main focus of the Plan is the full technical and social investigation of all

the informal settlements within the Metro, as well as the categorisation of each

settlement in term of needs and vulnerability.

The prioritisation of projects is based on technical readiness, including town planning

layout approvals, general plan layout approvals, environmental approvals, completed

geotechnical investigations, and the availability of bulk infrastructure. Greenfield

projects are also prioritised as destination projects for relocation purposes.

4.5.2 Strategy for better located housing developme nt for all and specifically

the poor in relation to densification

Well located, pro-poor urban development strategies are well entrenched in the

Sustainable Community Planning Methodology of the NMBM. The methodology

focuses on actions and approaches to achieve higher levels of functional, social and

economic integration, simultaneously promoting and improving social, economic and

environmental sustainability.

The density of existing areas should be increased through infill development on vacant

land not required for other purposes. Corridor development along public transport and

other major transport routes will also increase densities in existing areas. Transit

Oriented Development (TOD) is a priority of the City.

To effectively increase density and thereby reduce urban sprawl, future densities

should average at least 30 to 40 units per hectare (gross) in new areas. Current

densities average 20 units per hectare.

It is predicted that more than 80% of the future residential demand in the Metro will be

for low-income housing. In view of the need for densification, it is this sector that will,

of necessity, be most affected.

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The current practice of creating erven of 200 – 300 m² for low-income housing is

unsustainable from an economic and land utilisation point of view. Increased densities

will decrease land and servicing infrastructure costs and also enhance the viability of

public transport systems.

The proposals in the context of the Nelson Mandela Bay area are as follows:

• Strengthening the existing major bus routes and commuter routes in the Metro

by the addition of high-density development alongside (Transit Oriented

Development (TOD)).

• Intensifying development around existing public open spaces, where

appropriate. Intensification refers to the subdivision of the existing

appropriately located and designed Brownfield erven.

• Greenfield development of certain strategic sites which, although located on the

periphery of the City, could nevertheless be easily integrated into either the rail

or road transport system. Environmental considerations rather than cadastral

boundaries inform the perimeters of such external Greenfield sites.

4.6 CONCLUSION

The abovementioned documents together comprise the Spatial Strategy of the NMBM,

which has at its core the aim of sustainability and achieving a more equitable spatial

structure for the population of the Metro. The strategies mentioned above do not exist

in isolation of each other, but together enhance the prospects of achieving spatial

justice over time. Greater integration and alignment of the strategic spatial plans will

be achieved in this IDP focus period.

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CHAPTER 5: DELIVERY APPROACH

5.1 Corporate Services

The Corporate Services Directorate is the primary custodian of all human resources

policies and procedures within the institution.

The Directorate is responsible for the following:

• The implementation of an integrated Microsoft ICT platform and ensuring

proper ICT governance within the Municipality.

• The implementation of cost-saving measures in telecommunications.

• The creation of a Wi-Fi enabled environment, centralising all ICT systems in the

NMBM, the upgrading of computer software and implementing approved ICT

governance plans, contributes to the enhancement of optimum performance

and service delivery.

• The establishment of a legally compliant organisational structure as well as

driving a performance driven culture by rolling out performance management

to all levels within the institution.

• The performance management process includes the cascading of the

Directorate’s performance plan down to Director level and beyond, as well as

quarterly performance evaluations being conducted within the Directorate.

• The development, implementation and monitoring of the staff establishment.

• The implementation of E-recruitment for all positions in TASK Grade 14 and

above as well as focussing on the internal promotion of staff by advertising

positions from Grades 1 – 11 only on internal circulars.

• The development, implementation and monitoring of the staff establishment.

• The development and implementation of human resources strategies and plans

for the Municipality.

• The provision of adequate and cost-effective office accommodation and

facilities with connectivity for staff and Councillors.

• The development and implementation of an integrated lease management

strategy and plan for internal leases.

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• Proactive and sound Labour relations and labour engagement.

• The NMBM has a fully functional Local Labour Forum (LLF) in place and

quarterly meetings as well as Special LLF meetings are convened as and when

required; this is also a reflection of the improved relationship between the

employer and the labour unions.

• Labour relations and labour engagement.

• Through its Constituency Services Sub-directorate, it facilitates and co-

ordinates programmes and projects (in collaboration with Directorates and

strategic partners) that aim to mainstream Children, People with Disabilities,

Elderly, Women, Youth and Gender Equality development.

• Establishment and operationalization of Ward Committees.

• The Speaker’s office as well as Constituency Services provide a dual role

between the administration and the political offices

• Proper management of movable assets ensures that operational and

replacement costs are significantly reduced.

• The provision of corporate administration services (i.e. landlines and cellular

phones, secretariat and printing services and a centralised records

management system).

• Migration from paper agendas to paperless agenda for all Council

committees.

• Provision of communication initiatives and services to ensure that the public is

well informed of municipal programmes, services and events.

• Roll-out of work study services to improve efficiencies and to achieve value for

money.

• Continually reviewing policies relevant to Corporate Services as well as the

development of Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) relevant for the

implementation of the said policies.

• Skills development programmes are provided to unemployed job seekers as

well as to officials employed by the NMBM as part of providing both internal and

external skills development.

• Scarce Skills and Critical Skills are considered when recruitment processes are

being conducted.

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5.2 Chief Operating Officer

The Office is responsible for ensuring a more responsive, accountable, transparent

and compliant institution, with the focus on enhancing service delivery. In this regard,

it manages the integrated planning processes of the Municipality and ensures that the

focus remains on customers and that they are continuously engaged in planning,

implementation and monitoring and review processes.

The Office of the Chief Operating Officer ensures good corporate governance through

its sub-directorates, namely: Integrated Development Planning; External Relations,

Legal Services; Monitoring and Evaluation; Policy, Strategy and Research; Risk

Management; and Strategic Planning Coordination/Integrated City Development.

The following functions are performed within the Office of the Chief Operating Officer:

Strategic

• Manage the development, implementation and review of the Municipality’s

vision, long-term strategy and the Integrated Development Plan (IDP).

• Ensure that all institutional strategies are aligned to the IDP and long-term

strategy.

• Manage the development, implementation and review of corporate strategies

and policies.

• Develop and manage the implementation of institutional customer care

initiatives.

• Manage the development, implementation and review of the Municipality’s

Built Environment Performance Plan (BEPP).

• Provide for the prioritisation and coordination of planning, budgeting and

implementation efforts in line with strategic planning.

• Provide for the coordination of sectoral activities within the Metro.

• Monitor, evaluate and report to internal municipal structures, other spheres of

government and the public on the implementation of the Integrated

Development Plan, other strategies and the Budget.

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• Manage the development and implementation of external relations between

the Municipality, stakeholders, other spheres of government and international

partners to achieve alignment with the Council’s priorities, as expressed in its

IDP.

• Identify potential and/or existing control weaknesses and assess the

adequacy of the control governance processes in the institution and

recommend remedial actions.

• Manage the development and implementation of the Corporate Risk

Management Strategy.

Operational

• Manage the development and implementation of the institutional Performance

Management System and directorate operational plans (Service Delivery and

Budget Implementation Plans).

• Co-ordinate institution-wide projects and programmes.

• Undertake institution-wide research to support the development and

implementation of institutional strategies.

• Ensure the design and implementation of operational improvement initiatives.

• Coordinate and report on the Urban Settlements Development Grant and the

Integrated City Development Grant.

• Develop and monitor the Council Resolutions Monitoring Matrix.

• Ensure that the Municipality complies with all applicable legal and regulatory

requirements.

• Provide institution-wide legal support to the Executive and Council, to ensure

informed decision-making.

5.3 Infrastructure, Engineering, Electricity and En ergy

5.3.1 Water and Sanitation

The responsible delivery of water and sanitation services to residents of Nelson

Mandela Bay is a key mandate of the institution, provided by way of managing the

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supply of water, distribution of water, wastewater collection and treatment of

wastewater, which include the following:

• the storage of water in 10 dams,

• treatment of water at 8 water treatment works, including springs,

• bulk supply of treated water via 650 km of large diameter pipelines to the Metro

boundaries into distribution reservoirs,

• water distribution reticulation to all customers via 4 800 km water pipelines,

• collection of wastewater via 3 600 km pipework and pump stations,

• treatment of sewage at 8 wastewater treatment plants for both domestic and

industrial use,

• monitoring trade effluent discharges; and

• the relevant electrical and mechanical maintenance of plant/equipment.

The infrastructure described in general above is required to fulfill the key institutional

mandate to provide services to citizens and businesses located within the NMBM. In

order to achieve this, the infrastructure must be maintained, rehabilitated and

expanded, to keep up with the developmental needs of the NMBM. In doing so,

appropriate technologies are constantly researched and integrated into water and

sanitation delivery plans.

The provision of water and sanitation services, connectivity to services, the discharge

of sewage into sewers, as well as water conservation measures, are governed by

legislation.

Within the mandate of delivering water and sanitation services, three main areas need

special mention:

• The ongoing Water/Drought Disaster:

In January 2018, the average level of dams that supply water to the NMBM had

dropped by 25% (from 54% in January 2017). The NMBM was declared a

drought disaster area on 22 May 2017. No significant rain fell during the last 12

months, and none is predicted for the next six months. It is therefore critical that

the water consumption that is on average at 285 Ml/d be reduced to 250 Ml/d.

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In order to reduce the water usage and ensure that the current available water

is stretched to the next rainy season the following is being carried out:

o Awareness to reduce water usage.

o Maximum use of the water from the Nooitgedagt Scheme.

o Drilling of boreholes to supplement available water.

o Reducing water pressure to limit water losses and water use.

o Desalination and / or water reuse installation.

• Water Losses:

Reducing water losses remains key in the provision of an effective and efficient

service. Losses contribute negatively to the drought situation and also affect

the income of the NMBM. In this regard, the NMBM has developed a Business

Plan that governs efforts to reduce water losses. In reducing losses, key

interventions include:

o Reticulation Leaks repairs

o ATTP leak repairs

o Pressure management

o Reservoir rehabilitation

o Meter replacement

o Pipe replacement

o Zoning and night flow analysis

• Bucket Eradication:

The NMBM has reduced the number of buckets being serviced in the NMBM

from 16 317 in June 2016 to 8 562 in November 2017. The Bucket Eradication

Programme, as approved by Council on 1 December 2016, is being

implemented and is scheduled to be completed by June 2018. Operationally

there might be some carry-over projects, especially in communities that are

located on private land.

5.3.2 Electricity and Energy

The electricity industry in South Africa has historically provided adequate financing to

municipalities, allowing them to fund their electricity operations and capital needs,

generally subsidising a large portion of their budgets.

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In 2010, when the Eskom base tariff increased, a dramatic loss occurred in the net

profit derived through the sale of electricity. Since then, the profit on electricity has

been insufficient to cross-subsidise capital budgets for a growing city. Fortunately, the

City has a foundation of a good electricity network that is able to deliver quality

services.

What is important is the methodology applied to use the historically good networks,

staffing capacity and the additional opportunities that arise through our geographic

position, climate and new business opportunities in the alternative energy carriers and

renewable energy. It is intended to use this historic First World network as a basis to

become a destination of choice for the green economy. The emerging gas economy

that will arise in the Coega Industrial Development Zone of Nelson Mandela Bay is

also a potential future energy priority.

The NMBM's drive to develop a “Smart City” / fifth utility by introducing City-wide broad

band / internet services, both commercial and free, will allow the institution a potential

increased financial stream.

A number of public-private partnerships, collaboration with local universities, close

liaison with National Treasury and new service delivery methods will ensure that the

City remains a leader in the field of energy and stays abreast of best practices.

5.3.3 Fleet Management

Fleet Management is an enabling internal division that provides vehicles and/or plant

to all directorates across the Municipality. The Municipality intends to take a more

active role in the Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Alliance, with the view of greening a

section of the Municipality’s fleet by the year 2020.

The Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality’s Fleet Management Services is recognised as

a benchmark for good practice. The Sub-Directorate is visited annually by a number

of municipalities and Government Departments in order to study how the function is

performed in Nelson Mandela Bay.

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5.3.4 Roads and Transport

Nelson Mandela Bay is traversed by 4 397 km of roads (3 126 km municipal,

1 018 km provincial and 253 km managed by the South African National Roads Agency

Limited (SANRAL). A robust, high functioning road network, as well as a well-

capacitated, maintained and comprehensive stormwater network, which the

Municipality is mandated to provide, is vital in ensuring optimal mobility for residents.

The Municipality is also mandated and committed to provide Metro commuters with a

safe, accessible, reliable and affordable public transport / commuter system.

In the above regard, the Municipality is committed to maintaining existing roads,

stormwater and transport infrastructure, as well as developing new infrastructure that

will add value to the Metro and its residents.

The institution continuously identifies and evaluates road safety risks, and addresses

these through the installation of traffic calming measures (traffic circles, speed humps

and traffic lights). To ensure safety on our roads and to protect residents’ vehicles,

the Municipality has prioritised the fixing of potholes, in addition to improving the

visibility of directional signs and improving public awareness of high accident zones.

The institution continues to develop and advance capacity for an effective IPTS,

including the roll-out of IPTS specific stations and shelters on route networks, and the

procurement of buses for IPTS operations.

5.3.5 Scientific Services

The Municipality must ensure that the residents of Nelson Mandela Bay are provided

with potable water and live in a clean and uncontaminated environment. Towards this

end, the Scientific Services Laboratory provides analytical services to NMBM

directorates and external industrial customers. The accurate and efficient analysis of

the samples by the Scientific Services Laboratory is a pre-requisite for the effective

monitoring of the required parameters by the NMBM Public Health Directorate, as well

as other NMBM directorates, enabling them to ensure a safe environment for local

communities.

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The following criteria are monitored:

• Quality of potable water supply against the national specification;

• Quality of sewage effluent against the national specification;

• Quality of industrial effluent discharged into the municipal sewerage

system and water-courses;

• Compliance with public health standards (e.g. public food preparation);

• Quality of recreational water at recreation venues, for example beaches

and rivers.

The monitoring of the above in terms of compliance with national legislation and

NMBM By-laws supports the institution’s mandate to protect the environment and the

health of residents; also through ensuring compliance by local businesses and

manufacturers with environmental and NMBM licensing provisions. In addition, it

protects the NMBM against possible liability for non-compliance with required

standards.

The Scientific Services Division has regular interaction with the South African

National Accreditation System’s (SANAS) Management, other local authorities and

government departments with regard to the analytical methods and approaches

being adopted.

5.4 Human Settlements

Housing is a fundamental need and basic human right of the residents of Nelson

Mandela Bay.

The Constitution of South Africa Act 108 of 1996 and the Bill of Rights contained

therein, affirm the democratic values of human dignity, equality and freedom for all

citizens. This informs the work of the Municipality in human settlements provision,

while it must also give effect to the following associated rights:

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• Equality

• Human dignity

• Freedom and security

• Privacy

• Freedom of movement and residence

• Property

• Environment

• Healthcare, food, water and security

• Access to information

• Administrative justice

The City’s mandate in respect of human settlements is derived from the National

Housing Act 107 of 1997, which provides for “the establishment and maintenance of

habitable, stable and sustainable public and private residential environments, to

ensure viable households and communities in areas allowing convenient access to

economic opportunities, and to health, educational and social amenities in which all

citizens and permanent residents of the Republic will, on a progressive basis have

access to permanent residential structures with secure tenure, ensuring internal and

external privacy, and providing adequate protection against the elements, potable

water, adequate sanitary facilities and domestic energy supply”.

The delivery of housing in Nelson Mandela Bay provides an opportunity to transform

the face, shape and form of the City and its settlements, reduce the effects of

entrenched segregation and inequality, and provide rights to those citizens for whom

these rights are not yet a reality.

The Municipality has failed to adequately respond to this opportunity, due to a variety

of challenges:

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• A housing market in which poor households cannot participate.

• An on-going housing affordability problem across various sub-markets,

particularly the gap market.

• Weak spatial planning and governance capabilities.

• The high cost of well-located land for development, driving human settlements

to the peripheral areas.

• The inability to adequately respond to the diverse needs of low-middle income

households.

• The absence of a range of typologies and tenure types to support the needs of

poor households.

• The limited success of social housing to provide rental accommodation at scale.

• The escalating cost of development for government, resulting in a reduced

number of housing units delivered (National Department of Human Settlements

Strategic Plan, 2015-2020).

Notwithstanding the legislative and policy obligations that influence the activities of the

institution in providing human settlements, in order to be effective and deliver projects

and programmes that are sustainable and integrated, the following aspects need to be

addressed:

• Access to adequate accommodation that is suitable, relevant, appropriately

located, affordable and fiscally sustainable.

• Access to basic services such as water, sanitation, refuses removal and

electricity.

• Security of tenure, irrespective of ownership or rental, formal or informal

structures.

• Access to social services and economic opportunities within a reasonable

distance.

In addressing the above aspects, a multi-disciplinary and collaborative approach with

all relevant internal and external sectors is required. Alignment and integration

between municipal directorates and other government departments is critical to the

success and sustainability of human settlements interventions.

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It needs to be recognised that the Provincial Department of Human Settlements is

responsible for the allocation of funding for housing development in the Nelson

Mandela Bay area. This influences what can be achieved by the Municipality.

The key stakeholder group of the Municipality in providing human settlements is the

most vulnerable, poverty-stricken and desperate citizens of society. Therefore, a

priority area is to ensure the delivery of services to informal settlements and backyard

shacks.

The reality that faces the Municipality in providing adequate housing is that not every

citizen in need of a formal home, in a sustainable and integrated human settlement,

will receive one in the short or even medium term. To mitigate this, the approach

adopted to dealing with informal settlements is to focus on upgrading, de-densification

and in situ development.

In addition, not every citizen is in need of a subsidised house. There are those who

can benefit from other national housing or private initiatives, such as social housing

and the Finance Linked Individual Subsidy Program (FLISP). The role of the

Municipality is therefore to match citizens in need of homes to the appropriate

available housing instruments, in collaboration with other role-players.

The NMBM Human Settlements Directorate is staffed not only with technical staff, but

also project management and community development staff. These staff members

are crucial to the success of delivery and are the bridge between the Municipality and

local communities.

An important aspect in the provision of human settlements is the resolution of

community conflicts, disputes and civil disturbances. The relocation of communities

from emergency areas or after land invasions, or any highly emotive situations,

requires particular facilitation, consensus building, conflict resolution and problem-

solving skills. As the Human Settlements Directorate of the Municipality deals with the

most vulnerable citizens, it is critically important to ensure the appropriateness of its

approach to all aspects of human settlements delivery.

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In addition to the above, the Human Settlements Directorate inter alia performs the

following functions:

• Land survey

• Building control

• Land use management and spatial planning

• Development and support for human settlements delivery

• Property and planning administration

• Housing consumer education

5.5 Public Health

The purpose of the Public Health Directorate is to improve the health and quality of life

of people and the environment through key strategic interventions, such as the

prevention and treatment of pollution and diseases, and natural environment

protection.

The Public Health Directorate is committed, through a process of community

involvement, to rendering competitive services through developmental programmes

to improve the quality of life of people within the Municipality by creating and

maintaining a healthy and attractive environment.

Of extreme importance to the implementation of this mission are the legislative

prescripts that provide the strategic placement and functioning of the Public Health

Directorate to deliver efficient services to the people of this Municipality.

The Public Health Directorate’s functions inter alia include the following:

• Employee wellness.

• Implementation of the Occupational Health and Safety Act.

• Support of the Municipal Pound.

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• Planning and management of the Metropolitan Open Space System

(MOSS) and parks.

• Waste management.

• Planning and management of cemeteries.

• Pollution monitoring and control.

• Mainstreaming of HIV/AIDS in municipal projects and programmes.

5.6 Economic Development, Tourism and Agriculture ( EDTA)

The Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality is emerging as a city of rising opportunity.

Nelson Mandela Bay is located along the Eastern Cape coastline and will therefore

promote and invest in the Oceans Economy. Linked to this exciting opportunity is the

opportunity to capitalise on the growth in the tourism sector in order that Nelson

Mandela Bay can become a destination of choice for domestic and international

visitors.

Nelson Mandela Bay is a major role-player in the economy of the Eastern Cape

Province and its role in the economy thus goes beyond its own municipal boundaries.

Like many other urban areas of South Africa, Nelson Mandela Bay is challenged by

extreme socio-economic disparity and poverty among large sections of the population.

Against this backdrop, the NMBM is, like other South African local governments, faced

with the challenge of ensuring that the lives of people in local communities are

substantially improved; and this objective can only be achieved through inclusive

economic growth and development.

This means that the Municipality must achieve the goals of economic growth,

alleviation of poverty, as well as the general improvement of the quality of life of the

people of Nelson Mandela Bay; and it is therefore important that Local Economic

Development (LED) is implemented in such a way that it can achieve inclusive growth

in order to redress the socio-economic imbalances in the Nelson Mandela Bay region.

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In this regard it is important that the Municipality facilitates the growth and

diversification of the local economy through the attraction of new investments, skills

development and the facilitation of an enabling environment for small business growth

and job creation. In order to achieve this objective, the Municipality is committed to

employment opportunities through the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP),

strategic partnerships that enable empowerment through economic development and

targeted industry support and cluster development. Furthermore, the Municipality has

a responsibility to support the development of small businesses and emerging

enterprises through incubation, training and development.

Support for the agricultural sector is also important so as to stimulate the local value

chain of suppliers and the agro-processing industry. Creating an enabling

environment to do business in Nelson Mandela Bay is a major focus area: by working

together with other departments, cutting red tape and improving administrative

efficiencies, Nelson Mandela Bay can become a globally competitive city.

The successful implementation of the Local Economic Development Strategy remains

crucial to addressing the challenges of poverty and unemployment in Nelson Mandela

Bay. The potential of LED to empower local citizens has gained popularity in many

countries and cities. It is therefore vital that the City adopts and implements an

appropriate LED approach that will grow the economy and also reduce poverty and

unemployment.

After having conducted a thorough assessment of the state of the economy in the

region and the challenges faced, several key lessons have been learnt. These include,

but are not limited to, the approach in implementing LED projects, infrastructure

development, and trade and investment facilitation and promotion. Further to the

assessment done, the Municipality has comprehensively consulted with economic

sectors to get inputs on how to best tackle the challenges faced in growing the

economy.

The inputs from the economic sector sessions have provided critical direction for the

growth and development of the Metro’s economy. The plan is to ensure that LED helps

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communities to realise lively, resilient and sustainable local economies in order to

improve the quality of life for all.

Key to the creation of an “inclusive economy” is the focus on previously neglected

areas such as the Uitenhage/Despatch area and various townships across the region.

The City has placed strong emphasis on these areas, and various programmes and

projects in this five-year plan are aimed at ensuring that economic development in

these areas is given a priority.

The Municipality, in partnership with other stakeholders, will establish SMME Support

Centres in various communities in order to ensure ease of access to SMME support

services. The City therefore aims to implement projects and strategies to strengthen

the city's economic inclusivity, protect vulnerable areas, and improve services and

facilities for residents, businesses and visitors.

The next five years will cover two broad strategic approaches to local economic

development, namely: a pro-market approach, based on business development, and

a pro-poor approach, focusing on poverty reduction. The NMBM realises that both

approaches are equally valid; each needs to be pursued to meet the needs of a wide

range of stakeholders; and it is important to note that local development cuts across

both strategic approaches of LED.

Nelson Mandela Bay holds great promise for accelerated growth, job creation, and

poverty reduction over the next five years. In the full understanding that other external

factors impact on the development and growth of local economies, the Municipality,

through this five-year Plan, is determined to use its resources, and partner with other

stakeholders, to develop the local economy, further reduce unemployment and tackle

poverty. The Municipality will ensure the implementation of this Plan through various

monitoring and evaluation processes.

The ultimate goal is to create an environment that inspires the confidence of business

and communities and attracts job creating investments and initiatives, which will help

to reduce unemployment and provide people access to life-changing opportunities.

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5.7 Sports, Recreation, Arts and Culture

The Municipality is committed to entrenching and further developing its reputation as

a preferred sports destination and a competent host for local, national and international

sporting events. Towards that end, it is vital that it upgrades, renews and augments

existing sport facilities. A crucial area is the proper management of existing facilities,

and, towards that end, the Municipality is establishing Facility Management

Committees at its sport facilities.

As a water sports mecca and tourism city, the Municipality has prioritised the

maintenance of recreational water quality standards at its three Blue Flag Beaches

(three local beaches – Humewood, King’s Beach and Hobie – snatched the coveted

Blue Flag status). The Blue Flag serves as an assurance to holiday-makers and

tourists that the relevant beach is world class and offers safe, well managed facilities.

The Municipality has also partnered with local swimming associations in presenting

swimming lessons to local school-children, to prevent drowning at municipal beaches.

As part of its operations, the Municipality regularly hosts a number of key tourist and

marketing events, such as the annual Splash Festival or National Pride Day

celebrations, and is committed to ensuring compliance with relevant legislation.

Parallel to its commitment to entrench and grow the Municipality’s reputation as a

competent host city for key provincial, national and international sporting and tourism

events, the Municipality has prioritised the development and promotion of local sports

talent and sports teams. Additionally, it is committed to develop the local arts, culture

and creative industries sector, given its potential as a tool for social cohesion and

nation building.

In order to promote its Destination City goal, the Municipality is committed to the

maintenance and upgrading of major commercial sports infrastructure, the

development of sport and recreation precincts, and the upgrading of leisure,

recreational and beach facilities, as well as arts and cultural centres.

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Annually, the city hosts or supports a number of flagship events, national and

international sports events, as well as arts and culture festivals, which serve to boost

the local economy and promote the city’s reputation as an important events

destination, such as the following:

• Standard Bank Ironman African Championship

• Ironman 70.3 World Championships in 2018

• Mandela Festival

• Summer Season Festival

• Exterra Triathlon

• Ebubeleni Festival

• EP Athletics

• Northern Arts Festival

• Splash Festival

• Heritage Week

These events are often realised through partnerships with local institutions in the

private sector, sector stakeholders and NGOs. Examples are the aquatic, swimming

and sports programmes that the Municipality hosts at local schools. As is evidenced

by the number of arts and cultural events annually hosted or supported by the

Municipality, the institution has prioritised the development of the local Arts, Culture

and Creative Industries Sector, recognising its enormous potential for realising

economic growth and development. A valuable new addition in the array of tourism

attractions has been the NMBM Heritage Route, which has been prioritised for further

development.

Its expanse of golden beaches is the prime tourist attraction of the City, which

necessitates focus on the beach safety of holidaymakers and visitors. In this regard,

the Municipality is committed to establishing and maintaining effective and well-

supported partnerships with local lifesaving organisations.

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The City has a rich and diverse heritage and the Municipality has prioritised the

commemoration and celebration of this heritage through programmes that promote

redress and foster social cohesion.

The Municipality believes that instilling a culture of reading among residents and

students is a vital prerequisite to transforming them into readers - essential to

unlocking the doors to education and learning in the NMBM and promoting an informed

public.

Municipal libraries play a vital role in our information-driven society and are extensively

used by residents; both for academic research and recreational reading purposes. The

upgrading and restoration of library facilities is an ongoing institutional commitment.

The Municipality is also mandated to promote the health and well-being of residents,

and in this regard new sport and recreation facilities are being provided, while existing

sport facilities are upgraded or rehabilitated.

The Municipality recognises that it is important to ensure the sustainable provision of

water to its sports facilities and embraces research as the vital underpinning of the

sustainable provision of services.

5.8 Safety and Security

The safety and security of local communities, residents, visitors, tourists and holiday-

makers is a key focus area of the Municipality. To make the city safer, the institution

provides a broad spectrum of services.

The emergency services that are provided to ensure the safety of all communities and

visitors include disaster management, fire and emergency and security services, as

well as traffic and licensing services.

Collaboration between all internal and external stakeholders, particularly law

enforcement agencies, is maintained to identify potential threats and reduce or

eliminate risks.

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The functions of a Municipal Police Service are provided for in terms of legislation and

include the execution of traffic policing, the policing of municipal by-laws and

regulations, as well as the prevention of crime.

A central communication centre provides for the effective and efficient coordination of

disaster management services throughout the Municipality. Planning and training in

disaster management operations are conducted on an on-going basis. The

development of an integrated disaster management strategy and plan will address

public awareness and the establishment of partnerships and satellite offices, as well

as ensure that disaster risk assessment objectives are met.

The Municipality’s Fire and Emergency Services provides immediate and effective

response to incidents. The implementation of an integrated Fire Safety Strategy will

address aspects such as preventing the outbreak or spread of fires, fighting or

extinguishing fires, the protection of life or property against fires and threatening

danger, and the rescue of life or property from fire or other dangers.

Security Services provides for and coordinates all security related requirements in the

Municipality. This includes the supervision of all municipal sites guarded by contract

security services, armed escorts, security surveys and recommendations to

directorates to prevent loss or potential loss, close protection services for senior

officials, as well as integrated firearm management. All cases related to Council

losses, theft, damage and/or misuse of assets are investigated, and outcomes are

reported.

Traffic and Licensing Services promotes road safety through integrated and

coordinated law enforcement initiatives. The services provided, include licencing,

training of staff, municipal court services and the execution of traffic warrants.

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Two key Disaster Management related reports are available on the municipal website:

• Disaster Risk Assessment Report

http://www.nelsonmandelabay.gov.za/datarepository/documents/qqGwV_DM

%20Plan.pdf

• Disaster Management Plan

http://www.nelsonmandelabay.gov.za/Assets/leve_2_disaster_management_p

lan_2010.pdf

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CHAPTER 6: DELIVERY PLAN

The Municipality’s Delivery Plan is informed by a new, delivery-focused political vision

that has already brought change to Nelson Mandela Bay.

In order to ensure absolute alignment between the Budget, IDP and Strategic

Objectives, the directorates have prepared comprehensive situational analyses, while

the Mayoral Committee conducted extensive stakeholder engagements with residents

and economic clusters.

Expressed in the form of six pillars and nineteen strategic objectives, this Chapter

depicts the practical implementation of this political vision, realised and measured

through a number of strategic outcome-, output- and impact-based key performance

indicators.

The City Manager, as the Metro’s Accounting Officer, will oversee the performance

management process of translating this IDP into an activity-based Service Delivery

and Budget Implementation Plan (SDBIP), for which he is responsible.

The successful translation of the political vision into administrative action will result in

a Nelson Mandela Bay that is an iconic, friendly, ocean city driven by innovation,

service excellence and economic development – a destination of choice.

THE WELL RUN CITY

This pillar pertains to all initiatives that cater for meeting the standard operational

expectations of the Municipality, including initiatives that address the Human

Resources component, systems, accountable governance and the financial viability of

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the institution. In The Well Run City, monitoring and evaluation informs decision

making and provides information for accountability and performance improvement.

A culture of excellence among staff and institutional systems and processes is strived

for. In the Well Run Nelson Mandela Bay, all basic services are delivered to

expectation and the City sets the benchmark for transparent governance and financial

viability, and the eradication of corruption.

Objectives:

• Transforming the institutional systems, processes and organisational structure

to one of high performance in order to effectively deliver basic services to a

well-run city.

• Changing the way we think about and approach our work and ensuring that the

Municipality is staffed with the right people for the right jobs with the right

attitudes.

• Ensuring financial prudence and transparent governance and working towards

eradicating corruption.

Key directorates that play a role in realising these strategic objectives:

Corporate Services –

Corporate Services is the primary custodian of all human resources policies and

procedures within the institution. This Directorate will be responsible for the

implementation of an integrated ICT platform, which will include a Wi-Fi enabled

environment, and for driving a performance driven culture. More importantly, the

Directorate will ensure the provision of communication initiatives and services to

ensure that the public is well informed of municipal programmes, services and events.

This all speaks to creating a well-run administration.

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Chief Operating Officer –

The Office of the Chief Operating Officer will ensure that all institutional strategies are

aligned to the IDP and long-term strategy, provide for the coordination of sectoral

activities within the Metro, identify potential and/or existing control weaknesses,

assess the adequacy of the control governance processes in the institution, and

recommend remedial actions. This will create an accountable and transparent

institution, which can place its focus on enhanced service delivery.

Water, Sanitation, Electricity and Energy, Fleet Management -

A key part in delivering a Well Run City is having an efficient water and sanitation

system, mandated by the Department of Water and Sanitation. The City will monitor

trade effluent discharges, and ensure that water distribution and reticulation and

wastewater conveyance are conducted at reservoirs and pump stations; this will be

constantly improved by integrating new and innovative technologies into water delivery

plans to ensure optimal and sustainable water delivery.

THE OPPORTUNITY CITY

The Opportunity City delivers on well-planned initiatives to enable and cultivate job

creation and economic opportunity, develop competitive advantage, and ensure

access to skills. The Opportunity City is competitively differentiated as a destination

city for business, tourism and investment. Strategic partnerships with the private and

non-profit sectors thrive. Opportunity City initiatives secure the development of a

diversity of sectors, which range from marine manufacturing, urban agriculture and

agri-processing, to the cultural and creative industries. Infrastructure led growth is

properly planned and invested in and effective service provision for roads, public

transport and mobility ensures universal access to the Opportunity City.

The Opportunity City ensures efficiency in municipal process so that development is

not hamstrung or hindered in any way. Planning processes, land use applications,

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connection to utilities, issuing of rates clearance certificates and conducting

environmental impact studies need to be modernised, streamlined and fast-tracked.

Entrepreneurship is encouraged in an Opportunity City; the informal economy should

be supported and serviced in order to facilitate economic growth. Informal traders

should feel safe to conduct business in clean and well-defined public spaces where

by-laws are enforced and adhered to.

Nelson Mandela Bay, the Opportunity City, is a proudly iconic and global city that does

the legacy of Nelson Mandela proud.

Objectives:

• Growing and diversifying the local economy through the attraction of new

investment, skills development and facilitation of an enabling environment for

small business growth and job creation.

• Facilitating and promoting infrastructure led growth, development and tourism.

• Executing existing and designing and implementing new projects that

competitively differentiate Nelson Mandela Bay as a destination city for

business, tourism and investment – including through strategic partnerships.

• Developing an effective integrated public transport system that promotes

access to opportunity through mobility.

Key directorates that play a role in realising these strategic objectives:

Economic Development, Tourism and Agriculture –

The City under this Directorate plans to ensure that Local Economic Development

helps communities to realise a lively, resilient and sustainable local economy in order

to improve the quality of life for all. This will be achieved by growing and diversifying

the local economy through the attraction of new investment, skills development and

the facilitation of an enabling environment for small business growth and job creation.

Government processes involved in investment and development will be made more

efficient, and the informal economy will be supported.

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THE SAFE CITY

This pillar speaks to all initiatives that address safety and security. It also includes

those that create environmental safety, as well as safety for residents and tourists.

This pillar must also be aligned with the disaster management plans of the Metro.

In the Safe City, all communities, residents and visitors of Nelson Mandela Bay enjoy

the basic freedom of not only being safe, but of feeling safe. The Safe City’s Metro

Police are trusted, accessible, well-trained and suitably equipped, and protect the

communities they serve with pride. Fire and Emergency Services in the Safe City are

properly prepared to ensure that any disaster, natural or otherwise, is capably

addressed. In the Safe City, the need for the delivery of well-maintained street lights

to all communities is a top priority. In the Safe City, the Municipality partners with

communities to eradicate illegal connections - and with civil organisations to ensure

that residents and visitors enjoy access to adequately life-guarded public beaches and

pools.

Residents that fall victim to drug and substance abuse should be supported, and

awareness needs to be created around this societal challenge. Drug and substance

abuse leads to and is the cause of many related criminal activities that are addressed

in a Safe City.

In the Safe Nelson Mandela Bay, bylaws are fairly enforced and measures are set in

place to ensure that cattle are kept off roads at night. Safe working conditions are

ensured for all municipal employees.

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Objectives:

• Delivering well-resourced and capacitated policing and emergency services in

order to ensure the safety of all communities and visitors.

• Providing infrastructure that improves the safety of communities and visitors.

• Improving the safety and security of Nelson Mandela Bay through community,

industry and civic organisation partnerships.

Key directorates that play a role in realising these strategic objectives:

Safety and Security –

In an effort to ensure the safety of all communities and visitors, this Directorate aims

to deliver well-resourced capacitated policing and emergency services, as well as

sound infrastructure. This shall be further enhanced through community, industry and

civil organisation partnerships. The fight against drug and substance abuse will be

prioritised and victims will be supported.

THE INCLUSIVE CITY

This pillar relates to initiatives that promote equality and social cohesion and that

enable informal means of mobility between communities. The objectives under this

pillar strive for the integrated access to and delivery of a single community city

(pedestrian bridges, social cohesion promoting events, etc.). Deliverables are

concerned with the promotion of redress, transformation and employment equity.

Projects such as those providing communal grazing land could also be considered

inclusive (from a cultural perspective).

Delivery to an Inclusive City means delivery that speaks to the maturity of our society

as a collective community, and celebrated in all its diversity: One City One Future.

The Inclusive Nelson Mandela Bay is a well-connected city. It delivers integrated

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access to a single-community city. It has properly planned infrastructure and a built

environment that enables informal means of mobility between communities, including

pedestrian bridges and connective “corridor” routes.

In the Inclusive City, responsive governance is delivered through effective public

participation and the provision of communication channels that deliver the accessibility

of the Municipality to all residents. The Inclusive City is served by properly functioning

Ward Committees.

The Inclusive City proactively promotes redress and delivery on transformation

objectives. Productive relationships are cultivated with organised labour, ensuring that

all decisions are inclusively informed. Participatory governance is also reinforced in

the Inclusive City, through developmental municipal management systems and

processes, through which all employees are empowered to contribute to the

successful delivery of the IDP.

Many of our residents still live in underserviced parts of the City with no access to even

basic services – or access to rudimentary services only. In an Inclusive City, this

legacy of Apartheid is redressed and the previous government’s maladministration is

turned around on a systematic basis. Informal settlements need to be upgraded to

improve the delivery of basic services and therefore the quality of life of residents living

in those areas.

United in its diversity, the Inclusive City actively ensures that the cultural, traditional,

ancestral and struggle heritage of our communities is respected and appropriately

commemorated. In the Inclusive Nelson Mandela Bay, projects that pay homage to

our heritage, including the renaming of streets, are properly consulted and budgeted

for.

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Objectives:

• Ensuring responsive governance through consistent public participation,

effectively functioning and supported Ward Committees, and the creation of an

environment in and systems through which participatory and responsive

governance can thrive.

• Spatial and built environment developments that promote integrated

neighbourhoods, inclusive communities and a well-connected Nelson Mandela

Bay.

• Delivering on transformation objectives, promoting redress and fostering social

cohesion.

Key directorates that play a role in realising these strategic objectives:

Human Settlements –

Integrated development is a key priority in creating an Inclusive City. Nelson Mandela

Bay still suffers from Apartheid-era spatial planning, and many communities are

therefore separated and secluded from the larger City. Innovative spatial development

and housing solutions will be utilised to address this challenge.

Roads and Transport –

An Inclusive City is well connected and offers adequate infrastructure and public

transport to residents. The continued development of the IPTS plays an important role

in improving connectivity and ensuring that people from different communities can

travel easily throughout the City. Well-maintained road networks create a more

inclusive and connected Nelson Mandela Bay.

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THE CARING CITY

In the Caring City, equality is strived for through ensuring that all residents have access

to delivery that promotes their well-being. Access to affordable housing and the

provision of dignified housing is properly planned for to ensure maximum possible

delivery within the funding available. Dignified sanitation and waste management are

a reality for all households.

