Nuria Oliver, PhD Researcher Microsoft Research. 2 New opportunities for wearable health and...

Click here to load reader

download Nuria Oliver, PhD Researcher Microsoft Research. 2 New opportunities for wearable health and wellness continuous monitoring devices

of 29

  • date post

    27-Mar-2015
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    217
  • download

    3

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of Nuria Oliver, PhD Researcher Microsoft Research. 2 New opportunities for wearable health and...

  • Slide 1

Nuria Oliver, PhD Researcher Microsoft Research Slide 2 2 New opportunities for wearable health and wellness continuous monitoring devices Slide 3 Slide 4 Zillions of gadgets to monitor various physiological and environmental signals Typically proprietary data transmission protocols Typically capture on-board and off-line processing of the data after downloading to a PC Very difficult if not impossible to combine signals from different gadgets Lack of real-time on-board processing of the information to deliver value to the user Slide 5 Continuous monitoring and understanding of multiple physiological and environmental signals Finding correlations between lifestyle and wellness/health Identifying trends and deviations from those trends Developing new interesting and fun applications Empowering users 5 Slide 6 6 Audiovox 5600 GSM mobile phone Alivetec Alive ECG and Accelerometer sensor Blood oximeter HealthGear MPTrain Automatically Monitor and Detect Sleep Apnea Events Music and Physiology-based Personal Trainer Slide 7 Real-time, wearable physiological monitoring system on a mobile phone Physiological sensors wirelessly connected via Bluetooth to a mobile phone Continuous recording of blood oximetry, heart-rate and plethysmographic signal Real-time analysis and presentation of physiological data to the user Usage scenario: Sleep monitoring and automatic sleep apnea detection 7 Slide 8 Underdiagnosed but common condition Affects children and adults 4% in men and 2% in women (higher for elderly) Untreated causes $3.4 billion of medical costs 40 million undiagnosed Americans Periods of interrupted breathing (apnea) and periods of reduced breathing (hypoapnea) Leads to Hypoxia, asphyxia and awakenings Increased heart-rate, high blood pressure Extreme fatigue, poor concentration Compromised immune system Cardio/cerebrovascular problems 8 Slide 9 Nocturnal Polysomnography (PSG) In sleep center for 1-2 nights Continuous, simultaneous multi-channel measurements of 8 physiological signals Very expensive, cumbersome, time consuming, just one sample and subject to manual scoring and human error Pulse oximetry Useful as screening tool One simple, light-weight sensor on finger, toe or earlobe 9 Slide 10 10 Slide 11 20 volunteers 80% male, ages 25-65 30% healthy, 70% with sleep apnea or suspected Filled out pre-sleep and post-sleep questionnaires Wore HealthGear for one or two full nights in their own homes 11 Slide 12 Slide 13 Slide 14 Slide 15 3 long-term (2-3 weeks at a time) sleep studies 1 long-term (2.5 months) study with MITs PlaceLab Investigated correlations between quality of sleep and lifestyle factors Alcohol and caffeine intake Diet Exercise Stress levels 15 Slide 16 Slide 17 New hardware board!! More long-term sleep studies (MIT, Univ. Virginia) Study on drivers that have apnea (Univ. Iowa) Study on aircraft pilots Summits of Canada expedition Slide 18 18 Audiovox 5600 GSM mobile phone Alivetec Alive ECG and Accelerometer sensor HealthGear MPTrain Automatically Monitor and Detect Sleep Apnea Events Music and Physiology-based Personal Trainer Slide 19 Music Provides Pacing Advantage Distraction Positive Mood Music Positively Impacts Endurance Performance Perception Exertion Perception 19 Slide 20 Target HR zones recovery, weight management, aerobic, anaerobic, over-exertion Used to measure effort 20 PHR reserve =(maxHR - restHR)*P + restHR Slide 21 Next Action Module Next Action Module BPM(t) = Current Heart rate SPM(t) = Current pace BPM(t) = Current Heart rate SPM(t) = Current pace DBP M(t) >0