NIAGARA FALLS NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA ACCESS AND Falls NY Niagara Falls National Heritage Area...

download NIAGARA FALLS NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA ACCESS AND Falls NY Niagara Falls National Heritage Area Niagara

of 62

  • date post

    18-Mar-2020
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    0
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of NIAGARA FALLS NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA ACCESS AND Falls NY Niagara Falls National Heritage Area...

  •  

       

    NIAGARA FALLS NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA  ACCESS AND PARK RESTORATION PROJECT 

    Reconfiguration of Two Segments of the   Robert Moses Parkway Corridor and Adjoining Roads 

    Niagara Falls, Niagara County, New York   

       

    Application under:  AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT OF 2009 

    TRANSPORTATION INVESTMENT GENERATING ECONOMIC RECOVERY (TIGER)  GRANT PROGRAM 

    September 15, 2009 

    Submitted by:  City of Niagara Falls, New York 

    With Cooperation from:  New York State Office of Parks, Recreation, & Historic Preservation 

    Contact:  Thomas DeSantis, AICP, Senior Planner 

    City of Niagara Falls  745 Main Street, P.O. Box 69  Niagara Falls, New York 14303 

    Phone: (716) 286‐4477  Thomas.Desantis@niagarafallsny.gov 

     

  •  

     

    Project Information 

     

    Project Name:   Niagara Falls National Heritage Area:    Access and Park Restoration Project 

    Project Type:   Highway/Other    (Road Reconfiguration/Park Restoration) 

    Project Location:   State of New York     City of Niagara Falls    County of Niagara    28th U.S. Congressional District 

    Area Classification:  Urban Area    ARRA Economically Distressed Area 

    Project Applicants:  City of Niagara Falls, New York  with Cooperation from:  New York State Office of Parks,   Recreation & Historic Preservation 

    TIGER Grant   Funding    Requested:  $52,500,000 

  • Niagara Falls National Heritage Area     Niagara Falls  Access and Park Restoration Project    New York 

     

    Table of Contents 

    1. Project Description ........................................................................................1

    1.1. Project Name ............................................................................................................ 1

    1.2. Description & Need for the Project............................................................................ 1

    1.3. Sponsors ................................................................................................................... 9

    1.4. Cost and amount of TIGER Grant Request ................................................................. 9

    1.5. Status as an Economically Distressed Area ................................................................ 9

    2. Project Parties..............................................................................................11

    3. Grant Funds .................................................................................................12

    4. Primary Selection Criteria ............................................................................13

    4.1. Long‐Term Outcomes .............................................................................................. 13

    4.2. Summary of Project Benefits ................................................................................... 16

    4.3. “Shovel‐Ready” Criteria........................................................................................... 16

    4.4. Job Creation & Economic Stimulus .......................................................................... 20

    5. Secondary Selection Criteria ........................................................................22

    5.1. Innovation............................................................................................................... 22

    5.2. Partnership ............................................................................................................. 22

    5.3. Environmentally Related Federal, State and Local Actions ...................................... 22

    6. Certifications and Contact Information ........................................................24

    6.1. Federal Wage Rate Requirement Certification......................................................... 24

    6.2. Application and Project Contact Information .......................................................... 24

    7. Appendices ..................................................................................................25

     

     

  • Niagara Falls National Heritage Area     Niagara Falls  Access and Park Restoration Project    New York 

    1. PROJECT DESCRIPTION 

    1.1. Project Name  Niagara Falls National Heritage Area: Access and Park Restoration Project, Niagara Falls, New York. 

    1.2. Description & Need for the Project  Overview 

    The  Niagara  Falls  National  Heritage  Area  Access  and  Park  Restoration  Project  (the  “Project”)  is  intended  to  realize  an  appropriately‐scaled  and  sensitively‐ configured  system  of  road  access  and  park  facilities  along  the  Upper  and  Lower  Niagara  River  in  the  City of Niagara  Falls, within both  the Federally‐designated Niagara Falls National  Heritage  Area  and  State‐designated  Niagara  River  Greenway  corridor.    The  Project  area  passes through the National Historic Landmark  Niagara  Reservation  (now  known  as  Niagara  Falls State Park), the nation’s oldest State Park;  the  renowned  Niagara  Gorge  containing  a  number  of  park/trail  networks  and  unique  habitats;  and  several  City  of  Niagara  Falls  heritage/historic districts and sites.  

    The Project would result  in multiple economic  and environmental benefits, by physically and  symbolically re‐connecting the City to  its most  important  asset  and  resource,  the  Niagara  River.   Proposed  road  reconfiguration would create a  fully usable “green  ribbon” of park and natural  spaces along the Upper River and the Niagara Gorge totaling nearly 100 acres.  Moreover, it would open  nearly 250 acres of  land  in City neighborhoods—containing over 1,000  resident households, over 200  commercial  properties,  and  over  150  vacant  properties—to  direct  access  to  the  Niagara  Riverfront,  currently blocked by existing expressways. 

    Once completed, it would represent the most significant expansion of park and habitat restoration at  Niagara since the culmination of Frederick Law Olmsted’s vision for the Niagara Reservation in 1885. 

    Background & Context 

    Niagara  Falls, NY hosts over  eight million  tourists  annually  from  around  the world  and  is one of  the  United States' most‐visited destinations, attracting more people  than other U.S.  icons  like  the Grand  Canyon, Mount  Rushmore,  and  Yellowstone National  Park.    The  City’s  primary  destinations  are  its  three waterfalls—the American Falls, the Horseshoe Falls, and the Bridal Veil Falls—as well as the Upper 

    Whirlpool  State Park 

    American &  Horseshoe Falls 

    Downtown

    Park Place  Historic District 

    Whirlpool  Street

    Robert Moses  Parkway – North 

    Segment 

    Gorge

    Upper Rapids 

  • Niagara Falls National Heritage Area     Niagara Falls  Access and Park Restoration Project    New York 

    and  Lower Niagara Rapids and  the Niagara Gorge, which extends  roughly eight miles north  from  the  base of the Falls. 

    Historically,  the  economy  of  Niagara  Falls,  NY  capitalized  primarily  upon  the  Falls  as  a  source  of  abundant,  inexpensive  hydroelectric  power.    The  world’s  first  application  of  alternating  current  technology, allowing power to be transmitted over distances without losing in strength, was developed  at Niagara  in  the  late 1800s.   This  spawned a dense concentration of basic manufacturing companies  with  large power needs—ALCOA, Occidental, Goodyear, Shredded Wheat, and Carborundum, to name  just  a  few—to develop  large  industrial  complexes  in  the City.    Indeed,  it was  the  threat  of  rampant  industrial development upon the Falls that prompted Olmsted to help lead the 19th‐century movement  for the State to acquire land around Niagara Falls and preserve its natural beauty for future generations. 

    In  the  decades  following  the  end  of  World  War  II,  a  series  of  regional  and  national  trends  in  restructuring  of  U.S.  industrial  production  marked  the  beginning  of  a  steep  decline  in  basic  manufacturing in the City.  Throughout this period, many companies in the City progressively downsized,  relocated  operations  elsewhere,  or  underwent  outright  shut  down,  resulting  in  major  losses  of  employment  and  associated  economic effects  to  the City.   By  the  turn  of  the  21st  century,  with  the  City’s  unemployment  rates  hovering  around ten percent (almost twice the  state and national rates), City  leaders  had  come  to  the  realization  that  the  economic future of the City lie