In the Caring Nelson Mandela Bay, indigent communities are adequately supported

and food security programmes and community gardens are fully operational. Social

services and social development programmes are prioritised. In ensuring the well-

being of residents, the Caring City delivers libraries and sports and recreational

facilities that are accessible to all communities. Through effective cleansing

programmes, greening initiatives and the provision of well-maintained public parks,

every resident is able to feel proud of the community he or she lives in.

In the Caring City, occupational health and wellness for all municipal employees is

ensured.

Through the delivery of Public Health services, cemeteries are well managed and

planned, and the proper management of the environment is practised.

Objectives:

• Providing for the social needs of communities and the empowerment of

vulnerable people through the provision of access to social services, social

development programmes and indigent support.

• Promoting the health and well-being of all communities through the spatially

equitable provision of social infrastructure.

• Providing effective general environmental and public health services.

124

• Providing dignified housing and sanitation and accelerating access to improved

services to indigent households in order to create safe and decent living

conditions for all residents.

Key directorates that play a role in realising these strategic objectives:

Human Settlements –

The City aims to upgrade informal settlements by providing housing opportunities to

qualifying residents. Appropriately located, affordable and fiscally sustainable housing

opportunities will be prioritised by the City. A back-yarder programme will also be

initiated, in terms of which basic services will be extended to not only formal houses,

but also to residents residing in backyard structures.

Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture –

Although sport and recreation speaks to Nelson Mandela Bay’s attractiveness as a

preferred sport destination, this Directorate plays an important role in creating a Caring

City that offers quality facilities and events for residents to get involved in positive

recreational activities. Social services in the form of well-maintained public sport and

cultural facilities are crucial in creating a Caring City that looks after the well-being of

its residents.

Public Health –

Public health is an important aspect of a Caring City that leads to the improved quality

of life of residents. Community involvement is critical in delivering competitive primary

health care facilities and taking care of the environment.

125

THE FORWARD THINKING CITY

The Forward Thinking City is concerned with institutional innovation, support for

research and development, and plans for future sustainability. The Forward Thinking

City ensures multi-generational planning that promotes sustainable economic growth

through the optimal use and development of technology.

The Forward Thinking City strives for its environmental sustainability through proactive

planning, and the conservation of resources and the natural and built environment.

Objectives:

• Ensuring multi-generational planning that promotes sustainable economic

growth through research and development, innovation, and the optimal use and

development of technology.

• Developing an environmentally sustainable city through proactive planning and

the conservation of resources and the natural and built environment.

Key directorates that play a role in realising these strategic objectives:

Chief Operating Officer –

The Office of the Chief Operating Officer is tasked with the management and

implementation of long-term strategy in order to create an administration that focuses

on long-term development and success.

Economic Development, Tourism and Agriculture –

A longer-term view of economic development in Nelson Mandela Bay involves

facilitating the growth of industries that are labour absorptive and will change the

growth trajectory of the City substantially. The oceans economy, tourism and the close

126

proximity of the Coega Industrial Development Zone position Nelson Mandela Bay for

accelerated future economic growth.

The table below reflects the Key Performance Areas of this IDP as part of the

Performance Management System of the Municipality. It is usual to include only what

are recognised as strategic indicators at the level of the Integrated Development Plan.

Other indicators would be cascaded down to the Service Delivery and Budget

Implementation Plan (SDBIP) and Performance Agreements of Officials.

For the purposes of this IDP, however, some indicators have been included at this

level based on their strategic significance. These are:

Doing business in South Africa indicators: These have arisen as a result of the national

report that measures the competitiveness of cities in South Africa from time to time.

This indicator is important from a strategic perspective, as the Nelson Mandela Bay

Municipality is striving to be competitive.

Statistical indicators: These indicators are included to monitor strategic trends over

time. Once a trend has been established, performance indicators will be devised for

inclusion in subsequent IDPs.

It should be noted that in terms of the aforementioned indicators, the 2017/18 financial

year will be utilised to establish and verify reporting systems and determine accurate

baseline information to inform targets to be set for the outer years.

127

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Impr

oved

acc

ess

to s

anita

tion

Percentage of households with access to basic sanitation

WS

1.1 97% 98% 100% 100% 100% Percentage of

households (both formal and informal) provided with access to a basic level of sanitation

N/A

100% I&E (W&S)

% completion of the Coega Kop Boreholes exploration

N/A

50% I&E (W&S)

PILLAR 1

THE WELL RUN CITY In the Well Run City, monitoring and evaluation inf orm decision making and provide information for acc ountability and performance improvement. A culture of excellence am ong staff and institutional systems and processes i s strived for. In the Well Run Nelson Mandela Bay, all basic services are delivered to expectation and the city sets the benchmark for transparent governance, financial viability and the eradication of corruption.

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 1.1 Transform the institutional systems, processes and organisational structure to one of high performance in order to effectively deliver basic services

128

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Pub

lic A

ccou

ntab

ility

and

C

usto

mer

Car

e Number of basic service delivery complaints/fault reported

N/A

Baseline currently

being established

Statistical indicator:

Number of basic

service delivery

complaints/fault

reported will be

calculated annually

Statistical indicator: Number of basic service delivery complaints/fault reported will be calculated annually

Statistical indicator: Number of basic service delivery complaints/fault reported will be calculated annually

Statistical indicator: Number of basic service delivery complaints/fault reported will be calculated annually

Average turnaround time for dealing with basic service delivery complaints (from the date of receipt of the complaint to the date of feedback to the complainant)

N/A

Within 24 hours

CM

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Man

dela

Bay

Dev

elop

men

t Age

ncy

% achievement of the Mandela Bay Development Agency's 2018/19 Key Performance Indicators reflected in the Mandela Bay Development Agency Business Plan

N/A

New KPI – Baseline

will become available on

30 June 2018

80% 80% 80% 80% % achievement of the Mandela Bay Development Agency's 2018/19 Key Performance Indicators reflected in the Mandela Bay Development Agency Business Plan

N/A

80% CM

129

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Impr

oved

acc

ess

to w

ater

Percentage of households with access to basic water supply

WS

2.1 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Percentage of

households (both formal and informal) provided with access to a basic water supply (including households within a 200m radius of a standpipe)

N/A

100% I&E (W&S)

Number of new water connections meeting minimum standards W

S2.

11 3000

In line with Housing

Programme

I&E (W&S)

130

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Impr

oved

qua

lity

of w

ater

and

san

itatio

n se

rvic

es

(rev

ised

from

con

tinui

ty o

f ser

vice

s) Frequency of

sewer blockages W

S3.

1 708 675 650 600 550 Percentage of wastewater and sanitation complaints / callouts responded to within 24 hours (sanitation / wastewater)

WS

3.11

100% I&E (W&S)

Average number of days taken to unblock a stormwater blockage (from the date that the stormwater blockage is reported to the date that the blockage is unblocked)

N/A

I&E (W&S)

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Impr

oved

qua

lity

of w

ater

and

sa

nita

tion

serv

ices

(re

vise

d fr

om

cont

inui

ty o

f ser

vice

s) Frequency of

mains failures

WS

3.2 69 65 60 55 50 Percentage of

complaints/ callouts responded to within 24 hours (water)

WS

3.21

100% I&E (W&S)

Frequency of unplanned water service interruptions

WS

3.3 15 13 12 10 8

131

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E D

ELI

VE

RY

Impr

oved

qua

lity

of

wat

er (

incl

udin

g w

aste

wat

er) Percentage of

Drinking Water Compliance to SANS241

WS

4.1 99% 100% 100% 100% 100% % compliance with

the drinking water standards in line with South African National Standards 241 (SANS 241)

N/A

100% I&E (W&S)

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Impr

oved

qua

lity

of w

ater

(in

clud

ing

was

tew

ater

)

Percentage of Wastewater samples compliant to water use licence conditions

WS

4.2 75% 75% 80% 85% 85% Percentage of

industries with trade effluent inspected for compliance

WS

4.21

100% I&E (W&S)

Percentage of wastewater safely treated

WS

4.22

I&E (W&S)

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E D

ELI

VE

RY

Impr

oved

wat

er

sust

aina

bilit

y

Percentage of non-revenue water W

S5.

1 42.2% 40% 37% 35% 30% % non-revenue water (water that has entered the supply system but is lost before reaching the consumer)

N/A

I&E (W&S)

132

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Impr

oved

wat

er s

usta

inab

ility

Total water losses

WS

5.2 Litres per

connection per day

resulting in 39.9% losses

Litres per connection

per day resulting in 37% losses

Litres per connection

per day resulting in 34% losses

Litres per connection

per day resulting in 30% losses

Litres per connection

per day resulting in 30% losses

% real water losses as defined by the International Water Association (physical losses of water from the distribution system, including leakage and storage overflows)

N/A

32% I&E (W&S)

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Impr

oved

en

ergy

su

stai

nabi

lity Road transport

fuel usage per capita E

E4.

3

N/A

I&E (R&T)

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Mod

al s

hift

of w

eekd

ay tr

ips

(incl

udin

g ed

ucat

ion

trip

s) fr

om p

rivat

e to

pub

lic

tran

spor

t and

non

-mot

oris

ed

tran

spor

t Non-motorised transport paths and lanes as a percentage of the total municipal road network length

TR

1.2

0.15% of NMT paths (4,75KM as

a percentage

of total municipal

road network length)t

0.13% of NMT paths (4KM as a percentage

of total municipal

road network length)t

0.12% of NMT paths (3,8KM as

a percentage

of total municipal

road network length)t

0.12% of NMT paths (3,6KM as

a percentage

of total municipal

road network length)t

0.11% of NMT paths (3,4KM as

a percentage

of total municipal

road network length)t

Length in km of non-motorised transport paths built T

R1.

21 4KM I&E

(R&T)

Number of pedestrian bridges constructed

2 I&E (R&T)

m² of verges / sidewalks rehabilitated.

30000m² I&E (R&T)

133

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Impr

oved

affo

rdab

ility

of p

ublic

tran

spor

t Percentage share of monthly household income spent on public transport, for households using public transport

TR

2.1 20% 20% 20% 20% 20% I&E

(R&T)

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Impr

oved

wat

er s

usta

inab

ility

Total per capita consumption of water W

S5.

3 251 litres per capita per day

250 litres per capita per day

240 litres per capita per day

230 litres per capita per day

220 litres per capita per day

Water connections metered as a percentage of total connections

WS

5.31

I&E (W&S)

% quarter - to - quarter reduction in water meters that have reached or exceeded their design life

N/A

I&E (W&S)

134

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Impr

oved

wat

er

sust

aina

bilit

y

Percentage water reused

WS

5.4

Number of meters procured and installed to meter recycled water

N/A

I&E (W&S)

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Impr

oved

sat

isfa

ctio

n w

ith

publ

ic tr

ansp

ort s

ervi

ces

Percentage of respondents indicating that they believe public transport to be "safe"

TR

4.1 0% 50% 55% 60% 65% Number of CCTV

cameras installed in the IPTS busses and operational trunk routes

N/A

50 I&E (R&T)

Number of visible Security personnel deployed on the IPTS bus routes

N/A

15 I&E (R&T)

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Impr

oved

sat

isfa

ctio

n w

ith

publ

ic tr

ansp

ort s

ervi

ces Percentage of

respondents indicating that they believe public transport to be "reliable"

TR

4.2 0% 50% 55% 60% 65% Percentage of

municipally-contracted scheduled bus services 'on time'

TR

4.21

70% I&E (R&T)

135

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

A r

obus

t, w

ell m

aint

aine

d ro

ad a

nd s

torm

wat

er n

etw

ork

Percentage of overall municipal road network that is unsurfaced

N/A

Percentage of unsurfaced road graded

TR

6.11

I&E (R&T)

Km of unsurfaced roads graded N

/A 7km I&E

(R&T)

Km of gravel roads tarred N

/A 14km I&E

(R&T)

Km of surfaced municipal road lanes which has been resurfaced and resealed

N/A

10.8km 10.7km 10.7km 10.7km 10.7km Percentage of surfaced municipal road lanes which has been resurfaced and resealed

TR

6.12

0.37% I&E (R&T)

m² of roads rehabilitated / resealed / resurfaced

N/A

65000 m² I&E (R&T)

% of reported potholes repaired within 72 hours after inspection

N/A

75% I&E (R&T)

Number of stormwater ponds aesthetically rehabilitated for flood detention

N/A

2 I&E (R&T)

136

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E

DE

LIV

ER

Y

A r

obus

t, w

ell

mai

ntai

ned

road

and

st

orm

wat

er n

etw

ork

Percentage of roads unmarked/ unsigned

N/A

Number of streets marked / signed N

/A

HS

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Impr

oved

affo

rdab

ility

of

elec

tric

ity Households

receiving Free Basic Electricity as a percentage of all households with electricity connections

EE

2.1 25% 25% 25% 25% Free Basic

Electricity provision levels as a percentage of total residential electricity provision (in terms of MWh)

EE

2.11

25% E&E

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Impr

oved

af

ford

abili

ty o

f el

ectr

icity

Percentage of low-income households that spend more than 10% of their monthly income on electricity

EE

2.2 20% 20% 20% 20%

137

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Impr

oved

acc

ess

to e

lect

ricity

Percentage of households with access to electricity

EE

1.1 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Number of

dwellings provided with connections to the mains electricity supply by the Municipality

EE

1.11

1500 E&E

Number of dwellings provided with connections to the mains electricity supply by Eskom within municipal jurisdiction

EE

1.12

10 E&E

138

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Impr

oved

rel

iabi

lity

of e

lect

ricity

ser

vice

System Average Interruption Duration Index

EE

3.1 On 30

November 2017,

Council approved

the appointmen

t of a service provider

who will be able to

assist with keeping

municipal database

for customers for each

circuit. The Municipality

currently does not have the

database of customers

that are served with electricity

on a single circuit

Percentage of all unplanned outages that are restored to supply within industry standard timeframes

EE

3.11

30% within 1.5 hours

E&E

60% within 3.5 hours

90% within 7.5 hours

98% within 24 hours

Customer Average Interruption Duration Index

EE

3.2 99% above

24hours

139

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Impr

oved

re

liabi

lity

of

elec

tric

ity s

ervi

ce

N/A

% year-to-year reduction in electrical power outages on the high voltage network (lasting more than two hours)

N/A

8% E&E

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Impr

oved

ele

ctric

ity s

usta

inab

ility

% of main street and area lights operational throughout the year

N/A

96.5% 10% 97.5% 9.8% 98.5% Conducting an audit to determine the number of main street and area lights

N/A

By September

2018

E&E

Average number of days taken to fix reported street light faults (from the date that the fault is reported to the date that the street light is fixed)

N/A

45 days E&E

140

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Impr

oved

rel

iabi

lity

of e

lect

ricity

ser

vice

System Average Interruption Frequency Index

EE

3.3 On 30

November 2017,

Council approved

the appoint-ment of a service provider

who will be able to

assist with keeping

municipal database

for customers for each

circuit. The Municipality

currently does not have the

database of customers

that are served with electricity

on a single circuit

Percentage of Planned Electricity and Energy Maintenance Performed

EE

3.21

100% E&E

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Impr

oved

rel

iabi

lity

of e

lect

ricity

ser

vice

Customer Average Interruption Frequency Index

EE

3.4

141

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Impr

oved

ene

rgy

sust

aina

bilit

y Renewable energy capacity available within the municipal jurisdiction as a percentage of Eskom supply capacity to the Municipality

EE

4.1 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% Total renewable

energy capacity available through Independent Power Producers

EE

4.11

32MW E&E

Installed capacity of embedded generators on the municipal distribution network

EE

4.12

5MW E&E

Renewable energy production as a percentage of total energy consumption

N/A

4% E&E

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Impr

oved

ene

rgy

sust

aina

bilit

y Percentage total electricity losses E

E4.

4 13,8% 12,8% 11,3% 9,3% 9,0%

N/A

E&E

142

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E D

ELI

VE

RY

Impr

oved

ene

rgy

sust

aina

bilit

y Percentage of technical electricity losses

N/A

6.3% 6.3% 6.3% 6.3% 6.3% Number of Sub-stations upgraded through the installation of voltage and current transformers and associated metering equipment

N/A

3 E&E

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Impr

oved

ene

rgy

sust

aina

bilit

y % non-technical electricity losses (electricity losses as a result of non-technical causes attributed to either electricity theft / non-metered electricity / meter tampering / meter failures and/or illegal connections)

N/A

5.5% of the total

electricity losses

7.5% of the total

electricity losses

7.5% of the total

electricity losses

7.5% of the total

electricity losses

7.5% of the total

electricity losses

% reduction in non-technical electricity losses (electricity losses as a result of non-technical causes attributed to either electricity theft / non-metered electricity / meter tampering / meter failures and/or illegal connections)

N/A

7.5% of the total

electricity losses

E&E

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Min

imis

ed

solid

was

te Tonnes of

municipal solid waste sent to landfill per capita

EN

V 2

.1 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.03 0.03

N/A

PH

143

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Min

imis

ed

solid

was

te Tonnes of

municipal solid waste diverted from landfill per capita

EN

V 2

.2 Tonnes of

municipal solid waste diverted from landfill per capita

N/A

PH

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Min

imis

ed

solid

was

te Total collected

municipal solid waste per capita

EN

V 2

.3 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 0.02 Tonnes of

municipal waste disposed of through landfill alternatives

N/A

0.02 PH

Number of transfer sites upgraded for recycling

N/A

1 site PH

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Effe

ctiv

e W

aste

Man

agem

ent Kilometres of

roadsides swept annually (calculating the studied street sweeping beats)

N/A

Km of roadsides swept N

/A

PH

144

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E D

ELI

VE

RY

Effe

ctiv

e W

aste

M

anag

emen

t Percentage of households with basic refuse removal services or better

EN

V 3

.1 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Percentage of

known informal settlements receiving integrated waste handling services

EN

V 3

.11

100% PH

Percentage or number of known formal settlements receiving integrated waste handling services

N/A

100% PH

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Effe

ctiv

e W

aste

M

anag

emen

t Waste removal complaints due to non-collection as a percentage of total consumer units/billed accounts

EN

V 3

.2

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Effe

ctiv

e W

aste

Man

agem

ent Number of

illegal dumping fines issued as a percentage of the total number of illegal dumping reports and tip-offs received

N/A 20% 25% 25% 25% 25% % of illegal

dumping sites cleared of either / or domestic waste or construction rubble or building rubble within the timeline specified in the NMBM Service Delivery Charter

N/A 25% PH

145

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Impr

oved

qua

lity

of

mun

icip

al r

oad

netw

ork Percentage of

fatal crashes attributed to road and environmental factors

TR

6 0.14% 0.14% 0.14% 0.14%

N/A

S&S

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E D

ELI

VE

RY

Impr

oved

qua

lity

of

mun

icip

al r

oad

netw

ork Road Traffic

Fatalities Per 100 000 Of The Population

TR

7.1 24 24 24 24 Number of metro

police ghost squad vehicles in place

N/A

50 S&S

Number of road blocks held

48 roadblocks

S&S

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Impr

oved

qua

lity

of m

unic

ipal

ro

ad n

etw

ork Average

number of fatalities per fatal crash

TR

7.2 5 5 5 5 % quarter - to -

quarter increase in the number of roadworthy tests conducted

N/A

S&S

146

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 2

: MU

NIC

IPA

L IN

ST

ITU

TIO

NA

L D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T A

ND

T

RA

NS

FO

RM

AT

ION

Effe

ctiv

e C

omm

unic

atio

ns

Pla

tform

s fo

r C

apab

ly R

espo

nsiv

e G

over

nanc

e Functionality of prescribed municipal structures (as defined in Municipal Structures Act 117 of 1998)

GG

4.2

100% 100% 100% 100% Implementing a Council Committee Structure reporting and monitoring system

N/A

By June 2019

CS

Percentage of Regular Council resolutions implemented per year

N/A

80% 80% 80% 80%

KP

A 2

: MU

NIC

IPA

L IN

ST

ITU

TIO

NA

L D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T A

ND

T

RA

NS

FO

RM

AT

ION

Effe

ctiv

e C

omm

unic

atio

ns

Pla

tform

s fo

r C

apab

ly

Res

pons

ive

Gov

erna

nce % year-to-year

increase in the number of unique visitors to the NMBM website

N/A

Average of 200,000

visitors per month during

2017/18

5 % increase

10% increase

10% increase

10% increase

Upgrading of the NMBM website N

/A By June

2019 CS

KP

A 2

: MU

NIC

IPA

L IN

ST

ITU

TIO

NA

L D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

AN

D

TR

AN

SF

OR

MA

TIO

N

Effe

ctiv

e C

omm

unic

atio

ns

Pla

tform

s fo

r C

apab

ly

Res

pons

ive

Gov

erna

nce % positive

media coverage on the Municipality

N/A

Estimated to stand at 107 at the

end of June 2018

80% 80% 80% 80% Number of proactive media statements issued

N/A

CS

147

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Pub

lic A

ccou

ntab

ility

and

C

usto

mer

Ser

vice

Number of unmanned customer service teller desk days per year at traffic and licensing centres

N/A

1 1 1 1 Number of vacancies filled at the traffic and licensing centre

N/A

7 S&S

Operationalisation of the Motherwell Traffic and Licensing Centre

By June 2019

S&S

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Cen

tral

ised

ICT

Sys

tem

s fo

r Im

prov

ed M

unic

ipal

O

pera

tiona

l Effi

cien

cy

% reduction in Information Communi-cations Telecommuni-cations (ICT) operational costs as a result of ICT systems improvements

N/A

25%

reduction 30%

reduction 35%

reduction 40%

reduction % of users migrated from Novell to MicroSoft

N/A

25% CS

148

Strategic Objective 1.2 Ensure that the Municipality is staffed throughout with a motivated, committed and capable workforce

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T

RE

F YEAR 1

BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR N

T

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 4

: MU

NIC

IPA

L F

INA

NC

IAL

VIA

BIL

ITY

AN

D

MA

NA

GE

ME

NT

Inst

itutio

nal h

uman

res

ourc

es c

apac

ity, c

ompl

ianc

e,

capa

bilit

y an

d ex

celle

nce % of the

Municipality's budget actually spent on implementing its Workplace Skills Plan

N/A

0.0630% 0.0945% 0.0945% 0.0945% 0.0945% % of the Municipality's budget actually spent on implementing its Workplace Skills Plan

N/A

0.0945% CM

Implementation of Performance Management System for all employees in NMBM

N/A

NMBM Performance Management

System rolled out to

Director Level

NMBM Performance Management System rolled out down to TASK Grade

15

NMBM Performance Management System rolled out down to TASK Grade

14

NMBM Performance Management System rolled out down to TASK Grade

12

NMBM Performance Management System rolled down to TASK

Grade 10

Implementation of Performance Management System for all employees in NMBM

N/A

NMBM Performance Management

System rolled out down to

TASK Grade 15

CM

149

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F YEAR 1

BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22) SDBIP

INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 2

: MU

NIC

IPA

L IN

ST

ITU

TIO

NA

L D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T A

ND

TR

AN

SF

OR

MA

TIO

N

Inst

itutio

nal H

uman

Res

ourc

es C

apac

ity,

Com

plia

nce,

Cap

abili

ty a

nd E

xcel

lenc

e Functional and compliant Organisational Structure with Job Descriptions as defined in the MSA, Section 66

N/A

"As is" structure in

place

Micro Organizational

Structure approved by Council and

JD developed in line with the

approved micro

organizational structure

Existing Job descriptions reviewed in

line with approved

organizational structure and approved job descriptions

Organisational structure in place and

operational

Organisational structure in place and

operational

Developing a micro structure with supporting Job Descriptions in line with Section 66 of the MSA

N/A

By June 2019

CS

N/A Number of work stoppages occurring per quarter (per directorate)

N/A

CS

150

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T

RE

F YEAR 1

BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 5

: GO

OD

GO

VE

RN

AN

CE

AN

D P

UB

LIC

P

AR

TIC

IPA

TIO

N

Mor

e ef

fect

ive

city

adm

inis

trat

ion Audit Opinion

GG

3.1

Qualified Audit

Opinion in respect of 2016/17

Unqualified audit report

received from the Auditor General

Unqualified audit report

received from the Auditor General

Unqualified audit report

received from the Auditor General

Unqualified audit report

received from the Auditor General

Number of repeat audit findings

GG

3.1

1 0 CM

% year-to-year reduction in unauthorised/ fruitless/ irregular/ wasteful expenditure as reported in the Auditor General Report

N/A

25% reduction

CM

Achieving risk maturity level 3 in line with National Treasury standards

N/A

By June 2019

CM

Strategic Objective 1.3 Ensure financial prudence and transparent governanc e and work towards eradicating corruption

151

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T

RE

F YEAR 1

BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 5

: GO

OD

G

OV

ER

NA

NC

E A

ND

P

UB

LIC

PA

RT

ICIP

AT

ION

Zer

o to

lera

nce

of fr

aud

and

corr

uptio

n Number of alleged fraud and corruption cases reported per 100 000 population

GG

5.1

Baseline currently

being established

Statistical indicator: number of fraud and corruption

cases reported per

100 000 population

will be calculated annually

Statistical indicator: number of fraud and corruption

cases reported per

100 000 population

will be calculated annually

Statistical indicator: number of fraud and corruption

cases reported

per 100 000 population

will be calculated annually

Statistical indicator: number of fraud and corruption

cases reported per

100 000 population

will be calculated annually

Number of active suspensions longer than three months

GG

5.1

1 0 CM

KP

A 5

: GO

OD

GO

VE

RN

AN

CE

AN

D

PU

BLI

C P

AR

TIC

IPA

TIO

N

Zer

o to

lera

nce

of fr

aud

and

corr

uptio

n Number of dismissals for fraud and corruption per 100 000 population

GG

5.2

Baseline currently

being established

Statistical indicator: number of dismissals

for fraud and corruption

reported per 100 000

population will be

calculated annually

Statistical indicator: number of dismissals

for fraud and corruption

reported per 100 000

population will be

calculated annually

Statistical indicator: number of dismissals for fraud

and corruption reported

per 100 000 population

will be calculated annually

Statistical indicator: number of dismissals

for fraud and corruption

reported per 100 000

population will be

calculated annually

Quarterly salary bill of suspended officials

GG

5.1

2 R-value of salaries of suspended

officials (acceptable cost based

on historical

trend)

CM

152

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T

RE

F YEAR 1

BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 5

: GO

OD

GO

VE

RN

AN

CE

A

ND

PU

BLI

C P

AR

TIC

IPA

TIO

N

Zer

o to

lera

nce

of fr

aud

and

corr

uptio

n Number of convictions for bribery and/or corruption by city officials per 100 000 population

GG

5.3

Baseline currently

being established

Statistical indicator: number of convictions for bribery

and/or corruption by city officials per 100 000 population

will be calculated annually

Statistical indicator: number of convictions for bribery

and/or corruption by city officials per 100 000 population

will be calculated annually

Statistical indicator: number of convictions for bribery

and/or corruption

by city officials per

100 000 population

will be calculated annually

Statistical indicator: number of convictions for bribery

and/or corruption by city officials per 100 000 population

will be calculated annually

% of cases processed which have been reported through the ethics hotline and been identified for investigation

N/A

100% CM

KP

A 4

: MU

NIC

IPA

L F

INA

NC

IAL

VIA

BIL

ITY

A

ND

MA

NA

GE

ME

NT

Res

ourc

e E

ffici

ency

Growth rate in the annual rand amount spent on external rental fleet

N/A

2016/17 External

Non-Passenger

Vehicle Hire Vatable:

R24,176,404 External

Passenger Vehicle Hire

(No Vat): R174,524 Equipment

and Machinery:

R16,035,695

Zero growth rate

Zero growth rate

Zero growth rate

Zero growth rate

Number of fleet purchased N

/A 55

CM

153

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T

RE

F YEAR 1

BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

Sou

nd fi

nanc

ial m

anag

emen

t % of the Municipality’s Capital Budget actually spent

N/A

97.50% 95% 95% 95% 95% % of the Municipality’s Capital Budget actually spent

N/A

95% CM

% of the Municipality’s approved Operating Budget spent on repairs and maintenance

N/A

3.32% 3% 3% 3% 3% % of the Municipality’s approved Operating Budget spent on repairs and maintenance

N/A

3% CM

Sou

nd fi

nanc

ial m

anag

emen

t Value spent on outsourced professional / consultancy services

N/A

R109 million in respect of

2016/17 financial

year

Statistical indicator – value of

outsourced professional / consultancy services will be calculated

annually

Statistical indicator – value of

outsourced professional / consultancy services will be calculated

annually

Statistical indicator – value of

outsourced professional

/ consultancy services will

be calculated annually

Statistical indicator – value of

outsourced professional

/ consultancy services will

be calculated annually

% reduction in value spent on outsourced professional / consultancy services

N/A

CM

154

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T

RE

F YEAR 1

BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 2

: MU

NIC

IPA

L IN

ST

ITU

TIO

NA

L D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T A

ND

T

RA

NS

FO

RM

AT

ION

Inst

itutio

nal H

uman

Res

ourc

es C

apac

ity, C

ompl

ianc

e,

Cap

abili

ty a

nd E

xcel

lenc

e % in lost work hours as a result of employee absenteeism (AWOL and abuse of Sick Leave)

N/A

% implementation of the Electronic Leave Management System

N/A

100% CS

% of cases referred to the NMBM EAP Programme in the event of sick leave abuse

N/A

100% CS

155

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T

RE

F YEAR 1

BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 2

: MU

NIC

IPA

L IN

ST

ITU

TIO

NA

L D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T A

ND

T

RA

NS

FO

RM

AT

ION

Effe

ctiv

e C

omm

unic

atio

ns P

latfo

rms

for

Cap

ably

Res

pons

ive

Gov

erna

nce Number of

members of the public in attendance at municipal public participation meetings

N/A

Baseline currently

being established

Statistical indicator:

Number of members of the public in attendance at municipal

public participation meetings will be calculated

annually

Statistical indicator: Number of members of the public in attendance at municipal public participation meetings will be calculated annually

Statistical indicator:

Number of members of the public in attendance at municipal

public participation

meetings will be

calculated annually

Statistical indicator:

Number of members of the public in attendance at municipal

public participation meetings will

be calculated annually

N/A

CS

KP

A 4

: MU

NIC

IPA

L F

INA

NC

IAL

VIA

BIL

ITY

AN

D M

AN

AG

EM

EN

T

Add

ress

of S

ubst

ance

Abu

se Number of

employees known to abuse substances who received support from the NMBM Wellness centre

N/A

Baseline currently

being established

Statistical indicator: Number of employees known to abuse substances who received support from the NMBM Wellness centre will be calculated annually

Statistical indicator:

Number of employees known to

abuse substances

who received support from the NMBM Wellness

centre will be calculated annually

Statistical indicator:

Number of employees known to

abuse substances

who received support from the NMBM

Wellness centre will

be calculated annually

Statistical indicator:

Number of employees known to

abuse substances

who received

support from the NMBM Wellness centre will

be calculated annually

% Cases referred to Wellness and rehabilitated

N/A

100% CS

156

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T

RE

F YEAR 1

BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 4

: MU

NIC

IPA

L F

INA

NC

IAL

VIA

BIL

ITY

A

ND

MA

NA

GE

ME

NT

Sou

nd fi

nanc

ial m

anag

emen

t (I

mpl

emen

tatio

n of

the

2016

/17

to 2

018/

19

med

ium

term

rev

enue

and

exp

endi

ture

fr

amew

ork

(MT

RE

F) Percentage

of e-commerce transactions per municipal account holder

N/A

70% 70% 70% 70%

N/A

B&T

KP

A 4

: MU

NIC

IPA

L F

INA

NC

IAL

VIA

BIL

ITY

AN

D M

AN

AG

EM

EN

T

Sou

nd fi

nanc

ial m

anag

emen

t (I

mpl

emen

tatio

n of

the

2016

/17

to

2018

/19

med

ium

term

rev

enue

and

ex

pend

iture

fram

ewor

k (M

TR

EF

) Liquidity Ratio N

/A .08:1 .08:1 .08:1 .08:1

N/A

N/A B&T

Turnaround time for the payment of Creditors to ensure creditor system efficiency

N/A

Within 30 days from

date of receipt of invoice

Within 30 days from date of receipt of invoice

Within 30 days from date of receipt of invoice

Within 30 days from date of receipt of invoice

Within 30 days from date of receipt of invoice

Turnaround time for the payment of Creditors to ensure creditor system efficiency (from the date of receipt of the invoice to date of payment)

N/A

30 days B&T

Employee Costs ratio N

/A 34% 30% 30% 30% 30%

N/A

N/A B&T

157

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T

RE

F YEAR 1

BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

Cost Coverage Ratio (cash and cash equivalents, excluding unspent conditional grants)

N/A

2.32 months 2 months 2 months 2 months 2 months Cost Coverage Ratio (cash and cash equivalents, excluding unspent conditional grants)

N/A

2 months B&T

% outstanding service debtors to revenue

N/A

24.11% 20% 20% 20% 20% % outstanding service debtors to revenue

N/A

20% B&T

KP

A 4

: MU

NIC

IPA

L F

INA

NC

IAL

VIA

BIL

ITY

AN

D

MA

NA

GE

ME

NT

Sou

nd fi

nanc

ial

man

agem

ent

(Im

plem

enta

tion

of th

e 20

16/1

7 to

201

8/19

med

ium

te

rm r

even

ue a

nd

expe

nditu

re fr

amew

ork Debt

Coverage ratio (debt servicing costs to annual operating income)

N/A

2.79% 53 times 53 times 53 times 53 times Debt Coverage ratio (debt servicing costs to annual operating income)

N/A

53 times B&T

Repairs and Maintenance ratio

N/A

3.32% 2.90% 2.90% 2.90% 2.90% % expenditure against the planned maintenance budget

N/A

100% B&T

158

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T

RE

F YEAR 1

BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

% billed revenue collection rate (revenue collected over billed revenue)

N/A

94.30 95.50 96% 96.50% 97% % billed revenue collection rate (revenue collected over billed revenue)

N/A

95.50% B&T

159

PILLAR 2

THE OPPORTUNITY CITY The Opportunity City delivers on well-planned initi atives to enable and cultivate economic opportunity , develop competitive advantage and ensure access to skills. The Opportu nity City is competitively differentiated as a dest ination city for business, tourism and investment. Strategic partnerships with the private and non-profit sectors thrive. Opportu nity City initiatives secure development of a diversity of sectors that range fr om marine manufacturing, to urban agriculture and a gri-processing, to the cultural and creative industries. Infrastructure le d growth is properly planned and invested in and ef fective service provision for transport and mobility ensures universal access to the Opportunity City. Nelson Mandela Bay, the Opportunity City, is a prou dly iconic and global city that does the legacy of Nelson Mandela proud.

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 2.1 Grow and diversify the local economy through the at traction of new investment, skills development and facilitation of an enabling environment for small business growth and job creation.

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Mor

e ef

fect

ive

pove

rty

alle

viat

ion Percentage of

all qualifying households in the municipal area classified as indigent

GG

6.1

28% of all households classified

as indigent (as at 28 February

2018)

28% 28% 28% 28% % qualifying households earning less than or equal to R3 200 per month (two state pensions) with access to free basic services

N/A

100% B&T

Percentage of the Municipality's operating budget spent on free basic services to indigent households

GG

6.1

1 5% CM

160

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

Number of work opportunities created through EPWP, CWP and other related infrastructure programmes

GG

6.1

2 14227 CM

Number of Full-time Equivalent (FTE) jobs created

N/A

4461 CM

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

An

enab

ling

envi

ronm

ent t

o do

bu

sine

ss in

Nel

son

Man

dela

Bay

Cost to obtain a new electricity connection as a percentage of income per capita

N/A

42.3% 42.3% 42.3% 42.3% 42.3%

N/A

E&E

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Impr

oved

Gro

ss

Dom

estic

Pro

duct

GDP contribution of the agriculture sector, including agro-processing

N/A

1.2% 1.5% 2.0% 2.0% 2.0% Number of milking parlours evaluated in terms of Foodstuffs Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act

N/A

PH

Number of abattoirs inspected

PH

161

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Job

crea

tion

N/A

Number of standard 3-phase business electricity supply units kept in Municipal stock

N/A

5 E%E

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Dev

elop

men

t of t

he C

ultu

ral

and

Cre

ativ

e E

cono

my Total

attendance as a percentage of venue capacity at all arts and culture events hosted at Municipal museums, galleries, the Athenaeum and the Opera House

N/A

Number of programmes delivered by the Port Elizabeth Opera House in line with the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality / Port Elizabeth Opera House partnership agreement

N/A

SRAC

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Impl

emen

tatio

n of

th

e ai

r m

anag

emen

t pl

an o

f the

NM

BM

Percentage of households experiencing a problem with noise pollution

EN

V 1

.3 20% 18% 14% 10% 5% Percentage reduction of

Environmental noise pollution related complaints E

NV

1.3

18% PH

162

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Bio

dive

rsity

is c

onse

rved

an

d en

hanc

ed Ecosystem

/vegetation type protection level

EN

V4.

2

Proportion of biodiversity priority areas protected

EN

V4.

21

PH

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Bio

dive

rsity

is

cons

erve

d an

d en

hanc

ed Proportion of

biodiversity priority areas protected E

NV

4.21

Reviewing a biodiversity management plan N

/A

PH

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Bio

dive

rsity

is

cons

erve

d an

d en

hanc

ed Wetland

condition index

EN

V4.

3

N/A

PH

163

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

DE

VE

LOP

ME

NT

Pro

mot

ion

of L

ocal

Spo

rts

Tal

ent Ratio of the

NMBM Sports Development Budget spent in relation to the number of sports teams (professional and semi-professional) and schools that received financial support from the Municipality**

N/A

Number of semi-professional sports teams receiving funding from NMBM to contribute towards their development

N/A

6 SRAC

Number of professional sports teams receiving funding from NMBM to contribute towards their development

N/A

SRAC

Number of schools supported through the provision of funding towards the Get Ahead Sport Program (GASP)

N/A

SRAC

164

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E

DE

LIV

ER

Y

An

Ena

blin

g E

nviro

nmen

t to

do

Bus

ines

s in

Nel

son

Man

dela

Bay

Average number of days taken to complete an EIA for municipal land

N/A

N/A

PH

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Tou

rism

de

velo

pmen

t Number of Municipal Resorts fully operational with compliant SLA or contract in place

N/A

1 2 3 4 Number of Municipal Resorts fully operational with compliant SLA or contract in place

N/A

2 (Spring Resort Beachview Resort)

SRAC

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Aud

ienc

e D

evel

opm

ent a

nd

Mai

nstr

eam

ing

of

Art

s an

d C

ultu

re Number of

public spaces/sites made available for the installation of public artworks

N/A

N/A

HS

165

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Eco

nom

ic

empo

wer

men

t GDP contribution of the local tourism sector per year**

N/A

7.10% 2% 2% 2% 2% Number of jobs created through support of SMMEs in the tourism sector

N/A

10 EDTA

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Eco

nom

ic e

mpo

wer

men

t % youth unemployment** N

/A 1%

(increase)

2%

2%

2%

2%

Number of youth employed through the implementation of municipal funded youth employment projects

N/A

500 EDTA

Number of job opportunities created through partnership with private sector

N/A

1000 EDTA

166

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Impr

oved

Gro

ss

Dom

estic

Pro

duct

Number of industrial areas targeted for upgrade and revitalisation

N/A

0 0 0 0 2 (Perseverance

Markman)

Conducting a needs assessment on industrial areas within Nelson Mandela Bay with the intention to revitalise and / or upgrade to attract and retain investors

N/A

Conditional assessment conducted by 30 June

2019

EDTA

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Impr

oved

Gro

ss D

omes

tic P

rodu

ct Value of exports

contracts facilitated within the NMBM

N/A

R3 million R3 million R3 million R3 million Number of Small Medium and Micro Enterprises (SMMEs) provided with training through the Export Development and Promotion Programme

N/A

EDTA

Value of exports contracts facilitated within the NMBM

R3 million

167

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Impr

oved

Gro

ss D

omes

tic

Pro

duct

% contribution of the ICT Sector to NMB economy

N/A

1.50% 2% 2% 2% 2% Number of Small Medium and Micro Enterprises (SMMEs) graduating from the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality (NMBM) - Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA) Information Communication Technology Incubation (ICT) Programme

N/A

10 EDTA

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Impr

oved

Gro

ss D

omes

tic

Pro

duct

% contribution of the Construction Sector to the NMB economy

N/A

2.69% 3% 3% 3% 3% Number of Small Medium and Micro Enterprises (SMMEs) in the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality (NMBM) - Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA) Construction Incubation Programme obtaining additional construction grade(s)

N/A

12 EDTA

168

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Impr

oved

Gro

ss D

omes

tic P

rodu

ct Number of

SMMEs supported through the SMME Support Centre and Enterprise Development Policy turning a profit within business plan stipulated timeframe

N/A

0 100 120 150 200

N/A

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Dev

elop

men

t of t

he C

ultu

ral

and

Cre

ativ

e E

cono

my Number of arts,

cultural, creative industries and heritage practitioners empowered to contribute to growth and development of the cultural, creative and heritage economy

N/A

15 20 25 30 Number of arts, cultural, creative industries and heritage practitioners empowered to contribute to growth and development of the cultural, creative and heritage economy

N/A

SRAC

169

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Coa

stal

res

ourc

es

mai

ntai

ned

and

amen

ities

impr

oved

Recreational water quality E

NV

5.1

40% 50% 60% 70% 80% % of recreational water samples taken which met the minimum requirement for recreational water quality

N/A

50% PH

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Clim

ate

chan

ge

miti

gate

d an

d ad

apte

d to

Green House Gas emissions per capita

EN

V 6

.1

Number of trees planted

N/A

PH

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

An

enab

ling

envi

ronm

ent

to d

o bu

sine

ss in

Nel

son

Man

dela

Bay

% of rates clearance processed within 7 days (from the date of receipt of the request to the date the rate clearance is processed)

N/A

100% 100% 100% 100% Average turnaround time for processing a rates clearance (from the date of receipt of the request to the date the rate clearance is processed)

N/A

7 days B&T

170

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

An

enab

ling

envi

ronm

ent t

o do

bus

ines

s in

Nel

son

Man

dela

Bay

Average turnaround time for installing a standard 3-phase business electricity supply (from the date of receipt of payment to the date of electricity installation)

N/A

45 days 45 days 45 days 45 days 45 days Average turnaround time for installing a standard 3-phase business electricity supply (from the date of receipt of payment to the date of electricity installation)

N/A

45 days E&E

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Aud

ienc

e D

evel

opm

ent a

nd

Mai

nstr

eam

ing

of

Art

s an

d C

ultu

re Average cost of

library services in relation to NMBM budget, per library access

N/A

N/A

SRAC

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E D

ELI

VE

RY

An

Ena

blin

g E

nviro

nmen

t to

do

Bus

ines

s in

N

elso

n M

ande

la Hectares of

municipal land available as commonage for grazing

N/A

% completion of the Uitenhage Municipal animal pound upgrade

N/A

PH / HS

171

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E D

ELI

VE

RY

An

Ena

blin

g E

nviro

nmen

t to

do

Bus

ines

s in

Nel

son

Man

dela

Bay

Hectares of municipal land available for human burial

N/A

Number of cemeteries upgraded through either the construction of berms / installation of cameras / upgrade of the sewerage system and/or provision of fencing

N/A

PH / HS

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Est

ablis

hmen

t of

stra

tegi

c E

cono

mic

D

evel

opm

ent

Par

tner

ship

s Number of Industry clusters established and supported that result in increased contribution to the local GDP

N/A

0 2 1 1 1 Number of Industry clusters established and supported through either the provision of financial and / or other resources

N/A

2 EDTA

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Info

rmal

Eco

nom

y G

row

th a

nd S

uppo

rt Number of

Informal Traders accommodated through Infrastructure provision

N/A

0 100 150 200 250 Number of informal trading facilities provided

N/A

2 EDTA

172

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 2.2 Facilitate and promote infrastructure led growth, d evelopment and tourism.

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Dev

elop

men

t of

the

Cul

tura

l an

d C

reat

ive

Eco

nom

y Number of visitors to the Red Location Facilities (Museum, Gallery and Digital Library)

N/A

Facility closed

N/A

SRAC

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Eco

nom

ic

deve

lopm

ent t

hrou

gh

com

mer

cial

spo

rts

and

cultu

ral t

ouris

m

infr

astr

uctu

re % completion of the

Mendi cultural centre upgrade

N/A

100%

Phase 2 100%

(Operationalisation)

45% Phase 3

% completion of the Mendi cultural centre upgrade

N/A

SRAC

173

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 2.3 Execution of existing and design and implementation of new projects that competitively differentiate N elson Mandela Bay as a destination city for business, tourism and inv estment – including through strategic partnerships.

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F 2018/19

TARGET IMPL DIR

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Key

cat

alyt

ic p

roje

cts Implementing the

Built Environment Njoli Urban Hub Programme

N/A

Number of Roads redesigned / constructed within Njoli square

N/A

EDTA and I&E

% completion of the Ibhayi precinct plan N

/A

HS

174

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 2.4 Develop an effective and integrated public transpor t system that promotes access to opportunity throug h mobility.

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E D

ELI

VE

RY

Est

ablis

h a

safe

, af

ford

able

and

fully

in

tegr

ated

pub

lic

tran

spor

t sys

tem

Number of Integrated Public Transport System passengers transported per month**

N/A

0 138360 285960 427940 569920 Developing an IPTS marketing strategy N

/A By June

2019 I&E (R&T)

175

PILLAR 3

THE SAFE CITY In the Safe City, all communities, residents and vi sitors of Nelson Mandela Bay enjoy the basic freedo m of not only being safe, but of feeling safe. The Safe City’s Metro Police are t rusted, accessible, well-trained, suitably equipped and protect the communities they serve with pride. Fire and Emergencies Service s in the Safe City are properly prepared to ensure that any disaster, natural or otherwise, is capably addressed. In the Safe City, the need for urgent delivery of well-maintained str eet lights to all communities is of high priority. In the Safe City, the Municipa lity partners with communities to eradicate illegal connections - and with civil organisations to ensure residents and visitors enjo y access to adequately life-guarded public beaches and pools. In the Safe Nelson Mandela Bay, bylaws are fairly enforced and measures are set in place to ensure that cattle are kept off roads at night. Safe working conditions are ensured for all municipal em ployees.

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 3.1 Deliver well-resourced and capacitated policing and emergency services in order to ensure the safety o f communities and visitors.

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Miti

gate

d ef

fect

s of

em

erge

ncie

s

Number of fire related deaths per 1 000 population F

E1.

1 Percentage compliance with the required attendance time for structural firefighting incidents

FE

1.1

1 90% S&S

Number of full time firefighters per 1 000 population

FE

1.1

2 S&S

176

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Miti

gate

d ef

fect

s of

em

erge

ncie

s

Number of natural disaster related deaths per 1 000 population

FE

1.2

Number of reservists and volunteer responders per 1000 population F

E 1

.21 1 S&S

Number of Disaster Satellite stations capacitated in terms of the Disaster Management Act requirements

N/A

2 S&S

Reviewing the NMBM Disaster Management Plan for the NMBM and

N/A

By June 2019

S&S

177

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

"Sou

nd fi

nanc

ial m

anag

emen

t (I

mpl

emen

tatio

n of

the

2016

/17

to 2

018/

19

med

ium

term

rev

enue

and

exp

endi

ture

fr

amew

ork " % revenue collection

from traffic fines (as per the set budget target)

N/A

90% 90% 90% 90% 90% Average turnaround time for issuing of traffic fines in respect of traffic violations captured through cameras (from the date on which the violation was captured to the date on which the fine is issued)

N/A

30 days S&S

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E D

ELI

VE

RY

Cap

acita

ting

of th

e F

ire

stat

ions

Number of Fire Stations sufficiently resourced with human capacity, fleet and equipment

N/A

0 1 2 3 4 Number of Fire Stations sufficiently resourced with human capacity, fleet and equipment

N/A

1 S&S

178

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E D

ELI

VE

RY

Nel

son

Man

dela

Bay

M

unic

ipal

ity a

s a

Saf

e W

orki

ng E

nviro

nmen

t

Establishment of an in-house security guarding service through the appointment of security guards

N/A

25 security guards

appointed

50 security guards

appointed

75 security guards

appointed

100 security guards

appointed

Number of security personnel in-sourced N

/A 25 S&S

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Nel

son

Man

dela

Bay

Mun

icip

ality

as

a S

afe

Wor

king

E

nviro

nmen

t

Percentage of CCTV, Early Warning Detection System and Joint Operational Centre (JOC) operational in NMBM

N/A

20% 40% 60% 80% Number of surveillance cameras in Municipal buildings and/or facilities operational to facilitate safety and security of municipal staff, assets and resources

N/A

40 S&S

Number Early Warning Systems operational

N/A

2 S&S

Number Joint Operational Centre Operational

N/A

2 S&S

179

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Nel

son

Man

dela

Bay

M

unic

ipal

ity a

s a

Saf

e W

orki

ng

Env

ironm

ent

% of municipal buildings that have fully functional biometrics access control

N/A

2 5 5 5 5 Number of municipal buildings that have fully functional biometrics access control

N/A

5 S&S

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Ope

ratio

nalis

atio

n of

the

Met

ro

Pol

ice

Ser

vice % implementation of

the NMBM Metro Police Service

N/A

20% 40% 60% 80% Number of Metro Police precincts established within Nelson Mandela Bay

N/A

1 S&S

Number of Metro Police foot patrol hours patrolled to establish visibility of the Metro Police within Nelson Mandela Bay

N/A

1000 S&S

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E D

ELI

VE

RY

Impr

oved

qua

lity

of

mun

icip

al r

oad

netw

ork Percentage of fatal

crashes attributed to road and environmental factors

TR

6.1

Number of roadside trees maintained N

/A

PH / S&S

180

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 3.2 Provision of infrastructure that improves the safet y of communities and visitors.

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

"Im

prov

eden

ergy

sust

aina

bilit

y" Electricity usage per capita E

E4.

2

Number of new area lights installed

N/A

600 E&E

Number of new main road lights installed

N/A

200 E&E

Number of new residential street lights installed

N/A

160 E&E

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Era

dica

tion

of il

lega

l con

nect

ions Number of

fatalities resulting from illegal electricity connection per 100 000 of the population

N/A

0 0 0 0 0 Number of informal households on non-proclaimed erven provided with a temporary alternative electricity supply (either an off-grid photo voltage system or a basic 20 amp electrical supply)

N/A

1000 E&E

181

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Era

dica

tion

of il

lega

l co

nnec

tions

% of illegal connections removed within 24 hours of inspection

N/A

100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Number of illegal connections addressed through the replacement with a cheaper alternative (either an off-grid photo voltage system or a basic 20 amp electrical supply)

N/A

1300 E&E

182

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 3.3 Improve the safety and security of Nelson Mandela B ay through community, industry and civic organisati on partnerships.

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T

RE

F YEAR 1

BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR N

T

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Effe

ctiv

e an

d w

ell s

uppo

rted

pa

rtne

rshi

ps w

ith li

fesa

ving

or

gani

satio

ns Number of life-saving clubs operating from fixed premises within Nelson Mandela Bay

N/A 3 3 3 3 2 Number of

seasonal lifeguards placed at Municipal beaches in line with WESSA requirements

N/A 12 SRAC

183

PILLAR 4

THE INCLUSIVE CITY Delivery to an Inclusive City means delivery that s peaks to maturity of our society as one collective community, and celebrated in all its diversity; One City * One Future. The Inclu sive Nelson Mandela Bay is a well-connected city. I t delivers integrated access to a single-community city. It has properly planned in frastructure and a built environment that enables i nformal means of mobility between communities, including pedestrian bridges a nd connective “corridor” routes. In the Inclusive C ity, responsive governance is delivered through effective public participation and the provision of communication channels that d eliver the accessibility of the Municipality to all residents. The Inclusive Ci ty is served by properly functioning ward committee s. The Inclusive City proactively promotes redress and delivery on transf ormation objectives. Productive relationships are c ultivated with organised labour, ensuring that all decisions are inclusively informed. Participatory governance is also reinfor ced in the Inclusive City, through developmental municipal management systems and processes, through which all employees are empo wered to contribute to successful delivery of the IDP.

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 4.1 Ensure institutional accessibility, effective commu nication channels for participatory and responsive governance

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 5

: GO

OD

GO

VE

RN

AN

CE

AN

D

PU

BLI

C P

AR

TIC

IPA

TIO

N

Impr

oved

mun

icip

al c

apab

ility

Top Management Stability (% of days in the year that all Section 56 positions are filled by full-time, appointed staff not in an acting capacity)

GG

1.2

73% of working days

as at 31 March 2018 (CM position and 7 Senior

Manager positioned

filled) 3 x Senior Manager positions vacant

(Budget and Treasury,

Public Health, Electricity and

Energy)

100% Vacancies

filled in accordance

with timeframes contained in

Local Government: Regulations

on appointment

and conditions of employment

of senior managers

100% Vacancies

filled in accordance

with timeframes contained in

Local Government: Regulations

on appointment

and conditions of employment

of senior managers

100% Vacancies

filled in accordance

with timeframes contained in

Local Government: Regulations

on appointment

and conditions of employment

of senior managers

100% Vacancies

filled in accordance

with timeframes contained in

Local Government: Regulations

on appointment

and conditions of employment

of senior managers

Staff vacancy rate

GG

1.2

1

100% of posts filled in accordance

with timeframes contained in

Local Government: Regulations

on appointment

and conditions of employment

of senior managers

CM

184

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 5

: GO

OD

G

OV

ER

NA

NC

E

AN

D P

UB

LIC

P

AR

TIC

IPA

TIO

N

Per

cept

ion

of

Pub

lic s

afet

y % of households satisfied with services rendered by Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality

N/A

36% 50% 55% 60% 65% Conducting a Customer Satisfaction Survey for Nelson Mandela Bay

N/A By June

2019 CM

KP

A 5

: GO

OD

G

OV

ER

NA

NC

E A

ND

PU

BLI

C

PA

RT

ICIP

AT

ION

Acc

essi

ble

Gov

erna

nce % of

municipal policies, bylaws and identified key strategic documents available in English, isiXhosa and Afrikaans on the municipal website.

N/A

30% 50% 80% 100% Number of municipal policies, bylaws and key strategic documents identified for translation to English, isiXhosa and Afrikaans

N/A CS

KP

A 5

: GO

OD

GO

VE

RN

AN

CE

A

ND

PU

BLI

C P

AR

TIC

IPA

TIO

N

Incr

ease

d ac

cess

to a

nd

utili

satio

n of

soc

ial a

nd

com

mun

ity fa

cilit

ies Number of

community halls per 100 000 population

HS

3.2

27 community

halls - dependent on funding

28 community

halls - dependent on funding

30 community

halls - dependent on funding

32 community

halls - dependent on funding

N/A CS

Percentage utilisation rate of community halls

HS

3.5

70% 70% 70% 70% N/A

CS

185

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 5

: GO

OD

GO

VE

RN

AN

CE

A

ND

PU

BLI

C P

AR

TIC

IPA

TIO

N

Impr

oved

mun

icip

al c

apab

ility

Percentage of municipal skills development levy recovered

GG

1.1

Dependent on LGSETA

Dependent on LGSETA

Dependent on LGSETA

Dependent on LGSETA

Number of unemployed jobseekers registered on the NMBM database and trained through LGSETA and other training providers

N/A 200 CS

Number of municipal officials completed training in this quarter

N/A 30 CS

KP

A 5

: GO

OD

GO

VE

RN

AN

CE

AN

D P

UB

LIC

P

AR

TIC

IPA

TIO

N

Impr

oved

mun

icip

al r

espo

nsiv

enes

s Percentage of ward committees that are functional (meet four times a year, are quorate, and have an action plan)

GG

2.1 80% 80% 80% 80% Percentage of

Ward Committees with 6 or more ward committee members in place

GG

2.11

80% CS

Average number of councillor-convened community meetings per ward

GG

2.1

2 CS

186

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 5

: GO

OD

G

OV

ER

NA

NC

E A

ND

P

UB

LIC

P

AR

TIC

IPA

TIO

N

Impr

oved

mun

icip

al

resp

onsi

vene

ss Attendance

rate of municipal council meetings by all identified Traditional Leaders

GG

2.2

Not applicable to NMBM

Not applicable to

NMBM

Not applicable to

NMBM

Not applicable to

NMBM

Not applicable to

NMBM

N/A

CS

KP

A 5

: GO

OD

GO

VE

RN

AN

CE

A

ND

PU

BLI

C P

AR

TIC

IPA

TIO

N

Mor

e ef

fect

ive

city

ad

min

istr

atio

n Percentage of councillors who have declared their financial interests and whose declarations have been verified

N/A

100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Percentage of councillors who have declared their financial interests

GG

3.1

2 100% CS

187

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 5

: GO

OD

GO

VE

RN

AN

CE

AN

D P

UB

LIC

P

AR

TIC

IPA

TIO

N

Mor

e ef

fect

ive

city

adm

inis

trat

ion Percentage of

administrative staff who have declared their financial interests and whose declarations have been verified, including in comparison with the municipal supplier database

N/A

100% 100% 100% 100% 100% Percentage of administrative staff who have declared their financial interests

GG

3.1

3 100% CS

KP

A 5

: GO

OD

GO

VE

RN

AN

CE

A

ND

PU

BLI

C P

AR

TIC

IPA

TIO

N

Impr

oved

cou

ncil

func

tiona

lity Average

percentage councillors attending council meetings

GG

4.1

50% plus 1 50% plus 1 50% plus 1 50% plus 1 Number of agenda items deferred to the next council meeting

GG

4.

11 0 CS

Average of councillors attending council meetings

N/A

50% plus 1 CS

Average of councillors attending standing committee meetings

N/A

50% plus 1 CS

188

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 4.2 Spatial and built developments that promote integra ted neighbourhoods, inclusive communities and a wel l-connected Nelson Mandela Bay

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

"Mod

al s

hift

of w

eekd

ay tr

ips

(incl

udin

g ed

ucat

ion

trip

s) fr

om p

rivat

e to

pub

lic tr

ansp

ort a

nd N

MT

Percentage of dwelling units within 500m of scheduled public transport service

TR

1.1 0% 8% 12% 18% 30% Non-residential

development approved within 500m of scheduled public transport service, by internal floor space

TR

1.11

m² HS

Number of operational public transport access points added

TR

1.12

2 I&E (R&T)

Number of taxi and bus embayment's constructed to address illegal stopping

N/A

3 I&E (R&T)

Number of IPTS routes operational after hours (between 6pm to 10pm)

N/A

0 I&E (R&T)

189

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E D

ELI

VE

RY

Impr

oved

sat

isfa

ctio

n w

ith p

ublic

tran

spor

t se

rvic

es

Percentage of commuters (citywide) using private motorised transport

TR

1.3 47% 46% 45% 44% 43% Number of IPTS

routes operational

N/A

1% I&E (R&T)

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Red

uced

trav

el ti

me

Average public transport commuting time

TR

3.1 45min 45min 43min 41min 43min Number of

weekday scheduled municipal bus passenger trips

TR

3.11

180 trips I&E (R&T)

Average private transport commuting time

TR

3.2 33min 30min 29min 27min 26min

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Impr

oved

acc

ess

to p

ublic

tr

ansp

ort (

incl

udin

g no

n-m

otor

ised

tran

spor

t)

Percentage of households less than 10 minutes walk from scheduled public transport

TR

5.1 52% 84% 86% 88% Number of

public transport stops built within 800m radius in IPTS operation routes

N/A

10 I&E (R&T)

190

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Impr

oved

func

tiona

lity

of th

e pr

oper

ty m

arke

t Rateable residential properties as a percentage of total number of households in the Municipality

HS

2.2

94% 94% 94% 94% Number of rateable residential properties in the subsidy housing market entering the municipal valuation roll

HS

2.21

B&T

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

"Mod

al s

hift

of w

eekd

ay tr

ips

(incl

udin

g ed

ucat

ion

trip

s) fr

om p

rivat

e to

pub

lic tr

ansp

ort a

nd n

on-

mot

oris

ed tr

ansp

ort"

% of all households within 250m of a public access road

N/A

N/A

I&E

191

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Inte

grat

ed c

omm

uniti

es Annual

Review of the Metro Spatial Development Framework

N/A

Inner City, Walmer, Western Suburbs, Lorraine,

Mother, 2010 Stadium, Rural Management

LSDFs (Procurement

Processes to be undertaken)

Inner City, Walmer, Western Suburbs, Lorraine,

Mother, 2010 Stadium, Rural Management, Cape Road, Helenvale,

Happy Valley, Uitenhage Despatch

LSDFs Draft Document and

Plan

Inner City, Walmer, Western Suburbs, Lorraine,

Mother, 2010 Stadium, Rural Management, Cape Road, Helenvale,

Happy Valley, Uitenhage Despatch

LSDFs Public Participation &

Approval

N/A N/A Reviewing the Metro Spatial Development Framework

N/A

By June 2019

HS

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Inte

grat

ed c

omm

uniti

es Number of

Precinct Plans complete

N/A

Chatty/Jacktvlakte and Njoli

Draft Document,

Public Participation

and Approval. Lower Baakens, Motherwell Rail

link, Cleary Park and Uitenhage

Railway Shades Procurement to be undertaken

4 (Lower

Baakens; Motherwell Rail link;

Cleary Park; and Uitenhage

Railway Shades)

N/A N/A N/A Number of Precinct Plans complete

N/A

4 (Lower

Baakens; Motherwell Rail link;

Cleary Park; and Uitenhage Railway Shades)

HS

192

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E

Inte

grat

ed

com

mun

ities

N/A

Number of new LSDFs prepared.

N/A

2 (Soweto on Sea

and Veeplaas)

HS

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Aud

ienc

e D

evel

opm

ent

and

Mai

nstr

eam

ing

of

Art

s an

d C

ultu

re

Number of public spaces/sites made available for the installation of public artworks

N/A

N/A

SRAC

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Impr

oved

acc

ess

to p

ublic

tr

ansp

ort (

incl

. NM

T) Percentage of

households less than 10 minutes’ walk from closest public transport access point

TR

5.1

N/A

I&E

193

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 4.3 Deliver on transformation objectives, promote redre ss and foster social cohesion

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 2

: MU

NIC

IPA

L IN

ST

ITU

TIO

NA

L D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T A

ND

TR

AN

SF

OR

MA

TIO

N

Tra

nsfo

rmat

ion

thro

ugh

empl

oym

ent e

quity

Number of people from employment equity target groups employed in the three highest levels of management (City Manager, Section 56 Managers and Strategic Skilled Level Managers) in compliance with the Municipality’s approved Employment Equity Plan

N/A

As at 31 December

2017:- CM – 1 filled / 0

vacant Section 56 – 8 filled / 2 vacant

Strategic Skilled level

Managers – 51 filled / 9 vacant

Section 56 – 3 (ED:E&E;

ED:PH; CFO)

Strategic

Skilled level Managers –

9 In line with

NMBM Employment Equity Plan

Targets to be set / reviewed in line with the revised NMBM Employment Equity Plan set for adoption by Council in 2018

Targets to be set / reviewed in line with the revised NMBM Employment Equity Plan set for adoption by Council in 2018

Targets to be set / reviewed in line with the revised NMBM Employment Equity Plan set for adoption by Council in 2018

Number of positions filled from employment equity target groups in the three highest levels of management (City Manager, Section 56 Managers and Strategic Skilled Level Managers) in compliance with the Municipality’s approved Employment Equity Plan

N/A

Section 56 – 3 (ED:E&E;

ED:PH; CFO)

Strategic

Skilled level Managers –

9 In line with

NMBM Employment Equity Plan

CS

194

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Her

itage

Com

mem

orat

ion

Pro

gram

mes

that

Pro

mot

e R

edre

ss a

nd F

oste

r S

ocia

l C

ohes

ion Number of

programmes delivered by the South End Museum in line with the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality / South End Museum partnership agreement

N/A

2 Programmes per financial

year

2 Programmes per financial

year

2 Programmes per financial

year

2 Programmes per financial

year

2 Programmes per financial

year

Number of programmes delivered by the South End Museum in line with the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality/ South End Museum partnership agreement

N/A

2 Programmes per financial

year

SRAC

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Her

itage

Com

mem

orat

ion

Pro

gram

mes

that

Pro

mot

e R

edre

ss a

nd F

oste

r S

ocia

l C

ohes

ion Number of

Municipal Buildings, facilities and streets renamed per year

N/A

3 3 3 4 5 Number of Municipal Buildings, facilities and streets renamed

N/A

3 SRAC

195

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 4.4 Facilitate and promote infrastructure led growth, d evelopment and tourism

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T

RE

F YEAR 1

BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR N

T

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 5

: GO

OD

G

OV

ER

NA

NC

E A

ND

P

UB

LIC

PA

RT

ICIP

AT

ION

A W

I-F

I Ena

bled

City

Number of internet connections per 100 000 population

N/A

20 internet spots exists in NMBM

Number of Wi-Fi spots established by the Municipality or through partnership with the Municipality

N/A

20 CS

196

PILLAR 5

THE CARING CITY In the Caring City, equality is strived for through ensuring that all residents have access to deliver y that promotes their well-being. Access to affordable housing and provision of digni fied housing is properly planned for to ensure maxi mum possible delivery within funding available. Dignified sanitation and waste m anagement are a reality for all households. In the Caring Nelson Mandela Bay, indigent communit ies are adequately supported and food security prog rammes and community gardens are fully operational. Social services and social development programmes are well-prioritised. In ensuring the well-being of residents, the Caring City delivers libraries, spor t and recreational facilities that are accessible t o all communities. Through effective cleansing programmes, greening initiatives and prov ision of well-maintained public parks, every reside nt is able to feel proud of the community they live in. In the Caring City, occupat ional health and wellness for all municipal employe es is ensured. Through the delivery of Public Health services, cemeteries are well managed and planned and proper management of t he environment is practiced.

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 5.1 Provide for the social needs of communities and emp owerment of vulnerable people through provision of access to social services, social development and indigent support.

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Sub

sist

ence

Foo

d G

arde

ns

Number of food gardens supported that remain operational for at least a year after the support was provided

N/A

15 20 25 30 35 Number of food gardens supported through the provision of either farming equipment and / or other production inputs

N/A

20 EDTA

197

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Incu

lcat

e a

cultu

re o

f re

adin

g an

d w

ritin

g in

N

MB

M

Number of public libraries per 100 000 population

HS

3.3 % completion of

the Main Library Restoration / Upgrade

N/A

10

SRAC

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Incu

lcat

e a

cultu

re o

f re

adin

g an

d w

ritin

g in

N

MB

M

Average number of library visits per library

HS

3.6 SRAC

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Incu

lcat

e a

cultu

re o

f rea

ding

an

d w

ritin

g in

NM

BM

Number of libraries open in line with Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality library operating hours resolved by Council

N/A

24 24 24 25 25 SRAC

198

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 5.2 Promote the health and well-being of all communitie s through the spatially equitable provision of soci al infrastructure.

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Pro

mot

ion

of h

ealth

y, a

ctiv

e lif

esty

les

for

resi

dent

s an

d vi

sito

rs

Square meters of municipally owned or maintained public outdoor recreation space per capita

HS

3.1

Number of public open spaces upgraded through the provision of either outdoor gym equipment / fencing / pathways / benches and/or playground infrastructure

N/A

PH / SRAC

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Pro

mot

ion

of h

ealth

y,

activ

e lif

esty

les

for

resi

dent

s an

d vi

sito

rs

% of recyclables that are recovered annually from total tonnages disposed at landfill sites and permitted drop-off sites

N/A

N/A

PH

199

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Incr

ease

d ac

cess

to

and

util

isat

ion

of

soci

al a

nd

com

mun

ity

faci

litie

s

Percentage utilisation rate of sports fields H

S3.

4

N/A

SRAC

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Spo

rts

Fac

ilitie

s Rand net expenditure on sport and recreation infrastructure per 1000 residents**

N/A

% completion of the upgrade of the changing rooms and ablutions at Walmer/Fountain Road Sports Field

N/A

75% SRAC

% completion of the upgrade of the changing rooms and ablutions at Mqolomba Sports Field

N/A

80% SRAC

Number of sports facilities installed with astroturf pitches

N/A

SRAC

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E D

ELI

VE

RY

Spo

rts

deve

lopm

ent

for

wel

l-bei

ng

Number of participants in the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality Athletic Legacy Marathon**

N/A

2000 2500 3000

N/A

SRAC

200

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Spo

rt F

acili

ties Number of

existing sport facilities consistently maintained over a twelve month period

N/A

Number of sport facilities maintained through day-to-day maintenance

N/A

48 SRAC

Number of additional sports facilities equipped with rain water tanks

N/A

12 SRAC

Number of sports facilities with boreholes

N/A

5 SRAC

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Spo

rts

deve

lopm

ent f

or w

ell-

bein

g The percentage of municipal budget allocated to sports, recreation, arts and culture

N/A

Number of SRAC organisations supported either through financial provision / access to NMBM sports facilities / attire / sporting equipment

N/A

SRAC

Number of art pieces acquired

N/A

SRAC

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Incr

ease

d ac

cess

to a

nd

utili

satio

n of

soc

ial a

nd

com

mun

ity fa

cilit

ies Number of

Municipal Pools upgraded or rehabilitated

N/A

1 1 1 1 Number of Municipal Pools Upgraded N

/A

1 SRAC

% completion of New Brighton Swimming Pool

N/A

SRAC / MBDA

201

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Equ

al a

cces

s fo

r th

ose

with

sp

ecia

l nee

ds

Percentage of persons with disability where access to public transport is problematic

TR

5.2 0% 98% 96% 95% 93% Percentage of

municipally-contracted bus fleet that are low entry

TR5.21 21% I&E (R&T)

Number of facilities transformed to provide for the mobility of disabled people

N/A

15 I&E (R&T)

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Pro

mot

ion

of h

ealth

y, a

ctiv

e lif

esty

les

for

resi

dent

s an

d vi

sito

rs

Number of bed nights per year

% completion of the

Nelson Mandela Statue project

N/A

100% (Phase 2) - Site identification and approval; Approval of financial model

Number of beaches upgraded through the provision of either revetments / parking areas / walkways / security cameras / picnic facilities and/or dune stabilisation

EDTA / SRAC / PH

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Bea

ches

, res

orts

, le

isur

e an

d re

crea

tion

tour

ism

Km of public walkways, hiking, running and cycling paths maintained

PH

Number of beaches with Blue Flag status

SRAC

202

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

% completion of the Wells Estate coastal infrastructure upgrade

SRAC

Number of flagship events hosted to position the NMBM as a world class destination

6 SRAC

Number of beaches with Blue Flag status

11 SRAC

% completion of the Wells Estate coastal infrastructure upgrade

SRAC

KP

A 3

: LO

CA

L E

CO

NO

MIC

D

EV

ELO

PM

EN

T

Bea

ches

, res

orts

, lei

sure

and

rec

reat

ion

tour

ism

% of Nelson Mandela Bay Tourism Key Performance Indicator targets successfully met by Nelson Mandela Bay Tourism per the revised Service Level Agreement with Nelson Mandela Bay Tourism

N/A

92% 95% 95% 95% 95% % of Nelson Mandela Bay Tourism Key Performance Indicator targets successfully met by Nelson Mandela Bay Tourism per the revised Service Level Agreement with Nelson Mandela Bay Tourism

N/A

95% EDTA

203

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 5.3 Provide effective general environmental and public health services.

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

Ani

mal

Con

trol

% year-to-year reduction of stray animal complaints

N/A

Number of animal pounds operational / constructed

N/A

S&S

KP

A 4

: MU

NIC

IPA

L F

INA

NC

IAL

VIA

BIL

ITY

A

ND

MA

NA

GE

ME

NT

Add

ress

of S

ubst

ance

A

buse

Number of people known to abuse substances who received support from the NMBM Wellness centre

N/A

Implementation of the municipal strategy for addressing the prevalence of substance abuse in the Metro and the associated social impacts thereof

N/A

By June 2019 PH

204

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 5.4 Provide dignified housing and sanitation and accele rate access to improved services to indigent househ olds in order to create safe and decent living conditions for all residents .

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 T

AR

GE

T

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E D

ELI

VE

RY

Dig

nifie

d S

anita

tion Number of

buckets in circulation on state-subsidised or municipal land within Nelson Mandela Bay

N/A

16317 - June 2016

8562 - Nov. 2017

0 0 0 0 Number of new sewer connections meeting minimum standards W

S1.

11

I&E (W&S)

Number of buckets remaining in circulation

N/A

I&E (W&S)

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E D

ELI

VE

RY

De-

dens

ifica

tion

of

info

rmal

set

tlem

ents

Percentage of households living in adequate housing

HS

1.1 Number of

subsidised housing units completed

HS

1.11

HS

Number of formal sites serviced

HS

1.12

2500 SITES HS

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

De-

dens

ifica

tion

of

info

rmal

set

tlem

ents

Percentage of households living in informal settlements

N/A

Number of households relocated from stressed informal settlements and other servitudes to Greenfield development areas

N/A

800 HS

205

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 T

AR

GE

T

IMPL DIR

Number of backyard households relocated to formalised housing opportunities

N/A

80 HS

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Impr

oved

ac

cess

to

adeq

uate

ho

usin

g Title deed backlog ratio

HS

1.2 1800 1800 1800 1800 1800 Average number of

days taken to register the title deed (subsidised stands and units)

HS

1.21

HS

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

DE

LIV

ER

Y

HS

1. Im

prov

ed a

cces

s to

ade

quat

e ho

usin

g (in

clud

ing

secu

rity

of

tenu

re) Percentage

of households in informal settlements targeted for upgrading

HS

1.3

Number of informal settlements enumerated and classified (in terms of National Upgrading Support Programme or equivalent classification)

HS

1.31

HS

Percentage of informal settlements using a participatory approach to planning or implementing upgrading

HS

1.32

HS

206

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR

NT

RE

F

2018/19 T

AR

GE

T

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

HS

1. Im

prov

ed a

cces

s to

ad

equa

te h

ousi

ng

(incl

udin

g se

curit

y of

te

nure

) Percentage of property market transactions in the gap and affordable housing -market range

HS

2.1

N/A

B&T

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E D

ELI

VE

RY

HS

1. Im

prov

ed

acce

ss to

ade

quat

e ho

usin

g (in

clud

ing

secu

rity

of te

nure

) Number of building plans approved per year

N/A

Average number of days taken to process building plan applications H

S2.

22

HS

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

SE

RV

ICE

D

ELI

VE

RY

HS

2. Im

prov

ed

func

tiona

lity

of th

e pr

oper

ty m

arke

t Percentage of households living in formal dwellings who rent

HS

2.3

N/A

HS

207

PILLAR 6

THE FORWARD THINKING CITY The Forward Thinking City is concerned with institu tional innovation, support for research and develop ment, and plans for future sustainability. The Forward Thinking City ensures m ulti-generational planning that promotes sustainabl e economic growth through the optimal use and development of technolo gy. The Forward Thinking City strives for its environme ntal sustainability city through proactive planning , and conservation of resources and the natural and built environment.

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 6.1 Ensure multi-general and proactive planning for sus tainable city development

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR N

T

RE

F YEAR 1

BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR N

T

RE

F

2018/19 TARGET

IMPL DIR

N/A

208

STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE 6.2 Development of an environmentally sustainable city through proactive planning, and conservation of res ources and natural and built environment

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

2018/19 TARGE

T

IMPL DIR

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E D

ELI

VE

RY

Impl

emen

tatio

n of

the

air

man

agem

ent p

lan

of th

e N

MB

M Metropolitan Air

Quality Index (MAQI)

EN

V1.

1

MAQI ≤1 MAQI ≤1 MAQI ≤1 MAQI ≤1 MAQI ≤1 Percentage of atmospheric emission licenses (AELs) processed within guideline timeframes

EN

V1.

11

70% PH

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E

DE

LIV

ER

Y

Impl

emen

tatio

n of

th

e ai

r m

anag

emen

t pl

an o

f the

NM

BM

Number of days where PM2.5 levels exceeded guideline levels

EN

V 1

.2

Proportion of Air Quality monitoring stations providing adequate data over a reporting year

EN

V1.

12

80% PH

209

KP

A

KP

E

IDP INDICATOR NT

RE

F

YEAR 1 BASELINE (2017/18)

YEAR 2 TARGET (2018/19)

YEAR 3 TARGET (2019/20)

YEAR 4 TARGET (2020/21)

YEAR 5 TARGET (2021/22)

SDBIP INDICATOR N

T R

EF

2018/19 TARGE

T

IMPL DIR

Proportion of municipal atmospheric emission license applications captured on the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory System

EN

V1.

13

100% PH

KP

A 1

: BA

SIC

S

ER

VIC

E D

ELI

VE

RY

Bio

dive

rsity

is

cons

erve

d an

d en

hanc

ed Ecosystem/vege

tation type threat status E

NV

4.1

Percentage of biodiversity priority area within the metro

EN

V 4

.11

PH

Percentage of biodiversity priority area within the metro E

NV

4.1

1

PH

210

SECTOR DEPARTMENTS INPUT

In line with Intergovernmental Relations and Cooperation between various spheres of

government, a number of Sector Departments were requested to submit their inputs

for inclusion in the municipal IDP to ensure alignment of plans of the various spheres

of government. Below are the submissions received from the various government

departments:

1. PROVINCIAL DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT,

ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS AND TOURISM

MANDATE / KEY STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE(S) OF SECTOR DEPA RTMENT /

PARASTATAL/ORGANISATION:

Sustainable development underpinned by economic growth and sound environmental

management.

• ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

To promote economic growth and the development of local economies by

aligning LRED initiatives with government programmes, as well as to sustain

economic development and growth through partnerships with key stakeholders.

To this end, the District participates in IDP and LED Strategy Reviews initiated

by local municipalities, as well as forums such as the District Support Team that

support LED initiatives within the various municipal areas

To facilitate the implementation of micro-economic reform strategies through

business development and support. Furthermore, this unit facilitates the

registration of and access to finance by co-operatives and SMME’s. This is

done through referral to Eastern Cape Development Corporation (Imvaba Fund

and Business Loans) and the Small Enterprise Development Agency (Business

Plans, Product and Market Development).

211

To provide redress to valid consumer complaints on unfair business practices,

as well as the promotion of consumer awareness in terms of the National

Consumer Protection Act, 2011. This enables consumers to make educated

decisions

• ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS

The administering of legislation and regulations pertaining to the National

Environmental Management Act (Act 107 of 1998). This mandate includes

legislation such as Environmental Impact Management (EIA regulations),

Waste Management, Air Quality Management and Biodiversity Management.

All permits/approvals issued in terms of the afore-mentioned legislation are

subject to oversight by the Compliance and Enforcement Unit.

To provide Environmental Empowerment Services, that is empowering local

communities and various non-governmental stakeholders pertaining to issues

of environmental concern.

212

No. Details of Project /

Programme to be

undertaken in

2016/17

Overall Budget

Provision per

project /

programme

(specify year(s)

and if draft or

approved budget)

Area (specify

area / suburb /

township in

which project /

programme will

be implemented)

Positive

impact,

sustainability

and job

creation

opportunities

created by the

project/

programme

Challenge(s)

anticipated /

experienced – both

internally and

externally

Recommendation(s)

to address

challenges

1 LRED Grant Funding:

RV Footwear

R3 000 000 11 Parkin Street,

North End, Port

Elizabeth

Manufacturing

of quality shoes.

Creation of 101

jobs.

Rental commitment

outstanding.

Rental commitment to

be fast tracked by

NMBM.

2 LRED Grant Funding

proposals under

consideration (6):

Africa Auto Group

(Automotive parts) -

Coega IDZ

Total of R15.8m

requested by

applicants

Dependent on

project approval

Dependent on

project approval

Applications not

meeting the funding

criteria

N/A

213

No. Details of Project /

Programme to be

undertaken in

2016/17

Overall Budget

Provision per

project /

programme

(specify year(s)

and if draft or

approved budget)

Area (specify

area / suburb /

township in

which project /

programme will

be implemented)

Positive

impact,

sustainability

and job

creation

opportunities

created by the

project/

programme

Challenge(s)

anticipated /

experienced – both

internally and

externally

Recommendation(s)

to address

challenges

Clean-up Trading

(Fresh produce

market) - Uitenhage

Equipt Consulting

(Angora rabbit

products) -

Greenbushes

La Mohair Pty Ltd

(Mohair products) -

North End

214

No. Details of Project /

Programme to be

undertaken in

2016/17

Overall Budget

Provision per

project /

programme

(specify year(s)

and if draft or

approved budget)

Area (specify

area / suburb /

township in

which project /

programme will

be implemented)

Positive

impact,

sustainability

and job

creation

opportunities

created by the

project/

programme

Challenge(s)

anticipated /

experienced – both

internally and

externally

Recommendation(s)

to address

challenges

Lebenyane Trading cc

(Automotive parts) -

Deal Party

Zozinette Pty Ltd

(Weave products) -

Walmer

3

Consumer Awareness

Operational

Budget

Nelson Mandela

Bay

Creating

awareness re

the National

Consumer

Protection Act

Budgetary

limitations

N/A

215

No. Details of Project /

Programme to be

undertaken in

2016/17

Overall Budget

Provision per

project /

programme

(specify year(s)

and if draft or

approved budget)

Area (specify

area / suburb /

township in

which project /

programme will

be implemented)

Positive

impact,

sustainability

and job

creation

opportunities

created by the

project/

programme

Challenge(s)

anticipated /

experienced – both

internally and

externally

Recommendation(s)

to address

challenges

4 Environmental

Empowerment

Operational

Budget

Nelson Mandela

Bay

Creating

awareness re

Environmental

issues

Budgetary

limitations

N/A

216

2. The South African Police Services Service Points i n the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality ;

Mount Road Cluster Office Motherwell Cluster Office

Uitenhage Cluster Office

Mount Road Motherwell Uitenhage

Humewood KwaZakhele KwaNobuhle

Walmer New Brighton Kamesh

Kabega Park Ikamvelihle Despatch

Algoa Park KwaDwesi

Gelvandale Swartkops

Bethelsdorp Kinkelbos

Current Situation – Zwide Police Station is functioning from the Old Municipal Rent

office at Bertram Street, utilizing two offices in the building. A request was made from

Provincial Facility Management for additional accommodation at the building. The

NMBM is requested to provide SAPS with a suitable site to build a new police station,

or the proposal for additional accommodation at the current Old Rent Office to be

considered by the Municipality.

217

Bethelsdorp Police Station - Chatty Police Station

Background - The feasibility study was conducted to establish an additional police

station was approved on 2011-12-05 by the Provincial Commissioner. Currently, the

Bethelsdorp Police Station is functioning as the only police station in the area. During

2013, the identified sites, Erf 12638, Erf 11823 and Erf 11900 for building the

proposed police station were visited and it was found not suitable for the envisaged

project. Currently no progress reported on the matter from the Department of Public

Works. The NMBM is requested to provide SAPS with a suitable site to build a new

police station.

Kabega Park Police Station A feasibility study was conducted in 2015 to ascertain if the police station building is

meeting the required SAPS standards with regards to accommodation, SHE

Management requirements and infrastructure. It was found that, the building does not

meet certain standards on several avenues. It is recommended that a new building

should to be built in order to accommodate Kabega Park Police Station. Currently, the

Kabega Park Police is a rental building and belongs to a private owner. The NMBM is

requested to provide SAPS with a suitable site to build a new police station in the

Kabega Park Policing Area.

KwaNobuhle Police Station

The feasibility study conducted in 2013 to establish an additional police station in the

area was not recommended. The NMBM is requested to provide SAPS with a

suitable site, situated more central in the precinct, in order to build a new police

station.

New Brighton Police Station The police station is one of the oldest police stations build in the Port Elizabeth area

and does not fulfil the increased policing requirements of the area. The Metro is

requested to provide SAPS with a suitable site in New Brighton, centrally located in

the precinct, in order to build a new police station.

218

KwaDwesi Police Station

The police station was built during the late 80’s. Most of the infrastructure consists of

prefabricated material. The police station is situated opposite a shopping centre and

next to informal business, obstructing the traffic flow in and out from the police station.

Secondly, the new residential developments create a situation where the station is now

located on the geographical outskirts of the policing area. The Metro is requested to

provide SAPS with a suitable site, situated more central in the precinct, in order to

build a new police station.

219

NAME OF SECTOR DEPARTMENT: DEPARTMENT OF ROADS AND PUBLIC WORKS

MANDATE / KEY STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE(S) OF SECTOR DEPARTMENT/PARASTATAL/ORGANISATION:

• “A custodian of provincial government immovable ass ets and a provider of sustainable infrastructure re sulting in socio-economic reform, sector transformation and development”

No Details of Projects /

Programme to be undertaken in 2018/19

Overall Budget Provision per project/ programme (specify year(s) and if draft or approved budget)

Area (specify area/ward/suburb/ township in which project/ programme will be implemented)

Positive impact, sustainability and job creation opportunities to be created by the project/ programme

Challenge(s) anticipated / -both internally and externally

1. Jubilee Park R77 460 900,00 Uitenhage The project has employed 13 SSMEs and 90 laborers from the community.

The project was supposed to be completed long time ago but there is a challenge with the contactor that is responsible for building the school.

2. David Livingstone R 71 460 900,00 Port Elizabeth The project has employed 18 SMMEs and 70 laborers from the community

Implementation of the decanting process delayed by the tender evaluation process

3. Bhongweni R 39 989 440,76 Port Elizabeth The project has employed 17 SMMEs and 29 laborers from the community

Contractor is progressing well on site despite the delays in payments

220

No Details of Projects / Programme to be undertaken in 2018/19

Overall Budget Provision per project/ programme (specify year(s) and if draft or approved budget)

Area (specify area/ward/suburb/ township in which project/ programme will be implemented)

Positive impact, sustainability and job creation opportunities to be created by the project/ programme

Challenge(s) anticipated / -both internally and externally

4. Mfesane R 80 755 357,06 Port Elizabeth The project has employed 18 SMMEs and 70 laborers from the community

Delay in payments is affecting the cashflow of the contractor. Community protest and internal labour issues

5. Bethelsdorp R 80 025 172,80 Port Elizabeth The project has employed 13 SMMEs and 22 laborers from the community

Issues relating to the appointment of SMMEs has not been resolved

6. Dora Phase 1 R 99 851 315,06 Port Elizabeth The project has employed 30 SMMEs and 20 laborers from the community

1.Closure of site by SMME's and community 2. Fire damage to the building. 3. Delays from the roofing subcontractor. 4. Slow progress by SMME's

7. Dora phase 11 R 119052000,6 Port Elizabeth The project has employed 26 SMMEs and 43 laborers from the community

1. Closure of site by SMME's and community. 2. Piling delay caused by coguinite layer. 3. Slow production by SMME's

221

CHAPTER 7: BUDGET

7.1 CAPITAL PROGRAMME

The expenditure of the Capital Programme is predominantly towards improving

residents’ living conditions in the poor areas of the City. Funding has been allocated,

inter alia to servicing housing delivery areas, bucket eradication, the tarring of gravel

roads, stormwater improvements, electrification, and public open spaces.

The remainder of the Capital Programme focuses on essential infrastructure for the

future growth and development of the Municipality, including such areas as major road

construction, water supply and wastewater treatment.

Human Settlements

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

Programme: Services for Housing

Delivery (10074)

221,676,316

219,754,386

241,569,298

20110091

Khayamnandi Extension - Roadworks

(Human Settlements)

12,500,000

22,000,000

22,500,000

Khayamnandi Extension - Stormwater

(Human Settlements)

3,750,000

6,600,000

6,750,000

Khayamnandi Extension - Water Bulks

(Human Settlements)

3,750,000

6,600,000

6,750,000

Khayamnandi Extension - Sewer Bulks

(Human Settlements)

5,000,000

8,800,000

9,000,000

20120030

KwaNobuhle Area 11 – Roadworks

(Human Settlements)

21,001,316

15,750,000

-

KwaNobuhle Area 11 - Stormwater

(Human Settlements)

6,300,395

4,725,000

-

222

Human Settlements

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

KwaNobuhle Area 11 - Water Bulks

(Human Settlements)

6,300,395

4,725,000

-

KwaNobuhle Area 11 - Sewer Bulks

(Human Settlements)

8,400,526

6,300,000

-

20120031

Ekuphumleni - KwaZakhele –

Roadworks (Human Settlements)

-

500,000

500,000

Ekuphumleni - KwaZakhele -

Stormwater (Human Settlements)

150,000

150,000

Ekuphumleni - KwaZakhele - Water

Bulks (Human Settlements)

150,000

150,000

Ekuphumleni - KwaZakhele - Sewer

Bulks (Human Settlements)

200,000

200,000

20120033

Jagtvlagte (Chatty 11-14) – Roadworks

(Human Settlements)

20,000,000

21,627,193

30,872,807

Jagtvlagte (Chatty 11-14) - Stormwater

(Human Settlements)

6,000,000

6,488,158

9,261,842

Jagtvlagte (Chatty 11-14) - Water Bulks

(Human Settlements)

6,000,000

6,488,158

9,261,842

Jagtvlagte (Chatty 11-14) - Sewer Bulks

(Human Settlements)

8,000,000

8,650,877

12,349,123

20120043

Seaview Housing Job – Roadworks

(Human Settlements)

2,800,000

2,500,000

8,000,000

Seaview Housing Job - Stormwater

(Human Settlements)

800,000

750,000

2,400,000

Seaview Housing Job - Water Bulks

(Human Settlements)

2,000,000

750,000

2,400,000

223

Human Settlements

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

Seaview Housing Job - Sewer Bulks

(Human Settlements)

2,400,000

1,000,000

3,200,000

20120047

Walmer Development – Roadworks

(Human Settlements)

14,935,789

17,500,000

28,161,842

Walmer Development - Stormwater

(Human Settlements)

4,267,368

5,250,000

8,448,553

Walmer Development - Water Bulks

(Human Settlements)

10,668,421

5,250,000

8,448,553

Walmer Development - Sewer Bulks

(Human Settlements)

12,802,105

7,000,000

11,264,737

20120055

Motherwell NU 30 – Roadworks (Human

Settlements)

2,000,000

-

-

Motherwell NU 30 - Stormwater (Human

Settlements)

600,000

-

-

Motherwell NU 30 - Water Bulks (Human

Settlements)

600,000

-

-

Motherwell NU 30 - Sewer Bulks

(Human Settlements)

800,000

-

-

20120059

Malabar Ext 6, Phase 2 – Roadworks

(Human Settlements)

15,050,000

2,500,000

2,500,000

Malabar Ext 6, Phase 2 - Stormwater

(Human Settlements)

4,300,000

750,000

750,000

Malabar Ext 6, Phase 2 - Water Bulks

(Human Settlements)

10,750,000

750,000

750,000

Malabar Ext 6, Phase 2 - Sewer Bulks

(Human Settlements)

12,900,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

224

Human Settlements

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

20120061

Motherwell NU 31 – Roadworks (Human

Settlements)

1,000,000

1,750,000

1,750,000

Motherwell NU 31 - Stormwater (Human

Settlements)

300,000

525,000

525,000

Motherwell NU 31 - Water Bulks (Human

Settlements)

300,000

525,000

525,000

Motherwell NU 31 - Sewer Bulks

(Human Settlements)

400,000

700,000

700,000

20120062

Kuyga Phase 3 – Roadworks (Human

Settlements)

175,000

1,250,000

1,750,000

Kuyga Phase 3 - Stormwater (Human

Settlements)

50,000

375,000

525,000

Kuyga Phase 3 - Water Bulks (Human

Settlements)

125,000

375,000

525,000

Kuyga Phase 3 - Sewer Bulks (Human

Settlements)

150,000

500,000

700,000

20130040

Nkatha / Seyisi - Roadworks (Human

Settlements)

350,000

2,000,000

1,250,000

Nkatha / Seyisi - Stormwater (Human

Settlements)

100,000

600,000

375,000

Nkatha / Seyisi - Water Bulks (Human

Settlements)

250,000

600,000

375,000

Nkatha / Seyisi - Sewer Bulks (Human

Settlements)

300,000

800,000

500,000

20130054

Bethelsdorp Ext 32, 34 & 36 -

Roadworks (Human Settlements)

350,000

7,500,000

7,500,000

225

Human Settlements

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

Bethelsdorp Ext 32, 34 & 36 -

Stormwater (Human Settlements)

100,000

2,250,000

2,250,000

Bethelsdorp Ext 32, 34 & 36 - Water

Bulks (Human Settlements)

250,000

2,250,000

2,250,000

Bethelsdorp Ext 32, 34 & 36 - Sewer

Bulks (Human Settlements)

300,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

20130057

Kleinskool Kliprand - Roadworks

(Human Settlements)

350,000

7,500,000

7,500,000

Kleinskool Kliprand - Stormwater

(Human Settlements)

100,000

2,250,000

2,250,000

Kleinskool Kliprand - Water Bulks

(Human Settlements)

250,000

2,250,000

2,250,000

Kleinskool Kliprand - Sewer Bulks

(Human Settlements)

300,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

20120048

N2 North Development - Roadworks

(Human Settlements)

4,000,000

5,000,000

7,500,000

N2 North Development - Stormwater

(Human Settlements)

1,200,000

1,500,000

2,250,000

N2 North Development - Water Bulks

(Human Settlements)

1,200,000

1,500,000

2,250,000

N2 North Development - Sewer Bulks

(Human Settlements)

1,600,000

2,000,000

3,000,000

New

Motherwell NU 29 - Roadworks (Human

Settlements)

700,000

1,500,000

-

Motherwell NU 29 - Stormwater (Human

Settlements)

200,000

450,000

-

226

Human Settlements

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

Motherwell NU 29 - Water Bulks (Human

Settlements)

500,000

450,000

-

Motherwell NU 29 - Sewer Bulks

(Human Settlements)

600,000

600,000

-

New

Rocklands - Roadworks (Human

Settlements)

525,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

Rocklands - Stormwater (Human

Settlements)

150,000

300,000

300,000

Rocklands - Water Bulks (Human

Settlements)

375,000

300,000

300,000

Rocklands - Sewer Bulks (Human

Settlements)

450,000

400,000

400,000

Total

221,676,316

219,754,386

241,569,298

227

Infrastructure and Engineering

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

Programme: Resurfacing of Minor

Roads (10002)

30,000,000

20,000,000

20,000,000

19930026 Resurfacing Tar roads (non-subsidy)

30,000,000

20,000,000

20,000,000

Programme: Resurfacing of Major

Roads (10018)

10,000,000

10,000,000

10,000,000

19930002 Resurfacing of Subsidised Roads

10,000,000

10,000,000

10,000,000

Programme: Rehabilitation of Minor Tar

Roads (10019)

9,000,000

20,000,000

10,000,000

20070137 Rehabilitation of roads

9,000,000

20,000,000

10,000,000

Programme: Rehabilitation of Minor

Concrete Roads (10020)

1,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

19980218

Rehabilitate Concrete Roads - Northern

Areas

1,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

Programme: Buildings, Depots

Upgrading & Additions (10009)

2,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

20042767 Upgrading Depots and Offices

2,000,000

- -

20140008 Rehabilitation of Workshop Buildings

1,000,000

1,000,000

Programme: Vehicles & Plant (10010)

7,000,000

13,000,000

20,000,000

228

Infrastructure and Engineering

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

19940289 Replacement Vehicles Fleet

7,000,000

13,000,000

20,000,000

Programme: Tarring of Gravel Roads

(10023)

90,000,000

100,000,000

102,090,351

20050286 Tarring of Gravel Roads

90,000,000

100,000,000

102,090,351

Programme: Construction of Stormwater

Infrastructure (10025)

2,000,000

5,000,000

8,000,000

20030379

Motherwell NU29 & 30 : Roads & S/w

Bulk Infrastructure

2,000,000

5,000,000

8,000,000

Programme: Stormwater Improvements

(10026)

32,800,000

43,750,000

44,750,000

20030453 Flood Risk Improvements: Chatty River

-

- -

20030609

Flood Risk and Improvements (All other

rivers)

-

750,000

750,000

20060241 Blue Horizon Bay Bulk Stormwater

4,000,000

4,000,000

4,000,000

20060286

Groundwater Problem Elimination

Northern Areas

-

1,000,000

1,000,000

20080080

Cannonville / Colchester: Stormwater

Improvements

8,500,000

8,500,000

8,500,000

20080081

Greenbushes: Stormwater

Improvements

-

500,000

500,000

229

Infrastructure and Engineering

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

20060240 Theescombe/Gqebera Bulk Stormwater

3,000,000

- -

20030017 Paapenkuils Canal Rehabilitation

-

2,000,000

2,000,000

20060237 Zwide Bulk Stormwater

5,000,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

20090038 Stormwater Improvements: Ikamvelihle

2,000,000

4,000,000

4,000,000

20080079 Wells Estate: Stormwater Improvements

-

1,000,000

1,000,000

20030475

New Brighton / KwaZakhele: Bulk

Stormwater

2,500,000

3,500,000

3,500,000

20020149 Stormwater Improvements

2,000,000

2,000,000

3,000,000

20080078 Chatty: Stormwater Improvement

400,000

5,000,000

5,000,000

20140009 Rehabilitation of Stormwater Ponds

2,000,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

NEW Motherwell Canal Pedestrian crossings

1,400,000

1,500,000

1,500,000

NEW

Reconstruction of stormwater system -

Uitenhage

2,000,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

19940233 Motherwell Canal Wetlands

-

1,000,000

1,000,000

230

Infrastructure and Engineering

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

Programme: Traffic and Signage

Improvements (10031)

16,650,000

8,850,000

8,850,000

20070132 New Traffic Signals

800,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

20010023 Glen Hurd Drive Upgrading

12,500,000

- -

19940195 TM24 Guidance Signs

350,000

350,000

350,000

20060019 Public Transport Facilities

500,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

19940376 Traffic Control Equipment (Subsidy)

1,500,000

1,500,000

1,500,000

19980220 Traffic Calming Measures

1,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

Programme: Construction of Major

Roads (10027)

18,000,000

39,000,000

39,000,000

20070235 Planning and Design of Main Roads

1,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

NEW John Tallant Link Road

-

8,000,000

8,000,000

20140010 Construction of Bloemendal Arterial

15,000,000

10,000,000

10,000,000

NEW Stanford Road Extension

2,000,000

20,000,000

20,000,000

231

Infrastructure and Engineering

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

Programme: Rehabilitation of Major

Roads (10028)

1,500,000

4,000,000

10,000,000

19980319 Upgrade Main Road through Swartkops

1,500,000

3,000,000

5,000,000

19990144

Rehabilitation of William Moffatt

Expressway

-

1,000,000

5,000,000

Programme: Improvements to Minor

Roads (10022)

7,157,895

23,043,860

25,543,860

20043187

Provision of Rudimentary Services -

Roads and Stormwater

-

1,500,000

1,500,000

19990168 Njoli Square Redevelopment

5,657,895

17,543,860

17,543,860

19930030

Rehabilitation of Verges and Sidewalks -

Northern Areas

1,500,000

1,500,000

1,500,000

20162188 Wells Estate - Access Road

-

2,500,000

5,000,000

Programme: Improvements to Major

Roads (10029)

16,100,000

17,000,000

12,000,000

19980253 Minor Intersection Improvements

1,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

20060251 Access Road to Chatty Developments

5,000,000

5,000,000 -

20100082

Seyisi Square & Daku Square

Development

100,000

232

Infrastructure and Engineering

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

NEW

Road Upgrades to increase Capacity

(i.e. Circular Drive, Algoa Road, etc)

10,000,000

10,000,000

10,000,000

Programme: Management Systems

(10024)

1,100,000

- -

20070102 Fleet Management System

1,000,000

- -

20130051

Computer Upgrade – Infrastructure and

Engineering

100,000

Programme: Rehabilitation of Bridge

Structures (10030)

1,000,000

3,500,000

16,000,000

20070246 Rehabilitation of Bridge Structures

-

-

10,000,000

20162191

Construction of Joe Slovo Bridge –

Ward 41

-

2,500,000

5,000,000

20090079 Construction of Footbridges

1,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

Programme: Non-Motorised Transport

Facilities (10032)

21,000,000

10,300,000

10,300,000

20050042 Facilities for People with Disabilities

1,000,000

300,000

300,000

20060020 Provision of Sidewalks

20,000,000

10,000,000

10,000,000

Programme: Specialised Equipment

(10081)

1,500,000

2,800,000

3,860,000

233

Infrastructure and Engineering

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

20070201

Laboratory equipment - Scientific

Services

1,000,000

2,800,000

3,860,000

20100084

Fleet Management - Workshop

Equipment

500,000

- -

Programme: 2010 World Cup Work

Packages (10034)

168,242,175

104,986,775

109,667,963

20070244

IPTS - Work Package: Bus Rapid

Transit

168,242,175

104,986,775

109,667,963

Total

436,050,070

427,230,635

452,062,174

Sanitation - Metro (1411)

Programme: Buildings, Depots

Upgrading & Additions (10009)

-

3,000,000

1,000,000

20042918 Office Accommodation: Sanitation

-

3,000,000

1,000,000

Programme: Bucket Eradication (10043)

40,000,000

12,000,000

11,800,000

20050247 Rudimentary Services: Sanitation

-

2,000,000

1,800,000

20050248 Bucket Eradication Programme

40,000,000

10,000,000

10,000,000

Programme: Reticulation Sewers -

Rehabilitation & Refurbishment (10044)

11,400,000

15,000,000

15,000,000

20030672 Sewers: Maintenance Backlog

3,400,000

5,000,000

5,000,000

234

Infrastructure and Engineering

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

19930112 Sewer Replacement and Relining

8,000,000

10,000,000

10,000,000

Programme: Reticulation Sewers - New,

Augmentation & Upgrade (10045)

8,000,000

10,900,000

10,900,000

19940098 Improvements to Sewerage System

7,000,000

10,000,000

10,000,000

20080138

KwaNobuhle: Upgrade of sewer

reticulation

400,000

500,000

500,000

20080136 TEI: Sampling Stations

600,000

400,000

400,000

Programme: Bulk Sewers -

Rehabilitation & Refurbishment (10046)

26,000,000

16,500,000

11,000,000

20070143

Rehabilitation of KwaZakhele Collector

Sewer

4,000,000

6,500,000

10,000,000

20030034 Markman - Replace 600 mm Sewer

22,000,000

10,000,000

1,000,000

Programme: Bulk Sewers - New,

Augmentation & Upgrade (10047)

72,664,035

94,100,526

106,060,526

20060106 Motherwell North Bulk Sewerage

3,000,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

19980348 Paapenkuils Main Sewer augmentation

564,035

-

460,526

20030030 Lorraine - Bulk Sewerage augmentation

1,000,000

20,000,000

20,000,000

235

Infrastructure and Engineering

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

20060102

Colchester - Bulk Sewerage

Infrastructure & WWTW

500,000

100,526

100,000

20050105

Sewer Protection works for collector

sewers

1,000,000

2,000,000

500,000

20060103 Jagtvlakte Bulk Sewerage

1,000,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

20050064

Augment Collector Sewer for Walmer

Heights and Mt Pleasant

5,000,000

10,000,000

10,000,000

19960525

Chatty Valley Collector Sewer Stage 1

(nodes 20 -24)

1,000,000

- -

20110054 Motherwell Main Sewer Upgrade

1,000,000

1,000,000

3,000,000

20110056

Swartkops Low Level Collector Sewer

Upgrade

10,000,000

20,000,000

30,000,000

20030407 Seaview Bulk Sewer

1,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

20060177

Driftsands Collector Sewer -

Augmentation

32,000,000

10,000,000

10,000,000

20110066

Bulk Sewers Joe Slovo, Mandelaville,

Allenridge West, Uitenhage

9,500,000

15,000,000

15,000,000

20110067

Industrial Site (Airport Valley) - Bulk

Sewer

1,000,000

1,000,000

2,000,000

20060107

Motherwell / Coega WWTW and outfall

sewer

5,000,000

7,000,000

7,000,000

236

Infrastructure and Engineering

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

20110068 KwaNobuhle Area 11 - Link Sewer

100,000

- -

Programme: Sewerage Pump Stations -

Rehabilitation & Refurbishment (10048)

10,000,000

8,360,000

8,000,000

20060178

Sewerage Pump Station : Maintenance

Backlog

10,000,000

8,360,000

8,000,000

Programme: Sewerage Pump Stations -

New, Augmentation & Upgrade (10049)

500,000

500,000

2,000,000

20030167 Rocklands PHB Housing project WWTW

500,000

500,000

2,000,000

Programme: Waste Water Treatment

Works - Rehabilitation & Refurbishment

(10050)

15,500,000

13,500,000

18,000,000

20070147 Kelvin Jones WWTW: Upgrade

13,000,000

10,000,000

15,000,000

20050088 WWTW: Improve access roads

-

1,000,000

1,000,000

19990130 Telemetry - Pump Stations

2,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

20070153 Brickfields: Upgrade

500,000

500,000 -

Programme: Waste Water Treatment

Works (WWTW) - New, Augmentation &

Upgrade (10051)

97,900,000

134,000,000

122,100,000

20050250 Driftsands WWTW Phase 3 extension

15,000,000

15,000,000

15,000,000

237

Infrastructure and Engineering

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

20070156 Fishwater Flats WWTW Upgrade

64,400,000

90,500,000

90,500,000

20070144 KwaNobuhle WWTW : Upgrading

10,000,000

14,000,000

1,000,000

20060075 Cape Receife WWTW : Upgrading

7,000,000

12,000,000

12,000,000

20030182 Upgrade Despatch Reclamation Works

500,000

500,000

500,000

20030405 Witteklip Bulk Sewerage

1,000,000

2,000,000

3,000,000

20000066

WWTW - Sludge Treatment and

disposal facilities

-

-

100,000

Programme: Vehicles (10009)

-

2,000,000

3,000,000

19980344

Replacement of Sewage Collection

Vehicles

-

2,000,000

3,000,000

Total

281,964,035

309,860,526

308,860,526

Metro Water Service (1412)

Programme: Vehicles and Plant (10010)

2,000,000

2,000,000

3,000,000

20070160 Purchase New Vehicles

2,000,000

2,000,000

3,000,000

238

Infrastructure and Engineering

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

Programme: Dams - Drought Relief

Projects

12,750,000

13,000,000

5,000,000

20050097 Nooitgedagt / Coega Low Level System

12,750,000

13,000,000

5,000,000

Programme: Dams - Rehabilitation &

Refurbishment (10061)

1,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

20080094

Water Service Maintenance Backlog:

Dams

1,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

Programme: Water Treatment Works -

New, Augmentation & Upgrade (10063)

36,000,000

39,000,000

47,000,000

20000037 Loerie Treatment Works: Rehabilitation

20,000,000

22,000,000

24,000,000

20060080

Upgrading of Churchill Water Treatment

Works

10,000,000

10,000,000

15,000,000

20010307 Upgrading Groendal Treatment Works

1,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

20060082

Upgrading Springs Water Treatment

Works

1,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

20070162 Desalination Augmentation

3,000,000

4,000,000

4,000,000

20042889 Linton: Additional Treatment Facility

1,000,000

1,000,000

2,000,000

Programme: Water Treatment Works -

Rehabilitation & Refurbishment (10064)

12,000,000

15,000,000

5,000,000

239

Infrastructure and Engineering

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

19960156

Elandsjagt - Upgrade to Restore

Capacity

12,000,000

15,000,000

5,000,000

Programme: Water Pump Stations -

Rehabilitation & Refurbishment (10065)

25,000,000

35,000,000

29,000,000

20050106 Seaview Pump Station: Upgrade

25,000,000

35,000,000

29,000,000

Programme: Supply Pipe lines - New,

Augmentation & Upgrade (10067)

14,400,000

23,300,000

17,900,000

20030511 Seaview Bulk Water

8,000,000

10,000,000

10,000,000

20030512 St Albans Bulk Water

800,000

6,600,000

3,300,000

20060081 Coega Reclaimed Effluent Scheme

1,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

20080048 Jagtvlakte: Bulk Water Supply Pipeline

1,000,000

2,000,000

1,000,000

20080090 Govan Mbeki Midblock Mains

100,000

200,000

100,000

20080144

KwaNobuhle: Upgrading of water

reticulation

500,000

500,000

500,000

20162356 Advanced Meter Infrastructure - Water

3,000,000

3,000,000

2,000,000

Programme: Supply Pipe lines -

Rehabilitation & Refurbishment (10068)

20,500,000

8,000,000

8,000,000

240

Infrastructure and Engineering

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

20030630

Water Services Maintenance Backlog:

Pipelines

19,500,000

6,000,000

6,000,000

20042883 Older Dams Pipelines Augmentation

1,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

Programme: Reservoirs - Rehabilitation

& Refurbishment (10069)

11,500,000

8,500,000

8,500,000

19990185 Rehabilitation of Reservoirs

10,000,000

7,000,000

7,000,000

19990184 Reservoir Fencing

1,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

20120085 KwaNobuhle Reservoir Link Watermain

500,000

500,000

500,000

Programme: Reservoirs - New,

Augmentation & Upgrade (10070)

3,500,000

7,750,000

11,000,000

20100034 Balmoral Reservoir and Bulk Pipeline

500,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

20030295

Construction of Amanzi Reservoir and

Pipeline

2,000,000

4,750,000

9,000,000

20030601

Construction of a 1,0 Ml reclaimed

effluent reservoir: Uitenhage

1,000,000

2,000,000

1,000,000

Programme: Buildings, Depots

Upgrading & Additions (10009)

-

4,500,000

4,500,000

20042881 Office Accommodation: Water

-

2,500,000

2,500,000

241

Infrastructure and Engineering

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

20070152 Access Roads: Upgrade

-

2,000,000

2,000,000

Programme: Management Systems

(10024)

21,000,000

14,000,000

25,000,000

20042885 Metro Water: Master Plan

-

- -

20070157 Telemetry Systems Upgrade

2,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

20070161 Groundwater Investigation

19,000,000

12,000,000

23,000,000

Programme: Distribution Pipe lines -

New, Augmentation & Upgrade (10071)

3,000,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

20060083 Rudimentary Service: Water

1,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

20080088 Bulk Water Metering and Control

2,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

Programme: Distribution Pipe lines -

Rehabilitation & Refurbishment (10072)

33,350,000

35,450,000

42,100,000

19930320 Improvements to System - General

14,000,000

15,000,000

19,000,000

20080093

Water Service Maintenance Backlog:

Pump Stations

5,000,000

5,000,000

6,000,000

20000052 Purchase of Water Meters - Metro

9,000,000

10,000,000

10,000,000

242

Infrastructure and Engineering

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

20000051 Installation of Zone Water meters

3,250,000

3,250,000

4,000,000

20080087 Rehabilitation of Pipe Bridges

1,000,000

1,000,000

2,000,000

20080091

Helenvale Urban Renewal Programme

(HURP)

100,000

200,000

100,000

19950866 Cathodic Protection of Steel Pipelines

1,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

Total

196,000,000

210,500,000

211,000,000

243

Electricity & Energy

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

Programme: Customer Requirements

(10003)

57,000,000

60,500,000

60,000,000

19930259 Private Township Development

15,000,000

15,000,000

15,000,000

19930255 Miscellaneous Mains and Substations

30,000,000

30,000,000

30,000,000

19940149 Meters and Current Transformers

4,000,000

5,000,000

5,000,000

19930256 Peri-Urban Network

2,000,000

3,500,000

3,000,000

20130022 Relocation of existing electrical services

4,000,000

5,000,000

5,000,000

20160079 NMBM-Amat Prepaid meter project

-

19930233

Non-electrification Areas - Service

Connections

2,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

Programme: Network Reinforcements

(10005)

86,340,000

58,150,000

55,140,000

20042993

HV Network Reinforcement - Overhead

Cabling

16,500,000

20100122

HV Network Reinforcement - New

Substations

6,500,000

19990104

Reinforcement of Electricity Network -

Coega

30,000,000

30,000,000

30,000,000

244

Electricity & Energy

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

20042992

Reinforcement of Electricity Network -

Western

2,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

20030472

Reinforcement of Electricity Network -

Hunters Retreat

2,000,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

20030470

Reinforcement of Electricity Network-

Despatch

1,500,000

1,500,000

1,500,000

20030074

Reinforcement of Electricity Network-

Mount Road

3,000,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

20010119

Reinforcement of Electricity Network -

Uitenhage

6,000,000

4,000,000

1,000,000

20010118

Reinforcement of Electricity Network -

Ibhayi

1,700,000

1,650,000

1,600,000

20000175

Reinforcement of Electricity Network-

Swartkops

2,200,000

2,200,000

2,200,000

20000172

Reinforcement of Electricity Network-

Korsten

1,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

19970063

Reinforcement of Electricity Network-

Bethelsdorp 11kV

1,100,000

1,100,000

1,100,000

19960193

Reinforcement of Electricity Network

Wells Estate

550,000

550,000

550,000

19970061

Reinforcement of Electricity Network -

Newton Park

550,000

550,000

550,000

20030471

Reinforcement of Electricity Network-

Walmer Lorraine

3,000,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

245

Electricity & Energy

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

19960190

Reinforcement of Electricity Network-

Redhouse

540,000

600,000

540,000

19960195

Reinforcement of Electricity Network -

Summerstrand

1,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

19980402

Reinforcement of Electricity Network –

Malabar / Helenvale

1,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

20100120

HV Network Reinforcement -

Underground Cabling

5,000,000

19930254 Low Voltage Reticulation Improvement

1,200,000

2,000,000

2,100,000

Programme: Radio Communication

Systems (10006)

750,000

750,000

750,000

19930232 Radio & Test Equipment

750,000

750,000

750,000

Programme: Technical Control Systems

(10007)

9,580,000

16,500,000

17,500,000

20070209 Substation Fibre Optic Backbone

2,500,000

3,500,000

3,500,000

19990109 Substation Security Alarm Upgrade

3,000,000

5,000,000

5,000,000

19940414 Supervisory Control Systems Upgrade

2,000,000

2,500,000

2,500,000

20170045

Distribution Substation Building

Refurbishment Programme

1,000,000

3,000,000

4,000,000

246

Electricity & Energy

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

20060174 Control Room Upgrade

1,080,000

2,500,000

2,500,000

Programme: Data & Communication

Systems (10008)

4,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

20150053

SANEDI - Smart Grid Initiative

Programmes

3,000,000

-

-

20030467 Computer Systems Upgrade

1,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

Programme: Buildings, Depots

Upgrading & Additions (10009)

1,000,000

4,000,000

4,000,000

20150030 North Depot Improvements

1,000,000

4,000,000

4,000,000

Programme: Vehicles and Plant (10010)

4,500,000

8,000,000

8,000,000

20020093

New / Replacement of Plant and Motor

Vehicles

3,000,000

8,000,000

8,000,000

20170044 Test Van Equipment

1,500,000

Programme: Cables & Distribution

Kiosks (10013)

4,000,000

4,500,000

5,000,000

19980174 Distribution Kiosk Replacement

2,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

19970064 Cable Replacement 6.6kV

2,000,000

2,500,000

3,000,000

247

Electricity & Energy

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

Programme: Transformers & Switchgear

(10014)

24,000,000

28,500,000

33,500,000

20042989 MV and HV Switchgear replacement

20,000,000

25,000,000

30,000,000

19970070 Relay Replacement

3,000,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

20050189

Replace Switchgear in Mini substations -

KwaNobuhle

1,000,000

500,000

500,000

Programme: Line Refurbishment

(10015)

21,000,000

21,500,000

28,500,000

20042988 Overhead Lines Refurbishment

6,000,000

7,000,000

8,000,000

20050187 HV Line Refurbishment (66 & 132kV)

9,000,000

12,000,000

15,000,000

20090039 Fairview Refurbishment

1,000,000

1,500,000

2,000,000

20150028 Refurbishment of Power Transformers

5,000,000

-

-

20060217 Gas Turbine Refurbishment

1,000,000

3,500,000

Programme: Furniture and Equipment

(10073)

-

4,000,000

4,000,000

19930234 Electricity Buildings improvements

4,000,000

4,000,000

248

Electricity & Energy

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

Programme: Informal Housing

Electrification (10012)

44,815,789

39,473,684

39,473,684

19930264 Informal Housing Electrification

36,315,789

39,473,684

39,473,684

20170022 Undeclared Informal Electrification

8,500,000

Programme: Street Lighting (10017)

20,000,000

20,000,000

27,849,000

19930283 Public Lighting

20,000,000

20,000,000

27,849,000

Total

276,985,789

267,873,684

285,712,684

249

Public Health

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

Programme: Rehabilitation and

Upgrading of Halls and Buildings

(10038)

1,800,000

6,000,000

5,000,000

19980266 Secure Municipal Parks Facilities

-

1,000,000

1,000,000

20100095 Upgrade Major Parks

1,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

20070191

Occupational Health and Wellness

Centre at Walmer

-

500,000

500,000

20030658

Upgrade Infrastructure: Metro

Integration

500,000

1,500,000

500,000

20090053 Upgrade of Uitenhage Dog Pound

300,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

Programme: Medical Equipment

(10041)

-

-

-

20000141 Specialized Equipment

20100099

Occupational Health Rehabilitation

Medical Equipment

Programme: Upgrade and

Rehabilitation of Beaches (10052)

2,500,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

20010064 Beachfront

1,500,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

250

Public Health

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

20010059

Reinstatement of Embankment -

Tygerbay

1,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

20100088 Multi-purpose Reefs

Programme: Greening and

Development of Gateways and

Public Open Spaces (10053)

15,500,000

11,500,000

17,500,000

20010362

Upgrade and Development of Public

Open Spaces

12,500,000

5,000,000

11,000,000

20060110

Greenhouse Upgrade - Peter Gibbs

Nursery

-

2,000,000

2,000,000

20030420 Develop Floodplains

500,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

20150039 Upgrade of Public Toilets

1,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

20100100 New Playground Equipment

1,500,000

1,500,000

1,500,000

Programme: Cemetery Development

and Upgrading (10054)

6,000,000

6,000,000

6,000,000

20140003

Water drainage and roads at

cemeteries

2,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

20030421

Upgrade and development of

cemeteries

2,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

251

Public Health

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

20120045 Fencing of cemeteries

2,000,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

20162181

Rehabilitation of Bloemendal

Cemetery

Programme: Furniture and

Equipment (10073)

100,000

500,000

266,000

20000141 Computer and Office equipment

100,000

500,000

266,000

Programme: Specialised Vehicles

(1011)

1,500,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

20010370

Specialised Vehicles and Plant

(Parks)

1,500,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

20162197 Mobile Unit - OHS & W

20162196

Specialised Vehicles and Plant

(Waste Management)

20162198

Procurement of 4 bakkies and a

minibus

Programme: Refuse, Tip-Sites,

Recycle Stations and Equipment

(10055)

19,700,000

15,000,000

18,000,000

20010391 Waste Management Containers

1,500,000

2,000,000

2,000,000

252

Public Health

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

20030177

Development of Waste Disposal

Facilities

4,000,000

4,500,000

4,500,000

19940138 Replacement of Refuse Compactors

3,500,000

3,500,000

3,500,000

20000106

Urban Refuse Transfer/Recycling

Station

3,000,000

3,000,000

3,000,000

20162440

Municipal Solid Waste Beneficiation

and Diversion Project

7,500,000

-

-

New Air Pollution Monitoring Equipment

200,000

-

-

20150040 Climate change

-

2,000,000

5,000,000

Total

47,100,000

44,000,000

51,766,000

253

Safety & Security

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

Programme: Rehabilitation and

Upgrading of Halls and Buildings

(10038)

5,150,000

5,250,000

8,240,000

20080065 Additional Satellite Offices

2,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

20090019 Replacement of engine bay doors

650,000

500,000

500,000

20100060

Fire station Motherwell -

Refurbishment

2,000,000

500,000

2,000,000

20162192 Security Offices - Sidwell Fire Station

500,000

2,500,000

-

New Security Offices - Contract Unit

-

-

2,000,000

New Stores / Archiving at Contract Unit

-

-

240,000

20080073 South End Fire Station

-

-

2,000,000

New Upgrade of Uitenhage Pound

-

-

500,000

20162193

Security wall / fencing - Fire Training

Centre

-

750,000

-

254

Safety & Security

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

Programme: Upgrading of Computer

Systems and Software Enhancement

(10037)

-

-

500,000

New

Traffic Training Centre - Learner

Information Management System

-

500,000

Programme: Specialised Vehicles

(1011)

1,600,000

8,360,000

-

20060221 Replacement of off-road Appliances

1,700,000

-

New Refurbishment of Fire Appliances

2,000,000

-

20162194 Replacement of Firefighting Vehicle

1,860,000

-

20162195 Replacement of light off-road vehicle

1,600,000

2,800,000

-

Programme: Vehicles and Plant

(10010)

2,500,000

1,940,000

3,050,000

20140015

Vehicles for Safety and Security

(Security Only)

-

1,940,000

-

New

Vehicles for Safety & Security

(Disaster only)

-

-

550,000

New

Vehicles for Safety & Security (Metro

Police only)

2,500,000

-

2,500,000

255

Safety & Security

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

Programme: Furniture and

Equipment (10073)

-

-

2,000,000

New Furniture - Metro Police

-

2,000,000

Programme: Safety and Security

Equipment (10057)

3,000,000

5,500,000

5,210,000

20090062 CCTV Equipment & Infrastructure

1,000,000

1,000,000

-

Purchase of New Firearms

-

-

150,000

New PE TTC Firearms

-

-

500,000

New Law Enforcement Equipment

-

-

1,500,000

New

Replacement of Motor cycle test

equipment

-

-

60,000

New

PE TTC Road Safety : Seat belt

convincer

-

-

500,000

New In Car Camera for Law Enforcement

-

-

500,000

20100059 Replacement of Radios

1,000,000

500,000

-

256

Safety & Security

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

New Replacement Rescue Pump

-

2,500,000

-

New

Purchase of Plant and Equipment

(Fire & Emergency Services)

1,000,000

1,500,000

2,000,000

20162189

Replacement of Turntable Ladder

Aerial Appliance

-

20150047

Purchase of Plant and Equipment

(Fire & Emergency services)

-

Programme: Furniture and

Equipment (10073)

1,450,000

450,000

-

20150051

Upgrade and replacement of

Computers

1,000,000

-

-

20090017 Replacement of standby generator

450,000

450,000

-

Total

13,700,000

21,500,000

19,000,000

257

Corporate Services

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

Programme: Upgrading of Computer

Systems and Software Enhancement

(10037)

7,800,000

3,850,000

3,685,000

19930187

Computer Enhancements -

Corporate

2,000,000

3,850,000

3,685,000

New

Disaster Recovery Centre -

Information Security

4,000,000

New IT Infrastructure for mSCOA

1,800,000

Programme: Vehicles and Plant

(10010)

500,000

-

-

20162152 Vehicles - Corporate Services

500,000

-

-

Programme: Rehabilitation and

Upgrading of Halls and Buildings

(10038)

5,260,000

13,300,000

12,400,000

20030221

Office accommodation (Ward

Councillors)

-

2,000,000

2,000,000

New

Office accommodation (Ward

Councillors) - Matthew Goniwe

180,000

-

-

New

Office accommodation (Ward

Councillors) - Joe Slovo

180,000

-

-

258

Corporate Services

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

New

Office accommodation (Ward

Councillors) - Jarman Hall

-

-

-

20043125 Upgrade of Community Halls

-

1,000,000

1,500,000

New

Rehabilitation & Upgrading of Babs

Madlakane Community Hall

-

New

Upgrading of Nangoza Jebe

Community Hall

-

1,000,000

New

Upgrading of Gelvandale

Community Hall

-

400,000

20050222 Office Renovation

-

3,000,000

2,000,000

New

Lillian Diedericks Office Renovation -

Personnel files and archives offices

1,770,000

-

-

New Harrower Road Office Renovations

300,000

-

-

New KwaNobuhle Administration Building

500,000

-

-

New

Uitenhage Town Hall - Upgrade of

the foyer, passages leading to the

Mayor's Parlour

180,000

-

-

259

Corporate Services

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

New

Despatch Town Hall - Upgrade of the

Council Chamber, caucus room &

common areas

150,000

-

-

20060065 Air Conditioning of Buildings

1,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

20060149

Lillian Diedericks Building and

Rehabilitation

500,000

1,500,000

1,000,000

20070196 Mfanasekhaya Gqobose Building

500,000

500,000

1,500,000

20080041

Rehabilitation of Noninzi Luzipho

Building

-

20100077 KwaNobuhle Municipal Aerodrome

-

20120076 Woolboard Conference Centre

-

400,000

400,000

20120078 Upgrade of Municipal Depots

-

1,500,000

2,000,000

20130067 Algoa House Upgrade

-

1,000,000

1,000,000

Total

13,560,000

17,150,000

16,085,000

260

Budget & Treasury

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

Programme: Management Systems

(10024)

18,000,000

-

-

20140011 System Enhancements - Various

18,000,000

Programme: Rehabilitation and

Upgrading of Halls and Buildings

(10038)

5,424,580

5,242,500

18,619,553

20050219

Upgrade and Furnishing Customer

Care Centres

3,000,000

1,000,000

1,000,000

20060254

Mfanasekhaya Gqobose Building

Office Renovations

New

SCM Building Additions and

Upgrades

2,424,580

4,242,500

17,619,553

Programme: Furniture and

Equipment (10073)

2,150,000

1,000,000

1,200,000

20120040 Creditors Filing Equipment

1,500,000

-

-

20162351

Economic Catalytic Projects -

Various

20120079

Replacement Handheld Devices -

Meter Reading

300,000

500,000

600,000

20120080

Replacement of Vending POS

Equipment

350,000

500,000

600,000

Total 25,574,580 6,242,500 19,819,553

261

Chief Operating Officer

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

Programme: Integrated City

Development

6,410,526

15,331,579

16,191,228

20162353

Integrated City Development

Programmes

6,410,526

15,331,579

16,191,228

Total

6,410,526

15,331,579

16,191,228

Motherwell Urban Renewal Programme (MURP)

Revised

Draft

2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

Programme: Buildings, Depots

Upgrading & Additions (10009)

7,500,000

-

-

20090018

Motherwell Traffic and Licencing

Centre

7,500,000

7,500,000

-

-

262

Recreational & Cultural Services

Revised

Draft 2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

Programme: Vehicles and Plant

(10010) - - -

20162167 Vehicles for Sport and Recreation

Programme: Rehabilitation and

Upgrading of Halls and Buildings

(10038)

19,000,000

19,500,000

13,000,000

20100104 Mendi Arts and Cultural Centre

6,000,000

6,000,000

6,000,000

20060113 Upgrade and Restoration of Libraries

13,000,000

13,500,000

7,000,000

20162174

Rehabilitation of Red Location

Precinct Buildings

20162173 Upgrading of Art Museum

20030427

Secure Recreational Buildings /

Facilities

Programme: Upgrading and

Development of Sport and

Recreation Facilities (10058)

19,720,000

13,000,000

11,000,000

19980285 Upgrade Existing Sports Facilities

11,000,000

5,000,000

5,000,000

20010221

Springs Resort - Upgrade

Infrastructure

600,000

500,000

500,000

20030795 Upgrade Beaches -Tourism

400,000

1,000,000

2,500,000

263

Recreational & Cultural Services

Revised

Draft 2017/18

Capital

Budget

Draft

2018/19

Capital

Budget

Draft

2019/20

Capital

Budget

20000149

Maintain / Rehabilitate Sports Facility

Infrastructure -

20162354 KwaNobuhle Sports Complex -

20162170 Upgrade of Hobie Beach Yacht Club -

New Gelvandale Stadium Roof Structure

6,000,000

New

Provision of lighting - Mooredyke

Sports Ground

220,000

New Upgrade of Resorts (Beachview) -

5,000,000

2,000,000

New Beach Protection Equipment

1,500,000

1,500,000

1,000,000

NEW Hard Sports Surfaces -

Programme: Upgrade and

Development of Swimming Pools

(10059) -

3,000,000

4,000,000

20000160

Rehabilitating and Upgrading of

Swimming Pool Structures -

3,000,000

4,000,000

Programme: Upgrade and

Development of Heritage Sites,

Memorials and Cultural Centres

(10060) - - -

20060281 Motherwell Cultural Centre

Total

38,720,000

35,500,000

28,000,000

Total

1,565,241,316 1,574,943,310 1,650,066,463

264

7.2 FINANCIAL SUSTAINABILITY AND VIABILITY

7.2.1 INTRODUCTION

The institution must ensure that it becomes financially sustainable in order to deliver

on its objectives in terms of the IDP. The Budget and Treasury Directorate operates

within the parameters determined by the Municipal Financial Management Act

(MFMA) (56 of 2003), together with the applicable Regulations, and it is the

responsibility of this Directorate to ensure compliance across the institution. The

Directorate provides financial related services and support to all Council structures

and other municipal directorates and strives to ensure a well-run city.

Over the last number of years, the Municipality has experienced a significant decrease

in its collection rate, which in turn has led to a marked increase in the outstanding debt

owed to the institution. As a direct result of the aforesaid, the institution has over recent

years been unable to maintain cost coverage of three months, as required by National

Treasury. During the 2016/17 financial year, the institution has seen a marked

improvement in the collection rate as Council enforced strict adherence to the NMB

Credit Control Policy and launched a vigorous debt collection campaign.

The Municipality has now stabilised its finances and significantly improved its cash

holdings. The Budget and Treasury team will continue to strive to improve the financial

position of the institution by focusing on five core principles:

• Collection of all outstanding debt from those that can afford to pay for their

municipal services.

• Optimising operational efficiency within the institution in order to maximise

service delivery spending.

• Reforming Supply Chain processes within the institution in order to ensure

that said processes do not only become far more transparent, but also far

less cumbersome than in the past.

265

• Measures will also be put in place to ensure that Council receives value for

money through all of its tenders.

• Refining the Assistance to the Poor (ATTP) Policy in terms of which indigent

families qualify for a free basket of municipal services, so as to ensure that

the application process is as uncomplicated and efficient as possible.

Free Basic Services (FBS) - Indigent

The Municipality has an approved Indigent Policy referred to as the Assistance to the

Poor (ATTP) Policy, which is reviewed on an annual basis. This Policy does not

provide for a committee system which considers and approves Indigent applications,

as the qualifying criteria, as stipulated in the policy, is contained in the on-line Indigent

System where applications are captured and assessed after a site visit is completed

and authorised. The Indigent Section has a dedicated team of 39 staff members who

assist with the completion of application forms and attend to the on-site verification of

households who apply for subsidy.

The schedules below indicate the cost of FBS for the past two (2) financial years.

266

NELSON MANDELA BAY MUNICIPALITY - 2016/2017

Month

ATTP

Accounts

WATER SEWERAGE ELECTRICITY REFUSE RATES R/C

Total Value Total Value Total Value Total Value Total Value Total Value

Jul-16 112,288 10,525,367 12,745,851 3,807,748 9,877,845 8,580,867 45,537,679

August 112,613 10,471,785 13,382,200 3,826,532 9,888,676 8,932,037 46,501,229

September 112,923 13,129,261 16,361,341 3,863,655 11,794,927 12,343,413 57,492,597

October 114,080 11,018,670 13,613,964 3,979,846 9,972,645 8,591,830 47,176,955

November 115,480 11,273,937 13,766,687 4,044,566 10,046,917 8,706,080 47,838,187

December 115,934 10,888,149 13,796,780 4,060,672 10,108,509 8,769,776 47,623,885

Jan-16 115,952 12,238,173 14,204,672 4,029,277 10,108,296 8,747,471 49,327,889

February 116,192 12,191,675 14,192,323 4,046,580 10,114,156 8,716,523 49,261,257

March 115,656 11,115,318 13,827,362 4,065,197 10,914,123 8,684,584 48,606,585

April 115,339 11,553,057 13,860,353 4,060,259 10,036,474 8,628,359 48,138,502

May 115,339 11,703,500 13,893,120 4,084,400 9,972,432 8,540,569 48,194,021

June 112,419 11,398,898 13,571,225 4,038,318 9,718,499 8,338,750 47,065,690

TOTAL 137,507,790 167,215,878 47,907,050 122,553,500 107,580,259 582,764,477

267

NELSON MANDELA BAY MUNICIPALITY - 2015/2016

Month

Total ATTP

Accounts

WATER SEWERAGE ELECTRICITY REFUSE RATES R/C

Total Value Total Value Total Value Total Value Total Value Total Value

Jul-15 86,508 7,515,223 6,775,297 3,377,689 6,591,099 6,635,748 30,895,056

August 86,040 7,911,487 7,339,179 3,335,449 6,555,986 6,867,271 32,009,372

September 85,884 7,854,641 7,346,960 3,337,441 6,545,232 8,172,117 33,256,391

October 85,913 7,702,264 7,306,723 3,301,347 6,552,272 6,544,689 31,407,295

November 86,181 8,314,929 7,402,913 3,305,778 6,575,541 6,593,051 32,192,212

December 86,931 8,216,676 7,426,377 3,269,021 6,626,479 6,651,756 32,190,309

Jan-16 87,123 8,779,001 7,676,523 3,296,278 6,643,882 6,664,802 33,060,486

February 87,350 8,517,342 7,572,185 3,293,172 6,664,316 6,675,782 32,722,797

March 87,471 9,073,564 7,654,201 3,332,940 6,674,680 6,667,857 33,403,241

April 88,167 8,842,783 7,648,061 3,358,487 6,704,402 6,667,853 33,221,586

May 88,252 7,956,903 7,569,266 3,387,750 6,733,733 6,662,662 32,310,313

June 88,776 7,539,287 7,548,936 3,399,793 6,766,975 6,630,797 31,885,787

TOTAL 98,224,100 89,266,621 39,995,145 79,634,596 81,434,384 388,554,845

Streamlining the billing system to ensure that accurate accounts are rendered on time on a monthly basis

268

7.2.2 Delivery Approach

In terms of the Municipal Systems Act of 2000, Financial Sustainability is defined as

follows:

“in relation to the provision of a municipal service, means the provision of a municipal

service in a manner aimed at ensuring that the financing of that service from internal

and external resource, including budgeted income, grants and subsidies for that

service, is sufficient to cover the costs of:

The initial capital expenditure required for the service;

Operating the service; and

Maintaining, repairing and replacing the physical assets used in the provision of the

service”.

The Municipality experienced a serious cash-flow crisis during the 2010/11 financial

year. The recovery at the time was guided by a comprehensive Financial Recovery

Plan, aimed at placing the institution in a sound and sustainable financial position,

thereby ensuring its ability to meet its obligations.

Proper, adequate and regular financial management oversight is therefore crucial to

ensure this ongoing financial sustainability. This can be achieved through the effective

implementation of financial policies and procedures, not only within the Directorate

itself, but throughout the institution.

269

In addition to the above, the Budget and Treasury Directorate must:

• address the weaknesses identified in the SWOT analysis;

• give attention to the opportunities that have been documented;

• build on the strengths of the Directorate; and

• develop strategies to mitigate the risks identified, where possible.

In dealing with the above, priority and emphasis must be given to the following:

• Increased debt collection and credit control measures;

• revenue optimisation;

• operational efficiency and cost containment measures;

• proper procurement planning by all directorates; and

• ensuring value for money during the procurement process;

• proper tariff modelling;

• ensuring a cost coverage ratio of three months;

• the development of a Long-term Financial Plan.

In addition, the NMBM is in the process of developing a policy governing the Long-

term Financial Plan of the Municipality. This will serve as a guiding document for the

institution and contribute towards the establishment of a well-run and forward-thinking

city.

7.2.3 Long-Term Financial Sustainability Plan (LTFS P)

Long-term financial planning forms a key element of the Integrated Development Plan

(IDP), which enables local government to set priorities aligned to achieving the

strategic objectives of Council. The Long-term Financial Sustainability Plan (LTFSP)

must be constructed over a minimum period of 10 years and will be instrumental in

270

indicating the financial sustainability of the Nelson Mandela’s Bay Municipality over

the short, medium and long term.

The LTFSP is underpinned by a number of financial strategies, assumptions and

performance indicators, which will enable Council to make informed decisions to

ensure financial sustainability, while at the same time meeting the increasing service

delivery demands of local communities with the limited available resources.

Council has a legislative requirement to comply with the principles of sound financial

management, as detailed in the Municipal Finance Management Act No. 56 of 2003

(MFMA). National Treasury has played a pivotal role in the introduction of financial

management reforms across government since 1994, and local government since

1996. National Treasury’s primary objective was to secure the sound and sustainable

management of the financial affairs of government (national, provincial and local) and

to lead such reforms through policies, guidelines, regulatory interventions, circulars,

training etc., as well as provide hands-on support to municipalities.

The MFMA further aims to modernise budget, accounting and financial management

practices by placing local government finances on a sustainable footing in order to

maximise the capacity of municipalities to deliver services across communities. It also

aims to put in place a sound financial framework by clarifying and separating the roles

and responsibilities of the Council, Mayor and officials.

The NMBM is committed to work with National Treasury, as a pilot project, to develop

a long-term financial planning model as a basis for its Long-term Financial

Strategy/Plan. Extensive work has been done on the model, which is currently being

amended to comply with the SCOA accounting reforms.

A key component of sound financial management is the preparation of longer-term

financial strategies, plans and budgets. When preparing an LTFSP, a municipality

must take the following into consideration:

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• Capital and Operating Budgets

• Master plans and Backlog reports – Asset Management

• Consumption levels/units

• Losses and unaccounted for units

• Revenue streams

• Financial or other risks that may impact on financial sustainability

• Staffing levels

A policy governing the Long-term Financial Management Plan has been developed

and is in the process of being submitted to Council. The Policy assists the institution

in dealing with long-term financial management matters, even though not exhaustive

or comprehensive, and also takes into account all other regulatory requirements.

Key Objectives of the Long-term Financial Sustainability Plan (LTSFP)

The key objectives of the LTFSP are to ensure the financial sustainability of the NMBM

and therefore:

• The ability of the Municipality to meet its current and future service delivery

obligations and financial requirements, and

• The ability of the Municipality to retain sufficient financial capacity to be able to

manage and absorb future financial risks without external assistance or having

to significantly adjust revenue or expenditure.

• This implies that the Municipality must maintain a strong cash position, whilst

simultaneously developing its capacity to expand and meet the increasing

needs of the communities. Key performance indicators (KPIs) that have been

identified, will assist in ensuring that:

• the NMBM maintains a strong cash position;

• service delivery is maintained;

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• there is adequate capital spending – new and renewal;

• there is adequate spending on repairs and maintenance;

• the working capital levels are sufficient;

• the debt levels are minimised (reduced) and affordable;

• revenue streams are expanded and maximised.

7.2.4 Financial Plan

Section 26 (h) of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, as amended,

stipulates that a financial plan must be prepared as part of the Municipality’s Integrated

Development Plan.

Over recent years, financial sustainability in local government has become

increasingly difficult to maintain, as the demand for services expands beyond the

available revenue streams. Municipalities need to be proactive in minimising costs and

maximising operational efficiencies in order to meet these demands. In July 2010, the

NMBM was faced with serious cash and sustainability challenges as a result of the

absence of robust long-term financial planning.

The Five-year Financial Plan includes an Operating Budget and Capital Budget, both

informed by IDP priorities. It takes into account the Key Performance Areas reflected

in the IDP. All programmes contained in the Budget are reflected in the IDP. The

review of the Municipality’s IDP therefore has a ripple effect on the Budget.

In addition to being informed by the IDP, the municipal fiscal environment is influenced

by a variety of macro-economic measures. National Treasury determines the ceiling

of year-on-year increases in the total Operating Budget, whilst the National Energy

Regulator of SA (NERSA) regulates electricity tariff increases. Various government

departments also affect municipal service delivery through the level of grants and

subsidies.

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Budget assumptions

The multi-year Budget is underpinned by the following assumptions:

Financial targets for the period 2018/19 to 2022/23

2017/18

(Baseline) 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 2021/2022

2022/2023

Income % % % % % %

Water tariff increase 9.00 9.5 9.5 9.5 8 8

Sanitation tariff increase 9.00 9.5 9.5 9.5 8 8

Refuse tariff increase 9.00 9.5 9.5 9 9 9

Property rates increase 4.40

(Average) 7 7 7 7 7

Electricity tariff increase 1.88

(Average) 8.3 8.6 9 9.5 10

Revenue collection rates 94.00 95.5 96 96.5 97 97

Expenditure

Total expenditure increase

allowed (excluding repairs and

maintenance)

6.00 6 6 6 6

6

Salary increase (Subject to the

three year agreement)

8.00 8.3 8.5 8.9 9.1 9.1

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2017/18

(Baseline) 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 2021/2022

2022/2023

Increase in repairs and

maintenance (i.e. Inventory

Consumed)

8.00 22 11.5 11.5 12.5 13.5

Increase in bulk purchase of

power costs (subject to

determination by NERSA)

0.32 7.3 7.6 8.0 8.5 9

Increase in bulk purchase of water

costs

12.00 9.0 9.0 9.0 7.5 7.5

Projected Operating Budget for the period 2018/19 to 2022/23 (based on

recommended tariff increases)

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7.2.5 Statutory requirements specific to Capital Bu dget

The vehicle through which the needs of the Municipality are identified and its priorities

are set, is the Integrated Development Plan. The Capital Budget must be allocated to

cover the higher priority projects in the IDP.

Category

Sum of 2017/2018 (Baseline) 2018/2019 2019/2020 2020/2021 2021/2022 2022/ 2023

Fines, Penalties and Forfeits 265,711,307 318,853,568 350,738,925 382,305,429 416,712,917 416,712,917

Interest, Dividend and Rent on Land 281,717,842 306,931,589 331,332,650 355,354,267 380,229,066 406,845,101

Licences or Permits 26,671,035 28,271,297 29,967,575 31,915,467 33,989,973 36,369,271

Operational Revenue 75,164,846 81,553,858 88,893,705 96,894,139 106,099,082 116,178,495

Property Rates 2,000,000,000 2,140,000,000 2,289,800,000 2,450,086,000 2,621,592,020 2,805,103,461

Rental from Fixed Assets 18,685,624 20,357,987 22,190,206 24,187,325 26,364,184 28,736,961

Sales of Goods and Rendering of Services 160,053,835 179,660,430 198,524,775 219,369,876 241,306,864 265,437,550

Electricity 3,808,158,080 4,124,235,201 4,478,919,428 4,882,022,176 5,345,814,283 5,880,395,711

Waste Management 278,888,790 305,383,225 334,394,631 370,843,646 411,265,604 456,093,555

Waste Water Management 644,668,660 705,912,183 772,973,840 846,406,355 937,818,241 1,012,843,700

Water 838,136,260 917,759,205 1,004,946,329 1,100,416,230 1,219,261,183 1,316,802,078

Transfers and Subsidies (OPERATIONAL) 1,539,803,529 1,685,582,088 1,801,936,540 1,928,072,098 2,063,037,145 2,207,449,745

TOTAL REVENUE 9,937,659,808 10,814,500,630 11,704,618,605 12,687,873,008 13,803,490,561 14,948,968,544

Category

Sum of 2017/2018 (Baseline) 2018/2019 2019/2020 2020/2021 2021/2022 2022/ 2023

Bulk Purchases - Electricity 2,871,187,163 3,080,783,826 3,314,923,397 3,580,117,268 3,884,427,236 4,234,025,687.5

Bulk Purchases - Water 134,260,230 146,343,651 159,514,579 173,870,891 186,911,208 200,929,548.9

Contracted Services 1,161,192,669 1,242,476,156 1,329,449,487 1,422,510,951 1,529,199,272 1,643,889,218

Employee Related Cost 2,820,756,176 3,054,878,939 3,314,543,648 3,609,538,033 3,938,005,994 4,296,364,540 Interest, Dividends and Rent on Land (Incl Interest on Loan) 147,941,226 246,817,700 425,626,762 539,164,367 703,514,229 830,725,083 Inventory Consumed (Incl Maintenance portion) 276,892,170 337,808,447 376,656,419 419,971,907 472,468,395 536,251,629

Operating Leases 79,631,838 85,206,067 91,170,491 97,552,426 104,381,096 111,687,772

Operational Cost 997,056,932 1,046,909,779 1,104,489,816 1,170,759,205 1,246,858,554 1,327,904,360

Remuneration of Councillors 70,437,756 74,664,021 79,143,863 84,288,214 89,766,948 95,601,799

Transfers and Subsidies 112,165,450 119,568,370 127,938,156 137,277,641 147,298,909 158,051,729

Depreciation and Amortisation 808,877,177 869,542,965 934,758,688 1,009,539,383 1,090,302,533 1,177,526,736

Impairment Loss 619,213,278 422,398,042 408,649,369 391,989,094 372,424,779 389,984,051

TOTAL EXPENDITURE 10,099,612,065 10,727,397,961 11,666,864,674 12,636,579,381 13,765,559,154 15,002,942,153

TOTAL REVENUE - TOTAL EXPENDITURE -161,952,257 87,102 ,669 37,753,931 51,293,628 37,931,408 -53,973,608

REVENUE

EXPENDITURE

PROJECTED REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE TRENDS

PROJECTED REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE TRENDS

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The Municipal Finance Management Act (Act No. 56, 2003) states that:

“19.1 A Municipality may spend money on a capital project only if-: -

• the money for the project, excluding the cost of feasibility studies conducted by

or on behalf of the Municipality, has been appropriated in the capital budget;

• the project, including the total cost, has been approved by the council;

• the sources of funding have been considered, are available and have not been

committed for other purposes.

19.2 Before approving a capital project in terms of Section 19 (1) (b), the council of

a municipality must consider-

the project cost covering all financial years until the project is operational; and

the future operational costs and revenue on the project, including municipal tax and

tariff implications.”

Furthermore, the Financial Standing Orders state that

“1.5 Every Director shall, in respect of the activities of the Directorate, in consultation

with the Executive Director: Budget and Treasury, prepare: -

a draft Capital Budget in respect of the ensuing financial year and a draft Capital

Programme for the following two financial years, based on the following principles:

Year Two of the current Capital Programme shall become the new Capital Budget and

Year Three of the current Capital Programme shall become Year Two in the new

Capital Programme and New projects shall enter the Programme in Year Three.”

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a) 7.2.6 Credit Rating

A credit rating is an evaluation of the credit risk of a prospective debtor, predicting its

ability to pay back the debt, and an implicit forecast of the likelihood of the debtor

defaulting.

On 28 November 2017 Moody’s Investors Services, an internationally recognised

credit ratings agency, placed the long-term global scale rating of the NMBM, together

with those of other Metro’s under review for downgrade. This followed the weakening

of the South African government’s credit profile. On 01 December 2017, Moody’s

Investor Services assigned a Baa3/Aa1.za national scale issuer rating to the NMBM

which takes into account the NMBM’s solid financial performance and low debt.

External loan funding is currently being considered for the next five-year period; this

will, however, need to be structured in a sustainable manner without having a negative

impact on the Municipality’s credit rating going forward.

7.2.7 Policies / By-Laws

The Directorate is reliant on the following policies and by-laws to assist it in achieving

the respective IDP priorities:

• Financial Management Policy

• Revenue Enhancement Master Plan

• Assistance to the Poor Policy

• Cash Management and Investment Policy

• Tariffs Policy

• Creditors Payment Policy

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• Asset Management and Disposal Policy (the Municipality has a Generally

Recognized Accounting Practices (GRAP) compliant asset register)

• Supply Chain Management Policy

• Rates Policy

• Long-term Funding Policy

• Funding and Reserves Policy

• Customer Care and Revenue Management By-laws

• Unauthorized, Irregular, Fruitless and Wasteful (UIF+W) Expenditure Policy

• Credit Control Policy

The Budget related policies are updated on an annual basis.

7.2.8 Property Valuation Rolls

The rating of property is implemented impartially, fairly, equitable and without bias,

and these principles also apply to the setting of criteria for exemptions, reductions and

rebates, contemplated in Section 15 of the Municipal Property Rating Act.

The rating of property will be implemented in a way that:

• is developmental oriented;

• supports sustainable local government by providing a stable and buoyant

revenue source within the discretionary control of the Municipality;

• supports local and socio-economic development;

• promotes simplicity, uniformity, certainty in the property rates assessment

process;

• gives due consideration to the need for a simple and practical process of billing

and collection of property rates;

• promotes sustainable land management, especially that which reduces the risk

from natural disasters; and

• achieves national and local environmental management objectives.

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The NMBM has an updated Valuation Roll, which has been implemented. One

supplementary valuation is completed per financial year.

The NMBM has further implemented a General Valuation (GV) on 1 July 2017. The

relevant notice indicating that the valuation roll is open for public inspection and the

valuation roll is published on the municipal website in terms of section 49 of the

Municipal Property Rates Act, 2004. The next General Valuation will be implemented

on 1 July 2021, based on property valuations as at 1 July 2020. Ensuring that the

Valuation Roll is updated on a regular basis will achieve a sustainable rates base, in

order to generate income to provide quality services in a Well Run City.

Financial Reporting

The NMBM received a qualified audit report for the 2016/17 financial year. The

qualification was based on following:

The lack of adequate systems in place to identify and disclose all irregular expenditure

incurred during the year, as required by Section 125(2)(d)(i) of the MFMA.

Sufficient appropriate evidence could not be obtained for the retention of creditors

The municipality did not assess whether there were any indications that its

expectations about the useful lives of PPE had changed, as required by SA Standard

of GRAP 17.

An audit action plan is being developed to address the issues raised by the Auditor-

General, as with all previous audit reports. These action plans are monitored by the

Internal Audit Division.

In order to improve the audit outcomes of the 2016/17 financial year, an interim

financial statements (2016/17 financial year) Circular No. 1 of 2017 was submitted to

all directorates on 14 February 2017. The 2016/17 Annual Financial Statements were

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presented to the Auditor-General on 31 August 2017, and the consolidated annual

financial statements were presented to the Auditor-General on 30 September 2017.

The municipality compiles and submits all the required legislated financial reports,

which includes, inter-alia, those reports required in terms of Sections 71, 52 (d) 72 and

121 of the MFMA.

7.2.9 Implementation of SCOA Regulations

The objective of the Standard Chart of Accounts (SCOA) Regulations is to provide for

a national standard for the uniform recording and classification of municipal budget

and financial information at a transactional level, by prescribing a standard chart of

accounts for municipalities that:

is aligned to the budget formats and accounting standards prescribed for

municipalities; and

enables uniform information sets to be recorded in terms of national norms and

standards across the whole of government, for the purpose of national policy

coordination and reporting, benchmarking and performance measurement in the local

government sphere.

The NMBM’s implementation of the SCOA Regulations on 01 July 2017 will align itself

to the Well Run City Pillar, upon its compliance to the SCOA assessment check that

will be undertaken by National Treasury.

In addition, National Treasury aims to improve the credibility and reliability of financial

data, as well as general business processes and applications.

On 20 June 2014, Council considered an item dealing with the Municipal Regulations

for the SCOA and resolved, inter alia:

That Council adopts the Municipal Regulations on the Standard Chart of Accounts, as

gazetted for implementation, effective 1 July 2017.

That the City Manager drafts an Implementation Plan to ensure the implementation of

the SCOA, effective 1 July 2017.

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On 13 November 2014, the SCOA Implementation Plan was adopted by Council and

submitted to National Treasury on 14 November 2014.

The implementation of the SCOA will result in significant changes in the Municipality’s

business processes and will influence, amongst other things, the following:

• The Municipality’s accounting systems

• The preparation of budgets

• Reporting requirements

• Re-organization of cost centres

The above changes to business processes will ensure that the NMBM is aligned to its

six Pillars as follows:

The Well Run City : The implementation of the SCOA Regulations on 01 July 2017

will facilitate compliance with the Regulations, as well as pave the way for the NMBM’s

SCOA compliance assessment, to be conducted by the National Treasury. This will

further give credence to the NMBM’s aim of guaranteeing transparent budgeting;

transparent and efficient spending and performance monitoring. Furthermore, the re-

organisation of the NMBM’s cost centres closer to the Regulation’s Functional

Segment requirement will also support this Pillar.

The Opportunity City : This will be achieved as a result of implementing an accounting

system that aids efficiency; performance measurement; transparency and

benchmarking. The efficient use of public funds will result in further investor confidence

and more investment opportunities being identified within the NMBM.

The Safe City : This will be achieved through linking the NMBM’s budget to its IDP and

the Safety and Security Directorate’s SDBIP, as it relates to ensuring a safe city. In

addition, the reporting requirements will assist the benchmarking of the NMBM’s safety

and security processes and their outcomes to other government institutions.

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The Inclusive City : This will be achieved by linking the NMBM’s Budget to its IDP and

the SDBIP of all its directorates as it relates to the outcomes of the public participation

sessions held with local communities. The reporting requirements will assist in

transparent reporting and benchmarking of the NMBM to the respective legislative

requirements on creating an all-inclusive society, e.g. the Constitution; the

Employment Equity Act; the Labour Relations Act; the Municipal Finance Management

Act; the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act; the Occupational Health and

Safety Act, etc.

The Caring City : This will be achieved through linking the prescribed budget

preparation processes to the Regulations, which will in turn facilitate the benchmarking

of the NMBM’s budget for social cohesion and social upliftment and their outcomes to

other government institutions.

The Forward Thinking City : The reporting requirements enabled by the SCOA

Regulations will assist the City in identifying economic, financial, technological and

social opportunities within the NMBM, as well as enable the implementation of these

opportunities. The Regulations will allow National Treasury to easily conduct

benchmarking exercises across all spheres of government and all municipalities,

which will allow the NMBM to identify and implement solutions that will conform to the

definition of “The Forward Thinking City” across its functional areas, such as energy

efficient service offerings; water-wise projects; sustainable socio-economic upliftment;

environmental awareness; cost-saving technologies, etc.

The benefits of implementing the SCOA include:

• Standardization of all municipal and the whole-of-government reporting, which

leads to a reduction in the Auditor-General’s interpretations of multiple charts

of accounts.

• Improved transparency and accountability, leading to a high level of service

delivery and contributing to a well-run municipality.

• Providing for evidence based financial management, leading to improved

municipal bench-marking, policy making and interventions.

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• Bringing higher levels of cooperative government by enabling the submission

of credible, reliable and timely municipal information.

In order to meet the tight deadlines prescribed by National Treasury in respect of the

implementation of the SCOA, a service provider was appointed to provide and

implement a complete SCOA compliant Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) System.

The benefits of an ERP System are:

• Web-based, which allows for dynamic access, e.g. via 3G or VPN sign-on.

• Real time online posting of financial transactions.

• Integration of planning and budgeting processes as a core feature (golden

thread).

• Seamless integration of the standard business processes of local government.

7.2.10 Revenue Enhancement and Improvement of Debt Recovery

The escalating arrear consumer debt of the NMBM has resulted in the institution

soliciting the services of an external party, a specialist in the field of debt collection

and revenue enhancement, to curb its escalating arrears and identify new revenue

streams. The service provider was appointed for a three-year period in December

2015, where-after the project commenced in terms of a staged approach.

The major work streams identified, are the following:

• Baseline diagnostics

• Data cleansing and analysis

• Command and control centre

• Field verification

• Debt management (focusing on debt older than 120 days), and

• Income and cost optimization

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The project serves to strengthen and expand on the revenue base of the municipality.

The collection rate for the 2016/17 financial year is calculated at 94.3%. The collection

rate as at 31 December 2017 is calculated at 94.46%

Expenditure

Conditional Grants

The NMBM manages its conditional grants in terms of the DoRA requirements and

submits all required statutory reports in terms of the relevant requirements.

Remuneration

Councilor remuneration is determined annually in terms of the relevant Government

Notice issued by the Minister of COGTA in terms of the Remuneration of Public Office-

Bearers Act, 1998 (Act No 20 of 1998).

The upper limits of total remuneration packages payable to municipal managers and

managers directly accountable to municipal managers are determined and paid in

accordance with the annual government notice issued by the Minister of COGTA in

terms of Regulation 35 of the Local Government: Regulations on Appointment and

Conditions of Employment of Senior Managers as issued in terms of Government

Notice No 21 as published under Government Gazette No 37245 of 17 January 2014.

The overall increase in human resource costs as relevant to all other municipal

employees is determined in line with the relevant SALGBC agreement in this regard.

As at 30 September 2017 employee costs constituted 22.62% of the total operating

revenue.

Finance costs

All financing costs in terms of external loan funding agreements are serviced in terms

of the relevant approved funding agreements.

Payments to service providers

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All monies owing by the municipality to service providers are paid in terms of Section

65 (2) (e) of the MFMA.

Funding of Capital Expenditure

The table below reflects the reliance on government grants in order to fulfill the

mandate of providing services to the community:

Sources of funding 2014/15 % 2015/16 % 2016/17 %

Government Grants 781,938 53.87% 760,841 56.28% 849,241 59.74%

Other grants 2,266 0.16% 16,671 1.23% 5,170 0.36%

Public contributions 56,854 3.92% 47,757 3.53% 107,513 7.56%

Internal Funds 610,383 42.05% 526,641 38.96% 459,589 32.33%

Total Capital

Funding

1,451,441 100% 1,351,900 100% 1,421,512 100%

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7.2.11 Funding of Capital Expenditure

The table below reflects the reliance on government grants in order to fulfill the

mandate of providing services to the community:

Sources of funding 2013/14 % 2014/15 % 2015/16 %

Government Grants 1,012,405 64.04% 781,938 53.87% 760,841 56.28%

Other grants 14,048 0.89% 2,266 0.16% 16,671 1.23%

Public contributions 31,987 2.02% 56,854 3.92% 47,757 3.53%

Internal Funds 522,447 33.05% 610,383 42.05% 526,641 38.96%

Total Capital

Funding

1,580,887 100% 1,451,441 100% 1,351,900 100%

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7.2.12 Capital and Operating Spending Results

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

R thousand Budget Actual Audited Budget Actual Audi ted Budget Actual Audited

Operating Revenue 8 291 268 8 179 284 8 179 284 9 388 921 8 797 972 8 797 972 9 401 671 8 991 343

% Operating Revenue 98.65% 93.71% 95.64%

Operating Expenditure 8 757 794 8 192 029 8 192 029 9 321 591 8 765 724 8 765 724 9 823 533 9 292 077

% Operating Expenditure 93.54% 94.04% 94.59%

Net Surplus/(Deficit) (448,525) (12 745) (12 745) 6 7 330 32 248 32 248 (421 861) (300 734)

Capital Expenditure 1 560 118 1 436 107 1 436 107 1 573 441 1 352 298 1 351 900 1 552 012 1 421 512

% Capital Expenditure 92.05% 85.95% 91.59%

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CHAPTER 8: OVERSIGHT, REPORTING, MONITORING AND EVA LUATION

This Chapter outlines the important aspects of oversight, reporting, monitoring and

evaluation in order to ensure the accountable and well aligned delivery of this

Integrated Development Plan and its six pillars by the Nelson Mandela Bay

Municipality.

The key offices, role-players, structures and tools for these important functions are

discussed below and include:

• Executive Mayor

• City Manager

• Municipal Public Accounts Committee

• Rules and Ethics Committee

• Office of the Auditor-General

• NMBM Audit Committee

• NMBM Internal Audit and Risk Assurance

• Performance, Monitoring and Evaluation

• Supply Chain Management

• Ward Committees

8.1 Executive Mayor

The Executive Mayor is required to identify and prioritise the needs of the Municipality.

These are to be reflected in the IDP and Budget, which also need to take into account

applicable national and provincial plans.

The Executive Mayor is required to evaluate the progress of the performance of the

institution in the implementation of the IDP. This is done through the institutional

Performance Management System. The Executive Mayor must provide political

leadership and guidance in the annual revision, preparation and timeous approval of

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the IDP, the annual Budget and the Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan

(SDBIP).

The Executive Mayor has delegated the development and implementation of the

Performance Management System to the City Manager, in terms of the Municipal

Systems Act.

8.2 City Manager

The City Manager must provide operational guidance on the annual revision,

preparation and timeous approval of the IDP, the annual Budget and the SDBIP and

ensure strategic alignment between them.

In relation to IDP implementation, oversight, monitoring and evaluation, the City

Manager is inter alia responsible for the following:

• Developing an effective, efficient and accountable administration that is able to

implement the institutional IDP; in addition, ensuring an administration

responsive to the needs of the citizens, business and other sectors.

• Ensuring that all business of the administration is conducted in a manner that

is consistent with the IDP.

• Overseeing the implementation of the IDP, whilst ensuring integrated multi-

disciplinary orientated service delivery.

• Ensuring that a performance management system is in place for the

administration in order to determine whether the municipal targets set in the

IDP are being met.

• Ensuring regular reporting on progress with the implementation of the IDP to

the relevant Council structures.

The City Manager has delegated the development of the institution’s Performance

Management System to the Chief Operating Officer; and the cascading of

performance management in respect of non-Section 57 employees to the Executive

Director: Corporate Services.

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The City Manager must inculcate an organisational culture that is conducive to

effective performance management within an appropriate organisational structure that

can meet the demands of the IDP, and ensure that the Performance Management

System is current, effective and efficient.

8.3 Municipal Public Accounts Committee

The Municipal Public Accounts Committee (MPAC) is a key structure in Council and

the mechanism through which it exercises oversight over the expenditure of public

money. With regard to financial management, MPAC enables Council to fulfil its

obligation to ensure that the spending of ratepayers’ money and Council’s stewardship

of public assets is done economically, efficiently and effectively.

MPAC conducts its affairs in a non-party political manner in order to ensure neutrality

and maximise its effectiveness. It also ensures that the Municipality’s Oversight

Report on the Annual Report is prepared for adoption by Council, as required in terms

of the Municipal Finance Management Act (MFMA).

MPAC also has the responsibility to investigate and advise Council in respect of

unauthorised, irregular or fruitless and wasteful expenditure.

The Municipality’s Municipal Public Accounts Committee currently comprises the

following members:

• African National Congress (ANC) – 5 members

• Democratic Alliance (DA) – 6 members

• Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) – 2 members and also one occupying

Chairperson position

• Patriotic Alliance (PA) – 1 member

• United Democratic Movement (UDM) – 1 member

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8.4 Rules and Ethics Committee

A Rules and Ethics Committee was recently established for the purpose of monitoring

and reviewing the Rules of Order of Council.

The objectives of this Committee include:

• Inculcating a respect for the rule of law in the institution.

• Upholding Council’s Rules of Order, thereby promoting stability in Council.

• Putting the people first (Batho Pele principles).

• Ensuring open and constructive debate.

• Respecting divergent views.

• Enhancing the effective management of Council and Standing Committee

meetings.

• Fostering a sense of collective responsibility among Councillors in advancing

service delivery and deepening democracy.

8.5 Office of the Auditor-General

The Auditor-General of South Africa has a constitutional mandate and, as the supreme

audit institution of South Africa, exists to strengthen South Africa’s democracy by

enabling oversight, accountability and governance in the public sector through

auditing, thereby building public confidence.

The Auditor-General checks the spending of public money by determining whether it

has been used properly and for the intended purposes. This is done by performing an

annual audit. The results of the annual audit will reveal whether the Municipality is

adhering to legislation and good practice or whether there are areas that require

improvement. One of the areas examined, is that of irregular, fruitless and wasteful

expenditure - where there is such expenditure, the Accounting Officer must investigate

and take appropriate action.

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The Auditor-General also audits the planning processes and performance information

of the Municipality and its municipal entity (MBDA).

8.6 Audit Committee

The Audit Committee is appointed by Council as an independent advisory body. The

Audit Committee advises the Council, political office-bearers, the Accounting Officer

and the Executive Management Team on matters such as the following:

• Internal financial control and internal audits.

• Risk management.

• Accounting policies.

• Adequacy, reliability and accuracy of financial reporting and information.

• Performance management.

• Effective governance.

• Compliance with the MFMA, the annual Division of Revenue Act (DoRA) and

any other applicable legislation.

• Performance evaluation.

• Any other issues referred to it by the Municipality or its municipal entity.

Furthermore, the Audit Committee reviews the annual financial statements in order to

provide an authoritative and credible view of the Municipality’s financial position, its

efficiency and effectiveness, as well as its overall level of legislative compliance.

The Audit Committee responds to Council on any issues raised by the Auditor-General

in the Audit Report. Furthermore, it conducts investigations into the financial affairs of

the Municipality as may be necessary.

8.7 Internal Audit and Risk Assurance

In terms of Section 165 of the MFMA, the Accounting Officer must establish effective

systems of internal control to provide reasonable assurance that the Municipality’s

financial and non-financial objectives are achieved. In the execution of this

293

responsibility and also to promote ethics, good governance and integrity in the

institution, the Internal Audit Services and Risk Assurance was established.

The role of Internal Audit is to assist the City Manager and directorates in meeting their

objectives and discharging their responsibilities by providing independent and

objective quality assurance reviews of the adequacy and effectiveness of the controls

set up by Management to help run the organisation. These include consultancy

services.

Although the Risk Management Unit of the Municipality is responsible for the

identification of risk exposure, the risks recorded in Council’s Risk Register are used

to compile the Annual and Three-year Internal Audit Plans.

The Forensic Audit Services Section complements the broader justice system and

forms part of the Internal Audit Sub-directorate of the Municipality. The forensics

component derives its NMBM mandate from the Anti-Fraud and Anti-Corruption

Strategy, the NMBM Internal Audit Charter, the MFMA, and the Prevention and

Combatting of Corrupt Activities Act.

An Ethics Hotline was recently established, and the Internal Audit Sub-directorate

investigates all matters reported.

8.8 Performance, Monitoring and Evaluation

8.8.1 Performance Management

The municipal performance management function describes measures, evaluates and

reports on how the Municipality’s processes relating to the implementation of the IDP

will be conducted, organised and managed. This includes identifying role-players,

stakeholders and key timelines. Performance management therefore holds the key to

the successful implementation of the IDP.

Integrated development planning enables the achievement of the planning stage of

performance management. The Service Delivery and Budget Implementation Plan

294

(SDBIP), the Performance Information System, performance agreements and plans

underpin effective performance management.

The following table is useful in understanding important performance management

concepts:

CONCEPT DEFINITION

Integrated

Development

Planning (IDP)

The IDP is the Municipality’s principal people-driven

strategic developmental planning document over the

medium term (five years). Importantly, it ensures close co-

ordination and integration between projects, programmes

and activities, both internally and externally.

Performance

Management

A strategic approach through which performance objectives

of the Municipality are identified, defined, translated into

business plans and cascaded into individual scorecards.

This allows for regular planning, monitoring, evaluating,

reviewing and reporting of performance at both

organisational and individual levels and permits responses

to both inadequate performance and outstanding/excellent

performance.

Performance

Management System

(PMS)

The Municipality’s Performance Management System

entails a framework that describes and represents how its

cycle and processes of performance planning, monitoring,

measurement, review, reporting and improvement will be

conducted, organised and managed, including determining

the responsibilities of the different roleplayers.

The Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality uses the Balanced

scorecard method, which takes into account financial,

internal business, customer and learning and growth

perspectives.

295

CONCEPT DEFINITION

Key Performance

Areas (KPAs)

Critical function/domain that is crucial to the achievement of

organisational goals.

Objective Statement about the ultimate and long-term outcomes the

organisation wishes to achieve.

Key Performance

Indicators (KPIs)

Measures (qualitative and quantitative) that indicate

whether progress is being made towards achieving set

objectives.

Input indicators

An indicator that measures equipment, resources, economy

and efficiency, for example:

. Budget projection

. % capital budget spent to provide water.

. Unit costs for delivering water to a single household

. Amount of time/money/number of people it took the

Municipality to deliver water to a single ward.

Output indicators

Indicators that measure results, usually expressed in

quantitative terms (i.e. number / %), e.g. Number of

households connected.

Outcome indicators

Indicators that measure the impact of reaching the target,

e.g. Percentage of households with access to water.

Impact indicators Indicators that measure the marked effect or influence of

achieving specific outcomes.

Key Performance

Elements (KPEs) Focus areas linked to the identified Key Performance Areas.

Baseline indicators These provide quantitative and/or qualitative levels of

performance as at the beginning of the monitoring period in

respect of which the institution aims to improve.

Performance targets Quantifiable levels of the indicators that the organisation

wants to achieve at a given point in time.

Performance plan Plan of agreed Key Performance Areas, Objectives, Key

Performance Indicators and Targets covering a specific

financial year.

296

CONCEPT DEFINITION

Institutional

performance review

cycle

12 months’ period (continuous) that constitutes the financial

year of the Municipality: 1 July to 30 June of the following

year.

Review

A comprehensive assessment of the economy, efficiency,

effectiveness and impact in so far as the key performance

indicators and performance targets set by the Municipality

are concerned.

Performance management seeks to achieve the following:

• Clarifying institutional goals and priorities.

• Ensuring a continuous cycle of planning, coaching and feedback.

• Monitoring and improving service delivery.

• Ensuring accountability, oversight and legal compliance.

• Promoting community participation in local governance.

• Creating and entrenching a culture of performance amongst employees.

The Integrated Performance Management System used in the Nelson Mandela Bay

Municipality is reflected in the diagram below.

297

INTEGRATED PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

8.8.2 Monitoring and Evaluation

The Municipality has a Monitoring and Evaluation Unit in place, which is tasked to

improve institutional planning, implementation, budgeting and reporting processes

through the monitoring and evaluation of prioritized IDP programmes and projects.

Institutional SDBIP

Budget

Performance Measurement, Evaluation and

Review

Outcome, Impact and Staff

Assessments

Individual Scorecards/ Performance Agreements

Scorecards for Portfolio Cllrs,

Directorate and Municipal Entity

Implementation

Performance Reporting

Data Collection, Analysis, Verification

and Storage

Integrated Development

Plan

Performance Monitoring

Feedback

Communities and Stakeholders

Shared Long-term Vision and Strategic Plan

Performance Planning

KPAs, KPEs, Objectives, KPIs, & Targets

PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM

298

Towards this end, the focus is on the following:

• Monitoring and evaluation of the IDP implementation for tracking service

delivery progress and sustainability, and evaluating alternative options for

service delivery.

• Monitoring, evaluating and reporting on the performance of consultants /

service providers to ensure that the expected delivery outputs and outcomes

are achieved.

• Monitoring and evaluating Ward-Based Capital expenditure to ensure that the

objectives are achieved as planned.

• Monitoring the implementation of Council resolutions through the development

and maintenance of a matrix.

8.9 Supply Chain Management

The Municipality has an approved Supply Chain Management Policy which is required

to be reviewed on an annual basis. Inter alia, the policy provides for a committee

system to achieve and ensure competitive procurement. The Committees established

in compliance with the National Standards for Bid Committees, are as follows:

• The Bid Specification Committee

• The Bid Evaluation Committee

• The Bid Adjudication Committee

An Integrated Contracts Management System tracks the award of tenders from the

time of approval of the specifications to the time of final award.

The Municipality has embarked on the development and implementation of a Quality

Management System (QMS), in compliance with ISO 9001:2015. This process

commenced in March 2016 and is due for completion in 2018.

299

8.10 Ward Committees

The main function of a Ward Committee is to act as the formal communication channel

between Council and the community. The Ward Committees therefore provide the

channel through which communities can most effectively lodge their complaints and

concerns.

The roles and responsibilities of Ward Committees include:

• Create formal unbiased communication channels and cooperative partnerships

between the Municipality and the community within each ward.

• Promote harmonious relationships between residents of the ward, the Ward

Councillor and the Municipality.

• Facilitate participation in the IDP processes.

• Act as a reference group/advisory body on Council policies and issues that

affect the communities in the ward.

• Serve as an agent for mobilising community action.

• Act as a conduit for community complaints and feedback on Council responses.

• Make recommendations on any matters that may affect the ward or Council.

8.11 Special Sectors and Mainstreaming

The Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality has established an institutional framework that

coordinates and facilitates the mainstreaming of the best interests of children, people

with disabilities, elderly, women and youth through Special Programmes Unit within

Constituency Services.

In an effort to ensure integration and synergy, all Directorates are required to ensure

special sectors development is central in their planning, budgeting, implementation of

their projects and programmes. The Special Programmes Unit in conjunction with

Directorates and collaboration with relevant stakeholders is expected to conduct its

business in the following manner;

300

• Conduct public awareness and education for the promotion of mainstreaming

youth, women, aged, disability, gender and children’s rights issues in council

and government programmes; with extensive campaigns associated with

national days in the form of Pride and Observance dates, etc.

• Ensure special sectors’ concerns and needs become the integral dimension of

the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of policies, programmes

in all political, economic and social spheres for designated groups to benefit

equitably

• Coordinate efforts that ensure planning, policies, programmes and projects

counteract inequalities and disparities experienced by children, disability,

elderly, women, youth and gender machinery

• Ensures coordination and facilitation of systematic inclusion of all concerns of

children, disability, elderly, women, youth and gender machinery at all levels of

planning, policy making and programme implementation Ensures fairness and

availability of measures that compensate historical and social disadvantages

that prevent special sectors from operating on a level playing field

• Effectively and efficiently coordinate for the alignment and compliance to local,

provincial, national, SADC, regional, continental and international obligations

and protocols pertaining to special sectors

• Ensures special sectors contribute and benefit from economic, social, cultural

and political development

• Assesses the implications for designated groups of any planned action,

legislation, policies, or programmes in all areas and at all levels

• Coordinate conscientisation that build analytical skills to ensure self –

confidence and taking control

• Coordinate and facilitate appropriate training to improve knowledge, skills and

attitudes in special sectors – gender analysis, special sectors – gender

mainstreaming, special sector - gender responsive research, special sector –

gender responsive budgeting, and disaggregated data use.

ANNEXURE “A”

DOCUMENTED CHANGES IN THE IDP

The IDP is a five-year plan that is reviewed annually. This page deals with all the

changes that have been done in the document for ease of reference.

Changes effected to date are as follows:

1. Cover page – inserted 2nd Edition First Draft – Page 1

2. A Poem on institutional performance on page 2 as requested by the Executive

Mayor is inserted

3. IDP definition on page 3

4. On page 4, a Map of the NMBM reflecting new Ward Boundaries after the

demarcation processes of 2015 is included

5. The revised Table of Contents on pages 5 - 6

6. Revised Foreword by the City Manager on page 14

7. Revised strategic objectives in line with the 6 Pillars on pages 23 - 26

8. On page 27 - 28, reflection on political party seat allocation in Council

9. Changes in the Mayoral Committee Members is in line with the latest reshuffling

of Mayoral by the Executive Mayor from pages 29 - 30

10. On page 34, the 1.6 Heading is changed

11. New information on IDP and Budget Time-Schedule is included on page 45

12. Pages 45 – 47, new information is included on the Implementation of the Long

Term Development Plan

13. Changes on page 56 on Pillar 1 (Well Run City)

14. Changes on page 60 on Opportunity City

15. New information on public participation of 18 – 24 August 2017 on

pages 76 – 77

16. Revised list of catalytic programmes on page 102

17. Pages 127 – 201, changes effected by Directorates in their chapters

18. Changes in the Delivery Plan chapter on page 202 - 211

19. Chapter on Financial Sustainability and Viability from page 258 – 281 is revised

20. Pages 293 contain proposed changes on information dealing with Ward

Committees 21. Pages 293 – 294 contain new information on Special Sectors and

Mainstreaming

Page 1 of 6

ANNEXURE “B”

REPORT ON PUBLIC PARTICIPATION PROGRAMME (18 – 24 A UGUST 2017) 1. BACKGROUND

Chapter Seven (7) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, Act 108 of 1996, Chapter 4 and 5 of Local Government Municipal Systems Act, 32 of 2000 and, Chapter 4 of the Municipal Finance Management Act Number 56 of 2003 compel municipalities to engage communities in public participation. This should not only be done as a compliance exercise but also as an honest engagement with communities in order for all programmes that a municipality is implementing within the 5 year cycle of its Integrated Development Planning (IDP) to be informed by the priorities of its citizens.

Communities must own development taking place within its municipal space. At Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality (NMBM), the current political administration has introduced a new dimension on public participation. To make it more meaningful, they introduced the ranking of priorities in their order of importance.

The 2018/19 IDP / Budget public participation programme was approved by the Strategic Planning Steering Committee that was established by the Executive Mayor to oversee the whole planning and implementation processes. The entire programme was rolled out within five days with approximately four (4) meetings per day taking place at the same time in various venues.

All necessary preparatory requirements were done and the programme went out smoothly without major challenges. Despite very cold weathers during the times of the meetings, a number of the residents of the NMBM attended.

During the meeting with Councillors on the 18 August 2017, some amendments to the programme were suggested and effected. This resulted in an additional meeting being accommodated on the 24 August 2017 at the Newton Park Library. This additional meeting was to accommodate the following Ward; 6, 7, 8, 9, Portion of ward 12 and 39. All logistical arrangements for this additional meeting were to be facilitated by the Ward Councillors concerned.

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All the meetings took place as planned and without many disruptions except the following:

a) The meeting planned for 22 August 2017 with the Municipal Unions did not take place because the Municipal Unions did not show up.

b) In Gelvandale Hall on the 23 August 2017, disruptions and chaos occurred after an announcement that, the Ward Based Allocation document distributed at the meeting was not correct. A new document was then printed, distributed and the meeting continued.

c) Another meeting where disruptions occurred was in George Botha Hall on the

23 August 2017. The disruptions because community members objected to incorrect ward allocation of projects to wards that were affected by the new Ward demarcation process related to the 2016 Local Government Elections. As a result, a large number of people left the meeting but, the meeting continued until it was finalized.

2. COMMUNICATION AND MARKETING OF THE PROGRAMME

Various methods of communication and marketing were used to make communities aware about the programme. It was advertised in the various print media houses, various radio slots and news reads were arranged by Communications Directorate. The whole programme was uploaded in the NMBM Website. There was also regular loud hailing of the programme to relevant communities informing them about these meetings. Also, all Ward Councillors and Ward Committees were also requested to market the programme within their communities

The interaction and consultation process with communities is not only limited to the attendance of public participation meetings but also, communities are encouraged to make written submissions via emails, faxes or even verbal submissions to the IDP Office.

A total of 3026 residents attended the meetings. It is further noted that, of the 120 Councillors who were invited to attend the meeting, 39 Councillors attended.

Higher numbers of attendance by community members was more noticeable in the following venues; George Botha Hall with Ward Committees where 425 Ward Committee members attended the meeting. It is also noticeable that, in the following venues attendance by community members was in excess of 200. These were; Allan Ridge Hall with 299, Soweto Multi-Purpose Centre with 289, Lillian Ngoyi Sports Centre with 289, Babs Madlakane Community Hall with 231 and Gelvandale Community Hall with 221.

Page 3 of 6

3. ANALYSIS OF INPUT RECEIVED DURING THE PUBLIC MEE TINGS

(18 – 24 AUGUST 2017) Table 1 is a summary of the 13 most common issues raised by the communities during the public meetings held in August 2017 listed in their ranked order:

TABLE 1: PRIORITIES FREQUENTLY RAISED IN WARD MEET INGS DURING IDP/ BUDGET REVIEW IN AUGUST 2017

PRIORITIES RAISED WARDS 1. Provision of street lights (High mast lights) 4, 10, 11, 13, 14, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 28, 29,

30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 & 36 (19) 2. Construction of sports fields and upgrading/maintenance of existing ones

4, 11, 13, 14, 15, 18, 20, 21, 22, 24, 28, 31, 32, 33, 34 & 36 (16)

3. Rectification of houses 4, 10, 18, 21, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 30, 31, 33, 34, 35 & 36 (15)

4. Provision of houses 4, 11, 12, 13, 15, 18, 24, 25, 27, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34 & 36 (15)

5. Tarring of roads and

construction of speed humps

4, 11, 12, 13, 14,1 5, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 & 36 (14)

6. Provision and upgrade of

Clinics

14, 25, 27, 31, 32, 36, 41, 42, 43, 49, 55 & 60 (12)

7. Illegal dumping 12, 15, 24, 26, 28, 30, 31, 32, 34 & 36 (10)

8. Rectification of pre 1994

houses

4, 14, 15, 18, 20, 21, 25 & 36 (9)

9. Upgrading and maintenance of sewerage system

4, 15, 20, 26, 27, 28, 29 & 36 (8)

10. Visibility of Metro Police 12, 13, 14, 15, 18, 20, 27 & 34 (8)

11. Skills development 4, 13, 14, 27, 28, 28, 31, 33 & 36 (8)

12. Construction and upgrade

of Police Stations

4, 11, 29, 31, 33, 35 & 36 (7)

13. Construction and upgrade of

Libraries

9, 23, 40, 48,58 & 60 (6)

Table 1 shows that, of the 60 Wards in the NMBM, 19 (31, 67%) prioritized the provision of Street lights, 16 (26, 67%) provision and upgrade of sporting facilities, 15 (25%) want provision of houses, 15 (25%) are concerned about the rectification oh houses and a further 9 (15%) have raised the issue of rectification of houses that were built before 1994.

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19

1615 15

14

12

109

8 8 87

6

31.67

26.67

25.00 25.0023.33

20.00

16.67

15.0013.33 13.33 13.33

11.6710.00

Provisioning of

Street Lights

and High Mast

Lights

Construction

and Upgrade

of Sports

Fields

Rectification of

Houses

Provision of

Houses

Tarring of

Roads and

Construction

of Speed

Humps

Provision and

Upgrade of

Clinics

Illegal

Dumping

Rectification of

Pre 1994

Houses

Upgrade and

Maintenance

of Sewer

System

Visibility of

Metro Police

Skills

Development

Construction

and Upgrade

of Police

Stations

Construction

and Upgrade

of Libraries

Wa

rd

s

Issues

Figure 1: Top 13 Ward Priorities

Total: 60 Wards as % of 60

(Figure 1 and 2) show the schematic representation of the issues reflected in Table 1. It could be seen from Figure 1 that, the request for provision of electricity has the highest bar whilst, 11, 67 wants construction of Police Stations whilst only 10% of the Wards raised the construction of Libraries.

Provisioning of Street Lights and High Mast Lights

Construction and Upgrade of Sports Fields

Rectification of Houses

Provision of Houses

Tarring of Roads and Construction of Speed Humps

Provision and Upgrade of Clinics

Illegal Dumping

Rectification of Pre 1994 Houses

Upgrade and Maintenance of Sewer System

Visibility of Metro Police

Skills Development

Construction and Upgrade of Police Stations

Construction and Upgrade of Libraries

0 10 20 30 40 50 60

Issu

es

Wards

FIGURE 2: THE NUMBER OF WARDS RAISING THE TOP 13 PRIORITIES

Total: 60 Wards

as % of 60

Figure 2, shows the schematic representation of Wards that raised issues. From the above graph, it is evident that, communities are mainly concerned with safety related issues namely; lights, police stations and visibility of Metro Police as evidenced by many Wards raising these issues during the public meetings of August 2017. It is also noticeable that, 26, 7 % of the residents request the provision and upgrade of sporting fields. This is again an indication that, people want the municipality to provide sporting facilities that could benefit the youth in order to keep them occupied with sports.

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It is further noted from graphs above that, there are a number of Wards that want the municipality to rectify their houses including those houses that were built before 1994. It is clear that, a large number of wards raised issues that are Human Settlement related. This constitutes 39 (26, 5%) of the total number of wards that raised Human Settlement related issues.

One of the most important issues is, accommodating People with Disabilities in public meetings by providing services that are convenient for them to participate in public meetings. This issue came out strongly in a number of public meetings especially the one held with the Special Sector on the 23 August 2017. Such issues as, providing signs language interpreters in future meetings and also converting some of the municipal documents in braille could go a long way in addressing some of the concerns raised by the Special Sectors in a number of public platforms.

Priorities raised by the communities and the various stakeholders are consolidated in a report attached as (Annexure “C”) .

4. FINANCIAL COSTS RELATED TO THE PROGRAMME

Loud Hailing : R 114 513.00

PA system : R 41 097.00

Transport : R 127 152.00

Radio Slots : R 78 817. 42

Adverts : R 46 296. 77

Security : R 14 228. 98

Venues : R 5356. 00

GRAND TOTAL : R427 461.17

5. CHALLENGES

Although the meetings went out well, there were some challenges that were experienced. Namely;

• In Wards 36 and 4, the loud hailers encountered problems where they were not allowed to do their job. They were even threatened with burning of their vehicles. The matter was resolved in Ward 4. Even though they were not allowed to loud hail in Ward 36, residents from Ward 36 attended the planned meeting.

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• Ward Councillors were requested to submit their ranked priorities by the 25 August 2017. Of the 60 Ward Councillors in the NMBM, the following Ward Councillors submitted; Wards 1, 2, 6, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 23, 24, 25, 29, 31, 32, 33, 34, 36, 39, 40, 41, 47, 48, 49, 52, 53, 55, 57, 59 and 60.

• 30 (50%) of the 60 Ward Councillors submitted their ranked priorities to the IDP Office as requested.

• Where community issues were not ranked during the meetings, Ward Councillors were expected to attend to such issues during their respective ward meetings that led to the submission of ranked priorities by Ward Councillors.

• Sector Departments invited did not attend the meetings except for the Office of the Premier and COGTA (Provincially). A separate session with these Departments and State Owned Enterprises (SOEs) is planned for 29 September 2017.

6. CONCLUSION

Despite the minor challenges experienced during the rollout of the programme, the IDP / Budget review meetings were generally very successful. The political Principals attached to the programme played their oversight role. The Officials, who were involved in the planning and rollout of the programme, were also very committed to its success.

A number of community members expressed concerns in the cluster approach that was used. The proposed approach going forward is that, the responsibility of holding these IDP / Budget meetings should be done at the level of Ward Councillors. The required logistical arrangements on how this should be done will be discussed with the relevant political principals.

It also needs mention that, priorities that are of operational nature have been elevated to relevant Directorates for their urgent attention. Others of capital nature will be included in the IDP for budget allocation consideration and implementation. Those that fall within the mandate of other Sector Departments will be elevated to the relevant Department and will be discussed during the IDP Representative Forum meeting planned for the 29 September 2017.

ANNEXURE "C" 2018/19 WARD PRIORITIES

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

1 R&T ROADS AND TRANSPORT1 R&T Upgrade Buffelsfontein Road into double carriageway, with a centre island for a turning lane, from M

1 R&T Construct airport by-pass road to Summerstrand W1 R&T Installation of traffic lights / roundabout – intersection of Brighton Drive & Admiralty Way, H1 R&T Installation of traffic lights / roundabout – outside Kruger Gardens Retirement Village on Admiralty H1 R&T Resurfacing of Jenvey & Brewer Roads, Summerstrand W

1 R&T

Upgrade pavements along Admiralty Way, Kock Street, Rubin Crescent, Gomery Avenue,University Way & Admiralty Crescent – Summerstrand;Upgrading of pavement routes in Summerstrand for residents of Cheshire Home – wheelchair-friendly routes

H

1 R&T Rebuild and widen Kragga Kamma Road from Kamma Park to Cows Corner W1 R&T Rebuild and widen Butterfield Road to Cows Corner W1 R&T Assist NMMU in opening up a second vehicular entrance off Strandfontein Road into the NMMU W1 R&T Construction of new access road to Sardinia Bay beach H1 R&T New entrance / exit road to be created for Bushy Park; M1 R&T Victoria Drive to be widened from Rover Motor Club to Schoenmakerskop intersection W1 R&T Resurface Edmonds Road W

1 R&T

Upgrade and widen the following Roads:

1 R&T · Admiralty Way1 R&T · Sardinia Bay1 R&T · Welcome Avenue M1 R&T · Montmedy1 R&T · Old Seaview and Upper Sea view

1 R&T

· Marine Drive from the Summerstrand Beacon along the coast to Schoenmakerskop H

1 R&T · Glendore Road with new curbing installed M1 R&T Tar Greydawn Road (currently a gravel road) M1 R&T Tar Minor Road 83 (currently a gravel road) M

BUDGET PRIORITY

1

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

1 R&T Boundary Lane from Mount Pleasant to Sardinia Bay Road to be rebuilt to standard specifications W1 R&T Standard type road surface to be installed as an emergency access route to Bushy Park W1 R&T Installation of pavement along Glendore Road from Beethoven Avenue to Victoria Drive M1 R&T Traffic calming measures – Upper Seaview Road H1 R&T Traffic calming measures / permanent speed camera – intersection of Hilltop & Seaview Road – H1 R&T The installation of a roundabout at the intersection of Melsetter & Edmonds Roads, Lovemore M1 R&T Illegal taxi rank on the corner of University Way and Gomery Avenue to be moved to the NMMU H1 R&T All road signs, street name signs and road markings H1 R&T Pavement outside Fish Finders on Buffelsfontein cemented – Mount Pleasant H1 R&T Additional bus stop to be built opposite the existing bus stops on Glendore Road with the H

1 E&E

Installation of streetlights in the following areas:· along Hilltop Road, Lovemore Park· in Salisbury Park· in Theescombe

H

1 E&E

Upgrade electricity lines in:· Chelsea / Theescombe· Lovemore Park· Schoenmakerskop· Collen Glen

H

1 S&S

More visible policing by the Metro Police and law enforcement along Gomery Avenue,Summerstrand to assist with maintaining order with taxis in contravention of the law

H

1 S&S

More visible traffic officers and law enforcement in Lovemore Heights to assist with the existingspeeding problem

M

1 PH Creation of a new park area with play equipment on the c/o Glendore Road & Gladys Road M

1 PH

Upgrading of the park in Bernard Road, Lovemore Heights – the creation of an entrance/exit tothe park, fence and lighting

W

1 Construction of a refuse transfer station for household refuse in Theescombe H1 EDTA Develop the Summerstrand beachfront area along the Something Good Roadhouse area that H1 SRAC Upgrade ablution facilities: H1 SRAC • Pollock Beach H

1 SRAC • Pipe Beach H

2

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

1 SRAC

• Summerstrand Beacon H

1 SRAC

• Schoenmakerskop Beach H

1 SRAC • Flat Rocks H

1 SRAC

• Sardinia Bay Beach H

1 SRAC Construction of a new Lifeguard clubhouse / work station with ablution facilities M1 SRAC Construction of new board walk at Sardinia Bay Beach M1 SRAC Upgrade board walk along Summerstrand beachfront H1 SRAC Construction of outdoor gym at the Something Good beachfront area W1 SRAC Provision of cycling tracks along the following roads: W

1 SRAC

• Marine Drive: Summerstrand Beacon to Schoenmakerskop W

1 SRAC

• Victoria Drive to Sardinia Bay Beach along Sardinia Bay Road W

1 SRAC

• Lakeside Road to Glendore Road W

1 SRAC

• Kragga Kamma Road – from 17th Avenue to Old Seaview Road W

1 SRAC

• New Seaview Road – from Bushy Park to Seaview W

1 SRAC Metro Service Centre – to be built on Erf 1450, Summerstrand W1 SRAC The Metro Service Centre should include: W1 SRAC • Community Hall W

1 SRAC • Library W

1 SRAC • Ward Office W

1 SRACBeach promenade along Something Good beachfront area with concrete art M

1 I&E Replace fresh water pipes along Admiralty Way and Brewer Road, Summerstrand W

3

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

1 I&E Servitude between Bradley Avenue & Admiralty Way to be upgraded and fitted with new lighting H1 I&E Deepening of the Boundary Lane Dam to prevent future floods – Mount Pleasant H1 I&E Sewage line along Greenways Road to be upgraded – Lovemore Heights M

WARD 22 HS Finalizing and promulgation of a formal student accommodation policy to properly address the H2 R&T Traffic circle at intersection of Strandfontein and McArthur, Summerstrand (has been on IDP for H2 R&T Permanent solution to address taxi problems in front of Boardwalk casino H

2 R&T Pavements in Summerstrand (Retirement Village) H

2 R&T Speed humps in Forest Hill H

2 I&E Upgrade ageing infrastructure H

2 I&E

Water and irrigation - Cape Recife return effluent water supply scheme to be prioritized (southern beachfront) for servicing of beachfront non-potable water needs and create a new revenue stream

2 SRAC

Make provision for additional lifeguards and training up to peace beachfront aquatic safety officer level to improve beachfront safety and security and by-law enforcement.

M

2 SRAC

Refurbish and upgrade: · Hobie Beach toilets· Octagon toilets

H

2 SRAC Finalize expression of interest / request for proposals for redevelopment of Kings Beach M2 SRAC Improve beachfront children's play areas and playground equipment W2 SRAC Landscaping and irrigation at Hobie Beach recreational areas H2 SRAC Formalize entrance to King’s Beach W

2 SRAC Metro to establish future use for Hobie yacht club facility M

2 SRAC Refurbish southern beachfront walkways M

2 SRAC Purchase surf rakes and tractors for Blue Flag beach maintenance and cleansing H

2 SRAC Elmery Crescent children play area W

2 EDTA

Bayworld upgrade and refurbishment - MBDA to continue with public participation and redevelopment plans

W

2 EDTA Formalize trading areas for hawkers around Hobie beach precinct M

4

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

2 EDTA

Develop and implement policy to stimulate local economic development via advertising and allocation of beachfront trading concessions and investigation of implementing nodal development

H

2 EDTA

Telkom Park must be demolished and Request for Proposals advertised, calling for development proposals (MBDA)

H

2 EDTA Finalize Kings Beach and Happy Valley Local Spatial Development Framework M

2 EDTA Upgrade Something Good Pump station M

2 S&S Improve beachfront lighting and security H

2 S&S Upgrade parking Hobie Beach W

2 Health

South End Cemetery – replace existing fencing with palisade fencing to ensure residents’ safety M

2 Health Forest Hill Cemetery - upgrade ablution blocks and replace boundary fence to address frequent H2 Health Upgrade of beach area between Happy Valley and Hobie Beach (landscaping) M2 Health Dune rehabilitation and maintenance Southern Beachfront W2 Health Upgrade grass area opposite Courtyard Hotel to create a landscaped additional parking area M2 Health Removal of alien vegetation H

2 Health Ward-Based Greening – planting of additional indigenous trees throughout Ward M

2 Health

Establish formal recycling facilities at Strandfontein refuse transfer station / Recycling in general

2 Health Upgrade security of Strandfontein refuse transfer station H

2 E&E

Upgrading street lighting – priority route – La Roche Drive from Beach Road/Marine Drive toForest Hill and Allister Miller Drive (Airport road)

H

2 E&E Improve beachfront lighting and security H

2 Other

Enter into negotiations with Province / Transnet in respect of saving the Apple Express andinvestigate line concession.

H

2 Other Community based school programmes to address social issues i.e. Drug abuse, sex education M3 WARD 33 HS HUMAN SETTLEMENTS3 HS Rectification of houses built pre-1994 in Walmer H

3 S&S SAFETY AND SECURITY

5

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

3 S&S Opening up of Walmer Police Station during convenient hours H3 EDTA ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT TOURISM AND AGRICULTURE3 EDTA Proper management of Walmer Enterprise Village H

WARD 44 HS Approval of Site 11 305 must be fast-tracked H

4 HS Houses for People with Disabilities be prioritized H

4 R&T Tarring of Gravel Road in Ntakumba Street H

4 E&E Increase of budget for electrifying informal settlements H

4 S&S Mobile Police Station required in deeper parts of Walmer Township H

4 S&S Improved response time for Fire Emergency Services H

4 EDTA Budget be set aside for Youth Empowerment Programmes H

4 EDTA Youth development Centre and Walmer youth participation in the Centre H

4 SRAC Budget required for Youth Sports Centre H4 CS Provide Computers in Libraries that are accessible to those who are blind – Job Access With H4 CS Financial injection to projects implemented by PWDs H

4 CS Financial injection to Special Projects Unit to implement community projects H

4 I&E Eradication of bucket toilets H

4 I&E Improved drainage system in Walmer Township H

4 I&E Address the water leak in the Ward H

4 I&E Provision of infrastructure in Airport Valley HWARD 5

5 HS Social housing construction project in the area yet there is no infrastructure. H5 HS Enforcement of Municipal zoning and consent conditions in the Ward H5 R&T Installation of speed humps in Mt Croix towards the primary school H5 R&T Installation of pedestrian traffic light at the crossing of Cape Road and Bingley Street H

5 R&T Painting of road markings in Mt Croix H

5 R&T Installation of a speed hump in Cape Road and Bingley Street crossing H

6

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

5 R&T

Repair and maintain pavements in the following areas:· North End· Central· Richmond Hill

H

5 R&T Installation of traffic calming measures in Scanlen Street in Mt Croix H

5 R&T

Installation of the No Dumping / No Drinking sign at the following areas:· Travalger Square· Museum Street· Richmond Hill Park· Trinder Square· Hazelhurst / Turvey Erf 1995 (Mt Road) and· Erf 518 in North End

H

5 S&S

Requesting traffic control near Erica girls primary school, residents complaining about trafficissues such as heavy taxi flow.

H

5 S&S

Installation of surveillance cameras in:· Central· North End· Stanley Street· Rink Streets· Strand Street and taxi ranks

H

5 I&E Maintenance of servitudes in Mt Croix between: · Eastborne and Clevedon Roads from H5 I&E Replacement and maintenance of all manholes, drainage and fire hydrants H

5 PH Upgrade and maintenance of parks H

5 PH Provide gym and playground equipment H

5 PH Construction of public toilets in North End and Central H

5 PH

Transfer station for recycling garden refuse in the Ward (site identified in Richmond Hill) H

5 PH Provide wheely bins for flats in Central and North End H

5 PH Appointment of litter pickers in North End and Central H

7

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

5 SRAC Upgrade and maintenance of recreational facilities H

5 E&E Maintenance of Street lights in the Ward H

5 EDTA

Construction of a Multi-purpose centre in Erf 854 to cater for skills development for young people H

5 Other Demolition of old Khumbulani High School in Leyland Street (North End) HWARD 6

6 R&T William Moffatt Drive rehabilitation and upgrading H

6 R&T Glen Hurd Drive Upgrade H

6 R&T Widening of 17th Avenue H

6 R&T Widening of Circular Drive H

6 R&T Traffic Circle at Walter Road and Miles Avenue, Charlo H

6 R&T Widening of road from railway line into Carrington Road to Circular Drive M6 R&T Construction and provision of verges and sidewalks along Willow Drive for pedestrian usage H6 R&T Construction and provision of bus and other public transport embayments in Fairview and H6 R&T Provision of public transport services in Fairview and Overbaakens areas H6 R&T Traffic calming measures: Timothy Street Charlo, Margery Avenue Charlo, Oak Road Fairview, M6 R&T Cycle track in Charlo along railway line W

6 R&T Comprehensive Traffic assessment of ward H

6 E&E

Erection of permanent substation, William Moffatt Expressway, to replace existing temporary structure

H

6 E&E

Maintenance of streetlights and installation of further streetlights in Overbaakens, Fairview, Pinelands

H

6 E&E Lighting for John Avenue walkway to Margery Avenue, Charlo M

6 E&E Lighting for Heather bank Reservoir between Broadwood and Lovemore Heights M6 S&S Enforcement of and improvement of by-laws related to unkept private erven H6 S&S Enforcement of and improvement of by-laws related to businesses in residential areas H

6 S&S

Ongoing law enforcement in respect of speeding in Walter Road, Constance Road, Circular Drive and Martin Road Charlo

H

6 S&S Installation of traffic cameras in Circular Drive and Walter Road, Charlo H

6 S&S Roving traffic cameras for the ward H

8

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

6 PH Clearing of illegal dumping in Fairview H

6 PH Identification and development of municipal waste transfer site in Fairview M

6 PH Clearing bushes in public open spaces H

6 PH Clearing overgrowth in 3rd Avenue Dip to prevent flooding H

6 PH Clearing overgrowth under bridge on William Moffatt Expressway to prevent flooding H

7 WARD 77 E&E Attend to Illegal connections H

7 E&E Provision of lights for Newton Park parks M

7 E&E Installation of new improved lights for Schauderville and Holland Park H7 E&E Reduction in electricity tariffs (big businesses) H7 B&T Keep high rates increase to a minimum H7 CS Converting of old SABS building to serve the community H

7 CS Skills development H

7 SRAC

Provide playground equipment in the Ward in the following areas:· Beatty Place· Maple Square· Richter Crescent· Searle Road

H

7 SRAC Construction of a sports field in Holland Park and Schauderville H

7 SRAC Upgrade sport field in Mooredyke H

7 SRAC Build a Multi-purpose sports centre at Erf 4244, Korsten in Moore Dyke Area H7 PH Replace stolen Drain Covers H7 PH Upgrade sewage infrastructure in Holland Park H7 PH Building of a waste transfer station in Grumpit Street (ifo Marina House H

7 PH Building of a waste transfer station top of Jan Hofmeyer Street next to Mooredyke H

7 R&T

Upgrade of Burt Drive (from 3rd to 7th Avenue, Newton Park) and construction of Traffic Circles M

9

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

7 R&T

Construction of Speed Humps in Mary Boyd (between Mc Hardy and Poplar Avenue, Holland Park)

H

7 R&T Construction of Speed Humps in front of Westview School H

7 R&T Tarring of all circles in Schauderville M

7 R&T Tarring and upgrading of Westview Drive W

7 R&T

Construction of Traffic Circle at intersection of Kestell and Rochelle Road, Perridgevale (Collegiate School)

H

7 R&T Traffic calming measures- Rumble strips in Worracker Str, Newton Park (3rd Avenue) W

7 R&T Glen Hurd Drive Upgrade W

7 R&T Construction of Link Road between Restitution and Glen Hurd Drive W

7 R&T Comprehensive Traffic Assessment for Newton Park H

7 R&T

Traffic calming measures:· Gerald Street, Newton Park· Handsworth Street, Glen Hurd· Hudson Street, Newton Park· Cecil Street, Newton Park· Kinnersley Street, Newton Park

W

7 R&T Sidewalks in Schauderville H

7 R&T Traffic calming (traffic circle / traffic lights) at Handsworth and 3rd Ave, Newton Park H

7 R&T Traffic calming (traffic lights) at Diaz and Kingston Road H7 PH Accommodation for 300 backyard dwellers (Erf 4335) H8 WARD 88 R&T Upgrade Circular Drive H

8 R&T Widening of Kragga Kamma Road H

8 R&T Sell IPTS busses M

8 R&T Upgrade of Montmedy Road in Lorraine H

8 R&T

Upgrading f Kabega Road between Kragga Kamma Road and the intersection of Kabega Road and Frikkie Kotze Drive, including the low water bridge between Jill Avenue and Frikkie Kotze Drive

H

10

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

8 R&T Construct sidewalks on the western side of Kabega Road H

8 R&T Pedestrian / Cycle path for Verdun Road and Montmedy Road H

8 R&T Upgrading of Riverstone Road in Sherwood / Kabega H

8 R&T Construction of bus embayments throughout the Ward H

8 R&T

Construction of traffic circles with speed humps in:· Thionville / Verdun / Longwy Avenue in Kamma Park· Helen’s Way / Carstens / Ben Fleur Avenue in Kamma Creek· Luneville / Vitry Avenue in Lorraine· Kabega / Frikkie Kotze Drive in Kabega Park· Northumberland / Avondale Road in Kabega Park· Outeniekwa / Montmedy Road in Kamma Park· Longwy / Montmedy Road in Lorraine· Sedan / Montmedy Road in Lorraine· Nancy / Montmedy Road in Loraine

H

8 B&T Rates reduction H8 B&T Keep rate increases low H8 EDTA Job creation (EPWP) H8 EDTA Increase investment opportunities H8 EDTA Entrepreneurship Support H

8 I&E Upgrading of stormwater and sewerage infrastructure H8 I&E Upgrading of water pipes in the following Roads: H8 I&E • Vitry H

8 I&E • Macon H

8 I&E • Metz H

8 I&E • Verdun H

8 Develop part of Sedan Park (Erf 206 Lorraine) for the use of people with disabilities H

9 WARD 99 HS Relocation of street children and vagrants on municipal property

11

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

9 R&T Stormwater / water infrastructure upgrade (throughout the ward)9 R&T Upgrading of arterial routes: 9 R&T • Additional lane (Kragga Kamma Road, Sunridge Park)9 R&T • Traffic lights at Frikkie Kotze / Kabega Road9 R&T • Samantha Way off-ramp upgrade9 R&T • Bus / taxi embayment (Sunridge Park and Westering / Linton Grange)

9 R&T

• Left hand lane at the intersection at the Cape Road and Bramlin Street to be changed to a left turn only lane

9 R&T Road maintenance e.g. fixing of potholes, resurfacing roads etc. (throughout the ward)

9 R&T Upgrading of Baakens River sewer, Sunridge Park9 R&T Traffic calming measures / traffic circles in the Ward:

9 R&T

• Neville Street, Currie Crescent, Van Riebeeck Street, Bramlin Street, Moregrove Road, Boshoff Street, Bougainvillea Drive, Corner of Fourie and Van Wyk Street – Westering

9 R&T • Samantha Way- Framesby9 R&T • Cassia Drive, Circular Drive, Gazania Ave-Sunridge Park9 R&T Maintenance of street names and street markings (throughout the Ward)

9 R&T Erecting of bus shelters in ward9 E&E Additional lighting required:9 E&E • James Kleynhans Swimming Pool, Western9 E&E • Cnr Errol Drive and Smeeton Road , Frameby9 E&E • Circle at intersection of Errol Drive & Hawthorne Avenue, Framesby9 E&E • Kragga Kamma Road, Maria Street, Framesby

9 E&E

• Two (2) pedestrian bridges (in vicinity of St Marks School and Framesby High School) Westering

9 E&E • Open Public space in Boshoff Street, Westering9 S&S By-law enforcement (illegal businesses and street vendors)9 PH Upgrading of open spaces / playground equipment (including cutting of grass)9 EDTA Relocation of street vendors

12

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

9 EDTA Building of Multi-Purpose centres 9 SRAC Monitoring and upgrading of Linton Grange Library 9 CS Development of Community Hall

10 WARD 10

10 HS

The relocation of Malabar entrance shack dwellers to Malabar housing project: 25 families H

10 HS Adcock Old Age Homes Continuous Upgrading W

10 HS Elizabeth Stuurman Old Age Homes Upgrading M

10 HS

Fill in of vacancies for Staff at two Old Age Homes: Adcock & Elizabeth Stuurman –Extremely Urgent

H

10 HS

10 R&T Provision of Sidewalks: 10 R&T • Dinsmore Road , Schauderville H

10 R&T • Neave Street, Schauderville M

10 R&T • Searle Road, Schauderville – Ward 10 section H W

10 R&T • Beetlestone Road, Gelvan Park M

10 R&T • Gail Road, Gelvandale W

10 R&T • Hislop Street, Gelvandale10 R&T Rehabilitation of Streets in : • Springbok Street, Gelvandale H

10 R&T Rehabilitation of Streets in :· Hislop Street, Gelvandale H

10 R&T Rehabilitation of Streets in :· Wagenaar Street, Gelvandale M

10 R&T Rehabilitation of Streets in :· Liebenberg Road, Gelvandale M

10 R&T Rehabilitation of Streets in :· Raphael crescent, Gelvan Park W

10 R&T Rehabilitation of Streets in :· Springbok Street, Gelvandale H

10 Public lighting – most urgent requirement in Schauderville and Gelvandale H

10 Fencing and secure of substations M

10 S&S Provide CCTV Security Cameras: H

10 S&S • Cnr Gail Road and Stanford Road - Gelvandale H

13

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

10 S&S • Cnr Springbok Street and Goliath Crescent - Gelvandale H

10 S&S • Cnr Avalon Crescent and van Duuren Street - Gelvandale H

10 S&S • Corner Dinsmore Road and Lawler Street - Schauderville H

10 S&S New traffic signs in the Ward – currently non existent H

10 PH Provide Transfer Station - Schauderville H

10 PH Installation of the No Dumping boards in the ward M

10 SRAC

Additional budget to complete Gelvandale stadiums roof and electronic equipment for timing andscoreboard

H

10 SRAC Fencing of Gelvandale stadium parking lot H

10 SRAC Equipment for sporting codes at Gelvandale stadium W

10 SRAC Development of parks in the ward – Schauderville and Gelvandale H

10 SRAC Development of outdoor gym with equipment M

10 SRAC Upgrading of existing parks W

10 SRAC Beautification of Cnr of Aubrey Street & Kobus Road area M

10 SRAC Development of the Springdale Sports field W

11 WARD 1111 HS Housing required in the Algoa Park / Schauderville and Korsten H

11 HS Freeing up vacant pockets of land in Schauderville to build high density units H

11 R&T Address traffic congestion problems at Dube Road in Algoa Park H

11 R&T Tarring of the Three (03) Circles in the Ward H

11 R&T Refurbishment of Ditchling Road between Algoa Park and Young Park H

11 R&T Refurbishment of Durban Road between Jackson Street and Kempston Road H

11 E&E Electrification of Informal Settlements H

11 E&E Provide Street lights in close proximity to the Cemetery H

11 S&S Intersection between Gamble Street and Stanford Road needs urgent attention H

11 PH

Upgrading and development of public open spaces / playground equipment (including cutting of grass) in Algoa Park and Young Park

H

11 PH Establishment of a Dumping Site in Algoa Park H

11 SRAC Upgrade of sports fields H

14

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

11 I&E Upgrade of public toilets H

12 WARD 1212 HS Provision of houses H

12 S&S CCTV Cameras requested H12 S&S Visibility of Metro Police in the following areas: H12 EDTA Create jobs for local contractors and use local labour H

12 PH Removal of bushes in certain dangerous areas in the Ward H

12 PH Elimination of illegal dumping H

12 PH Installation of the No Dumping Signs H

12 PH Provision of park equipment and fencing of park in Stream Street H

12 PH Provision of outdoor gym in Saliehout Street H

12 PH Beautification of Bridgemead Bridge H

12 R&T Tarring of Terblanche and Crammer Streets in Malabar and parking area H

12 R&T Road markings need urgent attention H

12 R&T Correct street names must be installed in Antelope Crescent Park H

12 R&T Provision of sidewalks suitable for People with Disabilities H

12 R&T Fixing of potholes in Springbok and Terblanche Streets H

12 R&T Improvements on road markings and street signage requested H

12 R&T Re-tarring of Selago Crescent and Ocean view Drive H

12 R&T

Traffic circles in:· Graveyard Corner Hawathia / Bramlin and· Old age home in Saliehout / Driedoom Street

H

12 E&E Provision of new street lights in Parsons Ridge and Parsons Vlei H

12 SRAC Provision and maintenance of sports facilities in Roan Crescent H

12 SRAC Provision of high mast lights in the Park area between Bunn and Saliehout Streets H

12 other Provision of a Mobile Clinic in Malabar H

13 WARD 1313 HS Housing development to incorporate Helenvale and Extension 6 (Malabar) H13 HS Relocation of backyard shacks H

15

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

13 HS Update the housing waiting list H13 HS Rectification of dilapidated houses due to high water tables H13 HS Implement the Bramlin Markman housing project H13 HS Attend to the 101 empty plots, Barcelona H

13 I&E

Attend to blocked storm water pipes in the following Streets:· Cnr Martin and Kobus · Chamois (At the bend )· Ibex Street (At the bend )· Fitchard and Old Stanford

H

13 I&E Maintenance of Canals in Barcelona, Bramlin Markman and Vigo H

13 E&E

Erection of high mast lighting in the following Streets:· Leith, Deverell, Pott and Bongo · Blesbok, Hartebees, and Stanford Road· Extension 12 Lanique, Anita Drive and Renecke

H

13 S&S Safety : Upgrade CCTV Cameras in the area H13 S&S Visible Metro Police H13 PH Removal of waste H13 PH EPWP workers be used to clean the Ward H13 PH Safety Officers to address taxi problems in the area H13 PH Implement environmental program by cleaning of rivers and streams H13 EDTA Cooperative & SMME Development H13 EDTA Used Environment in creating job opportunities (Groot Kloof-Helenvale) H13 EDTA Cleaning of graveyards through Co-operatives H13 SRAC Create job opportunities through sport H13 SRAC Sport field Development for Rugby / Netball / Cricket H13 SRAC Removal of bushes in dangerous areas H13 SRAC Tree trimming H13 SRAC Grass cutting H

16

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

13 SRAC Parks and beautification of Stanford Road H13 CS Implementation of skills development programmes H13 CS Provide capacity building programmes for Ward Committees H13 CS Interns allocated to Ward Councillors Offices H13 B&T Provide budget for Ward Based Plan projects H14 B&T WARD 1414 HS Adcock Homes Upgrading H

14 HS Blockage of drains and toilets that need to be rectified H

14 HS Build houses for backyard dwellers as there is a backlog of backyard dwellers H

14 HS Rectification of pre 1994 houses in the Ward H

14 HS Cleaning of stormwater drains in the Ward H

14 R&T Completion of the upgrading of Dubula Street H

14 R&T

Fixing of potholes in the following Streets· Ntladi· Gqamlana· Connacher

H

14 R&T Clear road marking for speed humps and pedestrian crossing in the entire ward. H

14 R&T Installation of robots at Ferguson Road opposite Nguna and Jolobe Street H

14 R&T Build roads that are suitable for PWDs

14 R&T

Reconstruction of the following Streets:· Tshiwula· Msimka· Yokwe· Ncwana· Teya· Aggrey

H

14 R&T

Traffic calming measures in the following Streets:· Nikiwe · Ntshinga

H

17

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

14 E&E

Maintenance of Street lights in:· Ngesi· Ferguson· Nqadini· Mendi

H

14 E&E Maintenance of all flood lights in the Ward. H

14 E&E Re- implementing the geyser project H

14 E&E Provide high mast light in Embizweni Square H

14 S&S Increase of police visibility in the Ward H

14 S&S

Employment of security for all the schools in the ward as it is a haven of crime and drug abuse H

14 S&S Creation of budget for the ward patrollers H14 S&S Workshops to inform the community about Gender Based violence and assist in protecting the H

14 Other

New Brighton Clinic needs renovation and painting of building, blocked toilets and a toilet for people with disabilities patients

H

14 Other New Brighton Clinic requires installations of surveillance cameras H

14 Other Shortage of medication and equipment like Blood Pressure machines H

14 Other Address staff shortages in the Clinic H

14 EDTA

Workshop and road shows for SMMEs, Cooperatives and NGOs to assist them with business skills

H

14 EDTA Host a workshop for SMMEs on bidding for tenders H

14 EDTA Increase funding of startup capital for SMMEs, NPOs and NGOs H

14 EDTA

Employ security for Emlotheni Memorial Site to address high crime and illegal activities H

14 SRAC Create performance hall for artist to utilize and provide a workshop H

14 SRAC Provide recording studios, equipment, PA system and Videography H

14 SRAC

Upgrade of sports fields by creating changing rooms and maintenance of the sports fields H

14 SRAC Need stage Manager at Mendi Arts Center and Security H

14 SRAC Upgrade of City Lads sports ground H

18

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

14 SRAC Outdoor training equipment for the community usage H

14 CS Conversion of the Old Bhekile Beer Hall into a Youth Development Center H

14 CS Computer center for Youth, women and People with Disabilities H

14 CS

Free Wi Fi in order for school children and tertiary one to be able to access the Internet for free H

14 CS Capacity building workshops for the Ward Committees H

14 CS Assisting of women, People with Disabled and children with the necessary skills H

14 B&T Lowering of rates in the ward due to minimum earning households. H

14 B&T

Host awareness workshops / roadshows to inform the community about free basic services provided by the municipality

H

14 B&T Speed up provision of ATTP to deserving people in the ward H

14 B&T

Increase budget allocation for:· roof rectification· storm water and · upgrading of drainage system

H

15 WARD 1515 I&E Maintenance of drainage system in Mtiya Street

15 I&E Bucket eradication programme – container toilets H

15 I&E Sewerage Pump Station – maintenance backlog H

15 I&E Maintenance of drains in the Ward H

15 I&E Maintenance of sidewalks at White Location H

15 I&E Upgrade of the drainage system in Elundini and White Location M15 E&E Provision of streetlights in White Location15 E&E Attend to faulty Street lights from Ferguson Road to Deal Party15 E&E Repairing of high mast at Ntintili Street, H15 E&E Repairing of damaged sub-station at Yaya Street H15 SRAC Develop Callies Football Club playground H

15 SRAC Supply of goal poles at City defenders Football Club ground H

19

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

15 SRAC Maintenance of grass at City Defenders Football Club ground H

15 SRAC Upgrading of Red City Football Club ground H

15 SRAC Fencing of Yaya Street dumping place and convert it into a Golf Course H

15 SRAC Upgrading of hall at Masangwana village to accommodate Judo and Karate H

15 SRAC Upgrading of sports centre in Zola Street H

15 SRAC Construct a gym centre in Ramba Street H

15 CS Create jobs for Graduates H15 CS Training of Ward Committees on report writing and conflict resolution skills H15 CS Provision of tools of trade for Ward Committees e.g. phones etc. H15 CS Youth capacitation on how to start businesses M15 CS Attend to unemployed graduates programmes H15 CS Building of a community hall in Ximiya Street H

15 EDTA Opening of the Red Location Museum H

15 EDTA Attend to Back Packers challenges H

15 EDTA Opening of Art Gallery H

15 EDTA Provide assistance to Mzobomvu gardening project H

15 EDTA Provide stalls for informal traders H

15 EDTA Provide training opportunities for women H

15 EDTA Convert Old Ndokwenza in Singaphi Street into a Business Centre H

15 PH

Regular waste removal in the following areas:· Block 40· Yaya Street· Avenue D

H

15 PH Upgrade and development of Public open spaces M

15 R&T

Attend to potholes in the following areas:· Avenue B· Avenue E and · In Deal Party opposite Novoboard

H

15 R&T Tarring of: H

20

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

15 R&T • Silvertown H

15 R&T • Pushy Vena gravel Road H

15 R&T • 7th, 8th and 10th Streets H

15 R&T • Zola and H

15 R&T • Yaya Streets H

15 R&T Resurfacing Yaya and Mnqandi Streets H15 R&T Speed humps in: H15 R&T • Sheya Kulati H

15 R&T • Avenue A H

15 R&T • Singaphi Streets H

15 R&T Barriers in Yaya and Ntintili Streets H

15 R&T Maintain robots at the corner of Harmaans Street H

15 R&T Paving of circles in Silvertown H

15 S&S Establishment of Community Police Forum H

15 S&S Taverns must be closed on time H

15 S&S Metro Police visibility is requested H

15 HS Block 40, need top structure: info structure has been done (2013) H

15 HS Provision of houses for backyard dwellers H

15 HS Provision of houses for the destitute people in the Ward H

15 HS Rectification of roofing in White Location H

15 HS Rectification of the pre 1994 houses H

15 HS Refine the backyard dwellers waiting list H

15 Other Address staff shortage in the Clinic H

15 Other Build a waiting room in the Clinic H

15 Other Police visibility H

15 Other Mobile Police Station requested H

15 Other Railway flats residents need ownership H

16 WARD 16

21

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

16 EDTA Construction of a carwash in: H16 EDTA • Mahambehlala Street and H

16 EDTA • Corner Avenue A and Gunguluza H16 SRAC Upgrade (provide change room, fencing and grassing) of sport field in: H16 SRAC Upgrade of Winter Rose sports field in Kota Street H

16 CS Building of a community hall in Mahambehlala Street H

16 CS Renovation of Councillor’s Office H16 R&T Construction of sidewalks in: H16 R&T • Bekwa H

16 R&T • Nginza H

16 R&T • Ngxovu H

16 R&T • Ross H

16 R&T • Nozewu H

16 R&T • Mahambehlala and al the new streets at MK Qaqawuli Area H16 R&T Provide speed humps in: H16 R&T • Mahambehlala H

16 R&T • Mandela H

16 R&T • Nozewu and H

16 R&T • Avenue A H16 PH Development of community parks at MK Qaqawula Area H16 PH Provision of outdoor gym equipment H

16 PH Beautification and maintenance of Lungelo lake as a tourist destination H

16 E&E Provision of streets light throughout the Ward H

16 E&E Provision of high mast lights at strategic spots in the Ward H16 HS Rectification of Tshangana Flats, pre 1994 houses, Red Location, Aloes (Swartkops) H16 HS Relocation of 30 families in informal settlement H

16 HS Roof rectification of the pre 1994 houses H

16 I&E

Maintenance of ageing infrastructure in Tshangana Flats, pre 1994 houses, Red Location, Aloes (Swartkops)

H

22

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

17 WARD 17

17 EDTA

Increase the budget allocated to the Multi-Purpose Centre / Multi-Purpose Sports field(Masangwana Primary School)

H

17 EDTA Increase support to cooperatives H17 EDTA Finalization of the policy for SMMEs H17 R&T Tarring of: H17 R&T • Msimka H

17 R&T • Stokwe H

17 R&T • Dubu H

17 R&T • Dubula and H

17 R&T • Tshangane Streets H17 R&T Provision of sidewalks in: H17 R&T • Sangotsha H

17 R&T • Tsewu and H

17 R&T • Thabata Streets H17 R&T Maintenance of speed humps throughout the Ward H17 SRAC Develop a sport club house and fencing of Zondi sports field M17 SRAC Increase the budget for the construction of a swimming pool H17 PH Upgrade and fencing of play parks M17 PH Increase salary and extend contracts for litter pickers H17 PH Provision of outdoor gym equipment H17 HS Rectification of Qaqawuli and Pre 1994 houses H17 HS Relocation in Chris Hani H17 E&E Provision and maintenance of street lights in the following Streets H17 E&E • Sangotsha H

17 E&E • Tsewu H

17 E&E • Stokwe H

17 E&E • Msimka H

17 E&E • Hlawula H

23

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

17 E&E • Qaqawuli H

17 E&E • Tshangana H17 E&E Provision of street lights in: H17 E&E • Thabata Park H

17 E&E • Tshangana H

17 E&E • Dubu and H

17 E&E • Dubula Streets H

18 WARD 1818 HS Housing rectification M

18 HS Rectification of 27 houses in Grogro H

18 HS Review of the 2004 housing list H

18 HS Construction of houses in Ebongweni and Mandela Village H

18 Speaker Development of a Humanitarian Fund Policy H

18 R&T Provide speed humps generally in the Ward H18 R&T Tarring of six (6) Streets in Noxolo Area H18 E&E Provide street light in Njoli Road opposite the garage H

18 S&S Deployment of Metro Police in streets where there are taverns H

18 S&S Roll out of drug awareness programme H

18 S&S Crime prevention H

18 SRAC Upgrade of sport field in Ngene Street H

18 CS Build a Community Hall in Noxolo Area in Boom Street H

18 Provision of a Clinic in the Ward H

18 Fencing of parks and provision of outdoor gym H

18 Beautification and upgrade of Ichibi into a tourist attraction destination H

18 Attend to blocked drains throughout the Ward H

19 WARD 1919 HS Houses for Ekuphumleni,Dongweni and Urban foundation communities H

19 HS Rectification of RDP houses (Mbilini) M

19 HS Provide land for churches M

24

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

19 HS Build houses for the 32 families H

19 HS Build houses for Inkatha (Seyisi) H

19 HS Relocations in Ekuphumleni and Dongweni H

19 HS Survey land for informal settlement in Endulwini H

19 HS Rectification of pre 1994 houses H

19 I&E Maintenance of stormwater drainage M

19 R&T Tarring of roads H

19 R&T Provision of speed humps M

19 E&E Provision of electricity for informal settlements H

19 E&E Provision of street lights and maintenance of high mast lights H

19 S&S Implement crime prevention initiatives H19 PH Cleaning of dumping sites and create jobs H19 PH Provision of outdoor gyms H

19 PH Fencing of open spaces in Mnyanda Street H

19 SRAC Upgrade and fencing of Dynamos Football sports fields H

19 SRAC Upgrade of Wolfson Stadium H19 SRAC Renovate, provide water and electricity in the SANCO house and consider to convert it into an H19 SRAC Conversion of Urban Foundation into a customer care and Library H

19 B&T Construction of a Customer Care Centre H

19 Elimination of illegal connections H

19 Provision of street lights in KwaNontshinga Area and Boqo Street H

19 Maintenance of street lights throughout the ward H19 other Address the problem of increase in the number of shebeens in the Ward20 WARD 2020 HS Rectification of pre 1994 houses in Matthew Goniwe H

20 I&E Urgently attend to water leakages H

20 I&E Maintenance of drains H

20 R&T Attend to Road markings and speed humps H

20 E&E Attend to problems of electricity tempering H

25

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

20 S&S Provide Traffic Officers near schools for kids crossing the road H

20 SRAC SPORT, RECREATION, ARTS AND CULTURE20 SRAC Upgrade and provide parks and outdoor gyms H

20 other Police patrol requested H

21 WARD 2121 HS Rectification of pre 1994 houses H

21 HS Raymond Mhlaba top structure H

21 HS Update the 2003 housing waiting list H

21 I&E Upgrade stormwater drains in Tambo Village H

21 R&T Increase budget for resurfacing of roads H21 R&T Widening of the following Roads: H21 R&T • Matomela H

21 R&T • Kuzwayo and H

21 R&T • Mahambehlala H21 R&T Tarring of gravel roads in the following streets: (Mandela and Rolihlahla Villages) H21 R&T • Ngoyi H

21 R&T • Hani Crescent H

21 R&T • Kayingo H

21 R&T • Mahlangu H

21 R&T • Mbeki H

21 R&T • Ntsangana H

21 R&T • Mapipa H

21 R&T • Mbashe and H

21 R&T • Awu street H

21 E&E Provide street lights and high mast lights in Corner Mavuso, Daku and Seyisi H

21 E&E Street lights at Raymond Mhlaba H

21 E&E Provide electricity for communities in Raymond Mhlaba H

21 E&E Provide infrastructure for the Fezekile Building H

21 CS Renovate Councillor’s Office H

26

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

21 CS Building of a community hall H

21 SRAC Convert gap taps into playfields H

21 SRAC Building of KwaZakhele swimming pool H

21 SRAC Upgrade Mzontsundu sports ground into a multi-purpose sport facility H

21 EDTA Development of the Fezekile building for local Traders and small businesses H

21 PH Support ward based cooperatives to clean the Ward H

21 B&T Customer Care Centre to service ward 16,17,18,19,20,21,22, and 24 H

21 other Conversion of ILungelo School into a Youth Resource Centre H

22 WARD 2222 HS Demolish St Nelson Hospital H

22 HS Rectification of roofs in 24 houses in Solomon Mahlangu H

22 R&T Provide speed humps H

22 R&T Tarring of 3 side streets in Maronga near Njoli H

22 E&E Provide streetlights H

22 S&S Deploy Metro Police in the area H

22 B&T Increase budget for Njoli Development H

22 CS Accessibility of Councillor’s Offices to People with Disabilities H

22 CS Provide furniture for Councillor’s Office H

22 PH PUBLIC HEALTH22 PH Development of parks H

22 PH Provide outdoor gym equipment H

22 I&E Njoli Square development to be fast tracked H

23 WARD 2323 HS Relocation of backyard shark dwellers H

23 HS Rectification of Ramaphosa Phase NU2 Motherwell H

23 R&T Tarring of all circles in the Ward H23 R&T Installation of traffic calming measures ( speed humps ) in the following areas: H23 R&T • Indwe H

27

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

23 R&T • Corner of Hobe and Khwalimanzi Streets, H

23 R&T • Gaba H

23 R&T • Pikoko H

23 R&T • L.L.Sebe opposite Kaunda Street H

23 R&T • Ngxangxosi opposite Sangxa H

23 R&T Fixing of potholes in L.L.Sebe Street H

23 R&T

Provide Traffic circle and lights (corner of Kaulela and Khozi Street, and Corner of Kaulela Street and Maku Road

H

23 E&E

Provide Traffic circle and lights (corner of Kaulela and Khozi Street, and Corner of Kaulela Street and Maku Road

H

23 E&E Maintenance of all ward street lights H

23 E&E Installation of high master light close to NU2 clinic at Zamukulungisa Street. H

23 S&S

Deployment of safety and security officials to deal with cable theft and crime in the entire ward H

23 S&S Visibility of Metro Police in the Ward H

23 I&E

Maintenance of drains at corner of Makgato and Gawe Street, Maku Road and Matanzima Street NU2

H

23 I&E Maintenance of Stormwater canal H

23 I&E Repairs to Stormwater canal-close with Rocla pipes or cover with cement H23 I&E Rectification of toilets affected by road construction at NU2 square H23 PH Develop and upgrade all parks in the Ward H

23 PH Fencing and beautification of wetlands H

23 PH Elimination of illegal dumping in the Ward H

23 SRAC Development of a modular Library at NU2 community hall H

23 SRAC Provision of outdoor gym equipment at Nelson Mandela Peace Park H

23 SRAC

Development of informal sports field into formal sports field (between Kaulela street and Matanzima Street)

H

23 SRAC Identification of site for the building of Library H

23 SRAC Repairs, upgrading and completion of NU2 Stadium H

28

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

23 EDTA Construction of Nelson Mandela Peace Park (Phase 2) H

23 EDTA Development and provision of work opportunities for SMMEs H

23 EDTA Construction of Multi- Purpose sport complex H

23 CS Removal of a container in the Councillor’s Office to make it visible H

23 CS Provide parking space for parking inside the Councillor’s Office yard H

24 WARD 2424 HS Top structure required at Masakhane 125 sites H

24 HS Relocations and upgrading of houses in Soweto-on-Sea H

24 HS Rectification at Mhlaba Village – 18 outstanding houses H

24 HS Provide housing at Swartkops Silver Town and Sharpeville M

24 HS Prioritization of Zanemvula Project H

24 HS Delivery of housing in Pitoli H

24 R&T Resurfacing in Ngqondela, Tlalore and Ngwendu Streets M

24 R&T Installation of robots in intersection of Dibanisa and Khuzwayo Streets H

24 R&T Construction of speed humps in Mjamba, Qeqe and Ndongeni Streets M

24 R&T Repair of potholes H

24 R&T Road markings (Painting of all speed humps) M24 R&T Provide speed humps in the following Streets: H24 R&T • Mjamba H

24 R&T • Ndongeni H

24 R&T • Qeqe H

24 R&T • Salamntu H

24 R&T • Champion H

24 R&T • Ndongeni H

24 R&T • Ngqondela H

24 R&T • Makhubalo and H

24 R&T • Ngwendu H24 R&T Installation of Stop signs in H24 R&T • Corner of Samuel Street and H

29

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

24 R&T • Makubalo Streets H24 R&T Provide sidewalks in H24 R&T • Makubalo H

24 R&T • Ngqondela H

24 R&T • Tlalore and H

24 R&T • Mbilini Streets H24 R&T Provide steel barriers in the following Streets: H24 R&T • Njokweni H

24 R&T • Tlalore Street H

24 R&T • Ngqondela Street Corner Salamntu H

24 R&T • Qeqe Street H

24 R&T • Cnr Mjamba and Makubalo Streets H

24 R&T Daku and Dibanisa Road left side until end of houses en-route to Motherwell M24 E&E Repair Street lights in: H24 E&E • Salamntu and Sodladla Streets, Ngwendu and Kruisman (KwaZakhele) H

24 E&E • Ndongeni Street, Khumbulani Street and Champion Street (Soweto-on-Sea) H

24 E&E • Mjamba Street, Zwide H

24 E&E Repair Highmast lights: Silvertown H

24 E&E Removal of towers at the KwaZakhele Power Station H

24 S&S Metro Police Visibility H24 PH Elimination of illegal dumping in the following Streets in Soweto-on-Sea H24 PH • Kasril Canal H

24 PH • Qeqe H

24 PH • Sodladla H24 PH In Silvertown: H24 PH • Khuzwayo and H

24 PH • Mtetwa H

24 PH Litter picking – a request to extend the programme to a 12 months rotation H

24 PH Cleaning and fencing of the wetland H

30

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

24 PH Upgrade of open spaces between Bazi and Sodladla Streets into public parks H

24 PH Provide outdoor gym facilities for kids H

24 SRAC

Upgrade the Golden Aces Soccer field (Fencing, grass laying, installation of poles and change rooms)

H

24 SRAC

Development of the Young Romans Football Club field (Change rooms, Poles and Maintenance) H

24 SRAC Design and construct parking area outside the soccer fields H

24 SRAC Develop a swimming pool in the Corner of Nkewana and Boxongo Streets H

24 CS Provide a Community Hall H

24 CS Build the Ward Councillor’s Office H

24 CS Provide sign boards reflecting directions to Councillor’s Office H

24 CS Build a carport in the Councillor’s Office H

24 CS Provide security in the Councillor’s Office H

24 CS Appointment of customer care municipal official to service the Ward H24 I&E Maintenance of waste water channel from: H24 I&E • Kasril Canal H

24 I&E • Ndongeni and H

24 I&E • Sodladla Street along Chatty River H

24 I&E Extension of stormwater pipe in Kasril to the Chatty River H

25 WARD 2525 R&T Build an overhead bridge for pedestrians in National Road H

25 R&T Widening of 3 metre streets in New Look H

25 R&T Installation of speed humps in strategic areas in the Ward H

25 HS Rectification / renovation of old Zwide houses H

25 HS Provide housing for backyard dwellers and build toilets inside the houses H

25 CS Conversion of Zwide Rent Office into a Multi-Purpose centre H

25 SRAC Build an outdoor gym in open spaces H

25 EDTA Provision of support for co-operatives

25 PH Elimination of illegal dumping H

31

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

25 I&E Maintenance of stormwater drainage in the Ward H

25 Replacement of sewer pipes H

25 E&E Maintenance of street lights H

25 other Extension of Algoa Park Clinic H

26 WARD 2626 HS Rectification of houses H

26 I&E Attend to leaking drains in Endlovini H

26 I&E Development of a new stormwater drainage in the Ward H

26 PH Elimination of illegal dumping in Endlovini H

26 SRAC Investigate R4.4m rolled over for Pepco 3 and COSAS 5 Project H

26 SRAC Development of a soccer sports field at Celtic ground H

26 CS Humanitarian Fund must be increased to R200,000 H

26 CS Create programmes to reduce high unemployment rate in the Ward H

26 CS Employment of People with Disabilities H

26 CS Building of Councillor’s Office H

26 B&T Review ATTP Policy H

26 B&T Scrapping of account activation fee H

26 B&T Water accounts must be accurate H

26 R&T Provision of speed humps in: H

26 R&T • Qeqe H

26 R&T • Ngwekazi H

26 R&T • Kulati and H

26 R&T • Mabopa H

26 E&E Provision of street light in eNdlovini Area H

27 WARD 2727 HS Rectification of houses from Mbanga to Rholihlahla Streets H

27 HS

Overlapping of boundary walls because of small sites (between Mbanga and Rholihlahla area) H

27 HS Provision of houses H

32

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

27 HS Re-planning and relocation of small sites H

27 I&E Attend to leaking drains in Soweto H

27 I&E Attend to Sewer leakages in some houses H

27 I&E Upgrading of stormwater drainage system next to Soweto on Sea Primary H

27 E&E Installation of street lights in Mbanga and Hlanganisa Streets H

27 E&E Installation of high mast light between Soweto Primary and Community Hall H

27 S&S Address high crime rate in the area and Metro Police must assist H27 PH Maintenance of Public Open Spaces H27 PH Provision of outdoor gym equipment H

27 SRAC Reduce or scrap fees for hiring the Soweto MPCC H

27 SRAC Upgrade of sport fields at KwaNomzamo Area H

27 CS Skills development for the youth H

27 CS Request for assistance for a soup kitchen H

27 R&T Tarring of roads27 R&T Installation of speed humps in: H27 R&T • Samora H

27 R&T • Mpentse and H

27 R&T • Shaka H

27 R&T Review ATTP Policy H

27 EDTA Development of Soweto on Sea Square H

27 other Extension of the Clinic H

28 WARD 2828 HS Renovation of dilapidated building for rental use by business M

28 HS Rectification of houses in KwaJijana H

28 HS Rectification of houses in New Look H28 R&T Installation of steel barriers in the following streets: H28 R&T • Masoka H

28 R&T • Dlepu and H

28 R&T • Msengana H

33

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

28 I&E Repair water leakages in some yards H28 I&E Maintenance of drainage system in the streets throughout the ward M28 I&E Repair leaking toilets H28 E&E Repair and maintenance if high mast lights in the Ward H28 E&E Installation of high mast light and repair of streetlights in Kuwait H28 PH Elimination of illegal dumping H28 EDTA Establishment of cooperatives H

28 EDTA SMMEs development H

28 SRAC Provision of playground equipment H

28 S&S Installation of CCTV cameras in hotspot areas H

28 CS Training of Ward Committees H28 CS Skills development for youth H28 B&T Review ATTP Policy M

28 B&T Debt write-off for those who cannot afford H

29 WARD 2929 HS Relocation of the informal settlement in Vastrap and Qunu H29 HS Delivery of 600 outstanding houses in Greenfields H

29 HS Provision of housing list for Chatty 12 H

29 HS Resolve housing challenges in Nceba Faku area H

29 HS Rectification of houses in Vastrap and Phola Park H

29 HS Illegal occupants in Marikana to be verified H

29 HS Relocation from Phola Park H29 R&T Tarring of gravel roads in the following areas: H29 R&T • Auburn Street H

29 R&T • William Slammert Road H

29 R&T • Booysens Park Drive H29 R&T Construction of taxi rank H29 I&E Maintenance of drainage system H29 I&E Fixing of sewerage system H

34

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

29 I&E Attend to water leaks in Khayamnandi H

29 I&E Bucket eradication in Vastrap H29 I&E Provision of Jojo tanks H29 E&E Provide high mast lights H

29 E&E Installation of geysers H

29 SRAC Construction of new stadium or a soccer field H29 EDTA Finishing the Multi- Purpose community centre H29 EDTA Building of a shopping complex H

29 EDTA Participation of SMMEs in ward projects H

29 EDTA Request for assistance of farmers H

29 PH Building of community parks and provision of gym equipment H

29 PH Elimination of illegal dumping in Chatty 5 and Phola Park H

29 PH Removal of waste in Vastrap and Phola Park H

29 PH Develop a transfer centre in Chatty 5 H

29 PH Clearing of bush around Primary School in Chatty 11 H

29 CS Speed up completion of the Councillor’s Office H

29 CS Building of a Councillor’s Office in Khayamnandi H29 other Building a Police Station H29 other Building of a new clinic or extension of the existing clinic H

29 other Speedup completion of the Pilot Police Station H

29 other Building up of a Post Office in the designated area H

30 WARD 3030 HS Rectification of houses in Veeplaas H

30 HS Develop and replanning of small and vacant sites in KwaMagxaki H

30 HS Build social housing in KwaMagxaki H

30 HS Demolish dilapidated building in Cetu street, KwaMagxaki H

30 HS Demolish the unused shop in Veeplaas next to the Clinic H

30 R&T Installation of traffic lights / robots at KwaMagxaki two way stop (Cnr Mdoda and Cetu Streets) M

30 R&T Provision of sidewalks in Kani Road M

35

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

30 R&T Provision of speed humps M

30 R&T Tarring of Gongo Street H

30 PH Cleaning of open spaces where illegal dumping is a problem M

30 PH Provision of wheely bins M

30 PH Maintenance of play parks M30 PH Provide gym park H30 E&E Electrification of Nkanini and informal settlements H

30 I&E Sewer line in Veeplaas must be placed underground H

30 S&S Activate CCTV cameras in KwaMagxaki H

31 WARD 3131 HS Rectification of houses in Rholihlala H

31 HS Provide social Housing M

31 HS Housing for backyard shack dwellers M31 HS Rezone of four school site for housing urgently H31 HS Issuing out of title deeds to owners H31 HS Relocation of people in Vistarus to Joe Slovo West H31 HS Build new social houses in the Ward (Erf 1544, 1612, 3263) W31 HS Rectification of houses H31 HS Rectification of Balfour Heights (Smartietown) houses (phase one and two) M31 HS Finalization of pegging in Missionvale (Vistarus) H31 HS Finishing of the remaining 300 housing units for Garden Lots project H

31 I&E Fixing of non-functional toilets H31 I&E Naming of streets and numbering houses H31 I&E Filling or surfacing of water ponds / wetlands H31 R&T Traffic calming measures in the following Streets: H31 R&T • Dyke Road H

31 R&T • Bethelsdorp Road H

31 R&T • Old Uitenhage Road H

31 R&T • Colorado H

31 R&T • Tromp Road H

36

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

31 R&T • Siebritz Road H

31 R&T Upgrading of Old Uitenhage Road H

31 R&T Traffic light at Algoa Park near Missionvale Primary School H31 R&T Tarring or paving of all streets in Missionvale H

31 R&T

Construction of IPTS link road from Cleary Park to Missionvale via Old Uitenhage and Njoli Roads H

31 R&T Installation of traffic signs in Smarty Town for school children H31 R&T Tarring of Jack Road H31 R&T Clear Road markings on speed humps, pedestrian crossing and stops signs in: H

31 R&T • Ysterhoud Street, H

31 R&T • Hezel Road, H

31 R&T • Milkwood and H

31 R&T • Old Uitenhage Road H31 E&E Electrification of all shacks H31 E&E Provide underground infrastructure for Vistarus H31 E&E Maintenance of all high mast lights H31 E&E Upgrading of Missionvale pump station H31 PH Bush clearing along main routes / Bethelsdorp Road, Old Uitenhage Road and on the way to H31 PH Provide play-parks for children in: H31 PH • Algoa Park H

31 PH • Rholihlahla H

31 PH • Afrika Ground H

31 PH • GG Ground and H

31 PH • Khans Ground H31 PH Beautification and cleansing of Missionvale H31 PH Provide a Recycle Station / Site in Missionvale H31 PH Provide and increase litter pickers for: H31 PH • Balfour Heights H

31 PH • Vistarus H

31 PH • Rholihlahla and H

37

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

31 PH • Algoa Park H31 PH Installation of No Dumping signs H31 PH Planting of trees H

31 EDTA Building of a Car wash and Tyre Centre in Tromp Road and near Corsa Street H

31 EDTA Starting a gardening project in the ward H

31 EDTA

Having a centre for SMMEs and youth to start business and information centre with a restaurant H

31 EDTA Build a station centre for recycling H31 EDTA Construction of a Multi-purpose centre H31 Constit Training of Ward Committees H31 B&T Water bills to be written off for Missionvale community H31 B&T Increase the budget for tarring of Missionvale H

31 B&T Budget for infrastructure project for Vistarus H

31 SRAC Request for a Library in Missionvale H31 SRAC Upgrading of Missionvale sport field urgently and building of changing room, shower and toilets H31 SRAC Sport field (identification of land) Rholihlahla H31 other Provide a satellite Police Station at Missionvale next to Missionvale Clinic H31 other Extension of Clinic M

32 WARD 3232 HS Build social houses in old Windvogel Terminus M

32 HS Salt Lake: · Relocation of approved people to Chatty 12 and 13 H

32 HS Salt Lake: · Identifying land for housing and businesses M

32 HS Salt Lake: · Shelter for destitute / homeless / families affected by natural disasters W32 R&T Windvogel: H

32 R&T • Speed Humps in 1st Avenue H

32 R&T • 2nd Avenue H

32 R&T • First Street H

32 R&T • Second Street H

32 R&T • Fifth Street H

38

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

32 R&T • Sixth Street H

32 R&T • Seventh Street H

32 R&T • Eighth Street. H32 R&T Repairing of potholes H32 R&T Salt Lake: H32 R&T • Upgrading of concrete block streets (all Streets) H

32 R&T • Speed Humps in Barends Street; H

32 R&T • Freeman Street H

32 R&T • Allie Street H

32 R&T • Pamplin Street H

32 R&T • Abrahams Street H

32 R&T • Fellcass Street H

32 R&T Repairing of potholes H32 R&T Salsonneville: Speed humps in: H32 R&T • Syster Street H

32 R&T • Bonaventure Crescent H32 R&T Repairing of potholes H32 R&T Hillside / Cleary Estate: H32 R&T Speed humps in: H32 R&T • Beacon Street H

32 R&T • Carelson Street H

32 R&T • Cannon Street H

32 R&T • Bob Price Street H

32 R&T Repairing of potholes H32 R&T Arcadia: H32 R&T Speed humps in: H32 R&T • Sugarbush Street H

32 R&T • Melkbos Street H

32 R&T Repairing of potholes H

39

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

32 E&E Windvogel: H32 E&E • Repair and maintain street lights H32 E&E Salt Lake: H

32 E&E

• High-mast light on open space between Stanford Road and Rensburg Street opposite Cleary Park Shopping Centre

H

32 E&E • Repair and maintain street lights H32 E&E Salsonneville: H32 E&E • Repair, maintain street Lights H

32 E&E • High-mast Corner of Syster Street and Catherine Road H32 E&E Hillside / Cleary Estate: H32 E&E • Repair and maintain street lights H

32 E&E • High-mast on Bloukol Street H32 E&E Arcadia: H32 E&E Repair, maintain street lights H32 E&E High-mast in passage between Sugarbush Street and Melkbos Street. H32 PH Windvogel: H32 PH • Elimination of illegal dumping H

32 PH • Bush clearing – all vacant sites H

32 PH • Maintenance of trees H32 PH Upgrading and Fencing of play parks in : H32 PH • First Street and H

32 PH • Fifth Street H32 PH Salt Lake: H32 PH • Elimination of illegal dumping H

32 PH • Bush clearing – all vacant sites H

32 PH • Maintenance of trees H32 PH Upgrading and Fencing of play parks in: H32 PH • Baartman Street H

32 PH • Goldburg Street H

40

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

32 PH • Coetzee Street and H

32 PH • Rensburg Street H32 PH Salsonneville: H32 PH • Elimination of illegal dumping H

32 PH • Bush clearing – all vacant sites H

32 PH • Maintenance of trees H

32 PH • Upgrading and fencing of play parks in: H

32 PH • Catherine Road H

32 PH • Corner of Slabbert and H

32 PH • Albans Street H32 PH Irrigation system to park in: H32 PH • Catherine and H

32 PH • Wynford Streets H32 PH Hillside / Cleary Estate: H32 PH • Elimination of illegal dumping H

32 PH • Bush clearing – all vacant sites H

32 PH • Maintenance of trees H32 PH Upgrading and fencing of play parks in: H32 PH • Allen Hendrickse Street H

32 PH • Chris Wessels Street and H

32 PH • 3rd Avenue H

32 PH Upgrading open spaces in Corner of Bacon Street and 3rd Avenue H

32 PH Arcadia: H32 PH • Elimination of illegal dumping H

32 PH • Bush clearing – all vacant sites H

32 PH • Maintenance of trees H32 PH Upgrading and fencing of play parks in: H32 PH • Yellowwood Street H

41

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

32 PH

• Claasen Street Melkbos Street H

32 PH • Brumia Place and H

32 PH • Esterhuizen Street H

32 SRAC

Windvogel:· Upgrade of Windvogel sports field

H

32 SRAC

Arcadia:· Establishment of a Basketball Court in corner of Rensburg Street and Harrington Street (West End)

M

32 CS Building of a Councillor’s Office H32 CS Building of a Community hall H32 I&E Repair, maintain and unblock drains in: H32 I&E • Windvogel H

32 I&E • Salsonneville H

32 I&E • Salt Lake H

32 I&E • Hillside / Cleary Estate H

32 I&E • Sugarbush and Rensburg Streets in Arcadia H

32 I&E Building a Multi-purpose Resource Center in Salt Lake: M32 I&E Building a Multi-purpose sports field in Catherine Road in Salsonneville H32 other Building of a Clinic H32 other Building of a Police Station in Salt Lake H

32 other Building of a Library H

33 WARD 3333 HS Rectification of houses in Govan Mbeki Area H

33 HS Infrastructure for the Kliprand community H

33 HS Rectification of 298 houses H

33 R&T Traffic calming measures (speed humps) in the whole Ward M

33 R&T Tarring of Area K Roads M

33 R&T Installation of steel barriers in Tabalaza and Mkhonto Streets next to Vista H

42

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

33 R&T Installation of speed humps in Meke Road and Tabalaza Street opposite the Fire Station H33 I&E Provide infrastructure in Kliprand H

33 E&E Street lights for the entire Ward H33 PH Provide play parks in the Ward H33 PH Provide outdoor gym H

33 PH Provide wheely bins in Tembisa (Arcadia North) H

33 PH Waste removal in Kliprand H

33 SRAC Develop sport field for sports teams (Kleinskool) and entire Ward M33 SRAC Provision of a community Library H33 CS Skills development programs and learnerships M

33 EDTA Rollout EPWP project for employment creation H

33 B&T Installation of prepaid electricity vending machine facility M

33 other Provide a satellite Police Station

34 WARD 3434 HS Upgrading of the informal settlement at Riemvasmaak H34 R&T Tarring of Roads in: H34 R&T • Scholtz Street H

34 R&T • Soudien Road from the corner to Kleinskool H

34 R&T • Imbuia Street H

34 R&T • Bloukappie Street H

34 R&T • Bertram Road H

34 R&T • Hickory Street H

34 R&T

Development of a Foot Bridge between Oostenhuizen Street in Arcadia and Nash Street Fernwood Park

H

34 E&E Upgrading of the electricity Substation 1140 Loder Crescent. H

34 E&E

Installation of a high mast light in Oostenhuizen Street in Arcadia and Nash Street Fernwood Park H

34 E&E Provide street lights throughout the ward H

34 E&E Replacement of damaged lamp poles throughout the Ward H

43

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

34 S&S Recruitment of Metro Police Officers to combat the high crime in the Northern Areas H

34 S&S Provide security at Councillor’s Office H34 S&S SAPS visibility is requested34 PH Attend to illegal dumping H34 EDTA Require a vegetable garden in corner of Soudien and Rensburg Streets H34 SRAC Upgrading of sport fields in the following areas: H34 SRAC • Corner of Soudien and Lawrence Erasmus Streets H

34 SRAC • Soudien Road sports field opposite Bethvale School H

34 SRAC • At the back of Greenville Primary School and H

34 SRAC • Park United sports field in Arcadia H

34 CS Build an Office for Ward Councillor H

34 I&E Address the overflowing sewerage drains that runs into the Chatty River H

34 other Extend the Clinic’s working hours H

35 WARD 3535 HS Transfer of Trafalgar Sage flats to the municipality H

35 R&T Traffic calming measures (speed humps) in the Ward H

35 R&T Tarring of Area K Roads H35 R&T Construction of foot bridges in the following areas: H35 R&T • Kroneberg Drive next to Kroneberg Primary H

35 R&T • Between Kennedy and Bramble Street H35 R&T Installation of traffic calming measures in the following streets: H35 R&T • Bramble H

35 R&T • Hibbiscus Street H

35 R&T • Kroneburg Drive near Kroneburg Primay H

35 R&T • Killian Street H35 R&T Installation of Traffic Circle in the following Streets: H35 R&T • Lawrence Erasmus Drive H

35 R&T • Kroneburg Drive opposite Old Apostle Church H35 R&T Elimination of pot holes in Extension 21 and 31 H

44

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

35 R&T Installation of street name boards H

35 R&T Tarring of gravel road in Sanctor H

35 R&T Provision of side walks in Bethelsdorp (corner of Van Vuuren Street H35 E&E Installation of street lights throughout the Ward H35 E&E Installation of High Mast lights in the following areas: H35 E&E • Extension 21 Kramer Street (High Mast be moved to Kapp Close) H

35 E&E • Extension 21 Kayser park H

35 E&E • Extension 21 Bramble Street H35 E&E Installation of water meters in Sanctor H35 E&E Installation of street lights in the following areas: H35 E&E • Grootboom Street (Acardia) H

35 E&E • Herable Street (Acardia) H

35 E&E • Marock Street in Sanctor H

35 E&E • Esterhyspn Streeet H35 I&E Upgrade infrastructure in the Ward H35 SRAC Upgrading of Bethelsdorp Heritage Centre H35 PH Upgrading of play parks in the following areas: H35 PH • Extension 31 Bramble Street (Equipment and Bollands) H

35 PH • Extension 21 Kayser Park (Equipment and Bollands) H

35 PH • Extension 21 Killian Street (Equipment and Bollands) H35 PH Bush clearing in the following areas: H35 PH • Extension 21 (Kettledas, Kennedy and Kramer Streets) H

35 PH • Extension 31 ( Bramble and Hisbiscus Street) H35 PH Upgrading of play parks in the ward H35 PH Construction of a waste transfer station H35 PH Elimination of illegal dumping throughout the ward H35 PH Fencing of Sanctor cemetery H35 PH Bush clearance in the following areas: H35 PH • Mank H

45

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

35 PH • Moravian Church H

35 PH • Harable Street H

35 CS Upgrading of West End resource centre H35 B&T Budget allocation of the Ward is not accurate as affected by demarcation H35 other Provide a satellite Police Station H35 other Fencing of West End Clinic H36 WARD 3636 HS Rectification of Bethelsdorp Area C, 1071 housing units in KwaDwesi Ext. H

36 HS Finalization of backyard dwellers list in KwaDwesi H

36 HS Removal of houses in flood plains in KwaDwesi Ext H

36 HS Construction of a Town House Complex in KwaDwesi M

36 HS Land acquisition for Early Childhood Development Centres M

36 HS Provision of Social Housing in Asrayi Street H36 R&T Provide traffic lights and calming measures at: H36 R&T • Mission Road next to Xolilizwe KwaDwesi Ext and H

36 R&T • Mkwenkwe Street next to KwaDwesi Police Station and Ziyabuya Complex H

36 R&T Extension of intersection between KwaDwesi Police Station and Ziyabuya Complex H

36 R&T Tarring of gravel roads H

36 R&T Construction of a foot bridge / motor bridge – Mtshekisane Street, KwaDwesi H

36 R&T Provide traffic lights at Mission Road, KwaDwesi Ext. M

36 R&T Construction of speed humps in Xundu Village H

36 R&T Building of a Taxi Rank H

36 R&T Provide traffic calming measures in Xolilizwe Street H

36 R&T Tarring and resurfacing of roads across the Ward H

36 I&E Repair and maintain storm water drains M36 I&E Provision of water and sanitation in Westville informal settlement and H36 I&E KwaDwesi Extension H36 I&E Maintenance of Chatty River H

46

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

36 I&E

Repair stormwater drainage system in Westville Informal Settlement and KwaDwesi Extension Phase 2

36 E&E Provide high mast light and street lights H

36 E&E Electrification of Westville Informal Settlement H

36 E&E Provision of solar geysers – KwaDwesi and KwaDwesi Ext Areas H

36 S&S Installation of high quality CCTV cameras across the Ward H

36 PH Provision of waste or wheely bins H

36 PH Build refuse transfer recycling stations H

36 PH Elimination of illegal dumping sites H

36 PH Cutting of verges and trees M

36 PH Provision of outdoor gym equipment H

36 PH Maintenance of parks H

36 PH Maintenance of playgrounds and equipment H36 PH Fencing and maintenance of cemeteries H36 PH Provision of new playground equipment M

36 EDTA Provision of containers for vendors M

36 EDTA Building of Youth Development Centre H

36 EDTA Implement Ward Based Greening project H

36 EDTA Construction of a Multi-Purpose Centre H

36 SRAC Upgrading of existing and informal sports field in KwaDwesi and KwaDwesi Ext. H

36 SRAC Building and maintenance of sport fields H

36 CS Building of Ward Councilor’s Office H

36 B&T Increase of the Ward Budge to accommodate the needs of the ward H

36 other Upgrading and Renovations of the KwaDwesi Police Station H

36 other Construction of Clinics in Westville informal settlement and KwaDwesi Ext. H

36 other Upgrade of KwaDwesi Clinic H

36 other Provision of mobile Clinic facilities for KwaDwesi Ext. and Westville H

36 other Providing land for Light Industry in the Ward (Site Number 5433) M

37 WARD 37

47

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

37 HS Rectification of houses built in flooding areas next to Chatty River, Extension 31and 32 H

37 HS

Extension 32, 34, 36 Moeggesukkel, Kleinskool Area K informal settlement need urgent development

H

37 HS Allocation of plots for construction of houses H

37 HS Rectification of poorly built RDP houses in Extension 31, 32 and 33 H

37 HS Completion of 28 RDP houses that were built in 2006 H

37 HS Relocation of backyard dwellers M

37 HS Provide land for churches W

37 R&T Building of 3 bridges over Chatty River for school children H

37 R&T Tarring of gravel roads in Extension 32,36 and Kleinskool H

37 R&T Resurfacing and grading of gravel roads in Extension 32 and 36 H

37 R&T Provision of sidewalks M

37 SRAC Upgrade, fencing of sports field and install cricket nets in Extension 33 H

37 SRAC Provision of a Library W

37 Repair, maintain and unblock all storm water drains in Kleinskool Ext 31,35 and 36 M

37 Replace all stolen drain lids H

37 Water connections to houses in Kleinskool H

37 Provision of water in all informal settlements in Kleinskool H

37 EDTA Allocation of projects to benefit the youth M

37 EDTA Build a Multi-Purpose community centre H

37 PH Building six recreational parks with fencing and play equipment H

37 PH Greening and beautification of Rensburg Street and Barberry Drive H

37 PH Bush clearing M

37 PH Elimination of illegal dumping ( skip bins at all VD stations or transfer station) H

37 PH Uplifting all areas with tree planting H

37 PH Renovation and fencing of existing parks and play grounds H

37 PH Cleaning channel to Chatty River H

37 PH

Develop open field in Extension 33 into a recreational park with skateboard facility and plant trees M

48

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

37 PH Provide playgrounds or parks in all areas with gym equipment H

37 S&S Installation of CCTV cameras in all intersections H

37 S&S Traffic calming measures ( speed humps) all taxi routes in the ward and Cherry Street M

37 Constit Shelter for people at Ward Councillor’s Office H

37 Constit Allocation of projects to benefit the youth and the elderly H

37 E&E Provision of electricity in all informal settlements in Kleinskool H

37 E&E Installation of 4 high mast lights with CCTV cameras H

37 other

Building of Primary and Secondary Schools due to a high number of learners (over 15 000) H

37 other Build another Primary School in Extension 32 and 35 H

37 other Provision of a Clinic H

38 WARD 3838 HS Rectification of houses in the Ward H

38 HS Speed up relocations in areas identified for it H

38 HS Relocation of backyard dwellers in the ward H

38 R&T Tarring of gravel roads H

38 R&T Provision of speed humps H

38 R&T Elimination of potholes H

38 E&E Installation of high mast and street lights in the ward H

38 PH Address the problem of illegal dumping H

38 PH Building contractor rubble must be taken away in public open spaces H

38 PH Provision of outdoor gym equipment in the ward H

38 PH Bush clearing between Jacksonville, Palm Ridge and Booysen Park H

38 EDTA SMME Development H

38 CS Interns to be allocated to Ward Councillor’s Office H38 SRAC Upgrade and fencing of sports field H38 Provision of a library H

38 other Building of a high school H

38 other Provision of a clinic H

49

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

38 other Provision of a satellite police station H

39 WARD 3939 HS Building bylaw – to be revised H

39 I&E Improvements on the response time on water leaks H

39 I&E Stormwater infrastructure upgrade – Riverstone Road H

39 I&E Stormwater manhole covers to be replaced as needed M39 I&E Drainage of existing Roads in: H39 I&E • Riverstone Road, Kabega Park and H

39 I&E • Caresle Street, Rowallan Park H39 I&E Sewerage upgrade in: H39 I&E • Corner of Juan Pierre and Lategan Drive, Rowallan Park H

39 I&E • Corner Juan Pierre and Carelse Street, Rowallan Park and H

39 I&E • Erf 455, Froneman Street, Rowallan Park H39 I&E Sewerage upgrade to be done in Bushman’s Street, Sherwood H

39 I&E

Sewerage upgrade survey to be done in the entire Rowallan Park and Sherwood Areas H

39 I&E Water pipeline upgrade in: H39 I&E • Devon, Caledon and Bushman Streets, Sherwood H

39 I&E

• Cumberland, LA Trobe, Peebles, Chris Hatting and Hanna Ave, Rowallan Park H

39 I&E • Rotterdam Street, Kabega Park H

39 I&E Water pipeline upgrade survey to be done in the entire Sherwood Area H

39 I&E Tidying up after work done on burst pipes H

39 R&T Tarring of potholes H

39 R&T Kerbing: assessments to be done in Rowallan Park M

39 R&T Attend to Potholes – as per requests needed H

39 R&T Resurface Devon Road, Sherwood H39 R&T Tarring of the following Streets: H39 R&T • Carelse Street, Rowallan Park H

50

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

39 R&T • Riverstone Road, Sherwood H39 R&T Develop a 3 way stop in the following areas: M39 R&T • Gretha and Strydom Streets (Rowallan Park) and M

39 R&T • Fairley Road and Bangor Street (Sherwood) M

39 R&T Maintenance of street name signs and road marking H

39 R&T Install indicating signboards to establishments H39 R&T Repair potholes where needed H39 E&E Additional Street lights in: H39 E&E • Carelse Street,Lategan Drive (Left hand side) (Rowallan Park) H

39 E&E • Walker Drive, Caledon street and Henlo Crest (Sherwood) H39 S&S Install permanent speed cameras in: H39 S&S • Cape Road, Rowallan Park H

39 S&S • Walker Drive, Sherwood H

39 S&S Monitor Taxi and Bus embayments H

39 S&S

Implement law enforcement on traffic violation including speeding in the following areas: H

39 S&S

• Walker Drive, Devon Road, Montrose Road, Lancing Road and Caledon Street H

39 S&S • (Sherwood) H

39 S&S

• Old Cape Road, Great West Way, Olive Schriener, van der Stel (Kabega Park) Fife Laan, Deon Street, Froneman Street, Lategan Drive, Peebles Road (Rowallan Park)

H

39 S&S Develop a By-law in the following areas> H39 S&S • security control H

39 S&S • illegal squatters H

39 S&S • vagrants, H

39 S&S • street children and H

39 S&S • street trading H

39 S&S Crime Prevention H

51

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

39 B&T Attend to the incorrect billing system H

39 B&T Exploring the rentals of existing facilities Customer Care Centre for Western Suburbs H

39 B&T Remuneration for Ward Cllr assistants who are Secretaries to Ward Committees H39 PH Maintenance of colonial fencing in: M39 PH • Erf 461 Terrence Ave M

39 PH • Erf 2881 corner of Friesland and Cape Road M39 PH Upgrade and replace play equipment on public open spaces in: W39 PH • All parks in Sherwood W

39 PH • Rowallan and Kabega Park W

39 PH • Enclosure of Erf 421 Rowallan Park and Erf10, Kabega Park W

39 PH • Enclosure between Erf 1428 and 1430 Du Plooy Street, Rowallan Park W39 PH By-law enforcement on illegal dumping in the following areas: H39 PH • Sherwood – Talana, Caledon, Montrose, Sandton, Walker Drive H

39 PH • Rowallan – Carelse, Lategan, La Trobe, Hanna, Chris Hattingh H

39 PH

• Kabega Park – Riverstone, Van der Stel, Huguenot, Norman,Truro and Worthing H

39 PH Tree trimming in all areas in the Ward M39 PH Maintenance and bush clearing in: H

39 PH

• Sherwood: Erf 2205 – Shropshire Street, Erf 1890 – Tugela Street, Erf 3504 – Glamorgan Street,

H

39 PH • Walker Drive, Cartmoor Street and Erf 3882 Henlo Crest H

39 PH • Kabega Park: Erf 461 Terrance Avenue H

39 PH

• Rowallan Park: Erf 1167 Smollan Road, Erf 415 Peebles Road and Erf 2881 in Friesland Street

H

39 PH Litter picking in Main Arterials in the following areas: H39 PH • Cape Road H

39 PH • Northumberland H

39 PH • Walker Drive H

39 PH • Van der Stel H

52

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

39 PH

• Montrose and Lategan Drive (All along Cape Road and Kabega Park to Rowallan Park) H

39 PH • Walker Drive – from Lancing to the end H

39 PH • All areas frequented by hawkers and vagrant H

39 PH Bush clearing of all private properties H

39 PH Placing of bins next to bus and taxi embayments M

39 PH Greening of all areas M

39 PH Bush clearing of all open spaces H

39 PH Weed spraying – all streets in the Ward M39 PH Installation of the No Dumping signs in Parks and Open Spaces M39 PH Develop a cultural slaughtering by-law H

40 WARD 4040 HS Funding for sustainable human settlements at: H40 HS • Fitchet’s Corner H

40 HS • Van Stadens H

40 HS • Witteklip H

40 HS • St Albans H

40 HS • Shamrock H

40 HS • Platkeps H

40 HS • Gumtree H

40 HS • Bloza and Seaview H40 HS Sustainable human settlement in New Rest and Zwelidinga Low Cost Housing Project H40 HS Rectification of affected houses in Bloza (Rocklands RDP houses) H40 HS Funding to be made available for the relocation of and a sustainable human settlement for the H40 HS Land must be made available for squatters in Erica Deane and around Kuyga for the development H

40 HS

Land must be made available for informal livestock farmers in the Greenbushes, Kuyga and Rocklands area.

H

40 HS Housing requested in Kuyga, Green Bushes and Seaview H

40 HS Land needed for housing development in New Rest (Seaview) H40 HS Land be made available and fenced for Informal Livestock Farming in the Ward 40, in: H

53

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

40 HS • Kuyga H

40 HS • Greenbushes and H

40 HS • Rocklands Area. H40 R&T Sidewalks in the following areas: H

40 R&T

• Next to Seaview Rd from current position in Greenbushes to the Altona Primary School H

40 R&T

• Elands River Road from Bloza RDP development to the Rocklands school +-1.4km H

40 R&T Shelters (Bus stops) at the following areas: M40 R&T • Bloza M

40 R&T • Uncle Freddies M

40 R&T • Fitches Corner M

40 R&T • St Albans M

40 R&T • Kuyga x 2 M

40 R&T • Seaview opposite the Spar M

40 R&T • Beach View M

40 R&T • Kini Bay M40 R&T Road signs, replace rusted and damaged signs H40 R&T Tarring and maintenance of gravel roads H

40 R&T Resurfacing of roads in Kini Bay village M40 R&T Tarring of Trow Road, Colleen Glen W40 R&T Installation of street names throughout the Ward H40 R&T • Kuyga H

40 R&T • Bloza H

40 R&T Resurfacing of Blue Horizon Bay parking area at the Community hall H

40 R&T Marking of roads and road painting H

40 R&T Upgrade the Beach View Resort parking area W

40 R&T Upgrading of roads in Kuyga W

40 R&T Install new barriers and paving at western entrance to the beach in Blue Horizon Bay

54

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

40 E&E

Investment into an upgraded electricity grid in Colleen Glen, due to continuous electricity interruptions with wind and rain

H

40 E&E

Removal of illegal electricity connections throughout the Ward and making legal connections possible, in particular in Kuyga

H

40 E&E Repair and maintain street lights repaired throughout the Ward H

40 E&E Repair and maintain high mast lights in Kuyga H

40 E&E Installation of lights in Rocklands (Bloza) sports field H

40 E&E Motivate for funding for all areas without electricity for alternative electricity i.e. Solar H40 I&E Water for St Albans area (residents living around Ren Dalton St) H40 I&E Upgrade of stormwater and sewerage in Kuyga H

40 I&E

Provision of water for approximately 65 families in Uitenhage / Rocklands Road (a reservoir must be constructed and a pipeline must be brought down to the last farm from Ankervas towards KwaNobuhle.

H

40 I&E Provision of water down Elands Rivier Road until the end of the road40 I&E Attend to water leakages along the Main Road in Seaview H40 S&S Fire hydrants in the following areas: H40 S&S • Fitches Corner H

40 S&S • Witteklip Area H

40 S&S • St Albans and H

40 S&S • Blue Horizon Bay H

40 S&S

Traffic calming measures on Seaview Rd, in particular just before Seaview at New Rest and Zweledinga informal settlements

H

40 S&S Maintenance of all fire hydrants in the Ward H

40 S&S

Patrols by Metro Police over weekends at Maitlands Beach and throughout the Ward in general H

40 S&S Motivate for funding for the following: H40 S&S • high visibility vests H

40 S&S • vehicle lights H

55

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

40 S&S

• radio communications and bullet proof vests to be made available for Neighbourhood watches within the Ward i.e. Farm community and Seaview Neighbourhood watch.

H

40 S&S

Provide security upgrades to Councillor’s Office in Kuyga, Alarm system, cameras and electronic access control

H

40 PH Cutting of trees and vegetation on overgrown erven and verges H40 PH Motivate for funding for maintenance of cutting trees within the power lines H

40 PH Adequate bins for litter H

40 PH Monitoring of Illegal dumping hotspots: Mission Rd and Waterkloof Rd H

40 PH

Adequate containers / skips for refuse throughout the Ward (at least 5 additional containers) H

40 PH Seaview transfer and garden refuse site to be formalized - manned and maintained. M

40 PH Refuse transfer container for residents of Rocklands, opposite Uncle Freddie’s M

40 PH Recycling project to be started in the Seaview Area - manned and maintained W

40 PH Illegal dumping hotspots must be manned H

40 PH Litter picking staff dedicated to ward 40. H

40 PH Cutting of trees and verges on sides of roads H

40 EDTA Initiate programs to assist youth economic development and emerging SMMEs H40 EDTA Upgrade existing tourism sites within the Ward in: H40 EDTA • Maitlands Beach H

40 EDTA • Whale watching area near Maitlands H

40 EDTA • Camping grounds in Maitlands. H40 SRAC Installation of cluster’s playground / jungle gyms in the following Informal Settlements: H40 SRAC • Fitchers Corner H

40 SRAC • Wedgewood H

40 SRAC • Shamrock H

40 SRAC • Platkeps H

40 SRAC • Hoender Kamp H

40 SRAC • Bloza H

56

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

40 SRAC • Gumtree H

40 SRAC • Van Eyk se Grond H

40 SRAC • Erikadene H

40 SRAC • Kuyga H

40 SRAC • Fairview H

40 SRAC • Zwelledinga H

40 SRAC • Newrest H

40 SRAC • GroGro H

40 SRAC • Pendelsdrift H

40 SRAC Upgrade playgrounds in the Seaview area H

40 SRAC Provide sport fields for Bloza Location in Rockland H40 SRAC Motivate for funding to install the following: H40 SRAC • new ablution facilities in Maitland Beach H

40 SRAC • recreational facilities H

40 SRAC • parking and walkways manned and maintained H

40 SRAC Provide and maintain ablution facilities and water supply in Maitland Camping grounds M

40 SRAC Install a new boom gate at eastern entrance to beach in Blue Horizon Bay M

40 SRAC Beach View Resort restored to operational status and opened for public use H

40 CS Make Wi-Fi available to all informal settlements with free internet access H

40 CS Build a Community hall for Bloza Rocklands H

40 CS

Upgrade public ablution facilities at western entrance in the Blue Horizon Bay Community hall M

41 CS WARD 4141 HS Rectification of all houses in the Ward H

41 HS Installation of temporary Services at Masibulele H

41 HS Establishment / building of housing support center H41 R&T Building of speed Humps in the following areas: H41 R&T • Mzwandile, Melumzi Streets in Joe Slovo H

41 R&T • Bhobhoyi and Xollile Botoman Street in Khayamnandi H

57

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

41 R&T Tarring of sub streets H41 R&T Provision of sidewalks for People with Disabilities H

41 R&T Tarring of all gravel roads in the Ward H

41 R&T Paving of sidewalks H

41 I&E Maintenance of all storm water drainage H

41 I&E Repair of all water leaks especially in Khayamnandi H

41 E&E Changing of street lights to high mast lights H41 E&E Electrification of all informal settlement H41 S&S Implementation of crime prevention awareness programme H41 PH Fencing of all public open spaces H41 PH Removal of bushes close to the houses H41 PH Litter pickers programme to be strengthened M

41 PH Managing of dumping sites H

41 EDTA Building of business incubator M

41 EDTA Building of a skills development Centre H

41 EDTA Provide land for livestock Farmers H

41 EDTA Provide ploughing fields in Joe Slovo H

41 EDTA Build a Multi-Purpose Centre in Joe Slovo H

41 SRAC Upgrading of sport fields in Khayamnandi H

41 SRAC Develop play grounds in the Ward H

41 SRAC Upgrading and maintenance of existing sport facilities H

41 SRAC Building of a sport complex H41 SRAC Build the following sport fields: H41 SRAC • Netball Court H

41 SRAC • Rugby sport field and H

41 SRAC • Six (6) new Soccer fields H

41 SRAC Building of the Library in Joe Slovo H

41 CS Build a permanent Councillor’s Office H

41 CS Construction of youth education and skills development centres H

58

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

41 CS Support NGOs and NPOs H

41 CS Support for Youth, Elderly / Senior Citizens programmes H

41 B&T Provision of prepaid electricity vending facilities in Joe Slovo and Khayamnndi H

41 B&T Build and renovate customer care centres in Joe Slovo and Khayamnndi H

41 other Build a Police Station in Joe Slovo and Khayamnandi H

41 other Provide Police patrols in the Ward H

41 other Extension of all Clinics in the Ward H

41 other Building of a shopping complex H

42 WARD 4242 HS Housing rectification H

42 HS Conduct a land audit H

42 HS Delivery of houses H

42 HS Completion of gap houses in the Ward H42 R&T Tarring gravel Road in: H42 R&T • Hlosi Street H

42 R&T • Mngcunube Street H

42 R&T • Ntulo Crescent H

42 R&T • Mgwari Street H

42 R&T • Qilo Street H

42 R&T • Mthathi Crescent H

42 R&T • 5th Avenue H

42 R&T • Mqonci Crescent H

42 R&T • 7th Avenue H

42 R&T • Ntethe Street H

42 R&T • 8th Avenue H

42 R&T • Msedare Street H

42 R&T • Mnquma Street H

42 R&T • Ngwekazi H

59

REF. WARD DIRECTORATE

COMMUNITY INPUT PER DIRECTORATE ON THE IDP

HIGH - H

MEDIUM - M

WHEN POSSI-BLE - W

BUDGET PRIORITY

42 R&T • Khala Street H

42 R&T • Lindipasi Street H

42 R&T • Nyibiba Street H

42 R&T • Hobe Street H

42 R&T • Nxanxadi Street H

42 R&T • Mhlontlo Street H

42 R&T • Isiphingo Street H

42 E&E Provision of electricity in all sites in the Ward H

42 EDTA Provide land for Agriculture and Farming H

42 EDTA Build a Multi-Purpose center H

42 SRAC Provision of sport fields in Area 8 H42 CS Build a Community hall 42 I&E Upgrading of sewer system in the Ward M

42 other Provide a Mobile Police Station in Area 7 and 8 H

42 other Upgrading of all Clinics in the Ward H

43 WARD 4343 HS Housing development H43 HS Implement a rectification programme H43 HS Implement a relocation programme H43 R&T Provide Bus shelters H43 R&T Traffic controls at Sikhothina and Magqabi H43 R&T Provision of speed humps throughout the Ward H43 R&T Tarring of gravel Roads in Pityana H43 R&T Provisi